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Killexams : Certification-Board Assessment VCE exam - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/SBAC Search results Killexams : Certification-Board Assessment VCE exam - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/SBAC https://killexams.com/exam_list/Certification-Board Killexams : Election certification delays few, but a 'test run' for 2024

Before November, election officials prepared for the possibility that Republicans who embraced former President Donald Trump's lies about voter fraud would challenge the verdict of voters by refusing to certify the midterm results.

Three weeks after the end of voting, such challenges are playing out in just two states, Arizona and Pennsylvania, where Democrats won the marquee races for governor and Senate.

Legal experts predict the bids are doomed because local governmental agencies typically don't have the option to vote against certifying the results of their elections. But experts also say the delays are a signal that the United States must brace itself for similar disruptions in the next presidential contest.

"It is one of the few places where election deniers have a lever of power," Rick Hasen, a law professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, said of the local political authorities responsible for certifying election results in most states. "It's a good test run for 2024, showing state courts they're going to have to step in."

For now, the certification delay in a smattering of rural counties in just two states reflects the limited ability of election conspiracy theorists to disrupt the midterms. One rural Arizona county has drawn court challenges after its refusal to certify, but a second one that was flirting with blocking certification backed off amid legal threats.

In Pennsylvania, a handful of the state's 67 counties have delayed certification because of recounts demanded by local conspiracy theorists in scattered precincts. But in most states, certification has gone smoothly.

"Before Election Day, I thought Republicans would exploit the certification process to undermine election results," said Marc Elias, a Democratic lawyer who has sued to compel the lone Arizona county to certify.

That there's only one county delaying so far in that important battleground state, where Republican candidates who denied Joe Biden's victory in the 2020 presidential race ran unsuccessfully for governor and secretary of state, is "good news, and a bit of a surprise," Elias said.

In Wisconsin, where Trump pressured Republican lawmakers to decertify the 2020 results, the chair of the state elections commission certified the results of the midterm election during a quick meeting Wednesday without fanfare. Minnesota, where the failed Republican secretary of state candidate had cast doubt on the legitimacy of the 2020 presidential election, the state canvassing board certified this year's results without drama on Tuesday.

The smooth outcome in most of the country is a reflection of the diminished opportunities election conspiracy theorists have to control elections after a number of their candidates were routed in statewide elections for positions overseeing voting. They're largely left with a footprint in conservative, rural counties. Still, that's enough to cause headaches for having the election results certified on a statewide basis, raising concerns about how rural counties might respond after the next presidential election.

The movement that embraces Trump's lies about voting hoped it would have many more levers after November. Candidates who backed Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election ran for top posts with power over state voting — including secretary of state, which in most states is the top election position — in five of the six swing states that were key to Trump's 2020 loss. They lost every race in each of those states.

Democratic Secretary of State Katie Hobbs defeated Trump-backed Republican Kari Lake in the race for Arizona governor, flipping it out of the GOP category, and a Democrat also won the race to replace Hobbs. A Democrat defeated an election conspiracy theorist running for Nevada secretary of state, shifting another swing-state election office from the GOP.

On the local level, the picture is blurrier.

There are more than 10,000 local election offices in the country that follow guidelines set by secretaries of state or other agencies that their states designate as the top election authorities. That's where conspiracy theorists won at least some new offices and still have the power to disrupt proceedings.

During the June primary in New Mexico, rural Otero County refused to certify the results of its election, preventing the state from making the winners official until the state Supreme Court ordered it to act. That set a template that election lawyers feared would be vastly replicated in the weeks after the midterms. But this time, even Otero County certified its winners without a delay. New Mexico's canvass board certified the statewide results Wednesday.

In Michigan, where a GOP slate of election conspiracy theorists was defeated in statewide races, the Republican candidate for secretary of state, Kristina Karamo, implored the state's bipartisan board of canvassers not to certify the election during a hearing this week. Karamo insisted there had been widespread fraud, even though she lost her race against Democratic Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson by more than 13 percentage points.

