New syllabus of RCDD-001 is available now

Unsuccessful RCDD-001 exam? You should not be free RCDD-001 test prep accessible on the internet which usually is outdated plus invalid. Real RCDD-001 real questions are usually updated on a normal basis. Killexams.com is continually operating to keep RCDD-001 practice test up-to-date, valid, and examined. You are just required to download completely free Question Bank before a person registers for a complete copy of RCDD-001 examcollection. Practice guarantees that you sit down in a real RCDD-001 examination. You will notice how our RCDD-001 test questions functions.

Exam Code: RCDD-001 Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
RCDD-001 BICSI Registered Communications Distribution Designer

Number of Questions : 100
Allotted Examination Time : 2.5 Hours

Critical to building infrastructure development, this BICSI flagship program involves design and implementation of telecommunications distribution systems.
Being recognized as a BICSI RCDD has many advantages, including
A positive impact on your professional image
Recognition by the ICT Community as a Subject Matter Expert
New job and promotion opportunities
Higher Salary possibilities
An expanded ICT career field
Those who achieve the RCDD designation have demonstrated their knowledge in the creation, planning, integration, execution and/or detailed-oriented project management of telecommunications and data communications technology.

What you need to know about the RCDD Credential?
- Pinnacle designation in the ICT field
- Recognized by the ICT Community and employers
- Required in bids and job requirements
- Uses the Latest Technologies, Methods and Best Practices
- Opens doors and new opportunities for career growth
- Enhances Credibility
- Recognized Globally
- Built with Your Career in Mind
- Meets the Highest Standards

Dedicated information and communications technology (ICT) professionals such as yourself recognize and understand that holding a BICSI credential makes a difference in your career and the ICT industry. After earning the Registered Communications Distribution Designer® (RCDD®) credential, you will be recognized as an elite professional, knowledgeable and experienced in leading-edge ICT design principles. We appreciate your professional commitment in demonstrating the highest, global standard by acquiring an RCDD certification.
We develop and deliver the highest-quality credentialing programs that validate mastery in the field of ICT and contribute to the continued improvement of individual and organizational performance. We work closely with ICT professionals around the world to ensure that our programs are up-to-date and relevant for todays competitive business environments. This handbook provides an overview of the RCDD credential, including eligibility and recertification requirements. You will find detailed information to help guide you through the entire certification process.

Applicants must meet specific educational and/or work experience criteria at the time they submit their application in order to be eligible to take the RCDD exam. The requirements are outlined below:
Option #1: 2 years of verifiable full-time work experience in ICT design AND a current BICSI certification holder in TECH, RTPM, DCDC or OSP.
Option #2: 2 years of verifiable full-time equivalent work experience in ICT design AND completion of 2 years of higher education course work in ICT. 2 years of higher education course work in ICT may include:
• STEM or Trade school
• Two-year degree
• ICT and industry related programs, apprenticeships or certifications
• Military training equivalent
Option #3: 5 years of verifiable ICT experience
Definitions and Examples
ICT Design related work experience includes the following:
• User requirements and needs analysis
• Site surveys
• Operational requirements, schematics or conceptual drawings
• Coordinate with Architects, Professional Engineers (PE), Authorities Having Jurisdiction (AHJ), vendors, trades, design teams, and/or stakeholders
• Review and comply with standards, codes and AHJ requirements
• Review and/or creation of:
○ Request for Proposal (RFP)
○ Request for Qualification (RFQ)
○ Scope of Work (SOW)
• Detailed design, specifications and drawings including:
○ Structured cabling systems and pathways
○ Rack positioning and layout drawings
○ Grounding and bonding systems
○ Telecommunications spaces
• Project documents, including but not limited to:
○ Design drawings
○ Project specifications
○ Bill of Materials (BOM)
○ Bid documents and pricing
○ Record drawings (as-builts)
• Support and assess the installation process
Evidence of completion of higher education course
work includes:
• Certificates
• Diplomas
• Registrars documentation
• Other bona fide documents

