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Medical Practitioner study tips
Killexams : Medical Practitioner study tips - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/WHNP Search results Killexams : Medical Practitioner study tips - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/WHNP https://killexams.com/exam_list/Medical Killexams : 9 Tips for Finding the Right Therapist

If you’re considering therapy — whether it’s to restore a relationship, recover from a trauma, adjust to a new life phase, or Boost your mental health — finding the right therapist is the first hurdle to cross.

Researchers have found that the bond between you and your therapist is likely to have a big impact on your growth. That’s why it’s important to do your research, ask questions, and pay attention to your own responses in your search for the therapist that’s right for you.

Here are some tried-and-true methods for finding a therapist to help you reach your therapeutic goals.

If you plan to pay for therapy through your insurance plan, your first step might be to look through your plan’s provider network.

It’s also a good idea to find out whether your plan limits the number of sessions you can attend each year and whether using an out-of-network therapist will affect your out-of-pocket costs.

Looking for ways to support your mental health and well-being? Try Healthline’s FindCare tool to connect with mental health professionals nearby or virtually so you can get the care you need.

A referral from a friend, colleague, or doctor you trust is another way to find a therapist who might be a good fit for you.

While a referral is a good place to start, it’s important to recognize that you may have different needs and goals with your therapy than the person giving you the recommendation.

So, a good match for one of you might not be as beneficial to the other.

A number of mental health organizations maintain up-to-date, searchable databases of licensed therapists.

Your search could start as simply as typing in your ZIP code to generate a list of counselors in your area. You may also be able to search for specialists, like marriage and family counselors or therapists who focus on drug and alcohol use.

Some of the most commonly used online search tools include:

Your community may also have resources to help you. If you’re a student, your school might provide access to a counseling center.

If you’re employed, your human resources team might offer a list of therapists available through a workplace wellness or employee assistance program.

If you need counseling related to domestic or sexual abuse, you might be able to find group or individual therapy through a local advocacy organization.

If you want your faith to inform your treatment, you might consider reaching out to your church, synagogue, mosque, or other worship center for a list of licensed therapists affiliated with your faith.

If you’re looking for a therapist to help with a specific mental health condition, you might find local therapists through a national association, network, or helpline.

Here are a few examples of organizations that offer search tools to help you find a specialized therapist near you:

If your job is a source of stress and anxiety, you might find local therapists through a professional organization.

Many of these organizations and trade unions have resources to help you identify professionals who can assist with mental health needs. For example, the International Association of Firefighters offers help with mental health, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and substance use.

What do you want to accomplish in therapy? Studies have found that when you and your therapist both work together toward the same goals, your outlook will be better.

If you think some type of medication may help with your symptoms, you’ll want to find a psychiatrist or practitioner who can prescribe medications.

If you’ve heard that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy have been effective for others with your condition, you’ll want to look for a therapist with certifications or specialized training in those treatment approaches.

If you want to be part of a supportive network of people who understand your experiences, you may want to consider looking for a therapist who’s involved with support groups or group therapy sessions.

Your goals may change as you work with a therapist. It’s OK to talk with your therapist about changing the direction of your treatment plan as your needs evolve.

Talkspace and Betterhelp both offer tools to help you explore the kind of therapy you want. They can also match you with a licensed, accredited therapist you can work with online or via phone.

Some people find a digital therapy platform to be more convenient and more affordable than in-person therapy. Weekly sessions range from $35 to $80 for online therapy.

At least one study found that people with depression felt that their symptoms improved after online sessions. It’s worth noting, however, that two of the researchers involved with this study were consultants or employees of the digital therapy provider used.

When you meet your therapist, whether it’s online, on the phone, or in person, it’s not uncommon to completely forget every question you wanted to ask.

To make sure you have the information you need to make a good decision, keep paper and a pen, or a notes app, handy for a few days before your meeting. Jot down questions as they come to you.

The American Psychological Association suggests a few questions for you to consider asking your therapist during your first session:

  • Are you a licensed psychologist in this state?
  • How many years have you been in practice?
  • How much experience do you have working with people who are dealing with [the issue you’d like to resolve]?
  • What do you consider to be your specialty or area of expertise?
  • What kinds of treatments have you found effective in resolving [the issue you’d like to resolve]?
  • What insurance do you accept?
  • Will I need to pay you directly and then seek reimbursement from my insurance company, or do you bill the insurance company?
  • Are you part of my insurance network?
  • Do you accept Medicare or Medicaid?

The Anxiety and Depression Association of America adds questions like these:

  • If I need medication, can you prescribe it or recommend someone who does?
  • Do you provide access to telehealth services?
  • How soon can I expect to start feeling better?
  • What do we do if our treatment plan isn’t working?

Note: If you’ve ever been abused by someone in authority or affected by historic trauma or racism, you may want to ask questions that help you find out whether a potential therapist is culturally informed and sensitive to your experiences.

No matter how many professional accreditations your therapist has, your own feelings of trust and comfort should be your top priority. Will therapy be uncomfortable from time to time? Possibly. After all, you’ll likely be discussing difficult, personal topics.

But if you feel uncomfortable with your therapist for any other reason, it’s all right to look for someone else.

You don’t need a reason to switch therapists. It’s enough that you don’t feel comfortable.

Here are a few things to notice as you talk with your therapist:

  • Does the therapist interrupt you, or do they listen carefully to what you’re saying?
  • Does the therapist respect your time by being prompt to appointments?
  • Does the therapist brush off or invalidate your concerns?
  • Do you feel seen, heard, and respected during your session?

Teletherapy, which is therapy done remotely over the phone or via videoconferencing, makes it easy to explore therapy and its options. It’s convenient, and studies have shown that therapy conducted over video chat can be just as effective as in-person therapy.

Here are some options.

BetterHelp

This option has over 12,000 licensed professionals in its network, including psychologists, clinical social workers, and marriage and family therapists. BetterHelp therapists can help people with anxiety, depression, addiction, grief, and other issues.

Read our full review of BetterHelp here.

Get 20% off your first month

Talkspace

With over 3,000 licensed therapists, Talkspace offers options for people with a wide range of needs, from depression to PTSD. They offer counseling for individuals, couples, and teens.

Read our full review of Talkspace here.

Get $100 off using code SPACE

Amwell

If you’re looking for physical and psychological health services, with doctor or therapist visits available 24/7, Amwell is a great user-friendly platform. Couple and individual therapy sessions are available for trauma, depression, life transitions, and more.

Read our full review of Amwell here.