Tony Daunt, the Republican chair of the certification board, responded by blasting candidates who "feed into this nonsense" by making "claims that fire everybody up because it's a short-term gain for them, and that's dangerous to our system." The board unanimously certified the election.

In Pennsylvania, the most prominent certification hiccup has come in Luzerne County, north of Philadelphia, which voted for Trump by 14 percentage points in 2020. County commissioners delayed certifying the election on Monday after one Democrat abstained from voting following an Election Day fiasco in which the election office ran out of ballots.

But the Democrat, Daniel Schramm, later told reporters he would vote to certify on Wednesday, after having time to confirm that the foul-up didn't disenfranchise any voters. Certification is being delayed in a few other counties after local Republican committees and voters requested recounts.

In Arizona, the two Republicans on Cochise County's three-member county commission blew past Monday's certification deadline, saying they needed more information on the certification of vote tabulators, even though there have been no problems with voting or ballot counting in their county.

The secretary of state's office has sued, saying that it must certify the state's elections by Dec. 8.

"The only legal effect this has is to disenfranchise all their voters," said David Becker of the Center for Election Innovation.

The efforts to delay certification are dangerous even if they're doomed to fail, Becker and others said. They continue to sow discontent and distrust of voting and democracy.

David Levine, a former election official who is a fellow with the Alliance for Securing Democracy, noted that conspiracy theories about elections have reached such a fever pitch in Arizona that Bill Gates, the Republican chair of the county commission in Maricopa County, which includes Phoenix. has been given additional security by the local sheriff.

"When you provide legitimacy to baseless accusations about the election process, there is a concern that more of that will occur," Levine said.

Maricopa County, which includes Phoenix, certified its election results on Monday, after dozens of attendees demanded the board not do it. Some complained about printer malfunctions in the county, the state's most populous, that led to confusion and long lines on Election Day — even though Maricopa officials said everyone had a chance to vote and that all legal ballots were counted.

In other counties, activists also spoke out against certification, though unsuccessfully. In Yavapai County, north of Phoenix, a woman who gave her name as Nancy Littlefield, wearing a hoodie patterned on the American flag, made clear that part of her objections were because she simply didn't like the outcome of the election.

She urged Yavapai board members not to certify the vote because "I moved from California so I could be free and live my life and have my voice heard."

___

Associated Press writers Joey Cappelletti in Lansing, Michigan; Jonathan J. Cooper and Anita Snow in Phoenix; Christina A. Cassidy in Atlanta; and Mark Scolforo in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, contributed to this report.

___

Follow the AP's coverage of the 2022 midterm elections at https://apnews.com/hub/2022-midterm-elections

Copyright 2022 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Wed, 30 Nov 2022 05:01:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.wxyz.com/news/election-certification-delays-few-but-a-test-run-for-2024
Killexams : Election certification fights are a ‘test run’ for 2024

Before November, election officials prepared for the possibility that Republicans who embraced former President Donald Trump’s lies about voter fraud would challenge the verdict of voters by refusing to certify the results.

Three weeks after the end of voting, such challenges are playing out in just two states, Arizona and Pennsylvania, where Democrats won the marquee races for governor and U.S. Senate.

Legal experts predict the bids are doomed because local governmental bodies typically don’t have the option to vote against certifying the results of their elections. It also reflects the limited ability of election conspiracy theorists to disrupt the midterms. One rural Arizona county has drawn court challenges after its refusal to certify, but another flirting with blocking certification backed off amid legal threats.

In Pennsylvania, a handful of the state’s 67 counties have delayed certification because of recounts demanded by local conspiracy theorists in scattered precincts. But in most states, certification has gone smoothly.

“Before Election Day, I thought Republicans would exploit the certification process to undermine election results,” said Marc Elias, a Democratic attorney who has sued to compel the lone Arizona county to certify.