You can expect an RCDD to follow current standards and best practices for improved quality and performance, including standards established and/or contributed to by: BICSI, Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA), American National Standards Institute (ANSI), National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA), American Institute of Architects (AIA) and Construction Specifications Institute (CSI).
RCDDs are required to demonstrate proficiency across a wide range of areas within structured cabling systems, including network, outside plant, wireless and electronic safety and security design, data centers and building automation systems (BAS). This expanded knowledge enables the RCDD to advise the owner/end user of the appropriate IT, AV and security requirements. The RCDD has learned to perform the design tasks related to these systems, including construction drawings and specifications.
The U.S. Courts Design Guide1 requires that pathways and spaces be designed by an RCDD. Both the U.S. Defense Departments Unified Facilities Criteria (UFC)- Telecommunications Building Cabling Systems Planning and Design2 and the Armys Technical Criteria for the Installation Information Infrastructure Architecture3 require an RCDD to provide design services. During the Expansion of the Abu Dhabi International Airport4 in the United Arab Emirates it was required that the Testing Field Supervisor be an RCDD and that cabling installers have an RCDD on staff.

1 Principles of Transmission
2 Electromagnetic Compatibility
3 Telecommunications Spaces
4 Backbone Distribution Systems
5 Horizontal Distribution Systems
6 ITS Cables and Connecting Hardware
7 Firestop Systems
8 Bonding and Grounding (Earthing)
9 Power Distribution
10 Telecommunications Administration
11 Field Testing of Structured Cabling
12 Outside Plant
13 Audiovisual Systems
14 Building Automation Systems
15 Data Networks
16 Wireless Networks
17 Electronic Safety and Security
18 Data Centers
19 Health Care
20 Residential Cabling
21 Business Development and Project Management

1. Maintain a high standard of professional conduct.
2. Protect and enhance the reputation of the BICSI organization, the credentialing program and my credential through my actions.
3. Maintain the confidentiality of privileged information entrusted or known to me by virtue of my profession or position, unless disclosure is required by law or agreement.
4. Be accurate and truthful in my dealings with clients and be careful not to misrepresent the quality, availability or ability of the services I provide.
5. Never, under any circumstances, make a recommendation misrepresenting or misstating any other individuals qualifications, abilities or accomplishments.
6. Provide unbiased, accurate and objective assessments for all safety and operational deficiencies that may be discovered during the performance of my services.
7. Refrain from representing competitors to clients, or the public, by the use of false and misleading statements or malicious actions, but rather work and compete with them in a reasonable and professional manner for the benefit and advancement of our profession.
8. Refrain from using false and misleading statements or malicious actions that might injure another persons reputation or bring harm to their person or property.
9. Respect a clients decision in the selection of competitive services, and continue to offer and provide that client with quality services for as long as is necessary or requested.
10. Serve all members of the public impartially, providing no substandard service based on that individuals age, race, national origin, color, sex, sexual orientation, disability or religious belief.
11. Adhere to all relevant codes, laws, ICT industry standards and BICSI methodologies, where appropriate.
12. Take personal responsibility to ensure that all requirements necessary for the renewal of any BICSI credential that I hold is met on, or before, the expiration date.
13. Be accurate, honest and truthful in the presentation of all educational material or in the preparation of material orders and product availability.
14. I will not misrepresent my BICSI credential nor willingly allow others to do so.

BICSI Registered Communications Distribution Designer
BICSI Communications learn
Killexams : BICSI Communications learn - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/RCDD-001 Search results Killexams : BICSI Communications learn - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/RCDD-001 https://killexams.com/exam_list/BICSI Killexams : Machine Learning and Wireless Communications

To save content items to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Wed, 20 Jul 2022 09:13:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/machine-learning-and-wireless-communications/7B9232F97E99598A26368EAE323A9AF9
Killexams : Four Corporate Communications Best Practices To Learn From GE

GE has made significant organizational changes over the past year: The company announced it would move its global headquarters to Boston, it redesigned its performance development and review process, and CEO Jeff Immelt and other executive leaders began talking openly about the company’s aim to re-engineer its culture to foster and promote a “startup-like” mentality.

