These SBAC Practice test are very well updated

killexams.com always suggest you to download SBAC exam bootcamp for trial, go through the questions and answers before you apply for full version. Killexams.com allows you 3 months free updates of SBAC Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium exam questions. Our certification group is consistently working at back end and update the SBAC bootcamp as and when need.

SBAC Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium approach | http://babelouedstory.com/

SBAC approach - Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium Updated: 2024

Get SBAC SBAC test dumps with practice software.
Exam Code: SBAC Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium approach January 2024 by Killexams.com team

SBAC Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium

Exam: SBAC (Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium)

Exam Details:
- Number of Questions: The number of questions may vary depending on the specific grade level and subject being assessed.
- Time: The test duration varies depending on the specific grade level and subject being assessed.

Course Outline:
The SBAC is an assessment system used in several U.S. states to measure student achievement in English language arts/literacy (ELA) and mathematics. The course outline for SBAC exams is based on the Common Core State Standards and typically includes the following components:

1. English Language Arts/Literacy:
- Reading: Assessing students' ability to comprehend and analyze complex texts, make inferences, and determine the main ideas and supporting details.
- Writing: Assessing students' ability to write informative, argumentative, and narrative texts with clarity, organization, and appropriate use of language conventions.
- Listening: Assessing students' ability to comprehend spoken language, make connections between oral and written texts, and evaluate information presented orally.
- Research: Assessing students' ability to conduct research, gather evidence from multiple sources, and cite sources appropriately.

2. Mathematics:
- Conceptual Understanding: Assessing students' understanding of mathematical concepts, procedures, and problem-solving strategies.
- Procedural Fluency: Assessing students' ability to perform mathematical operations accurately and efficiently.
- Problem Solving and Modeling: Assessing students' ability to apply mathematical concepts and procedures to solve real-world problems and create mathematical models.
- Communicating Reasoning: Assessing students' ability to explain and justify mathematical reasoning and solutions using mathematical language.

Exam Objectives:
The objectives of the SBAC exams are to measure students' mastery of the knowledge and skills outlined in the Common Core State Standards. The exams aim to assess the following:

1. Content Knowledge: Students' understanding of key concepts, skills, and strategies in English language arts/literacy and mathematics.
2. Critical Thinking and Problem Solving: Students' ability to analyze information, think critically, and apply knowledge to solve complex problems.
3. Communication Skills: Students' ability to effectively communicate their ideas and reasoning using appropriate language and conventions.
4. Research and Information Literacy: Students' ability to conduct research, evaluate sources, and use evidence to support their arguments.

Exam Syllabus:
The specific syllabus for SBAC exams is based on the grade-level expectations outlined in the Common Core State Standards. It includes a wide range of subjects and skills related to English language arts/literacy and mathematics. The syllabus may cover:

- reading comprehension and analysis
- Writing skills, including argumentative, informative, and narrative writing
- Vocabulary development and use
- Speaking and listening skills
- Mathematical concepts and procedures
- Algebraic thinking and problem solving
- Geometry and measurement
- Data analysis and statistics
- Mathematical modeling

It's important for students and educators to consult the official Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium resources, including test blueprints and practice tests, to obtain the most accurate and up-to-date information on the specific content and skills assessed in SBAC exams at their grade level.
Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium
Certification-Board Assessment approach

Other Certification-Board exams

BCBA Board Certification in Business Valuation (BCBA)
CDL Commercial Drivers License
DMV Driver Motor Vehicle
FSOT Foreign Service Officer Test
ICTS Illinois Certification Testing System
ISEE Independent School Entrance Examination
MTEL Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure
NCE National Counselor
SBAC Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium
STAAR State of Texas Assessments ofAcademic Readiness
BCB-Analyst Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA)
ABCTE American Board for Certification of Teacher Excellence Exam
ABFM Family Medicine Board Certification Exam
ABPN-VNE American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology - Vascular Neurology Exam
CSLE National-Interstate Council Cosmetology Licensing Exam
NAB-NHA Nursing Home Administrator (NAB)
NCC Certified in NeuroCritical Care (ABEM)
NLN-PAX Nursing School Entrance Test
NRP Nationally Registered Paramedics (EMT)
RACP Royal Australasian College of Physicians test (FRACP)
TCRN Trauma Certified Registered Nurse Exam