That there’s only one county delaying so far in that important battleground state, where Republican candidates who denied Joe Biden’s victory in the 2020 presidential race ran unsuccessfully for governor and secretary of state, is “good news, and a bit of a surprise,” Elias said.

The outcome is a reflection of the diminished opportunities election conspiracy theorists have to control elections after a number of their candidates were routed in statewide elections for positions overseeing voting. They’re largely left with a growing footprint in conservative, rural counties. Still, that’s enough to cause headaches for having the election results certified on a statewide basis, raising concerns about how rural counties might respond after the next presidential election.

“It is one of the few places where election deniers have a lever of power,” Rick Hasen, a law professor at the University of California at Los Angeles, said of the local political bodies charged with certifying election results in most states. “It’s a good test run for 2024, showing state courts they’re going to have to step in.”

The movement that embraces Trump’s lies about voting hoped it would have many more levers after November. Candidates who backed Trump’s efforts to overturn the 2020 election ran for top posts with power over state voting — including secretary of state, which in most states is the top election position — in five of the six swing states that were key to Trump’s 2020 loss. They lost every race in each of those states.

In 2020, Trump tried unsuccessfully to get Republican governors and secretaries of state to overrule their own voters and declare him the winner of some of the states won by Biden. With 2024 on the horizon, Trump now has fewer officials in his party to pressure if he becomes the nominee.

A Democrat, Secretary of State Katie Hobbs, defeated Trump-backed Republican Kari Lake in the race for Arizona governor, flipping it out of the GOP category, and a Democrat also won the race to replace Hobbs. A Democrat defeated an election conspiracy theorist running for Nevada secretary of state, shifting another swing-state election office from the GOP.

On the local level, the picture is blurrier. There are more than 10,000 local election offices in the country that follow guidelines set by secretaries of state or other agencies that their states designate as the top election authorities. That’s where conspiracy theorists won at least some new offices and still have the power to disrupt proceedings.

During the June primary in New Mexico, rural Otero County refused to certify the results of its election, preventing the state from making the winners official until the state Supreme Court ordered it to act. That set a template that election lawyers feared would be vastly replicated in the weeks after the midterms. But this time even Otero certified its winners without complaint.

In Michigan, where a GOP slate of election conspiracy theorists was defeated in statewide races, the Republican candidate for secretary of state, Kristina Karamo, implored the state’s bipartisan board of canvassers not to certify the election during a hearing earlier this week. Karamo insisted there had been widespread fraud, even though she lost her race against Democratic Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson by more than 13 percentage points.

Tony Daunt, the Republican chair of the certification board, responded by blasting candidates who “feed into this nonsense” by making “claims that fire everybody up because it’s a short-term gain for them, and that’s dangerous to our system.” The board unanimously certified the election.

In Pennsylvania, the most prominent certification hiccup has come in Luzerne County, north of Philadelphia, which voted for Trump by 14 percentage points in 2020. County commissioners delayed certifying the election on Monday after one Democrat abstained from voting following an Election Day fiasco in which the election office ran out of ballots.

But the Democrat, Daniel Schramm, later told reporters he would vote to certify on Wednesday, after having time to confirm that the foul-up didn’t disenfranchise any voters. Certification is being delayed in a few other counties after local Republican committees and voters requested recounts.

In Arizona, the two Republicans on Cochise County’s three-member county commission blew past Monday’s certification deadline, saying they needed more information on the certification of vote tabulators, even though there have been no problems with voting or ballot counting in their county.

The secretary of state’s office has sued, saying that it must certify the state’s elections by Dec. 8. If Cochise, which voted for Trump in 2020 by nearly 20 percentage points, declines to include its conservative electorate in the total and a court doesn’t force it to, that would change the tally in one of the state’s congressional seats from being narrowly won by a Republican to narrowly being taken by a Democrat.