I’ve been very impressed by GE’s willingness to be so transparent about the company’s new approach to culture, and specifically its openness in communicating through serious corporate change. After speaking with Vice President and Chief Communications Officer Deirdre Latour about GE’s strategy to communicating through change, I'd like to share my own takeaways for some best practices for all corporate communicators.

1. Integrate internal communications with external communications for the most effective brand storytelling.

As Deirdre describes, at GE there is "no longer a divide between internal and external communications." GE aims to communicate to its employees about big changes first, helping them understand the personal impact of any change and provide context. In doing so, they've built a culture that is open and transparent and have been able to translate that into the external domain.

GE recognizes that, as a brand leader, internal changes are of interest to employees' families and friends, prospective employees, customers, suppliers and surrounding communities, so they "want to be sure that everyone can get the information they need." It's a modern approach to recognize that what employees hear, everyone hears. Organizations can help contextualize and shape that perception when they themselves manage external communications of internal change -- and not leave it to their employees to do for them.

2. Deliver your messages to people where they are already seeking information.

GE has embraced LinkedIn as a publishing platform to communicate cultural changes -- going so far as to publish emails to GE employees verbatim. While it may seem obvious to anyone who regularly checks LinkedIn for news and views (me, for one), LinkedIn has a large, built-in, engaged and professional audience. Plus, as a company that is constantly recruiting, LinkedIn is also the best place for GE to communicate with potential job seekers. While it may seem obvious, many companies are still using their own websites, blogs and intranets to communicate with their employees, missing out on the opportunity to attract and influence those beyond their walls.

As Deirdre says, "Today we have so much content and so many tools, we're always fighting for people's attention. Just as you would with an external announcement, our internal communications plans look across all the places our employees are active and aim to deliver the message in the right way for those channels -- whether they're internal or external." As in, don't tell people where to go to hear your message; find out where they are reading and interacting with content and meet them there. Similarly, Medium has risen in popularity as a tool for CEOs and other industry leaders to communicate through corporate change.

3. Use your chief executives as your primary spokespeople, and your employees as your secondary spokespeople.

Another major evolution in corporate communications strategy in the social/digital world is the opportunity for a variety of employees to be brand storytellers or spokespeople, a role traditionally reserved for very senior executives. The 2017 Edelman Trust Barometer revealed that trust in businesses and CEOs is falling; at the same time, there's a marked increase in the credibility of a "person like me."

To leverage the power of peers, GE encourages its employees to share their own stories. The company has even developed an internal tool and system for employees to submit their GE stories. Then their internal communications team -- like a real editorial team -- works with individual employees to build out the stories and distribute them. Not surprisingly, GE has found the reaction from their own employees to be very positive. They seek to "humanize the change for employees so they understand their purpose and influence" in GE's aim to be the digital industrial world leader.

4. When it comes to balancing transparent communications with real corporate risk, start from a place of "yes."

As a corporate communicator who is often faced with the dilemma of "what to share, when, with who, and how much," the balance of being transparent while maintaining a positive corporate image can feel very subjective at times. I love GE's approach to determining what is appropriate for public consumption, which Deirdre describes as "starting with the mindset of wanting to share as much as we can." GE calls this "telling our story, our way" and acknowledges that the old way of thinking is to communicate only when you have to or when you are trying to drive change externally or internally.

In today's complicated environment of many different media models and social networks, GE recognizes that you should always be telling your story, in new and creative ways with engagement from leadership and employees, before you need to tell your story. In other words, if people are hearing consistently from you about your company's culture and strategy, this will pay dividends when you actually need their respect and trust.