killexams.com is the latest preparation source for passing the SBAC SBAC exam. We have cautiously complied and assembled actual test questions and answers, which are up to date with the equal frequency as real test is updated, and reviewed by means of enterprise specialists. Huge Discount Coupon and Promo codes are offered.
SBAC Dumps
SBAC Braindumps
SBAC Real Questions
SBAC Practice Test
SBAC dumps free
Certification-Board
SBAC
Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium
http://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/SBAC
Question: 100
Although some pet owners feel that spaying or neutering their pets is unnecessary, it actually gives pets the chance for
a longer and healthier life. Pets who are spayed or neutered do not have to endure the stress of going into heat and
looking for a mate. Spaying or neutering your pet also helps drop the number of unwanted pets living in shelters or on
the streets.
People who are against the idea of spaying and neutering argue that the animals don’t have a say in the process and we
are taking away their “rights” to reproduce. Others suggest that spaying or neutering may change their pet’s
personality. Animal experts and pet care professionals have debunked both of these arguments and support spaying
and neutering as one of the most responsible actions a pet owner can take.
A student is writing a persuasive speech for his speech class about the value of spaying and neutering pets. Read the
attached paragraphs from the student’s draft and complete this task:
What are more concrete or specific words to replace the three underlined words/phrases in the text? Choose the best
answer.
A . lessen, proponents, affect
B . stabilize, adversaries, transform
C . reduce, opponents, alter
D . improve, patrons, redesign
Answer: C
Question: 101
A student is writing an informational essay about the impact of global warming on polar bears in the Arctic.
As climate change and the effects of global warming are felt worldwide, scientists have determined that polar bears in
the Arctic are just one of the many species facing extinction from our rapidly warming planet. As the ocean waters
warm, the main food source for the bears is disappearing. Shortages of food are literally causing these creatures to die
of starvation.
Whereas bears could previously walk out onto the sea ice and wait for a seal to poke its snout through, shrinking sea
ice means the bears must now walk or swim much farther than they did before to find food. These longer migrations to
find food are taking their toll on the bear population.
Seals are a polar bear’s main source of protein. They are also another victim of global warming. With the sea ice
melting earlier in the warmer springtime and forming later in the warmer winters, seals struggle with finding a safe
place to raise their pups. As a result, their numbers are starting to drop, meaning they are also no longer a plentiful
food source for the bears
Read the attached passage and then answer this question about it. Choose the transition sentence that would improve
the links between the first and the second paragraph.
A . Polar bears are not the only ones having a difficult time finding food.
B . There are many reasons why the polar bears are starving.
C . Polar bears are having a difficult time finding food.
D . Scientists suggest that climate change is a result of the Earth’s natural cycle of heating exacerbated by man-made
causes.
Answer: A
Question: 102
What is a better way to write this sentence? “Me and Alex went to the movies last weekend and saw a great film by
our favorite director Steven Spielberg.”
A . “Alex and me went to the movies last weekend and saw a great film by our favorite director: Steven Spielberg.”
B . “To see a great film by our favorite director: Steven Spielberg, Alex and me went to the movies last weekend.”
C . “Alex and I went to the movies last weekend and saw a great film by our favorite director, Steven Spielberg.”
D . “Steven Spielberg is mine’s and Alex’s favorite director, so we went to the movies last weekend to see a movie by
him.”
Answer: C
Question: 103
Read the text attached.
Workplace Diversity
The twenty-first century workplace features much greater diversity than was common even a couple of generations
ago. Individuals who might once have faced employment challenges because of religious beliefs, ability differences, or
sexual orientation now regularly join their peers in interview pools and on the job. Each may bring a new outlook and
different information to the table; employees can no longer take for granted that their coworkers think the same way
they do. This pushes them to question their own assumptions, expand their understanding, and appreciate alternate
viewpoints. The result is more creative ideas, approaches, and solutions. Thus, diversity may also enhance corporate
decision-making.
Communicating with those who differ from us may require us to make an extra effort and even change our viewpoint,
but it leads to better collaboration and more favorable outcomes overall, according to David Rock, director of the
Neuro-Leadership Institute in New York City, who says diverse coworkers “challenge their own and others’
thinking.”2 According to the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), organizational diversity now
includes more than just racial, gender, and religious differences. It also encompasses different thinking styles and
personality types, as well as other factors such as physical and cognitive abilities and sexual orientation, all of which
influence the way people perceive the world. “Finding the right mix of individuals to work on teams, and creating the
conditions in which they can excel, are key business goals for today’s leaders, given that collaboration has become a
paradigm of the twenty-first century workplace,” according to an SHRM article.3
Attracting workers who are not all alike is an important first step in the process of achieving
greater diversity. However, managers cannot stop there. Their goals must also encompass inclusion, or the engagement
of all employees in the corporate culture. “The far bigger challenge is how people interact with each other once they’re
on the job,” says Howard J. Ross, founder and chief learning officer at Cook Ross, a consulting firm specializing in
diversity. “Diversity is being invited to the party; inclusion is being asked to dance. Diversity is about the ingredients,
the mix of people and perspectives. Inclusion is about the containerCthe place that allows employees to feel they
belong, to feel both accepted and different.”4
Workplace diversity is not a new policy idea; its origins date back to at least the passage of the Civil Rights Act of
1964 (CRA) or before. Census figures show that women made up less than 29 percent of the civilian workforce when
Congress passed Title VII of the CRA prohibiting workplace discrimination. After passage of the law, gender diversity
in the workplace expanded significantly. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the percentage of
women in the labor force increased from 48 percent in 1977 to a peak of 60 percent in 1999. Over the last five years,
the percentage has held relatively steady at 57 percent. Over the past forty years, the total number of women in the
labor force has risen from 41 million in 1977 to 71 million in 2017.5 The BLS projects that the number of women in
the U.S. labor force will reach 92 million in 2050 (an increase that far outstrips population growth).
The statistical data show a similar trend for African American, Asian American, and Hispanic workers (Figure 8.2).
Just before passage of the CRA in 1964, the percentages of minorities in the official on-the-books workforce were
relatively small compared with their representation in the total population. In 1966, Asians accounted for just 0.5
percent of private-sector employment, with Hispanics at 2.5 percent and African Americans at 8.2 percent. 6 However,
Hispanic employment numbers have significantly increased since the CRA became law; they are expected to more than
double from 15 percent in 2010 to 30 percent of the labor force in 2050. Similarly, Asian Americans are projected to
increase their share from 5 to 8 percent between 2010 and 2050.
Figure 8.2
There is a distinct contrast in workforce demographics between 2010 and projected numbers for 2050. (credit:
attribution: Copyright Rice University, OpenStax, under CC BY 4.0 license)
Much more progress remains to be made, however. For example, many people think of the technology sector as the
workplace of open-minded millennials. Yet Google, as one example of a large and successful company, revealed in its
latest diversity statistics that its progress toward a more inclusive workforce may be steady but it is very slow. Men
still account for the great majority of employees at the corporation; only about 30 percent are women, and women fill
fewer than 20 percent of Google’s technical roles (Figure 8.3). The company has shown a similar lack of gender
diversity in leadership roles, where women hold fewer than 25 percent of positions. Despite modest progress, an
ocean-sized gap remains to be narrowed. When it comes to ethnicity, approximately 56 percent of Google employees
are white. About 35 percent are Asian, 3.5 percent are Latino, and 2.4 percent are black, and of the company’s
management and leadership roles, 68 percent are held by whites.
Figure 8.3
Google is emblematic of the technology sector, and this graphic shows just how far from equality and diversity the
industry remains. (credit: attribution: Copyright Rice University, OpenStax, under CC BY 4.0 license)
Google is not alone in coming up short on diversity. Recruiting and hiring a diverse workforce has been a challenge
for most major technology companies, including Facebook, Apple, and Yahoo (now owned by Verizon); all have
reported gender and ethnic shortfalls in their workforces.
The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has made available 2014 data comparing the participation of
women and minorities in the high-technology sector with their participation in U.S. private-sector employment overall,
and the results show the technology sector still lags.8 Compared with all private-sector industries, the high-technology
industry employs a larger share of whites (68.5%), Asian Americans (14%), and men (64%), and a smaller share of
African Americans (7.4%), Latinos (8%), and women (36%). Whites also represent a much higher share of those in the
executive category (83.3%), whereas other groups hold a significantly lower share, including African Americans (2%),
Latinos (3.1%), and Asian Americans (10.6%). In addition, and perhaps not surprisingly, 80 percent of executives are
men and only 20 percent are women. This compares negatively with all other private-sector industries, in which 70
percent of executives are men and 30 percent women.
Technology companies are generally not trying to hide the problem. Many have been publicly releasing diversity
statistics since 2014, and they have been vocal about their intentions to close diversity gaps. More than thirty
technology companies, including Intel, Spotify, Lyft, Airbnb, and Pinterest, each signed a written pledge to increase
workforce diversity and inclusion, and Google pledged to spend more than $100 million to address diversity issues.9