“The only legal effect this has is to disenfranchise all their voters,” said David Becker of the Center for Election Innovation.

The efforts to delay certification are dangerous even if they’re doomed to fail, Becker and others said. They continue to sow discontent and distrust of voting and democracy.

David Levine, a former election official who is a fellow with the Alliance for Securing Democracy, noted that conspiracy theories about elections have reached such a fever pitch in Arizona that Bill Gates, the Republican chair of the county commission in Maricopa County, which includes Phoenix. has been given additional security by the local sheriff.

“When you provide legitimacy to baseless accusations about the election process, there is a concern that more of that will occur,” Levine said.

Maricopa County, which includes Phoenix, certified its election results on Monday, after dozens of attendees demanded the board not do it. Some complained about printer malfunctions in the county, the state’s most populous, that led to confusion and long lines on Election Day — even though Maricopa officials said everyone had a chance to vote and that all legal ballots were counted.

In other counties, activists also spoke out against certification, though unsuccessfully. In Yavapai County, north of Phoenix, a woman who gave her name as Nancy Littlefield, wearing a hoodie patterned on the American flag, made clear that part of her objections were because she simply didn’t like the outcome of the election.

She urged Yavapai board members not to certify the vote because “I moved from California so I could be free and live my life and have my voice heard.”

Story by Nicholas Riccardi. Associated Press writers Joey Cappelletti, Jonathan J. Cooper, Anita Snow, Christina A. Cassidy and Mark Scolforo contributed to this report.

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 23:20:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.bangordailynews.com/2022/11/30/national-politics/election-certification-fights/
Killexams : LMS Compliance makes Catalist debut at S$0.265; 1.9% above IPO price No result found, try new keyword!TESTING and certification services provider LMS Compliance began trading on the Catalist board of the Singapore Exchange on Thursday (Dec 1) at S$0.265, about 1.9 per cent or S$0.005 above its initial ... Wed, 30 Nov 2022 11:27:00 -0600 text/html https://www.businesstimes.com.sg/companies-markets/lms-compliance-makes-catalist-debut-s0265-19-above-ipo-price Killexams : CFP Board Announces November 2022 CFP® Certification exam Results

WASHINGTON, Dec. 6, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc. (CFP Board) today announced the results of the November 2022 CFP® Certification Exam. The exam was administered during a November 1-8 testing window to 3,204 candidates, with 4% of candidates testing remotely. The pass rate for the November exam was 64%.

Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc. Logo (PRNewsfoto/Certified Financial Planner Boa)

According to the November 2022 post-exam survey, most exam-takers (65%) are pursuing CFP® certification to become more skilled at their jobs and to better serve their clients.

The post-exam survey also showed that 68% of November candidates are under 40 years old and 35% are under 30 years old.

Nearly 75% of exam-takers reported receiving some level of financial support from their employers during the CFP® certification process. Further, 68% of exam-takers also reported that while they were preparing for the exam, the CFP Board provided the right information and resources at the right time. The top five CFP Board resources used by candidates were CFP Board Practice exam 1, the exam Candidate Handbook, CFP Board supplementary resources and guidance documents, the CFP Board Candidate Forum and the Candidate Preparation Toolkit. Other resources used included webinars, the CFP Board Mentor Program and scholarship opportunities.

"The results of our post-exam survey continue to prove that earning CFP® certification is an essential step for financial planners who want to elevate their careers and serve their clients' best interests," says CFP Board CEO Kevin R. Keller, CAE. "CFP Board would like to congratulate all of the candidates who pursued CFP® certification by successfully passing the exam. We appreciate your dedication to helping clients achieve their financial dreams." 

Historical exam statistics — including those from the November 2022 exam — are available on CFP Board's exam statistics webpage.