Transparent, integrated communications that leverages brand storytelling is a great barometer for all corporate communicators -- whether you're communicating through massive cultural change or just telling your story, your way.

Mon, 01 May 2017 01:21:00 -0500 Amanda Guisbond en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbescommunicationscouncil/2017/05/01/four-corporate-communications-best-practices-to-learn-from-ge/
Killexams : Four Communications Predictions For 2023

I am the Vice President of Global Communications at Pure Storage, a Silicon Valley based technology company.

It’s that time of year again. As we near the end of 2022, we have the chance to reflect on what has happened in the last 12 months and prepare for what the coming year will bring. For those of us who work in communications and PR, this means analyzing data, identifying lessons from past experiences and getting ahead of future trends. Here are four important developments that communications professionals should get ready for in 2023.

1. ‘Sustainable’ companies will have to show their work.

Customers value environmental sustainability more than ever, and they have increasingly high standards for the companies they buy from. In a 2021 global survey, 85% of respondents reported that they have shifted their buying behavior to be more sustainable in the past five years. Half of consumers ranked sustainability among their top five value drivers, and 34% indicated they would pay more for sustainable products or services.

In 2023, I believe the expectations and stakes will be higher for companies that push a sustainability angle. People are becoming savvier about spotting “greenwashing,” when a company’s PR spin doesn’t match its actual business decisions. Sustainability claims will need to be backed by concrete data. Look for opportunities to incorporate numbers and narratives to demonstrate the impact of your company’s sustainability efforts. Real customer success stories will lend credibility to your message.

For example, at my company, we supported our sustainability claims with both third-party lifecycle analysis of our products and real customer results. We produced specific data points and developed stories about how the data was connected to relatable, everyday examples.

2. Reputation management will be more proactive.

Many companies have crisis communications plans, but they are often tucked away “just in case” or used in a reactive fashion. Good reputation management strategies are proactive, ongoing, refined and forward-thinking companies will prioritize them in 2023.

Building a positive and memorable reputation for your company now will help you if a crisis strikes in the future. Take the initiative to develop a long-term reputation management plan before your reputation is called into question. What steps will you take to cultivate your ideal brand image? How can you grow a database of “friendlies” who have positive perceptions of your company and would be willing to share those positive views publicly through social media and quotes in news articles? What are your contingency plans if something happens to tarnish this image?

3. Data-driven metrics will play a more important role.

In years past, PR teams would get a pass on quantitative metrics because certain aspects of awareness cannot be concretely measured. I wrote about finding the balance of quantitative and qualitative measures last year, but I think that even more data-driven metrics will become part of the communications measurement stack in 2023.

If you haven’t revisited your measurement strategy recently, make it a priority in the new year. With sophisticated new AI and analytics tools at your fingertips, it’s possible to track granular

numbers on readership by article and multimedia viewership, measure the success of your communications and look beyond just share of voice.

4. Sources of influence will evolve.

Target audiences and their behaviors are not static. I believe that in 2023, many communications and PR pros will take a close look at their target audiences and the sources of information they rely on for decision making. This is an opportunity to re-evaluate your audiences and see if they still align with your current company strategy and direction. Spend time assessing the watering holes where your audiences gather, and ask: “Who/what/where is truly influencing our customers and potential buyers?”

For instance, my company recently re-assessed the way we prioritize media, influencers and analysts based on their level of influence across three buckets: our core buyers, CIOs and business leaders (CEOs, CFOs, Chief Sustainability Officers, etc). While it may seem like these are obvious personas, we examined them closely and aligned our messaging with their interests. We sought to balance standard channels with those that push boundaries, then we aligned the content for each medium to the interests of the audiences they serve.

The last few years have brought more than their fair share of communications challenges and opened our eyes to new ways of thinking. We don’t yet know exactly what highs and lows 2023 will hold, but we can prepare for these likely scenarios.


Forbes Communications Council is an invitation-only community for executives in successful public relations, media strategy, creative and advertising agencies. Do I qualify?