Teen Counseling

This is a great resource for teens ages 13 to 19 and caregivers. The therapists in Teen Counseling specialize in issues affecting teens, such as stress and eating disorders. The platform offers live chats, phone calls, videoconferencing, and messaging with licensed therapists.

Read our full review of Teen Counseling here.

Pride Counseling

This option offers safe and supportive mental health services for LGBTQ+ people. Pride Counseling matches you with a counselor who fits your therapy objectives and needs.

Read our full review of Pride Counseling here.

In the event that you meet with a therapist for the first time and decide that they’re not a good match for you, know that that’s completely fine. It’s totally normal and happens to many people who are looking for the right therapist for them. It can take some time to find someone that you feel completely comfortable with.

At the end of your first session, your therapist may want to schedule another appointment. If you know that you do not want to meet with them again, you can let them know that while you appreciate their time, you don’t think that it’s a good match at this time.

If you feel uncomfortable communicating this to them face-to-face, you can also text, call, or even email them to let them know you’re no longer interested in seeing them.

Regardless of how you choose to tell them, it’s important that you do inform them, instead of not showing up to your next appointment without an explanation. Many therapists have cancellation policies, so make sure you cancel at least 24 hours before your appointment to avoid a fee.

Therapists and psychiatrists aim to treat mental health conditions and Boost emotional well-being. But there are key differences between the two professions.

Therapists

Therapists are licensed mental health professionals, including psychologists, social workers, and counselors. They aim to help people manage their emotions, build healthier relationships, and understand themselves better.

Therapists use talk therapy and behavior modification techniques to help people make positive life changes. During therapy, they can assess, diagnose, and treat mental health conditions.

Therapy typically suits people who want to learn more about themselves and make long-lasting changes in their lives. It may also help people with mild mental health conditions.

Most therapists have a master’s degree and may have a doctorate. All licensed therapists have to have at least a master’s degree.

Generally, therapists can’t prescribe medications. But in some states, psychologists with specialist pharmacology training can prescribe certain medications.

Psychiatrists

Psychiatrists are medical doctors who specialize in diagnosing and treating mental health conditions. Because they hold medical degrees, psychiatrists can prescribe medication.

Psychiatrists use a combination of talk therapy and medication to treat mental health conditions. A psychiatrist may be the better option for people who experience more severe symptoms and who need medication to help treat them.

How much does therapy cost?

The cost of therapy can depend on the type of therapy, the therapist’s experience, and whether you’re talking with a therapist in person or through teletherapy.

Therapists may charge between $100 and $200 per session for in-person appointments. But in bigger cities, therapy can cost more. Some therapists may offer sliding scale rates. If you have insurance, you may pay a portion of the fee depending on your coverage.

Teletherapy is generally less costly. The price per session starts at around $50. Some platforms offer unlimited therapy with a weekly or monthly subscription.

What types of therapy are there?

There are many different types of therapy, and the type you choose will depend on your needs and preferences. Some common types include:

  • Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT): CBT helps you identify and change negative thinking patterns and behaviors.
  • Dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT): DBT combines elements of CBT with structured skill-building in mindfulness, distress tolerance, emotion regulation, and interpersonal effectiveness.
  • Psychodynamic therapy: This type of therapy focuses on your unconscious thoughts and emotions.
  • Interpersonal therapy: The focus of interpersonal therapy is on your relationships with other people.
  • Family therapy: This type of therapy helps families resolve conflict and Boost communication.
  • Group therapy: In this type of therapy, you meet with a group of people who share similar experiences.
  • Art therapy: This type of therapy uses art to express emotions and help process trauma.
  • Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy: EMDR is an interactive form of psychotherapy used to relieve psychological and trauma-based stress.

What are the benefits of therapy?

Therapy has several benefits, including improving mental health, resolving personal issues, and increasing self-awareness. Therapy can also help people learn new coping skills and manage stress.

Some people see therapy as a way to prevent mental health issues or as a way to address underlying causes of mental health conditions. Others use therapy to work through traumas or difficult life events.

Therapy is an effective treatment for many mental health conditions, including anxiety, depression, PTSD, and eating disorders.

Whether you’re coping with grief, trauma, or relationship issues, or want treatment for a mental health condition, finding a helpful therapist can make a big difference in your journey.

To find a therapist who’s a good fit, start by considering practical matters like licensure, insurance coverage, location, and specialties.

You may find that friends, colleagues, and healthcare professionals are a good source of referrals. You may also find options by using search tools provided by organizations that address your specific concerns.

When you’ve narrowed down your choices, you may find it helpful to think about your goals and questions. This way you can be sure you and your therapist are well matched and aligned on your treatment plan.

Ultimately, finding the right therapist is a personal matter. Human connection is at the heart of effective therapy, and you can build that sense of connection whether you talk with your therapist in person, on the phone, or online.

Sun, 27 Nov 2022 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.healthline.com/health/how-to-find-a-therapist
Killexams : How To Lose Weight Fast

1. Implement Long-Term Lifestyle and Behavior Changes

When trying to lose weight, ban the word “diet,” suggests Albertson. Dieting can be unpleasant and make you hungry, so you constantly think about food, which is exactly what you don’t want when trying to lose weight. Instead, she recommends thinking of weight loss as a part of getting healthier and concentrating on taking care of your body first.

“Weight loss is complicated and you don’t have total control over the number on the scale, but you do have control over what you eat, how much you move and other factors that impact weight, such as stress and sleep,” says Albertson. She suggests setting SMART—specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time-sensitive—goals and rewarding yourself when you hit them.

2. Focus on the First 5% to 10%

Instead of saying, “I need to lose 25 pounds,” and overwhelming yourself with what seems like an impossible goal, look toward the health benefits that can come from even modest weight loss.

“Set smaller, achievable targets,” suggests Bennett. “Losing only 5% to 10% of your total body weight (TBW) can greatly Boost your health and lower your risk for illnesses, such as type 2 diabetes, stroke, cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancer.”

3. Reduce Your Intake of Ultra-Processed Carbs and Sweets

A study in the Journal of the American Medical Association reveals what you eat is most important for weight loss . The pounds will come off more quickly if you Boost the quality of the foods you ingest.

“One of the healthiest ways to shed weight is to reduce your intake of sugar and rapidly metabolized carbohydrates,” says Bennett. “In particular, you want to cut out or drastically curtail your intake of high-glycemic-load foods, such as sugary snacks, processed carbs and soft drinks. When you avoid or cut back on French fries, chips, crackers and the like, you’ll speed up your weight loss.”