March 2023 Exam
The CFP® exam is offered three times annually in March, July and November. Registration for the March 2023 CFP® Certification exam is now open. This exam will be administered from March 7 to March 14, 2023. The registration deadline is February 21, and the Education Verification deadline is February 14. Testing appointments are scheduled on a first come, first served basis. We therefore encourage individuals to register for the exam at least 60 days in advance for the best date and site availability. Early registrants who schedule exams by January 10 are eligible for a discount.

To begin the path to certification, individuals aspiring to become CFP® professionals should create accounts on CFP.net. Here, they can access resources for all stages of their certification journey.

ABOUT CFP BOARD 
Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc. is the professional body for personal financial planners in the U.S. CFP Board sets standards for financial planning and administers the prestigious CFP® certification – one of the most respected certifications in financial services – so that the public has access to and benefits from competent and ethical financial planning. CFP Board, along with its Center for Financial Planning, is committed to increasing the public's awareness of CFP® certification and access to a diverse, ethical and competent financial planning workforce. Widely recognized by the public, advisors and firms as the standard for financial planning, CFP® certification is held by more than 93,000 people in the United States

Cision View original content to get multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/cfp-board-announces-november-2022-cfp-certification-exam-results-301696393.html

SOURCE Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc.

Tue, 06 Dec 2022 07:55:00 -0600 en text/html https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/cfp-board-announces-november-2022-cfp-certification-exam-results-1031956546
Killexams : LMS Compliance Ltd’s IPO Draws Strong Support Placement shares of 14 million priced at S$0.26 per share fully subscribed
Trading debuts on the Catalist Board of the SGX-ST at 9.00 am on Wednesday, 1 December 2022

SINGAPORE - Media OutReach - 30 November 2022 - Laboratory testing and certification services provider LMS Compliance Ltd , (“LMS Compliance ” or the “Company ” and together with its subsidiaries consisting of the MY CO2 group of companies, Empiric Science Sdn. Bhd. and LMS Compliance International Pte. Ltd., the “Group ”) has attracted positive interest from investors for its initial public offering (“IPO ”) by way of a placement (the “Placement ”) of 14 million shares (the “Placement Shares ”) at S$0.26 per share. LMS Compliance registered its offer document on 22 November 2022, and the listing and trading of its shares on the Catalist Board of the Singapore Exchange Securities Trading Limited (the “SGX-ST ”) is expected to commence on a “ready” basis at 9.00 am on 1 December 2022.

As at the close of the Placement at 12.00 noon on 29 November 2022, all 14 million Placement Shares have been validly subscribed for and application monies received for these Placement Shares amount to S$3.64 million.

Dr. Ooi Shu Geok, LMS Compliance’s Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer, annotated: “We are thrilled to launch our IPO, which marks a new growth chapter for the Group in the laboratory and testing certifications industry. We will leverage on our established track record of 15 years and our experience that spans a gamut of industries and sectors to create and enhance value for all stakeholders, building on our proven capabilities and technological know-how to drive robust growth in the future.”

Mr Nickle Luo, Founder and Chief Executive Officer of RID Testing & Certification and VEO Standards, is one of the anchor investors that took part in the Placement. Mr Luo has a Master Degree in Management and is highly experienced in the fields of investment, strategy and mergers and acquisitions.

Usage of Proceeds

The Placement will raise gross proceeds of approximately S$3.64 million and net proceeds of approximately S$2.04 million. The allocation of the intended use of proceeds is set out below:

  • S$0.30 million to expand its certification services segment and conformity assessment technology distribution segment
  • S$1.20 million for acquisitions, joint ventures and strategic alliances to grow its business
  • S$0.54 million for general working capital

Group’s Strategy

LMS Compliance plans to increase the range of its accredited and non-accredited tests in existing industry sectors, and expand into new sectors, such as oil and gas, by investing in new laboratory equipment, cleanrooms and instruments, as well as hiring new chemists and marketing staff. It may also set up new laboratories in other states of Malaysia where it does not have a footprint to capture demand from these locations, subject to an assessment of the commercial viability of such investments. LMS Compliance also intends to expand through acquisitions, investments, joint ventures and strategic alliances and may also consider strategic partnerships or alliances with parties which are synergistic with its existing businesses, in countries such as Malaysia, Indonesia and China.