Thu, 01 Dec 2022 10:00:00 -0600 Rena Fallstrom en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbescommunicationscouncil/2022/12/02/four-communications-predictions-for-2023/
Killexams : Effective communication in marriage

Lack of communication destroys friendships and marriages. Many marriages have crumbled due to poor communication. From actions and inactions in marriages, there is a need for effective communication to build healthy, long-lasting unions.

A language instructor and wife, Aishat Lawal-Olanipekun, stated that for effective communication to be achieved, both partners have to be interested.

She said, “It isn’t just about communication, it is mostly about comprehension. When comprehension is achieved, everything else will be seamless. However, without the interest of both parties, effective communication is almost impossible.”

She stated that cases abound when partners were not honestly knowledgeable about how to communicate their feelings, decisions or actions.

Lawal-Olanipekun noted, “When they seek knowledge, they would learn how to communicate effectively. For example, it is only an interested spouse that would ask the partner ‘How would you prefer we talk about this?’ that was because there’s an interest in learning and this would definitely aid effective communication. Also, it is important to note the interest and willingness that will help a couple to seek professional help when they are not getting it right.”

She added that communication styles were different including reception styles, urging each couple to identify what works in their own marriage.

She noted, “If this isn’t solved, a partner may think they are communicating but the other person isn’t comprehending. This isn’t wrong to happen, as long as such persons are willing to adjust. It may take time but with patience and effort, anyone would get to that height of effective communication.”

A plumber and father of seven, Lanre Adenekan, told Sunday PUNCH that effective communication was important, stating that it could determine the lifespan of a union.

He said, “These days, I noticed that young unions don’t last because they have not mastered the importance of communication. This is beyond sending a WhatsApp message. It is being able to let your partner know how you sincerely feel about something.”

Adenekan explained that he had recently settled a crisis between two young couples he worked for in their home.

He said, “I was the plumber who worked on the plumbing works in the building where they are now tenants, so when they have any plumbing work to do, they contact me. The husband visited my shop to tell me about what I needed to fix in their kitchen, when he came, I noticed his countenance was not welcoming and it was unusual of him to be like that. I got to their house and the reception of the wife was unusual too which made me know there was an issue.

“When I finished, I called her to her attention to my observation of her attitude likewise her husband when he came to my shop. She explained what happened to me and I realised that she inappropriately communicated a useful issue to her husband who didn’t comprehend it and got angry. They exchanged words and the result was what I saw.”

Adenekan stated that when the husband came to his shop later in the evening, he called him to explain what he did and how he got to understand the importance of the issue his wife explained to him then.

He added, “His face changed and one could see that he was relieved. He said he didn’t know and the thing about the entire issue was caused by what would be taken for dinner. I advised him appropriately and the matter was resolved.

“When our younger generation realises that people are different, how they will handle issues will be different. They will start learning to know who their partner is and how best they can communicate to them. This will help them a lot and I’m certain they will get much better at communicating. It is an integral part of a home that must not be lost.’’

Adenekan finally added that some couples need to listen attentively most times when their partners discuss with them so that they do not miss out on important details.

In her contribution, an entrepreneur and wife, Rodiat Sanni-Ibrahim, noted that to achieve effective communication in marriage, it’s important that partners explain the tiniest details.

She stated, “Both parties should know that they were brought up differently and the way they will react to issues or relate with people will be different. Partners should have the mindset that they both want to make it work and both parties must be ready to learn. Once the mind is set on the fact that no matter what happens, they will always communicate with one another, growth will come in and they will see themselves explaining every detail to their spouses.”

She explained that partners should also not make assumptions, but rather ask questions if they were not clear about what was communicated.

Sanni-Ibrahim noted, “You should ask why your partner acted that way he or she does and the other partner should explain himself  or herself and then sort things out.  Partners should not assume in any way. If your partner acts in a way you don’t like, call their attention to it and communicate in a calm manner, There should be nothing like ‘I’ll retaliate.’ You are building a household and not a war zone.