Diversity and inclusion are positive steps for business organizations, and despite their sometimes slow pace, the
majority are moving in the right direction. Diversity strengthens the company’s internal relationships with employees
and improves employee morale, as well as its external relationships with customer groups. Communication, a core
value of most successful businesses, becomes more effective with a diverse workforce. Performance improves for
multiple reasons, not the least of which is that acknowledging diversity and respecting differences is the ethical thing
to do.
According to the attached passage, which of these statements is not true about diversity and inclusion in the
workplace?
A . Workplace diversity is an idea that is new to the twenty-first century corporate world and has gained more attention
since the turn of the millennium.
B . Workplace diversity can increase creativity and enhance employee morale.
C . Workplace diversity and increased inclusion can be challenging for companies to institute.
D . Workplace diversity also requires workplace inclusion, where all employees are able to access and engage in the
company’s culture and feel like valuable members of the corporate “team.”
Answer: A
Question: 104
A student is writing a biography about a person she considers to be the most influential person of the twentieth
century. She would like to conduct more research to find resources to include in her essay.
Which two sites are the least likely to offer her reliable, factual information she can use in her biographical essay?
Site 1: The Smithsonian Institution website: www.si.edu
Site 2: The blog post of a Hollywood insider: www.insidehw.com
Site 3: The Public Broadcasting Service website: www.pbs.org
Site 4: The archives of the National Library: www.nlb.gov
Site 5: The top 10 most influential people list: www.people.com
A . sites 1 and 5
B . sites 1 and 3
C . sites 2 and 4
D . sites 2 and 5
Answer: D
Question: 105
Read the text attached.
Workplace Diversity
The twenty-first century workplace features much greater diversity than was common even a couple of generations
ago. Individuals who might once have faced employment challenges because of religious beliefs, ability differences, or
sexual orientation now regularly join their peers in interview pools and on the job. Each may bring a new outlook and
different information to the table; employees can no longer take for granted that their coworkers think the same way
they do. This pushes them to question their own assumptions, expand their understanding, and appreciate alternate
viewpoints. The result is more creative ideas, approaches, and solutions. Thus, diversity may also enhance corporate
decision-making.
Communicating with those who differ from us may require us to make an extra effort and even change our viewpoint,
but it leads to better collaboration and more favorable outcomes overall, according to David Rock, director of the
Neuro-Leadership Institute in New York City, who says diverse coworkers “challenge their own and others’
thinking.”2 According to the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), organizational diversity now
includes more than just racial, gender, and religious differences. It also encompasses different thinking styles and
personality types, as well as other factors such as physical and cognitive abilities and sexual orientation, all of which
influence the way people perceive the world. “Finding the right mix of individuals to work on teams, and creating the
conditions in which they can excel, are key business goals for today’s leaders, given that collaboration has become a
paradigm of the twenty-first century workplace,” according to an SHRM article.3
Attracting workers who are not all alike is an important first step in the process of achieving
greater diversity. However, managers cannot stop there. Their goals must also encompass inclusion, or the engagement
of all employees in the corporate culture. “The far bigger challenge is how people interact with each other once they’re
on the job,” says Howard J. Ross, founder and chief learning officer at Cook Ross, a consulting firm specializing in
diversity. “Diversity is being invited to the party; inclusion is being asked to dance. Diversity is about the ingredients,
the mix of people and perspectives. Inclusion is about the containerCthe place that allows employees to feel they
belong, to feel both accepted and different.”4
Workplace diversity is not a new policy idea; its origins date back to at least the passage of the Civil Rights Act of
1964 (CRA) or before. Census figures show that women made up less than 29 percent of the civilian workforce when
Congress passed Title VII of the CRA prohibiting workplace discrimination. After passage of the law, gender diversity
in the workplace expanded significantly. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the percentage of
women in the labor force increased from 48 percent in 1977 to a peak of 60 percent in 1999. Over the last five years,
the percentage has held relatively steady at 57 percent. Over the past forty years, the total number of women in the
labor force has risen from 41 million in 1977 to 71 million in 2017.5 The BLS projects that the number of women in
the U.S. labor force will reach 92 million in 2050 (an increase that far outstrips population growth).
The statistical data show a similar trend for African American, Asian American, and Hispanic workers (Figure 8.2).
Just before passage of the CRA in 1964, the percentages of minorities in the official on-the-books workforce were
relatively small compared with their representation in the total population. In 1966, Asians accounted for just 0.5
percent of private-sector employment, with Hispanics at 2.5 percent and African Americans at 8.2 percent. 6 However,
Hispanic employment numbers have significantly increased since the CRA became law; they are expected to more than
double from 15 percent in 2010 to 30 percent of the labor force in 2050. Similarly, Asian Americans are projected to
increase their share from 5 to 8 percent between 2010 and 2050.
Figure 8.2
There is a distinct contrast in workforce demographics between 2010 and projected numbers for 2050. (credit:
attribution: Copyright Rice University, OpenStax, under CC BY 4.0 license)
Much more progress remains to be made, however. For example, many people think of the technology sector as the
workplace of open-minded millennials. Yet Google, as one example of a large and successful company, revealed in its
latest diversity statistics that its progress toward a more inclusive workforce may be steady but it is very slow. Men
still account for the great majority of employees at the corporation; only about 30 percent are women, and women fill
fewer than 20 percent of Google’s technical roles (Figure 8.3). The company has shown a similar lack of gender
diversity in leadership roles, where women hold fewer than 25 percent of positions. Despite modest progress, an
ocean-sized gap remains to be narrowed. When it comes to ethnicity, approximately 56 percent of Google employees
are white. About 35 percent are Asian, 3.5 percent are Latino, and 2.4 percent are black, and of the company’s
management and leadership roles, 68 percent are held by whites.
Figure 8.3
Google is emblematic of the technology sector, and this graphic shows just how far from equality and diversity the
industry remains. (credit: attribution: Copyright Rice University, OpenStax, under CC BY 4.0 license)
Google is not alone in coming up short on diversity. Recruiting and hiring a diverse workforce has been a challenge
for most major technology companies, including Facebook, Apple, and Yahoo (now owned by Verizon); all have
reported gender and ethnic shortfalls in their workforces.
The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has made available 2014 data comparing the participation of
women and minorities in the high-technology sector with their participation in U.S. private-sector employment overall,
and the results show the technology sector still lags.8 Compared with all private-sector industries, the high-technology
industry employs a larger share of whites (68.5%), Asian Americans (14%), and men (64%), and a smaller share of
African Americans (7.4%), Latinos (8%), and women (36%). Whites also represent a much higher share of those in the
executive category (83.3%), whereas other groups hold a significantly lower share, including African Americans (2%),
Latinos (3.1%), and Asian Americans (10.6%). In addition, and perhaps not surprisingly, 80 percent of executives are
men and only 20 percent are women. This compares negatively with all other private-sector industries, in which 70
percent of executives are men and 30 percent women.
Technology companies are generally not trying to hide the problem. Many have been publicly releasing diversity
statistics since 2014, and they have been vocal about their intentions to close diversity gaps. More than thirty
technology companies, including Intel, Spotify, Lyft, Airbnb, and Pinterest, each signed a written pledge to increase
workforce diversity and inclusion, and Google pledged to spend more than $100 million to address diversity issues.9
Diversity and inclusion are positive steps for business organizations, and despite their sometimes slow pace, the
majority are moving in the right direction. Diversity strengthens the company’s internal relationships with employees
and improves employee morale, as well as its external relationships with customer groups. Communication, a core
value of most successful businesses, becomes more effective with a diverse workforce. Performance improves for
multiple reasons, not the least of which is that acknowledging diversity and respecting differences is the ethical thing
to do.
According to the attached passage, which of these statements is not true about diversity and inclusion in the
workplace?
A . Workplace diversity is an idea that is new to the twenty-first century corporate world and has gained more attention
since the turn of the millennium.
B . Workplace diversity can increase creativity and enhance employee morale.
C . Workplace diversity and increased inclusion can be challenging for companies to institute.
D . Workplace diversity also requires workplace inclusion, where all employees are able to access and engage in the
company’s culture and feel like valuable members of the corporate “team.”
Answer: A
Question: 106
Read the text attached.
Workplace Diversity
The twenty-first century workplace features much greater diversity than was common even a couple of generations
ago. Individuals who might once have faced employment challenges because of religious beliefs, ability differences, or
sexual orientation now regularly join their peers in interview pools and on the job. Each may bring a new outlook and
different information to the table; employees can no longer take for granted that their coworkers think the same way
they do. This pushes them to question their own assumptions, expand their understanding, and appreciate alternate
viewpoints. The result is more creative ideas, approaches, and solutions. Thus, diversity may also enhance corporate
decision-making.
Communicating with those who differ from us may require us to make an extra effort and even change our viewpoint,