4. Eat More Plants

Research shows a plant-based diet not only promotes weight loss, but is also easier to stick to than a low-calorie diet . Plus, it’s nutrient dense and has numerous health benefits.

“Produce supports weight loss because it’s rich in fiber and water, which are both calorie-free yet take up space in your stomach so you feel full,” says Albertson. In fact, a Brazilian study found a direct correlation between increased fruit and vegetable consumption and enhanced weight loss .

Albertson suggests aiming to consume five daily servings of produce to start and working up to seven to nine servings a day. “Start your day with a green smoothie, have a salad or cut up vegetables with your lunch and eat fruit for snacks and desserts,” she says. “For supper, have more stir frys, incorporate veggies into your pasta dishes and stir them into soups.”

5. Pump Up Your Protein

Increasing your protein consumption can help reduce appetite and help prevent the loss of muscle mass.

“Eating around 25 to 30 grams of protein—two scoops of protein powder or 4 ounces of chicken breast—per meal can Boost appetite control and manage your body weight,” says Dr. Albertson. “The best way to do it is to make sure you have one serving of high-quality protein per meal.”

Albertson also says women older than 50 need significantly more protein (1 to 1.5 grams per kilogram of body weight daily) than men and younger women (who require .8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight daily). “Women need more protein after 50, especially as they approach menopause, because decreases in the hormone estrogen result in a loss of skeletal muscle mass, strength and regenerative capacity,” she explains.

(Note: Product details and price are accurate as of publication and are subject to change.)

6. Drink More Water

Research shows drinking more water is associated with weight loss independent of diet and exercise . Ample water intake can help increase satiety and combat sugar cravings. Water is also necessary for lipolysis, the body’s process of burning fat for energy.

“I suggest following the eight by eight rule—8 ounces of water eight times throughout the day—for a minimum water intake recommendation,” says Florida-based celebrity trainer Jordan Morello who works for the fitness platform Sweat Factor. “My clients are usually surprised once they add this [rule] into their own routine [by] how much this simple thing can curb cravings and leave you more satiated throughout the day.”

Another water trick? Try drinking two cups of water before each meal. Studies have shown this simple move can increase weight loss as well .

7. Eat a Well-Rounded Breakfast

Breakfast skippers, listen up. If you’re trying to lose weight, skimping on morning fuel is not the way to go. In fact, studies consistently show skipping breakfast is associated with overweight and obesity .

Additionally, a study in the Proceedings of the Nutrition Society found people who don’t eat breakfast tend to have poorer quality diets overall, and they skimp on nutrients, such as vitamin D, calcium and iron.

But not just any breakfast will do. “To think more clearly, perform more efficiently and be in better moods, you want a well-rounded, blood-sugar-balanced first meal of the day with ample protein, healthy fats and what I call quality carbs like fresh berries,” says Bennett .

8. Stand Up and Move More

One of the easiest ways to shed weight is to up your non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT)—the energy expended for everything you do outside of eating, sleeping or exercising. Little changes like carrying your groceries instead of pushing a cart, parking farther away from the entrance to the mall, taking the stairs instead of the elevator or even tapping your toe can lead to hundreds of extra calories burned.

Or try to stand more than you sit. Studies show that simply replacing sitting with standing leads to a greater daily energy expenditure, which directly translates into more calories burned and ultimately pounds shed .

For example, if you weigh 160 pounds and alternate sitting and standing, you can burn approximately 35 additional calories an hour—an extra 280 calories a day, 1,400 calories a week and about 70,000 calories a year.

“Set a timer on your phone, Fitbit or computer to remind you to get up and move around every hour,” says Albertson. “You’ll burn more calories and may lower your blood sugar and risk of heart disease.”

9. Hit the Weights

Muscle burns more calories than fat. So how do you build more muscle? Strength training.

Adding resistance training to your weight loss plan is a smart idea not only because of the calories you’ll burn while working out, but also because of the “afterburn effect.”

Known as excess post-exercise oxygen consumption, EPOC reflects how long oxygen uptake remains elevated after exercise in order to help muscles recover. This elevation boosts metabolism both during and after strength training sessions.

And the more muscle you add to your frame, the higher your resting metabolic rate (RMR). Your RMR determines how many calories your body needs to function at rest. The greater your RMR, the more you can eat and not gain weight.

“While cardiovascular exercise is often emphasized, strength training is key for dropping pounds and maintaining weight loss, especially after age 50 because muscle mass—which burns calories—declines at a rate of 1% to 2% per year,” says Albertson. “Strength training can slow down muscle mass decline.”

10. Don’t Go Overboard

Cutting calories too drastically or working out 24/7 may actually backfire when it comes to weight loss. Most people think shedding pounds requires draconian measures to get results, but allowing yourself adequate recovery time is more productive.

“Many people, when they get frustrated that they haven’t lost weight, will double down on the stressor (i.e. catabolic phase) that they are doing,” says certified personal trainer Rob Darnbrough, CEO and co-founder of The Smart Fit Method in California. “For example, they’ll run extra miles, double up on the amount of time they spend at the gym and/or eat less food. However, all of the results we desire from doing the above things actually occur during the anabolic recovery phase.”

During the anabolic phase, the body builds muscle mass and loses fat mass while recovering from the stressor, explains Darnbrough. So, instead of pushing yourself to a breaking point, which ends up leading to overtraining and diminished results, put as much energy into rest and nutrition as you do into workouts. “To create sustainable results, try to balance your ratio of stress to recovery,” says Darnbrough.

11. Check in With an Accountability Partner

Sometimes losing weight can feel lonely, but you don’t have to do it all by yourself.

Research shows being accountable works. In one study, two-thirds of participants who joined a weight loss program with friends maintained their weight loss for six months after the meetings ended, compared to just a quarter of those who attended on their own . Of course, many organizations also suggest having a sponsor or champion on your path to weight loss.

“One of the best ways to consistently eat better and shed weight steadily is to check in every day with an accountability partner,” suggests Bennett. “Your accountability partner doesn’t need to be your bestie, favorite co-worker or partner. Just find someone with similar weight loss goals. You don’t need to talk every day, either. Just text each other to share that you’re eating healthy foods and staying on track. If you’re tempted by junk foods, you can lean on your partner, too. That’s when you may want to call them.”

12. Watch Less Television

Couch surfers wanting to lose weight should turn off the TV—in fact, the more television people watch, the more weight they gain.