“Lastly, to achieve effective communication, you should also understand that whatever you are going through, your partner should know and don’t leave them to guess at any time. We are humans and we get tired when we are over-pushed.”

Commenting on the issue, a relationship counsellor, Bimbo Douglas, explained that communication makes or breaks marital institutions, advising couples to take cognisance of it to strengthen their marriages.

She noted, “This is an important issue we are not really talking about anymore. Over the years and with many cases brought to me, I have come to know that many marital crises could have been avoided if the partners involved communicated effectively. Couples should realise that the communication level they maintained during courtship becomes different immediately after marriage. Everything should be talked about, everything without shying away from it due to differences in thoughts or opinions.”

Douglas explained that despite the importance of communication, there were some persons who lacked how to communicate effectively, urging individuals to find ways to help their partners to become better.

She stated, “One of the keys to helping a partner who does not know how to communicate is to spend quality time with them. When partners spend time together, over time, they would get to know themselves and how to relate with one another on certain issues and thus, help their communication level become better by the day.

“Partners should also learn how to express both their negative and positive feelings. The anyhowness in communication often leads to tragic results because it was too blunt or rather said at the wrong time. The timing, constructive expression and calmness will help a lot when partners want to achieve effective communication.”

She further added that partners should also learn how not to be defensive at all times when something negative was communicated, noting that they should listen with an open mind and be willing to correct their wrongdoings.

Also, another marriage counsellor, Kehinde Atoba, said that it was important for partners to tell each other what they want and what they don’t.

He said, “I have noticed that some people out of respect and love, not fear, decide not to caution their partners from doing what they do not like and over time, with the different relationship issues I have handled, I realised that this destroys marriages.

“You have to be able to communicate your likes and dislikes to your partner and they need to reason with you. The inability to express this feeling is part of the communication gap. Rather than creating a greener relationship, it’ll get darker.’’

Atoba explained that it was also important that partners learn to respond to one another’s expressions quickly without waiting for a period of time before responding or taking necessary actions.

He noted, “When people communicate, they want a result and when they get actions or results of what was communicated, they have a feeling that they were heard and they will continue to positively communicate and they’ll be encouraged. However, when this is delayed, they’ll be discouraged and start questioning if they were right or wrong and a much further gap in communication will be created.”

He encouraged couples to be open-minded and loving to one another, stating that such would aid their journey to reach the peak of communication in their marriages.

Sat, 12 Nov 2022 10:00:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://punchng.com/effective-communication-in-marriage/
Killexams : The Communication Gap Between Patients and Practitioners Is Dangerous – Here’s What We Can Do About It

When you’re in the vulnerable position of seeking help from a healthcare provider, you really want to enter the situation knowing you’ll be heard, seen and understood. And that’s the goal of your provider too, of course.

But too often, in these situations where a patient is tasked with relaying their symptoms and explaining exactly what feels wrong or worrisome, that’s not the case. In a recent survey conducted by SheKnows looking at the experiences of more than 1500 women, we found that 66 percent of respondents said they struggle to accurately describe their ailment or condition to a provider and 81 percent have reported feeling misunderstood by a medical professional.

More from SheKnows

And we’ve all been there: Knowing something is wrong yet finding it hard to put to words exactly what it is without resorting to the terminology found during scary late-night google searches or vague descriptions of discomfort. But communication gaps such as this can absolutely put a strain on patient-provider relations, contributing to individuals feeling like they’re being medically gaslit or hopeless about getting treated for their conditions. To get a better understanding of how this happens, the dangers of this communication gap and what patients and providers can do about it, SheKnows asked a few experts to weigh in.

The Dangers of Feeling Misunderstood

Rachel Kaplan, a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and psychotherapist who specializes in working with adults with chronic illnesses, told SheKnows that “while it is very common to feel misunderstood by your doctor, it is also a very isolating and discouraging experience.”