but it leads to better collaboration and more favorable outcomes overall, according to David Rock, director of the
Neuro-Leadership Institute in New York City, who says diverse coworkers “challenge their own and others’
thinking.”2 According to the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), organizational diversity now
includes more than just racial, gender, and religious differences. It also encompasses different thinking styles and
personality types, as well as other factors such as physical and cognitive abilities and sexual orientation, all of which
influence the way people perceive the world. “Finding the right mix of individuals to work on teams, and creating the
conditions in which they can excel, are key business goals for today’s leaders, given that collaboration has become a
paradigm of the twenty-first century workplace,” according to an SHRM article.3
Attracting workers who are not all alike is an important first step in the process of achieving
greater diversity. However, managers cannot stop there. Their goals must also encompass inclusion, or the engagement
of all employees in the corporate culture. “The far bigger challenge is how people interact with each other once they’re
on the job,” says Howard J. Ross, founder and chief learning officer at Cook Ross, a consulting firm specializing in
diversity. “Diversity is being invited to the party; inclusion is being asked to dance. Diversity is about the ingredients,
the mix of people and perspectives. Inclusion is about the containerCthe place that allows employees to feel they
belong, to feel both accepted and different.”4
Workplace diversity is not a new policy idea; its origins date back to at least the passage of the Civil Rights Act of
1964 (CRA) or before. Census figures show that women made up less than 29 percent of the civilian workforce when
Congress passed Title VII of the CRA prohibiting workplace discrimination. After passage of the law, gender diversity
in the workplace expanded significantly. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the percentage of
women in the labor force increased from 48 percent in 1977 to a peak of 60 percent in 1999. Over the last five years,
the percentage has held relatively steady at 57 percent. Over the past forty years, the total number of women in the
labor force has risen from 41 million in 1977 to 71 million in 2017.5 The BLS projects that the number of women in
the U.S. labor force will reach 92 million in 2050 (an increase that far outstrips population growth).
The statistical data show a similar trend for African American, Asian American, and Hispanic workers (Figure 8.2).
Just before passage of the CRA in 1964, the percentages of minorities in the official on-the-books workforce were
relatively small compared with their representation in the total population. In 1966, Asians accounted for just 0.5
percent of private-sector employment, with Hispanics at 2.5 percent and African Americans at 8.2 percent. 6 However,
Hispanic employment numbers have significantly increased since the CRA became law; they are expected to more than
double from 15 percent in 2010 to 30 percent of the labor force in 2050. Similarly, Asian Americans are projected to
increase their share from 5 to 8 percent between 2010 and 2050.
Figure 8.2
There is a distinct contrast in workforce demographics between 2010 and projected numbers for 2050. (credit:
attribution: Copyright Rice University, OpenStax, under CC BY 4.0 license)
Much more progress remains to be made, however. For example, many people think of the technology sector as the
workplace of open-minded millennials. Yet Google, as one example of a large and successful company, revealed in its
latest diversity statistics that its progress toward a more inclusive workforce may be steady but it is very slow. Men
still account for the great majority of employees at the corporation; only about 30 percent are women, and women fill
fewer than 20 percent of Google’s technical roles (Figure 8.3). The company has shown a similar lack of gender
diversity in leadership roles, where women hold fewer than 25 percent of positions. Despite modest progress, an
ocean-sized gap remains to be narrowed. When it comes to ethnicity, approximately 56 percent of Google employees
are white. About 35 percent are Asian, 3.5 percent are Latino, and 2.4 percent are black, and of the company’s
management and leadership roles, 68 percent are held by whites.
Figure 8.3
Google is emblematic of the technology sector, and this graphic shows just how far from equality and diversity the
industry remains. (credit: attribution: Copyright Rice University, OpenStax, under CC BY 4.0 license)
Google is not alone in coming up short on diversity. Recruiting and hiring a diverse workforce has been a challenge
for most major technology companies, including Facebook, Apple, and Yahoo (now owned by Verizon); all have
reported gender and ethnic shortfalls in their workforces.
The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has made available 2014 data comparing the participation of
women and minorities in the high-technology sector with their participation in U.S. private-sector employment overall,
and the results show the technology sector still lags.8 Compared with all private-sector industries, the high-technology
industry employs a larger share of whites (68.5%), Asian Americans (14%), and men (64%), and a smaller share of
African Americans (7.4%), Latinos (8%), and women (36%). Whites also represent a much higher share of those in the
executive category (83.3%), whereas other groups hold a significantly lower share, including African Americans (2%),
Latinos (3.1%), and Asian Americans (10.6%). In addition, and perhaps not surprisingly, 80 percent of executives are
men and only 20 percent are women. This compares negatively with all other private-sector industries, in which 70
percent of executives are men and 30 percent women.
Technology companies are generally not trying to hide the problem. Many have been publicly releasing diversity
statistics since 2014, and they have been vocal about their intentions to close diversity gaps. More than thirty
technology companies, including Intel, Spotify, Lyft, Airbnb, and Pinterest, each signed a written pledge to increase
workforce diversity and inclusion, and Google pledged to spend more than $100 million to address diversity issues.9
Diversity and inclusion are positive steps for business organizations, and despite their sometimes slow pace, the
majority are moving in the right direction. Diversity strengthens the company’s internal relationships with employees
and improves employee morale, as well as its external relationships with customer groups. Communication, a core
value of most successful businesses, becomes more effective with a diverse workforce. Performance improves for
multiple reasons, not the least of which is that acknowledging diversity and respecting differences is the ethical thing
to do.
According to the attached passage, which of these statements is not true about diversity and inclusion in the
workplace?
A . Workplace diversity is an idea that is new to the twenty-first century corporate world and has gained more attention
since the turn of the millennium.
B . Workplace diversity can increase creativity and enhance employee morale.
C . Workplace diversity and increased inclusion can be challenging for companies to institute.
D . Workplace diversity also requires workplace inclusion, where all employees are able to access and engage in the
company’s culture and feel like valuable members of the corporate “team.”
Answer: A
Question: 107
A student is writing an informational essay about the impact of global warming on polar bears in the Arctic.
As climate change and the effects of global warming are felt worldwide, scientists have determined that polar bears in
the Arctic are just one of the many species facing extinction from our rapidly warming planet. As the ocean waters
warm, the main food source for the bears is disappearing. Shortages of food are literally causing these creatures to die
of starvation.
Whereas bears could previously walk out onto the sea ice and wait for a seal to poke its snout through, shrinking sea
ice means the bears must now walk or swim much farther than they did before to find food. These longer migrations to
find food are taking their toll on the bear population.
Seals are a polar bear’s main source of protein. They are also another victim of global warming. With the sea ice
melting earlier in the warmer springtime and forming later in the warmer winters, seals struggle with finding a safe
place to raise their pups. As a result, their numbers are starting to drop, meaning they are also no longer a plentiful
food source for the bears
Read the attached passage and then answer this question about it. You are asked to help a student with his conclusion
for the attached essay. Which would be the best conclusion option he should use?
A . The effects of global warming and climate change are seen in a chain-reaction in nature. The melting of the ice
creates a struggle for the seals as they seek a safe place to raise their young, and with fewer seals that are more
difficult to find the polar bears are starving. The ecosystem is all interrelated and global warming shows us just how
delicate a balance it is.
B . Polar bears find themselves in a battle with humans over their main food source. With locals killing seals for food
and fur, the polar bears are finding it more and more difficult to hunt. We must enact stricter hunting regulations to
save the seals, which will, in turn help to save the polar bears.
C . Before the majestic animals of the Arctic become extinct, people must work hard to drop their greenhouse gas
emissions, including driving less and recycling more. Only by reversing the damaging effects of greenhouse gasses can
the animals of the Artic be saved. We much step up and do our part to help save the planet.
D . Scientists are still working to understand the effects of global warming and climate change. In Australia, as climate
change sparks huge and destructive wildfires, the eucalyptus trees native to the area are being destroyed. This, in turn,
has a huge impact on another bear, the koala bear.
Answer: A
Question: 108
There are 125 adults and children attending a movie in a theatre. The cost for an adult to attend the movie is $5.75 and
a child pays 3.50. The theatre raised $617.50 in total sales for the movie.
If a represents the number of adults and c represents the number of children that attend the movie, which of the
following systems of equations can be used to find the number of adults and children that attended the movie?
A . a + c = 125 5.75a + 3.50 c = 617.50
B . 5.75a + 3.50c = 125 a + c = 617.50
C . a + c = 125 3.50a + 5.75c = 617.50
D . a + c = 617.50 3.50a + 5.75c = 125
Answer: A
Question: 109
Read the text attached.
Study Suggests Today’s US Students Are Less Efficient Readers
Do today’s students perform better than their peers in 1960? Given the advances in education and technology, it would
be natural to assume that the answer is a resounding “yes.” But, when it comes to reading efficiency, new research
suggests that that’s not the case. The research, published by the International Literacy Association, compares the
comprehension-based silent reading efficiency of US students (grades 2C12) in 2011 with data collected in 1960. A