One study that collected data from more than 50,000 middle-aged women over six years found that for every two hours the participants spent watching television each day, they had a 23% higher risk of obesity and a 14% higher risk of developing diabetes .

Excess television watching is correlated with extra pounds primarily because it’s a sedentary activity that often also leads to mindless eating. So, turn it off or maybe change the channel to an exercise program instead.

13. Reconnect With Your Satiety Cues

Speaking of mindless eating, you can reprogram your brain for weight loss by tuning back into your body’s natural “I’m hungry” and “I’m full” cues.

“Dieting combined with eating on the run or while multitasking—driving, watching TV, playing with your phone—can really disconnect you from your natural signals of hunger and satiety,” says Albertson. “Plus, as children, we also learned to clean our plates rather than eat until satisfied.” Add the fact that portion sizes have grown significantly—as much as 60% for things like snack foods— and the result is consistent overeating.

“Instead, try to eat when you’re hungry and stop when you are satisfied rather than stuffed,” says Albertson. “Instead of tracking your food, try tracking how hungry you are before, during and after meals to get back in touch with these signals.”

14. Get More Sleep

Getting a good night’s sleep is one of the best things you can do to maintain a healthy weight and overall health. Studies show that poor sleep is associated with weight gain and other health disorders. When researchers analyzed 16 years’ worth of data on 68,183 middle-aged American women, they found those who slept no more than five hours per night were 15% more likely to have obesity compared to those who slept seven hours a night .

Insufficient sleep may also affect the production of appetite-regulating hormones ghrelin and leptin, which can lead people to feel hungrier throughout the day. Additionally, poor sleep increases cortisol and can result in harder-to-lose body and belly fat.

“Most of us can’t control what time we have to get up, but we can control when we go to bed, so counting back seven to nine hours from the time you have to wake up is a great tip,” says Darnbrough. “I also encourage the 3-2-1 rule, which means stop working three hours before bed, stop eating two hours before bed and stop digital stimuli one hour before bed to Boost your deep sleep and REM.”

15. Find Non-Edible Substitutes for Self-Soothing

There’s a reason it’s called “comfort food.” However, emotional eating can quickly derail all weight loss efforts.

“When you feel stressed, which raises cortisol levels, rather than reaching for food to feel better—since eating triggers the release of the feel-good neurotransmitter dopamine—raise levels of oxytocin, the love hormone, either by soothing touch, playing with a pet or getting a hug,” suggests Albertson.

Animal studies have found oxytocin reduces calories consumed and has positive effects on metabolism . A small human study also found that giving men oxytocin over an eight-week period promoted weight loss .

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“While more research is needed to understand exactly how increasing oxytocin can impact weight and appetite, if you’re experiencing difficult emotions, a self-compassion break will allow you to provide yourself the care you need so you will be less likely to eat,” says Albertson. “Remember the acronym ‘HALT,’ which stands for hungry, angry/anxious, lonely and tired. If you are physiologically hungry, eat. If you are experiencing difficult emotions, ask, ‘What do I need?’ and provide yourself what you truly need. If you’re not hungry, it isn’t food.”

Mon, 05 Dec 2022 17:27:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.forbes.com/health/body/how-to-lose-weight-fast/
Killexams : Artificial Intelligence Battles to be Accepted in the Medical Field

If intubation is avoided wherever possible, the danger of intubation and the side effects of mechanical ventilation, such as ventilator-induced lung injury, nosocomial infection, pressure injuries, and thrombosis, are reduced. Therefore, it is crucial to create technologies that can properly identify patients who are in danger of deterioration.

From February 2020, complete data on critically ill patients with COVID-19 admitted to Australian intensive care units (ICUs) have been prospectively collected by the Short Period Incidence Study of Severe Acute Respiratory Infections (SPRINT-SARI) registry. The database's strength comes from its consistency and dependability, which are used across more than 50 hospitals nationally thanks to thorough management and standardized collection processes. More than 100 demographic, clinical, and laboratory findings are included in the highly detailed data collected for each patient stay.

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Artificial Intelligence Predicts Which Patients Requires Ventilation

The first study using artificial intelligence/machine learning to detect publicly available clinical risk factors for mechanical ventilation in patients with COVID-19 admitted to the ICU was published in October 2022 by the SPRINT-SARI collaboration of investigators. The study used Australian data. The 'grey area' cohort of patients, who are ill enough to warrant admission to the ICU but not yet in need of mechanical ventilatory assistance, was the study's main emphasis.

The early detection of patients at risk of invasive ventilation within three days of ICU admission was made possible by the high sensitivity (81%) of machine learning algorithms developed in the investigation, providing a potent tool to support clinical decision-making and more efficient resource allocation at the organizational level.

What is Machine Learning

A growing body of research shows that machine learning may effectively characterize and predict complicated biological processes for which there are no prior theories. It's capacity to negotiate non-linear interactions within high dimensional data, producing a mechanism via which more precise predictions can be formed, gives it an edge over conventional (typically linear) statistical methods.

Machine learning has proven to be very successful in 'personalised prediction', as demonstrated by the algorithm used by Netflix to tailor television show and movie suggestions or by Facebook (now Meta) to deliver tailored advertisements.

FDA-approved Algorithms in Ophthalmology and Radiology

With notable accomplishments like a detection system for diabetic retinopathy in the field of ophthalmology that was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and automated image analysis for hospital workflow management in radiology, these potent algorithms have been implemented gradually but steadily in patient care.

Machine learning technologies offer two major benefits in a health system under constant demand from staff shortages, growing prices, and protracted wait times: scalability and efficient resource allocation. Machine learning algorithms can now be installed on cloud servers, making them accessible from any location with an internet connection.

This means that by expanding internet connection in Australia, we may work toward achieving fair access to artificial intelligence-based medical technology. Additionally, the idea of integrating telehealth services and machine learning-driven decision assistance is promising. Over 95 000 practitioners countrywide provided 118.2 million telehealth services to 18 million patients between 13 March 2020 and 31 July 2022.

In the future, seamless artificial intelligence integration into the backend of telehealth services may complement prompt diagnosis and early action. Artificial intelligence integrated into the electronic medical record may help with resource allocation by speeding up the triaging of patients for primary and tertiary care. To predict the progression of conditions like diabetes to chronic kidney disease, for instance, established, precise models based on huge datasets (>50 000 individuals) already exist.

These are useful in making sure high-risk patients are given priority and aren't 'lost' in the long waiting lists for specialized care, especially in rural areas.