Click here to read the full article.

After all, as Kaplan notes, people seeking healthcare are looking for “safety in their relationship with their doctor” — and just going in to the doctor’s office can be anxiety-inducing if you’re worried about getting bad news or have had negative experiences in healthcare before.

Working with both patients and medical teams, Kaplan says she’s found issues on both sides of the dynamic that can contribute to misunderstandings and conflict.

“It is common for a doctor to communicate in a way that is perceived as invalidating, stigmatizing, or minimizing the patient’s experience. This can be due to time constraints and pressured expectations from insurance providers to see a high volume of patients, feelings of burnout, or having limited empathy and insight into the emotional experience of being in the patient role because they simply don’t have the bandwidth to get emotionally invested with each person they care for,” Kaplan says. “I’ve seen many well meaning and wonderful doctors refer patients to therapists for emotional support, but oftentimes doing so in a way that sends the message that whatever symptoms the patient is experiencing is ‘all in their head’ or that their anxiety or stress management is what is causing physical pain. Doctors in high-stress settings or working with terminally-ill patients may suffer from compassion fatigue, or have had to learn to de-personalize and become desensitized to each person’s story and ‘humanness’ because they cannot continue to function in this setting without protecting themselves from all of the emotional pain.”

That said, sometimes those factors can then lead to a patient to feel shameful or stigmatized and more likely to withdraw from the relationship with their doctor — disclosing less information or censoring themselves.

“The patient often then begins to worry about how they portray themselves to their doctors, causing them to hold back their  emotions or minimize how hard things are for fear of being not taken seriously or labeled as emotional, dramatic, or anxious,” Kaplan says. “This engagement in toxic positivity, emphasis on acceptance from doctors, and wanting to be a ‘good’ patient, adds to the imbalance in this power dynamic and perpetuates that the doctor is an authority figure, instead of a collaborative partner in your health journey.”

Time Isn’t on Anyone’s Side

Nancy Mitchell, an RN and contributing writer at Assisted Living told SheKnows that the time constraints of most medical appointments — along with the anxiety-inducing nature of navigating health problems — can be a factor contributing to these sorts of misunderstandings.

“The doctor’s office is notorious for long waiting times yet extremely brief visits. Many patients feel rushed or that they aren’t allowed enough time to get past their nerves and anxieties about the office to properly articulate themselves,” Mitchell says. “A more relaxed setting—one where doctors take the time to value each patient’s care as priority—can make all the difference in patient satisfaction levels and adequate treatment.”

And there’s also the issue of how fast providers are expected to get through each interaction with a patient.

“The problem now is that most care providers fly through patients. Sometimes this is due to overbooked schedules. Other times it’s because there’s a high demand for healthcare yet few practitioners available in their area,” Mitchell adds. “Patient care is more complex than many people presume. So there’s a lot more work to be done internally with our health system to provide the resources that allow doctors themselves to provide more of themselves to each person.”

What Patients & Providers Can Do

Rafael E. Salazar II, MHS, OTR/L, a licensed occupational therapist and author of Better Outcomes: A Guide to Humanizing Healthcare tells SheKnows that there are steps clinicians can take to maintain positive relationships between patients and their providers.

“Clinicians and facilities (clinics, hospitals, etc.) should provide space for the patient to share their narrative experience (their story). This may be done via intake paperwork or during the initial consult or appointment. But clinicians and organizations need to provide space to be the ones not doing the talking and allowing the patient to tell their side of the story,” Salazar says. “This is also where clinicians and organizations can practice the fundamental keys to good communication: active listening, empathy, friendliness, encouragement, and appropriate body language.”

There are also plenty of ways patients can advocate for themselves (and prepare themselves to do that advocating work heading into their appointments too).