key finding was that students fall further behind as they advance through the grades, wrote Alexandra Spichtig, Ph.D.,
Chief Resource Officer of reading Plus, and first author of the study. The study showed that today’s second-grade
students are comparable to their peers of 50 years ago, but that by the end of high school, students’ comprehension-
based silent reading rates average 19 percent slower than the rates of their 1960 peers. “What we know C and the data
underscore this C is that for many students, the progression to efficient silent reading does not develop naturally. Many
students need structured silent reading instruction,” explains Mark Taylor, Chief Executive Officer of reading Plus, a
web-based silent reading program for schools. Some of the benefits of implementing silent reading instruction at home
or in school are: expanded vocabulary, improved comprehension, increased efficiency, enhanced reading enjoyment,
[and] improved writing skills. Experts agree that without extensive silent reading practices in the classroom or at home,
students will continue to struggle and literacy rates will continue to fall short or fall behind. “Effective reading
instruction must integrate fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension practice tailored to meet each student’s unique
needs. This study demonstrates that as long as structured silent reading practice is neglected in this country, the literacy
problem is likely to continue,” Taylor adds. While researchers can’t pinpoint reasons for the decline in silent reading
efficiency from that of 50 years ago, it stands to reason that those students who engage in structured silent reading
practice become more efficient readers and take with them a love of books that lasts far past their high school
graduation.
A student plans to use the attached text to write an argument paper about the need for increased reading instruction in
school. Which three of the following sources would provide the best and most credible information she might also use?
Source 1: A chart showing the reading assessment scores of students in grades 2-12 over the past 25 years.
Source 2: A blog written by a 4th grade teacher about his experiences with student readers over his 15 year teaching
career.
Source 3: A map showing the states with the lowest reading comprehension scores.
Source 4: A research paper about learning disabilities in early childhood.
Source 5: A study on the impact of budget cuts on classroom instruction.
Source 6: A newspaper article about the reading demands required by employers and their disappointment in the
reading skills of the next generation of employees.
A . sources 1, 2, and 6
B . sources 1, 3, and 6
C . sources 2, 5 and 6
D . sources 3, 4, and 5
Answer: A
Question: 110
Read the text attached.
Workplace Diversity
The twenty-first century workplace features much greater diversity than was common even a couple of generations
ago. Individuals who might once have faced employment challenges because of religious beliefs, ability differences, or
sexual orientation now regularly join their peers in interview pools and on the job. Each may bring a new outlook and
different information to the table; employees can no longer take for granted that their coworkers think the same way
they do. This pushes them to question their own assumptions, expand their understanding, and appreciate alternate
viewpoints. The result is more creative ideas, approaches, and solutions. Thus, diversity may also enhance corporate
decision-making.
Communicating with those who differ from us may require us to make an extra effort and even change our viewpoint,
but it leads to better collaboration and more favorable outcomes overall, according to David Rock, director of the
Neuro-Leadership Institute in New York City, who says diverse coworkers “challenge their own and others’
thinking.”2 According to the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), organizational diversity now
includes more than just racial, gender, and religious differences. It also encompasses different thinking styles and
personality types, as well as other factors such as physical and cognitive abilities and sexual orientation, all of which
influence the way people perceive the world. “Finding the right mix of individuals to work on teams, and creating the
conditions in which they can excel, are key business goals for today’s leaders, given that collaboration has become a
paradigm of the twenty-first century workplace,” according to an SHRM article.3
Attracting workers who are not all alike is an important first step in the process of achieving
greater diversity. However, managers cannot stop there. Their goals must also encompass inclusion, or the engagement
of all employees in the corporate culture. “The far bigger challenge is how people interact with each other once they’re
on the job,” says Howard J. Ross, founder and chief learning officer at Cook Ross, a consulting firm specializing in
diversity. “Diversity is being invited to the party; inclusion is being asked to dance. Diversity is about the ingredients,
the mix of people and perspectives. Inclusion is about the containerCthe place that allows employees to feel they
belong, to feel both accepted and different.”4
Workplace diversity is not a new policy idea; its origins date back to at least the passage of the Civil Rights Act of
1964 (CRA) or before. Census figures show that women made up less than 29 percent of the civilian workforce when
Congress passed Title VII of the CRA prohibiting workplace discrimination. After passage of the law, gender diversity
in the workplace expanded significantly. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the percentage of
women in the labor force increased from 48 percent in 1977 to a peak of 60 percent in 1999. Over the last five years,
the percentage has held relatively steady at 57 percent. Over the past forty years, the total number of women in the
labor force has risen from 41 million in 1977 to 71 million in 2017.5 The BLS projects that the number of women in
the U.S. labor force will reach 92 million in 2050 (an increase that far outstrips population growth).
The statistical data show a similar trend for African American, Asian American, and Hispanic workers (Figure 8.2).
Just before passage of the CRA in 1964, the percentages of minorities in the official on-the-books workforce were
relatively small compared with their representation in the total population. In 1966, Asians accounted for just 0.5
percent of private-sector employment, with Hispanics at 2.5 percent and African Americans at 8.2 percent. 6 However,
Hispanic employment numbers have significantly increased since the CRA became law; they are expected to more than
double from 15 percent in 2010 to 30 percent of the labor force in 2050. Similarly, Asian Americans are projected to
increase their share from 5 to 8 percent between 2010 and 2050.
Figure 8.2
There is a distinct contrast in workforce demographics between 2010 and projected numbers for 2050. (credit:
attribution: Copyright Rice University, OpenStax, under CC BY 4.0 license)
Much more progress remains to be made, however. For example, many people think of the technology sector as the
workplace of open-minded millennials. Yet Google, as one example of a large and successful company, revealed in its
latest diversity statistics that its progress toward a more inclusive workforce may be steady but it is very slow. Men
still account for the great majority of employees at the corporation; only about 30 percent are women, and women fill
fewer than 20 percent of Google’s technical roles (Figure 8.3). The company has shown a similar lack of gender
diversity in leadership roles, where women hold fewer than 25 percent of positions. Despite modest progress, an
ocean-sized gap remains to be narrowed. When it comes to ethnicity, approximately 56 percent of Google employees
are white. About 35 percent are Asian, 3.5 percent are Latino, and 2.4 percent are black, and of the company’s
management and leadership roles, 68 percent are held by whites.
Figure 8.3
Google is emblematic of the technology sector, and this graphic shows just how far from equality and diversity the
industry remains. (credit: attribution: Copyright Rice University, OpenStax, under CC BY 4.0 license)
Google is not alone in coming up short on diversity. Recruiting and hiring a diverse workforce has been a challenge
for most major technology companies, including Facebook, Apple, and Yahoo (now owned by Verizon); all have
reported gender and ethnic shortfalls in their workforces.
The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has made available 2014 data comparing the participation of
women and minorities in the high-technology sector with their participation in U.S. private-sector employment overall,
and the results show the technology sector still lags.8 Compared with all private-sector industries, the high-technology
industry employs a larger share of whites (68.5%), Asian Americans (14%), and men (64%), and a smaller share of
African Americans (7.4%), Latinos (8%), and women (36%). Whites also represent a much higher share of those in the
executive category (83.3%), whereas other groups hold a significantly lower share, including African Americans (2%),
Latinos (3.1%), and Asian Americans (10.6%). In addition, and perhaps not surprisingly, 80 percent of executives are
men and only 20 percent are women. This compares negatively with all other private-sector industries, in which 70
percent of executives are men and 30 percent women.
Technology companies are generally not trying to hide the problem. Many have been publicly releasing diversity
statistics since 2014, and they have been vocal about their intentions to close diversity gaps. More than thirty
technology companies, including Intel, Spotify, Lyft, Airbnb, and Pinterest, each signed a written pledge to increase
workforce diversity and inclusion, and Google pledged to spend more than $100 million to address diversity issues.9
Diversity and inclusion are positive steps for business organizations, and despite their sometimes slow pace, the
majority are moving in the right direction. Diversity strengthens the company’s internal relationships with employees
and improves employee morale, as well as its external relationships with customer groups. Communication, a core
value of most successful businesses, becomes more effective with a diverse workforce. Performance improves for
multiple reasons, not the least of which is that acknowledging diversity and respecting differences is the ethical thing
to do.
According to the attached passage, which of these statements is not true about diversity and inclusion in the
workplace?
A . Workplace diversity is an idea that is new to the twenty-first century corporate world and has gained more attention
since the turn of the millennium.
B . Workplace diversity can increase creativity and enhance employee morale.
C . Workplace diversity and increased inclusion can be challenging for companies to institute.
D . Workplace diversity also requires workplace inclusion, where all employees are able to access and engage in the
company’s culture and feel like valuable members of the corporate “team.”
Answer: A
For More exams visit https://killexams.com/vendors-exam-list
Kill your test at First Attempt....Guaranteed!