Resistance to Adopting Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare

Despite the obvious benefits of artificial intelligence, resistance to its use in clinical settings still exists, most notably because of the complexity of machine learning algorithms. The term 'black box' still permeates the discourse surrounding the use of artificial intelligence in healthcare, encapsulating the widespread skepticism against a system whose inner workings are hidden from the clinicians who use it. There is concern that handing up decision-making authority to an unknowable ally may breach the clinician's basic duty to safeguard the welfare of patients and expose them to medico-legal risk.

Patients are also wary because the ability of 'non-human' computers to decide how to manage them may make them uncomfortable. The trade-off between model complexity and explicability further complicates matters. The most challenging algorithms to comprehend are frequently those that are complicated and best suited to extract and exploit data trends.

In addition, third-party explanation systems that are as inventive and sophisticated as the algorithms are being developed, which is an important step in closing this trust gap. A unique explanatory modelling framework for enhanced non-linear machine learning model interpretability was developed in 2020, and it utilized a game theory-based methodology to rationalize the contributions made by various input features to the predictions being made.

The SPRINT-SARI group used this technique to establish which characteristics were most helpful in their artificial intelligence system for foretelling invasive ventilation in critically ill COVID-19 patients. It was intended to provide doctors a better understanding of the reasoning behind the algorithm to increase clinician trust and adoption. In the future, there is hope for a better working connection between medical experts and artificial intelligence-based solutions used in hospitals thanks to the algorithm transparency attained by this unique method.

Predictive algorithms' utility is severely constrained by the demographic and disease-related characteristics of the cohort in question because, in the end, they are only as good as the data used to train them.

Source: Medindia

Wed, 07 Dec 2022 04:00:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.medindia.net/news/healthwatch/artificial-intelligence-battles-to-be-accepted-in-the-medical-field-209559-1.htm
Killexams : Children in child protection need more say about their care, says study

New Australian Catholic University (ACU) research shows that more must be done to support children's participation in child protection to ensure they have a voice when making decisions about their protection. ACU social work lecturer and study lead Dr. Elise Woodman said the new research revealed gaps between policy and practice.

It also identified the ongoing challenge of implementing best practice in when workers had high caseloads and limited time to build relationships with .

Dr. Woodman, from the School of Allied Health, worked with ACU Emeritus Professor Morag McArthur and Dr. Steven Roche from Charles Darwin University. They conducted in-depth interviews with 18 child protection practitioners to determine how they understood children's participation.

The results, published in Child & Family Social Work, showed most practitioners understood and valued participation but found it difficult to implement. Some discussed participation as child-focused decision-making but did not refer to the child's involvement in the process. Children's participation is essential to achieving good outcomes for children involved in child protection systems, Dr. Woodman said.

Despite this, research has consistently found children report low levels of participation, are poorly consulted, and feel inadequately involved in decisions about their lives.

"The findings show that children's participation may be overly reliant on the skills of individual practitioners, which can be further constrained in complex practice settings where children's safety is the primary concern and time to work with children is limited," Dr. Woodman said.

"Sharing power with children, especially in creating child-accessible organizations and processes, while also developing environments where children can participate at the times and in the ways they want to, may allow children to further influence decisions about their lives and maximize children's rights to both participate and achieve personal safety."

Study co-author Dr. Steven Roche said the results showed decisions were often being made about a child's protection without any from the child.

"The research suggests that there is a gulf between the theory of participatory decision making in child protection and the practice because there is not much reference to listening before acting," Dr. Roche said. "There is also a wide interpretation of what participation actually means in practice to decision makers."

More information: Elise Woodman et al, Children's participation in child protection—How do practitioners understand children's participation in practice?, Child & Family Social Work (2022). DOI: 10.1111/cfs.12947

Provided by Australian Catholic University

Citation: Children in child protection need more say about their care, says study (2022, November 21) retrieved 9 December 2022 from https://phys.org/news/2022-11-children-child.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

Mon, 21 Nov 2022 08:10:00 -0600 en text/html https://phys.org/news/2022-11-children-child.html
Killexams : How the London Centre for Work and Health aims to drive work and health research

There is often little collaboration between employers, occupational health professionals and academic researchers, despite a clear need for evidence-based health interventions at work. But one new initiative aims to change that. Ashleigh Webber finds out more about the London Centre for Work and Health.

The need for further research into health and work outcomes has never been so important. A record 2.5 million people are economically inactive because of long-term illness, according to exact figures from the Office for National Statistics. Conditions including musculoskeletal disorders, mental ill-health, occupational lung disease – and, more recently, long Covid – have caused many employees to fall out of work prematurely.

Occupational health practitioners are crying out for evidence-based interventions to support those most likely to be forced into early ill-health retirement. One recently launched multidisciplinary work and health research centre is aiming to do just that – equipping practitioners with the solutions and knowledge they need to keep their clients’ workforces happy and healthy.

Launched in the summer, the London Centre for Work and Health has a goal to increase capacity in work and health research and, importantly, engage employers, workers, trade unions and occupational health professionals in the process.

The project brings together researchers with different areas of expertise and from a variety of disciplines. They have one common, overarching aim: helping working-age people to have and maintain healthy, fulfilling work, through research that informs government policy and employer practice.

The centre’s origins

The centre was established by Professor Paul Cullinan, a professor in occupational and environmental respiratory disease, and Professor Ira Madan, a professor of occupational medicine and academic dean at the Faculty of Occupational Medicine, after they found they, along with other academics, were working in areas that often overlapped.

Cullinan and Madan sit as directors of the centre, and are supported by occupational health research expert Dr Vaughan Parsons as centre manager.

Thirty work and health research specialists from institutions including King’s College London;  University College London; the National Heart and Lung Institute at Imperial College; and Guy’s and St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust are collaborating at the centre to drive forward research in this area.

“The way forward in work and health research is definitely multidisciplinary and collaborative,” Prof Madan tells OHW+.

“We need to think particularly about capacity-building in work and health research, and we needed a centre where people who are working in this area can join forces and share expertise.”

The centre has three primary areas of interest: occupational health, occupational lung disease and occupational mental health.

One of its main missions is to work with closely with government, employers – including occupational health professionals, employees and trade unions – to shape policy and answer the questions organisations need help with.

Engaging with employers and OH professionals

“Reaching out to employers certainly needs to be embedded throughout our activity. Their views and experience should really help to shape and guide our work,” says Dr Parsons.

He says one of the challenges to overcome is how the centre might reach employers, and how this outreach can be embedded into its operations.