In addition, the Group will expand its certification services to new industry sectors, such as agriculture, basic metals, machinery and equipment, recycling, as well as hotels and restaurants.

Also, the Group has plans to enhance the features and capabilities of the Group’s digital laboratory solutions, namely “aizenz-Document Management System”, “aikinz-Laboratory Information Management System” and “aisinz-Global Real-time Surveillance”, by adding artificial intelligence, data analytics, data mining or benchmarking capabilities to analyse customer behaviour patterns to assist in decision-making. Following that, the Group will leverage on its existing customer base, as well as other marketing and promotion efforts, to cross-sell its digital laboratory solutions. Having commercialised its “aikinz-Laboratory Information Management System” in 2020, there are approximately 24,000 online users across 41 countries for the period of one year up to the latest practicable date (being 16 September 2022).

While LMS Compliance currently does not have a fixed dividend policy, its directors intend to recommend and distribute dividends of a minimum of 20% of its profit attributable to owners of the Group in respect of the FY2022, FY2023 and FY2024 financial years.

Hashtag: #LMSCompliance

The issuer is solely responsible for the content of this announcement.

About LMS Compliance

LMS Compliance is a laboratory testing and certification services provider based in Malaysia with an established track record of more than 15 years. The Group’s operations comprise four segments – (1) Testing and Assessment, (2) Certification, (3) Trading, and (4) Distribution of Conformity Assessment Technology.

The Group’s testing and assessment services include chemical, microbiology, nucleic acid and physical analyses for its clients across a gamut of sectors, from food and healthcare to industrial and green-tech, assisting them to achieve compliance with industry standards as well as product safety. In this regard, LMS Compliance has three accredited laboratories across Malaysia with the capability to conduct a range of accredited and non-accredited tests.

For its certification segment, the Group provides audit and management system certification services. The certification audits provided by the Group include ISO 9001 – 2015 Quality Management Systems certification, ISO 22000 – 2018 Food Safety Management System certification and ISO 45001 - 2018 Occupational Health & Safety Management System certification.

In terms of the Group’s trading segment, the Group trades and distributes a broad range of analytical instruments, testing equipment, chemicals, glassware, and laboratory consumable items.

Lastly, the Group also markets and distributes its in-house developed Conformity Assessment Technology, which include a digital laboratory information management system to help customers streamline and digitalise laboratory operations, and a one-stop ISO certification platform that enhances the efficiency of the certification process for businesses.

More about LMS Compliance:

This press release contains certain forward-looking statements which involve known and unknown risks, delays, and uncertainties not under the Company’s control which may cause real results, performance, or achievements of the Company to be materially different from the results, performance, or expectations implied by these forward-looking statements. The Company makes no representation or warranty, express or implied, as to or endorsement of the accuracy or completeness of any information, statements, or representations contained in this press release with respect to the Company

This press release has been prepared by the Company and its contents have been reviewed by the Company’s sponsor, ZICO Capital Pte. Ltd. (the “Sponsor ”), in accordance with Rule 226(2)(b) of the Singapore Exchange Securities Trading Limited (“SGX-ST ”) Listing Manual Section B: Rules of Catalist.

This press release has not been examined or approved by the SGX-ST and the SGX-ST assumes no responsibility for the contents of this press release, including the correctness of any of the statements or opinions made or reports contained in this press release.

The contact person for the Sponsor is Ms. Goh Mei Xian, Director, ZICO Capital Pte. Ltd. at 77 Robinson Road, #06-03 Robinson 77, Singapore 068896, telephone (65) 6636 4201.

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 21:20:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.asiaone.com/business/lms-compliance-ltd-s-ipo-draws-strong-support
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