Certification-Board Assessment approach - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/SBAC Search results Certification-Board Assessment approach - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/SBAC https://killexams.com/exam_list/Certification-Board New Cardiology Certification Board: What's the Plan?

The proposal by the major cardiovascular societies in the US to form a new board of cardiovascular medicine to manage initial and ongoing certification of cardiologists represents something of a revolution in the field of continuing medical education and assessment of competency. 

Five US cardiovascular societies — the American College of Cardiology (ACC), the American Heart Association (AHA), the Heart Failure Society of America (HFSA), the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), and the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography & Interventions (SCAI) — have now joined forces to propose a new professional certification board for cardiovascular medicine, to be known as the American Board of Cardiovascular Medicine (ABCVM). 

The ABCVM would be independent of the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM), the current organization providing maintenance of certification for cardiologists as well as many other internal medicine subspecialties. The ABIM's maintenance of certification process has been widely criticized for many years and has been described as "needlessly burdensome and expensive." 

The ABCVM is hoping to offer a more appropriate and supportive approach, according to Jeffrey Kuvin, MD, a trustee of the ACC, who has been heading up the working group to develop this plan. 

Kuvin, who is chair of the cardiology at Northwell Health, Manhasset, New York, a l arge academic healthcare system, explained that maintenance of certification has been a subject of discussion across the cardiovascular community for many years, and the ACC has a working group focused on the next steps for evaluation of competency, which he chairs.

"The subject of evaluation of competence has been on the mind of the ACC for many years and hence a work group was developed to focus on this," Kuvin noted. "A lot of evolution of the concepts and next steps have been drawn out of this working group. And now other cardiovascular societies have joined to show unification across the house of cardiology and that this is indeed the way that the cardiovascular profession should move." 

"Time to Separate from Internal Medicine"

The general concept behind the new cardiology board is to separate cardiology from the ABIM. 

"This is rooted from the concept that cardiology has evolved so much over the last few decades into such a large multidimensional specialty that it really does demarcate itself from internal medicine, and as such, it deserves a separate board governed by cardiologists with collaboration across the entirely of cardiology," Kuvin said. 

Cardiology has had significant growth and expansion of technology, tools, medications, and the approach to patients in many specialities and subspecialties, he added. "We have defined training programs in many different areas within cardiology; we have our own guidelines, our own competency statements, and in many cases, cardiology exists as its own department outside of medicine in many institutions. It's just time to separate cardiology from the umbrella of internal medicine." 

The new cardiology board would be separate from, and not report to, the ABIM; rather, it would report directly to the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS), the only recognized medical certification body in the US. 

What Are the Proposed Changes

Under the present system, managed by the ABIM, clinicians must undergo two stages of certification to be a cardiologist. First, they have to pass the initial certification test in general cardiology, and then exams in one of four subspecialties if they plan to enter one of these, including interventional cardiology, electrophysiology, advanced heart failure or adult congenital heart disease. 

Next, clinicians enter the maintenance of certification phase, which can take three different forms: 1) taking another recertification test every 10 years; 2) the collaborative maintenance pathway — a collaboration between ACC and ABIM, which includes evaluation, learning and a certified test each year; or 3) longitudinal knowledge and assessment — in which the program interacts with the clinician on an ongoing basis, sending secured questions regularly. 

All three of these pathways for maintenance of certification involve high stakes questions and a set bar for passing or failing. 

Under the proposed new cardiology board, an initial certification test would still be required after fellowship training, but the maintenance of certification process would be completely restructured, with the new approach taking the form of continuous learning and assessment of competency. 

"This is an iterative process, but we envision with a new American Board of Cardiovascular Medicine, we will pick up where the ABIM left off," Kuvin notes. "That includes an initial certifying examination for the five areas that already exist under the ABIM system but with the opportunities to expand that to further specialties as well."

He points out that there are several areas in cardiology that are currently not represented by these five areas that warrant some discussion, including multimodality imaging, vascular heart disease, and cardio-oncology. 

"At present, everybody has to pass the general cardiology test and then some may wish to further train and get certified in one of the other four other specific areas. But one subject that has been discussed over many years is how do we maintain competency in the areas in which clinicians practice over their lifetime as a cardiologist," Kuvin commented. 

He said the proposed cardiology board would like to adhere to some basic principles that are fundamental to the practice of medicine. 

"We want to make sure that we are practicing medicine so that our patients derive the most benefit from seeing a cardiologist," he said. "We also want to make sure, however, that this is a supportive process, supporting cardiologists to learn what they know and more importantly what they don't know; to identify knowledge gaps in specific area; to help the cardiologist fill those knowledge gaps; to acknowledge those gaps have been filled; and then move on to another area of interest. This will be the focus of this new and improved model of continuous competency."

The proposed new board also says it wants to make sure this is appropriate to the area in which the clinician is practicing.

"To take a closed book certified test every 10 years on the world of cardiology as happens at the current time – or the assessments conducted in the other two pathways – is often meaningless to the cardiologist," Kuvin says. "All three current pathways involve high stakes questions that are often irrelevant to one’s clinical practice." 

Lifelong Learning

"The crux of the changes we are proposing will be away from the focus of passing a test towards a model of helping the individual with their competency, with continuous learning and evaluation of competency to help the clinician fill in their knowledge gaps," he explains.

He described the new approach as "lifelong learning," adding that, instead of it being "a punitive pass/fail environment with no feedback, which causes a lot of discontent among clinicians," it will be a supportive process, where a clinician will be helped in filling their knowledge gaps. 

"I think this would be a welcome change not just for cardiology but across medical specialties," Kuvin said. 

He also pointed out the ABMS itself is considering a continuous competency approach, and the proposed new cardiology board aims to work with the ABMS to make sure that their goals of continuous competency assessment are matched. 

"The world has changed. The ability to access information has changed. It is no longer imperative for a clinician to have every piece of knowledge in their brain, but rather to know how to get knowledge and to incorporate that knowledge into clinical practice," Kuvin noted. "Competency should not involve knowledge alone as in a closed book exam. It is more about understanding the world that we live in, how to synthesize information, where we need to Strengthen knowledge and how to do that." 

Kuvin acknowledged that asking clinicians questions is a very helpful tool to identify their knowledge base and their knowledge gaps. "But we believe the clinician needs to be given resources – that could be a conference, an article, a simulation - to fill that knowledge gap. Then we could ask clinicians some different questions and if they get those right then we have provided a service." 

Tactile skills for cardiologists needing to perform procedures – such as interventionalists or electrophysiologists may be incorporated by simulation in a technology-based scenario.

On how often these assessments would take place, Kuvin said that hadn't been decided for sure. 

"We certainly do not think an assessment every 10 years is appropriate. We envision, instead of an episodic model, it will be rather a lifelong journey of education and competency. This will involve frequent contact and making sure knowledge gaps are being filled. There are criteria being set out by the ABMS that there should be a certain number of touch points with individuals on an annual as well as a 5-year basis to make sure cardiologists are staying within specific guardrails. The exact nature of these is yet to be determined," he said. 

Kuvin added that it was not known yet what sort of hours would be required but added that "this will not be a significant time burden."

What is the Timeframe?

The application to the ABMS for a separate cardiology board is still ongoing and has not yet received formal acceptance. Representatives from the five US cardiovascular societies are in the initial stages of formulating a transition board. 

"The submission to the ABMS will take time for them to review. This could take up to a year or so," Kuvin estimates. 

This is the first time the ABMS has entertained the concept of a new board in many years, he noted. "It will be a paradigm shift for the whole country. I think that cardiology is really at the forefront and in a position where we can actually do this. If cardiovascular medicine is granted a new board, I think this will help change the approach of how physicians are assessed in terms of continuous competency not just in cardiology but across all specialties of medicine."