“One of the issues we’ve had to date is trying to get our frontline OH colleagues engaged in occupational health research, and that’s for all sorts of reasons including workload pressures,” he says.

One of the aims of the London Centre is to really raise the profile of work and health research, particularly within the OH specialty, and really get our colleagues to think about and recognise the importance of embedding research into their clinical practice” – Dr Vaughan Parsons

“One of the aims of the London Centre is to really raise the profile of work and health research, particularly within the OH specialty, and really get our colleagues to think about and recognise the importance of embedding research into their clinical practice. And that could simply be a case of collecting data that allows research to take place.”

Prof Madan says: “We hope [the outreach] will go both ways. If we can show that we are useful to employers, then hopefully they will approach us with what they need. But historically in work and health research it’s been challenging.”

She encourages organisations and OH professionals to think about the work and health questions they have, and to consider contacting the centre to discuss how they might go about answering them and what data they might need.

“Most employers have the question but they don’t have the academic expertise to be able to answer it, but we’re very happy to assist with that,” Prof Madan adds.

Current research

The centre is currently working on a variety of projects. These include the ENABLE study, which aims to explore the interplay between multiple long-term conditions and employment; a study on risk factors for healthcare workers developing long Covid; and a study exploring opportunities for multidisciplinary working in NHS OH as part of the Growing Occupational Health and Wellbeing Together project.

The way forward in work and health research is definitely multidisciplinary and collaborative” – Prof Ira Madan

Several papers have already been published by the centre, including the Employee Staff Record study, which explored the associations between sickness absence and Covid-19 in NHS staff.

Prof Madan says the centre would like to support education and training in the field of OH and work and health research.

“Part of that is through the existing Lungs at Work courses, and we have just developed a diploma in occupational health practice which will begin in January next year and is in association with the At Work Partnership,” she says

Furthermore, the centre wants to offer opportunities to support people wishing to apply for Colt and NIHR fellowships, with Prof Madan hoping that they will see at least one person achieve a fellowship in the field of work and health within the next two years.

“We also want people to realise that there is a career in work and health research,” she says. “We really want to develop clinical and non-clinical researchers in our field, to expand capacity in this important area.”

With the UK’s working population facing varied, and often interconnected and overlapping, health challenges, getting a better understanding of the how employers and government can facilitate healthier working lives will undoubtedly help to keep employees in work for longer.

The hope is that, through greater collaboration with academics and via cross-institutional partnerships such as the London Centre for Work and Health, OH can in time begin to build the robust the evidence base it needs to help workers thrive.

Employers, OH professionals or academics in the field of work and health research can contact the London Centre for Work and Health Research by visiting lcwh.org or emailing [email protected]

Wed, 30 Nov 2022 20:43:00 -0600 Ashleigh Webber en-GB text/html https://www.personneltoday.com/hr/london-centre-for-work-and-health-occupational-health-research/
Killexams : Why physician-led, team-based care is the best medicine for Kentucky: Opinion

Growing up, I knew I wanted a job helping others. This passion is what drove me to become a physician and helped me through years of medical school, residency and finally into my own practice. It’s the same passion that motivates me today to ensure my patients receive the very best care.

Of course, quality care is something that requires an entire team of health providers—and everyone involved serves an important role in meeting our patients’ needs. But it’s important that physicians are at the helm, leading the way.

Under a physician-led, team-based model of care, physicians and other health professionals work collaboratively, within their scope of experience and education, to ensure patients are treated safely and effectively. Most importantly, this model leads to the best health outcomes for our patients. An American Medical Association study found that physician-led care resulted in fewer emergency room visits, fewer hospital admissions and readmissions, shorter hospital stays and overall lower health care costs.

Furthermore, studies show 95% of patients want a physician involved in their diagnosis and treatment. With eight years of formal education, a minimum three-year residency and at least 12,000 hours of clinical training, physicians are the most highly trained health providers—and we are trained to lead a care team.

More:Nurse practitioners can help address Kentucky's doctor shortage. State law stands in the way

Physician-led, team-based care can also help address one of Kentucky’s most pressing health care problems: access to care. The Health Resources and Services Administration anticipates Kentucky will face a shortage of 960 primary care physicians by 2025—the third greatest shortage nationwide.

As a first step, we must invest in programs that keep and bring more physicians to Kentucky, such as graduate medical education funding and loan repayment programs. Kentucky should also consider other evidence-based reforms to resolve our health care workforce shortage—things like expanding telehealth and creating new initiatives and programs that encourage students from underserved areas to pursue medical school.

The Kentucky Medical Association has led the way in bringing these reforms to our state. Last year, we helped pass House Bill 573, which established a state-based loan forgiveness program for physicians and other providers willing to locate to underserved areas, and we will continue to look for solutions to recruit and retain more physicians.

Despite what some may claim, resolving complex issues like health care access, quality and cost is not as simple as expanding non-physicians’ scope of practice and allowing for independent practice, as was indicated in a exact Courier Journal story on nurse practitioners. We know this because it has been tried and has failed.

More Opinion:Why nursing shortages still have a grip on Kentucky's health care system: Opinion

Over the last two decades, various scope of practice initiatives have been enacted in an attempt to fill gaps within the state’s health care workforce. Despite these efforts, 94% of Kentucky counties still faced a primary care shortage in 2021. Since non-physician providers tend to locate in the same general areas as physicians, even in states with relaxed scope of practice laws, these reforms do little to address the problem.

Not to mention that physician involvement, even when care is provided by non-physician providers, is linked to higher quality care—which is what all providers should want for their patients. That’s why a majority of states, including those neighboring Kentucky, have at least some provisions regulating the level and scope of care provided by non-physicians.

Access, quality and cost—all of which are inextricably linked to physician-led, team-based care—are the foundation of the Kentucky Medical Association’s new Kentucky Physicians Care campaign. This effort will educate Kentuckians on the role physicians play within the care team and the collaboration among providers that leads to the best patient outcomes. We will also continue to advocate for policy solutions that will ensure this model’s longevity, even as the health care system evolves.

As a physician, I care deeply about the health and wellbeing of not only my patients, but all Kentuckians. They are not just numbers and charts. I know that I need a strong team working alongside me to provide the best care. I feel a tremendous responsibility to serve my patients in the safest and most effective way possible because I know the positive impacts of quality, accessible care can be felt throughout entire communities.

Delivering that type of care means sticking with—and expanding—what really works: the physician-led, team-based model that puts patients’ best interests and care needs first.