He added: "We are confident that we can work within the construct of the ABMS guidelines that have been revised to be much more holistic in the approach of continuous competence across the board. This includes thinking beyond rote medical knowledge and thinking about the clinician as a whole and their abilities to communicate, act professionally, work within a complex medical system, utilize medical resources effectively. These all have to be part of continuous competence."

How Much Will This Cost?

Noting that the ABIM has received criticism over the costs of the certification process, Kuvin said they intend to make this "as lean a machine as possible with the focus on reducing the financial [burden] as well as the time burden for cardiologists. It is very important that this is not cumbersome, that it is woven into clinical practice, and that it is not costly." 

But he pointed out that building a new board will have significant costs. 

"We have to think about developing initial board certification examinations as well as changing the paradigm on continuous certification," he said. "This will take some up-front costs, and our society partners have decided that they are willing to provide some start-up funds for this. We anticipate the initial certification will remain somewhat similar in price, but the cost of ongoing continuous competency assessment will be significantly reduced compared to today's models."

Kuvin said the collaboration of the five participating US cardiovascular societies was unprecedented. But he noted that while the transition board is beginning with representatives of these individual societies, it will ultimately be independent from these societies and have its own board of directors. 

He suggested that other societies representing other parts of cardiology are also interested. "Cardiology has recognized how important this is," he said. "Everybody is excited about this."

Thu, 07 Dec 2023 08:53:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/new-cardiology-certification-board-what-s-plan-2023a1000umq
Changes in Board Certification Could Strengthen Vascular Surgery Training

Certification and Accreditation

Certification in vascular surgery (VS) in the United States is currently the responsibility of the American Board of Surgery (ABS), which is also responsible for certification in general surgery (GS). The ABS is one of 24 certifying boards that are members of the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS). As such, it is responsible for certifying those surgeons who are found to be qualified after meeting specific training requirements and completing an examination process. Certification in VS is specifically overseen by the Vascular Surgery Board (VSB), a component board of the ABS. Details of the ABS and VSB structure can be found on their Web site ( www.absurgery.org ). It should be noted that the ABS is responsible for certification of individuals and is not responsible for hospital credentialing or surgeon reimbursement.

Accreditation of VS training programs in the United States is the responsibility of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), which develops accreditation standards and reviews accredited programs for compliance. In VS and GS, this is done by the Residency Review Committee for Surgery (RRC-S), one of 26 specialty-specific review committees of the ACGME. Details of the ACGME and RRC-Surgery structures can be found on their Web site ( www.acgme.org ). It should be noted that the RRC-S is responsible for establishing minimal training requirements in VS training programs but is not responsible for individual surgeon certification. However, surgeons seeking certification by an ABMS board must successfully complete an ACGME-accredited residency training program.

Currently, VS is a specialty board of the ABS, such that primary certification in GS is required before a secondary certificate in VS can be obtained. Similarly, completion of an ACGME-accredited residency program in GS is a prerequisite for VS training in an ACGME-accredited program. However, recertification in GS is not required to maintain certification in VS.

Fri, 22 Dec 2023 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/498511
New police board revokes certification for six officers in first meeting

Dec. 13—During their first time meeting as a group Wednesday, members of a newly formed state police board revoked the certification of six officers — and one law enforcement communication worker — from around the state.

The board also issued certification suspensions — from 30 hours to 180 days — to eight officers or dispatchers and dismissed four disciplinary cases.

They were the first steps in a process that could shape law enforcement statewide for years to come — changes that could include the overhaul of rules that govern law enforcement policies, discipline and training.

In the short term, Wednesday's moves cut down some of the backlog in disciplinary cases for the Law Enforcement Certification Board, a product of state legislation earlier this year that split the former Law Enforcement Academy Board into two different groups that each oversee different functions of the state's police academy program.

The other newly formed body — the Standards and Training Council — met in exact weeks to begin its review of police training around the state.

One of the actions the board took Wednesday was a temporary suspension of certification for Brad Lunsford, a Las Cruces police officer who recently was indicted on a voluntary manslaughter charge after he was accused of shooting and killing a man.

The board requested the academy's staff to expedite an investigation into Lunsford's disciplinary case.

Board members voted on the disciplinary cases after spending more than three hours in private discussions. The closed session also included discussion of four pending court appeals challenging suspensions or revocations by the former board, as well as one pending lawsuit from an Albuquerque Police Department officer whose certification-by-waiver was rejected by the former board in exact years.

The new certification board is made up of sheriffs and police chiefs from around the state as well as civil rights attorneys and academics.

Board member and attorney Joseph Walsh called the new board structure "effectively a new paradigm that's trying to be implemented to hopefully be a model for law enforcement."

He added the new board structure can bring "true accountability."

The board began a process to hire a CEO for the academy Wednesday with the approval of a job description to be posted for recruiting. Members expressed hope the position would be filled in six months to a year.

A CEO will act as the "enforcement mechanism" of the board's directives at the academy, Walsh said, and make business decisions such as hiring and firing.

Until the position is filled, the board authorized academy director Sonya Chavez to make decisions.

Chavez, who began in the position Oct. 30, previously served as the U.S. Marshal of New Mexico. Before that, she worked as a special agent in the FBI.

"What we're involved in I think is going to be monumental for law enforcement in New Mexico," Chavez told the board Wednesday.

The board's misconduct investigations and hearings are still conducted according to administrative rules set decades ago for the former board, which was for years led by the state Attorney General.

On Wednesday, board members voted to form a four-member working group to draft changes to the rules.

The two members tasked with drafting changes to the rules for the board's disciplinary actions are public defender Julie Ball and Cody Rogers, a Las Cruces-based attorney. Rule changes pertaining to certification qualifications were assigned to be reviewed and redrafted by John Soloman, a criminal justice program director at Central New Mexico Community College, and Carly Lea Huffman, a training coordinator at the Bernalillo County Emergency Communications Center.

The rulemaking process is expected to generate new administrative rules for the board to be in place by the end of 2024.

Wed, 13 Dec 2023 10:01:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://news.yahoo.com/police-board-revokes-certification-six-043300563.html
5 Best Personalized Vitamin Subscriptions (2024)

The potential benefit of personalized vitamins over regular vitamins is that they are specifically tailored to your individual needs, says Jenelle Kim, a doctor of Chinese medicine and founder of JBK Wellness Labs in San Diego, California.

Regular vitamins contain a standard amount of nutrients that may not be optimal for everyone, explains Dr. Kim. Personalized vitamins take into account health factors that may influence individualized supplementation recommendations.

Another benefit of personalized vitamins is convenience, says Mahmud Kara, M.D., founder of KaraMD, a supplement company, in Cleveland. “Oftentimes, personalized vitamins will contain a wide variety of vitamins and minerals designed to target multiple health areas, and these will be combined into one dosage. If they are not combined into a single dosage, these vitamins will often come packaged together in a single daily pack,” he explains.

By combining supplements into one or packaging them into once-a-day packaging, the cost and inconvenience of buying multiple vitamins on their own and taking vitamins from multiple bottles throughout the day are reduced, he adds.

Finally, personalized vitamins often combine complementary ingredients, says Dr. Kara. For example, studies show that vitamin C helps with iron absorption. “Personalized vitamin brands often recognize the importance of combining complementary ingredients and will recommend vitamins that support each other for your specific needs,” he explains.

It’s What’s Happening Inside That Counts

With their in-house scientists and expert council, Ritual developed this men's 18-49 multivitamin to help support your heart, bones, normal muscle and immune function are important for the long term.

Thu, 04 Jan 2024 23:41:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.forbes.com/health/supplements/best-personalized-vitamin-subscription/
The Pharmacy Technician Certification Board Grants Funding to Propel Training and Advancement for Pharmacy Technicians Across the Country

Recipients of PTCB Partnership Funds Program Include State Associations in Hawaii, Iowa, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas and Washington

WASHINGTON, Dec. 12, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- The Pharmacy Technician Certification Board (PTCB), the nation's first and most-trusted pharmacy technician credentialing organization, has announced the most exact recipients of their Partnership Funds Program. Initiated in 2019, this program aids the efforts of state pharmacy associations that are dedicated to acknowledging the contributions of pharmacy technicians, fostering medication safety, and advancing the roles of these professionals. The recently-awarded grants will offer crucial support for innovative projects aimed at addressing pressing needs within the pharmacy technician profession.

PTCB has recently awarded funding to seven state pharmacy associations.

The recipients of the most exact grants are the Hawaii Pharmacists Association (HPhA), Iowa Pharmacy Association (IPA), the New Jersey Society of Health-System Pharmacists (NJSHP), Pennsylvania Pharmacists Association (PPA), Tennessee Pharmacists Association (TPA), Texas Pharmacy Association (TPA), and the Washington State Pharmacy Association (WSPA).

"These funds underscore our commitment to driving positive change in the pharmacy technician profession," said Ryan Burke, PharmD, Senior Director of Professional Affairs at PTCB, who oversees the program. "By supporting these projects that are closely tied to current initiatives in pharmacy practice, we are actively contributing to the evolution and growth of pharmacy technicians, and ultimately improving patient care and outcomes."

The Hawaii Pharmacists Association (HPhA) will undertake the Pharmacy Technician Advancement and Recruitment (PTAR) project. PTAR aims to advocate for pharmacy technician recruitment and provide education sessions addressing workforce needs, work environment conditions, and career opportunities. The initiative will involve engagement with local pharmacies and healthcare organizations, supplemented by the creation of a comprehensive resource guide. The project is slated for completion by the end of 2024.

The Iowa Pharmacy Association (IPA) is set to launch "Charting a Pathway Forward: Career Development for Pharmacy Technicians." This project focuses on supporting the growth and sustainability of the pharmacy technician workforce, emphasizing role advancement and responsibilities. IPA will create a Pharmacy Technician Career Guidebook and host Idea Sharing Symposiums with technicians, employers and others to foster collaboration and idea generation. The project is expected to conclude by October 2024.

The New Jersey Society of Health-System Pharmacists (NJSHP) will provide education and training to health system pharmacy technicians related to sterile compounding, non-sterile compounding and hazardous drug compounding, in particular with regard to the updated USP 795 and 797 chapters, and key considerations in the USP 800 chapter. This initiative will include in-person workshops and on-demand recordings, with a workshop scheduled for January 2024.

The Pennsylvania Pharmacists Association (PPA) will embark on the "Community Health Worker (CHW) Expansion in the Community Pharmacy Enhanced Service Network (CPESN)" project, focusing on improving access and promoting safe and effective medication use through specially trained pharmacy technicians. The project will support the completion of a 16-week CHW training by pharmacy technicians at five identified pharmacies, with completion anticipated by mid-2024.

The Tennessee Pharmacists Association (TPA) is also engaged in Community Health Worker training, offering scholarships for up to 40 pharmacy technicians. This initiative aims to bridge the gap between pharmacy technician expertise and community health empowerment, with the training provided through online CHW courses. Completion is expected by the end of 2024.

The training of Community Health Workers will also be the focus of the Texas Pharmacy Association (TPA). The organization will introduce a CHW training program for up to 30 pharmacy technicians. This program aims to cultivate the dual role of pharmacy technician/CHW, demonstrating the positive impact they can have on patient outcomes. Completion is anticipated by the end of 2025.

And finally, the Washington State Pharmacy Association (WSPA) will implement a Technician Product Verification (TPV) project, advocating for the expansion of pharmacy technicians' roles in community pharmacy practice. The project will include a toolkit, a TPV PTCB-Recognized Education/Training Program, and a poster presentation at the WSPA Annual Meeting. Completion is targeted for the end of 2024.

These Partnership Fund Grants exemplify PTCB's dedication to advancing pharmacy technician roles and fostering innovation within the profession. By supporting these projects, PTCB aims to strengthen the pharmacy workforce and Strengthen patient outcomes nationwide.

About PTCB

The Pharmacy Technician Certification Board (PTCB) is the nation's first, most trusted, and only nonprofit pharmacy technician credentialing organization. Founded on the guiding principle that pharmacy technicians play a critical role in advancing medication and patient safety, PTCB has established the universal standard of excellence for those supporting patient care teams by offering the industry's most-recognized credentials, including the PTCB Certification for Certified Pharmacy Technicians (CPhT).

Cision

View original content to get multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/the-pharmacy-technician-certification-board-grants-funding-to-propel-training-and-advancement-for-pharmacy-technicians-across-the-country-302011858.html

SOURCE Pharmacy Technician Certification Board (PTCB)

Mon, 11 Dec 2023 20:00:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/pharmacy-technician-certification-board-grants-150000153.html
New police board revokes certification for six officers in first meeting

Dec. 13—During their first time meeting as a group Wednesday, members of a newly formed state police board revoked the certification of six officers — and one law enforcement communication worker — from around the state.

The board also issued certification suspensions — from 30 hours to 180 days — to eight officers or dispatchers and dismissed four disciplinary cases.

They were the first steps in a process that could shape law enforcement statewide for years to come — changes that could include the overhaul of rules that govern law enforcement policies, discipline and training.

In the short term, Wednesday's moves cut down some of the backlog in disciplinary cases for the Law Enforcement Certification Board, a product of state legislation earlier this year that split the former Law Enforcement Academy Board into two different groups that each oversee different functions of the state's police academy program.

The other newly formed body — the Standards and Training Council — met in exact weeks to begin its review of police training around the state.

One of the actions the board took Wednesday was a temporary suspension of certification for Brad Lunsford, a Las Cruces police officer who recently was indicted on a voluntary manslaughter charge after he was accused of shooting and killing a man.

The board requested the academy's staff to expedite an investigation into Lunsford's disciplinary case.

Board members voted on the disciplinary cases after spending more than three hours in private discussions. The closed session also included discussion of four pending court appeals challenging suspensions or revocations by the former board, as well as one pending lawsuit from an Albuquerque Police Department officer whose certification-by-waiver was rejected by the former board in exact years.

The new certification board is made up of sheriffs and police chiefs from around the state as well as civil rights attorneys and academics.

Board member and attorney Joseph Walsh called the new board structure "effectively a new paradigm that's trying to be implemented to hopefully be a model for law enforcement."

He added the new board structure can bring "true accountability."

The board began a process to hire a CEO for the academy Wednesday with the approval of a job description to be posted for recruiting. Members expressed hope the position would be filled in six months to a year.

A CEO will act as the "enforcement mechanism" of the board's directives at the academy, Walsh said, and make business decisions such as hiring and firing.

Until the position is filled, the board authorized academy director Sonya Chavez to make decisions.

Chavez, who began in the position Oct. 30, previously served as the U.S. Marshal of New Mexico. Before that, she worked as a special agent in the FBI.

"What we're involved in I think is going to be monumental for law enforcement in New Mexico," Chavez told the board Wednesday.

The board's misconduct investigations and hearings are still conducted according to administrative rules set decades ago for the former board, which was for years led by the state Attorney General.

On Wednesday, board members voted to form a four-member working group to draft changes to the rules.

The two members tasked with drafting changes to the rules for the board's disciplinary actions are public defender Julie Ball and Cody Rogers, a Las Cruces-based attorney. Rule changes pertaining to certification qualifications were assigned to be reviewed and redrafted by John Soloman, a criminal justice program director at Central New Mexico Community College, and Carly Lea Huffman, a training coordinator at the Bernalillo County Emergency Communications Center.

The rulemaking process is expected to generate new administrative rules for the board to be in place by the end of 2024.

Wed, 13 Dec 2023 10:01:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.aol.com/police-board-revokes-certification-six-043300039.html




SBAC health | SBAC candidate | SBAC information search | SBAC techniques | SBAC study help | SBAC test Questions | SBAC resources | SBAC download | SBAC learning | SBAC resources |


Killexams test Simulator
Killexams Questions and Answers
Killexams Exams List
Search Exams
SBAC exam dump and training guide direct download
Training Exams List