Monalisa Tailor

Monalisa Tailor, MD, is a practicing physician and president of the Kentucky Medical Association.

This article originally appeared on Louisville Courier Journal: Why physician-led, team-based care is the best medicine for Kentucky

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 20:31:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://news.yahoo.com/why-physician-led-team-based-103114722.html
Killexams : Realtimecampaign.Com Talks About The Importance Of Continuing Medical Education
(MENAFN- GetNews)

Some busy healthcare professionals view continuing medical education (CME) as a hassle or a burden. In truth, while this process can be time-consuming, it's vital to a practitioner's ability to continue providing adequate patient care. CME is considered a non-negotiable, ongoing requirement for good reasons, so don't put it off. Find out why participating in CME is so important.

Keep Licenses and Certifications Current

In a perfect world, medical professionals would jump at the chance to continue their educations so that they could provide the best possible patient care, but according to realtimecampaign.com, most need some incentive. That's why state medical boards maintain CME requirements for physicians and nurses. Failure to meet those CME requirements will result in the loss of the practitioner's medical license. specialists will also find that ignoring CME requirements leads to the loss of board certification.

Stay Current With Industry Changes

Although healthcare practitioners often view keeping their state licenses and board certifications current as the primary purpose of CME, it's really about helping healthcare professionals stay current in their fields. Every specialty is a little different, but according to realtimecampaign.com, all of them undergo changes in best practices, treatment modalities, technologies, and other aspects of daily practice. CME helps physicians stay up-to-date with all of those changes. One can look at a company such as sermo .

Learning or Perfecting Skills

CME offers doctors, nurses, and other practitioners a way to learn new skills or hone the ones they already have. Wondering if it really works? Just check out the medical literature. the role of continuing medical education programs in promoting iranian nurses, competency toward non-communicable diseases, a qualitative content analysis study” offers an excellent example of CME in action. The study participants, and subsequently their patients, benefited substantially from continued education.

Improving Patient Outcomes

Keeping up to date with changes in the medical field is the only way to provide the best possible patient outcomes. New technologies, pharmaceutical interventions, and treatment modalities can all be applied immediately, allowing patients to access a full range of potential therapeutic interventions. In most cases, this creates opportunities for better patient outcomes. As a secondary benefit, patients that perceive their healthcare teams as being committed to keeping their knowledge of the field up-to-date also tend to report greater satisfaction rates.

Gaining Access to Elite Organizations

CME credits are typically required to maintain specialty board certifications, and these certifications often provide access to professional organizations. Membership in professional organizations can Boost a doctor's reputation, offer access to new opportunities, and further increase patients' satisfaction rates. Those interested in specialty medical organizations can browse this site to learn more.

CME Is Worth the Time and Effort

It's always worth the time and effort for doctors, nurses, and other healthcare professionals to learn about changes in their fields. Healthcare practitioners benefit directly by meeting state licensing and board certification requirements. Patients benefit indirectly from the improvements in care that are brought about by the maintenance of up-to-date medical knowledge. Even hospitals, clinics, and other facilities benefit from improved reputations and greater patient satisfaction rates.

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Tue, 29 Nov 2022 11:43:00 -0600 Date text/html https://menafn.com/1105244206/RealtimecampaignCom-Talks-About-The-Importance-Of-Continuing-Medical-Education
Killexams : Big egos, lack of staff training and policy enforcement are major barriers to island conservation

A new study led by the University of Oxford is the first to quantify the day-to-day barriers that conservation workers face as they try to conserve and manage island ecosystems around the world. The results have been published today in the journal People and Nature.

Island nations are noted for their particularly high-levels of biodiversity and endemic species. However, they are also more vulnerable to biodiversity loss, having already experienced 61% of exact global extinctions. The research amplifies the voices of frontline workers to highlight the main barriers to effective conservation on islands, as well as potential solutions.

Governance hinders conservation and management efforts

An online survey of 360 conservation practitioners led by researchers from the University of Oxford and the Seychelles Islands Foundation showed that the biggest barriers to effective management of island ecosystems play out at the national level. More than 60% of agreed that "poor conservation policy implementation and law enforcement," which are needed to effectively deliver and police plans, hinders more effective management efforts.

Lead author Dr. April Burt from the Department of Biology at the University of Oxford, commented, "These findings suggest that governments are either not making policies to protect the environment or that existing policies are simply not being enforced, leaving frontline workers without the support they need to effectively manage these critical ecosystems."

Lack of training opportunities prevents more effective management

Eight-five percent of participants also highlighted the importance of the skills gap, with 82% of respondents having to recruit volunteers to fill skill gaps within the organization(s) they work for. For instance, staff in many collect data but then struggle to translate it into useful information that can be used to make effective management decisions.

This could mean that, despite the data being collected, downward trends in population size or ecosystem health are simply not reported. Species therefore run the risk of becoming extinct before anyone can act.

Big egos interfere with effective collaborations

As well as the lack of national support and the skills gap, 84% of participants in the agreed that 'big egos' and other interpersonal issues between practitioners at high levels had hindered effective collaboration and conservation efforts. These issues included a lack of trust within collaborations; blocking of data and knowledge sharing among practitioners; and possessiveness over data, species, or sites.

"This is really alarming," says Dr. Burt, "because it suggests that egos and interpersonal issues hinder conservation efforts worldwide."

From problems to practical solutions

The study's authors hope that the information gathered in the survey can be used to leverage targeted funding for actions that address these barriers experienced by frontline island conservation workers. This may ultimately increase the chances of meeting island nations' biodiversity targets.

The potential solutions identified by the survey participants were longer funding cycles, additional staff, better training opportunities for staff and incentives to keep high-capacity staff long-term.

Dr. Nancy Bunbury from the Seychelles Islands Foundation, a co-author of the paper, adds, "The practitioners in this study have shown us what they need to be effective as they work in the frontline of conservation. Supporting local people to do their jobs better is the only way to stem the current tide of biodiversity loss."

The study, "An International Assessment of the Barriers Influencing the Effectiveness of Island Ecosystem Management," has been published in People and Nature.

More information: April Burt et al, An international assessment of the barriers influencing the effectiveness of island ecosystem management, People and Nature (2022). DOI: 10.1002/pan3.10417

Citation: Big egos, lack of staff training and policy enforcement are major barriers to island conservation (2022, December 6) retrieved 9 December 2022 from https://phys.org/news/2022-12-big-egos-lack-staff-policy.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

Tue, 06 Dec 2022 02:45:00 -0600 en text/html https://phys.org/news/2022-12-big-egos-lack-staff-policy.html
Killexams : PJ Care: recruiting new skilled care practitioner roles in in Peterborough with higher rates of pay

Carers play a vital role in society, and one of Peterborough’s leading providers is creating a new role to recognise extra experience and dedication, with the aim of recruiting the best talent and providing even better care for its residents.

Award-winning PJ Care is recruiting skilled people for new care practitioner roles based at its Eagle Wood care centre in Bretton. The roles are open to people with relevant skills and experience who want to take their career and earning potential to the next level.

The care practitioner role involves ensuring care is delivered to the highest standard, helping supervise and train colleagues, and encouraging staff to realise their potential in this rewarding sector.

Becoming a care practitioner also offers a career path into nursing.

The award-winning provider offers care for adults with progressive conditions like young onset dementia and Huntington’s disease. Their care centres are not homes for the elderly but specialist centres which also provide care and rehabilitation for people with acquired brain injuries.

Staff at the family-run company have voted them the ‘Best Care Home to Work For’ in the Best Companies awards. PJ Care also offers a real career development plan for its staff, with no limit to the opportunities.

If you have experience as a senior carer, and an NVQ Level 3 or above in health and social care, you could be the perfect fit. You’ll be supported to undertake Care Home Assistant Practitioners (CHAPS) training which involves some study and competencies assessments.

Care practitioners will earn up to £12 per hour.

Wed, 07 Dec 2022 22:02:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.peterboroughtoday.co.uk/health/pj-care-recruiting-new-skilled-care-practitioner-roles-in-in-peterborough-with-higher-rates-of-pay-3946643
Killexams : Press release - New study identifies key barriers to conserving important island ecosystems

image: Aldabra atoll Mangrove System. Image credit: Seychelles Islands Foundation. view more 

Credit: Image credit: Seychelles Islands Foundation.

For immediate release

Big egos, lack of staff training and policy enforcement are major barriers to island conservation

Published today in the journal People and Nature, a new study is the first to quantify the day-to-day barriers that conservation workers face as they try to conserve and manage island ecosystems around the world.

Island nations are noted for their particularly high-levels of biodiversity and endemic species. However, they are also more vulnerable to biodiversity loss, having already experienced 61% of exact global extinctions.

The research amplifies the voices of frontline conservation workers to highlight the main barriers to effective conservation on islands, as well as potential solutions.

Governance hinders conservation and management efforts

An online survey of 360 conservation practitioners led by researchers from the University of Oxford and the Seychelles Islands Foundation showed that the biggest barriers to effective management of island ecosystems play out at the national level. Over 60% of survey respondents agreed that ‘poor conservation policy implementation and law enforcement’, which are needed to effectively deliver and police plans, hinders more effective management efforts.

Lead author Dr April Burt from the Department of Biology at the University of Oxford, commented: ‘These findings suggest that governments are either not making policies to protect the environment or that existing policies are simply not being enforced, leaving frontline workers without the support they need to effectively manage these critical ecosystems.’

Lack of training opportunities prevents more effective management

85% of participants also highlighted the importance of the skills gap, with 82% of respondents having to recruit volunteers to fill skill gaps within the organisation/s they work for. For instance, staff in many island nations collect data but then struggle to translate it into useful information that can be used to make effective management decisions. This could mean that, despite the data being collected, downward trends in population size or ecosystem health are simply not reported. Species run the risk of becoming extinct before anyone can act.

Big egos interfere with effective collaborations

As well as the lack of national support and the skills gap, 84% of participants in the online survey agreed that ‘big egos’ and other interpersonal issues between practitioners at high levels had hindered effective collaboration and conservation efforts. These issues included a lack of trust within collaborations; blocking of data and knowledge sharing among practitioners; and possessiveness over data, species, or sites.

‘This is really alarming,’ says Dr Burt, ‘because it suggests that egos and interpersonal issues hinder conservation efforts worldwide.’

From problems to practical solutions

The study’s authors hope that the information gathered in the survey can be used to leverage targeted funding for actions that address these barriers experienced by frontline island conservation workers. This may ultimately increase the chances of meeting island nations’ biodiversity targets.

The potential solutions identified by the survey participants were longer funding cycles, additional staff, better training opportunities for staff and incentives to keep high-capacity staff long-term. Dr Nancy Bunbury from the Seychelles Islands Foundation, a co-author of the paper, adds:

‘The practitioners in this study have shown us what they need to be effective as they work in the frontline of conservation. Supporting local people to do their jobs better is the only way to stem the current tide of biodiversity loss.’

-END-

Notes to editors

For media enquiries and interview requests, contact:

Dr April Burt, Department of Biology, University of Oxford: april.burt@biology.ox.ac.uk

Megan Harvey, Communications Manager, University of Oxford: megan.harvey@biology.ox.ac.uk 07485187131

The paper ‘An International Assessment of the Barriers Influencing the Effectiveness of Island Ecosystem Management’ has been published in People and Nature: https://besjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/pan3.10417.

Images and a descriptive cartoon of the study are available at https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1j656xskczDT-atxJVqxxeVAdLriuRwSY

About the University of Oxford

Oxford University has been placed number 1 in the Times Higher Education World University Rankings for the seventh year running, and ​number 2 in the QS World Rankings 2022. At the heart of this success are the twin-pillars of our ground-breaking research and innovation and our distinctive educational offer.

Oxford is world-famous for research and teaching excellence and home to some of the most talented people from across the globe. Our work helps the lives of millions, solving real-world problems through a huge network of partnerships and collaborations. The breadth and interdisciplinary nature of our research alongside our personalised approach to teaching sparks imaginative and inventive insights and solutions.

Through its research commercialisation arm, Oxford University Innovation, Oxford is the highest university patent filer in the UK and is ranked first in the UK for university spinouts, having created more than 200 new companies since 1988. Over a third of these companies have been created in the past three years. The university is a catalyst for prosperity in Oxfordshire and the United Kingdom, contributing £15.7 billion to the UK economy in 2018/19, and supports more than 28,000 full time jobs.

The Seychelles Islands Foundation

Seychelles Islands Foundation (SIF), is a non-profit charitable organisation that was established as a public trust by the government of Seychelles in 1979. SIF manages and protects the UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Aldabra Atoll and the Vallée de Mai and has the President of Seychelles, Wavel Ramkalawan, as Patron. https://www.sif.sc/


Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.

Mon, 05 Dec 2022 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/973504
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