“I always encourage patients in my clinic to be assertive (but not forceful) in making sure their needs are known. A lot of times, clinicians don’t intend to overlook certain things. They’re just trying to get through a busy day full of many patients, documentation, and other administrative tasks. So, it’s not that they’re intentionally ignoring the needs of their patients. They’re simply forgetting to ask,” Salazar says. “Often, simply saying something like, ‘I just want to make sure I tell you…’ is enough to alert a clinician that there may be more that they need to listen to and take into consideration. “

Other experts along the way recommended patients take the following actions or incorporate these practices to make space for the most positive interactions with their healthcare providers:

  • Don’t be afraid to thoroughly research, screen and vet providers ahead of your appointments.

  • Put in writing your symptoms/any specifics you want to remember and write down notes of what your doctor says as needed. A health binder can be incredibly helpful if you have chronic illnesses, multiple health issues or a longer health history to disclose to a new provider.

  • Team up with a therapist or a loved one to address your needs, any triggers you might have or any particular challenges you might be anticipating.

  • Building on that, know you don’t need to attend an appointment alone! Bring someone you trust who can help you clarify, keep track of the conversation.

  • If you feel like you’re not being understood you can pause and say “I’m not sure you’re understanding me and I want to make sure we’re on the same page…” or ask for further clarification.

Best of SheKnows

Sign up for SheKnows' Newsletter.
For the latest news, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 00:00:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://news.yahoo.com/communication-gap-between-patients-practitioners-140000467.html Killexams : What do scientists gain from engaging in public communications?

Psychologists Dr. Friederike Hendriks and Prof Rainer Bromme surveyed scientists at the University of Münster about their involvement in the public outreach activities of two interdisciplinary research networks. The study demonstrates how communication with groups beyond the scientific community can have positive retroactive effects on the scientific collaboration of researchers from different disciplines.

Scientists who communicate their research to non-scientific audiences experience positive retroactive effects on their scientific work, according to a newly published study.

"As a result of their involvement in public outreach, the scientists we surveyed not only perceived an increase in their personal motivation and competence for , but they also saw benefits related to networking and knowledge exchange with colleagues from other disciplines within interdisciplinary research networks," explains psychologist Dr. Friederike Hendriks from the Technische Universität Braunschweig.

Together with psychologist Prof Rainer Bromme from the University of Münster, she collected assessments from scientists at Münster University on their involvement in the public communication activities of two interdisciplinary research networks in the field of cell dynamics and imaging.

The basic premise, she says, is that scientists who engage in communication with non-scientific audiences need to broaden their own specialized views of their research in order to make complex Topics understandable. As the same principle is true for interactions with fellow researchers from other disciplines, communication with people beyond the scientific community can also promote communication between different disciplines within science.

The interviewees reported almost no negative effects related to their . However, they agreed that they had limited time and resources for such tasks. Furthermore, doctoral students were more hesitant in their assessment of their role in public communications and its benefits than postdocs, who are more advanced in their careers, and professors.

"As a scientist, you have to weigh priorities in the face of multiple tasks," says Rainer Bromme. He emphasizes that their study "helps make clear that is not just an effort that you make for other people on top of your many other tasks, that it can also be beneficial for your work," adding that public communication both demands and promotes reflection on one's own research and the relationship between science and society.

Crossing boundaries facilitates learning on multiple levels

The positive side effects that the scientists associated with their public outreach activities included finding a "common language" between different disciplines, getting an overview of research projects, and developing a better understanding of the research of their colleagues in other disciplines. In one case, two research groups who collaborated on activities even went on to undertake a joint scientific project.

The majority of interviewees also reported that they enjoyed the activities, perceived an improvement in their public communication skills and were motivated, by their positive experiences, to pursue further engagement. Individuals also reported that interacting with non-expert audiences had encouraged them to reflect on their own work on a more abstract level.

These diverse potentials were identified and explored by the researchers who produced this study based on the theory of "boundary crossing". "When boundaries come up or are even crossed in communication with other people, this opens up avenues for learning about yourself and your conversation partners," explains Friederike Hendriks.

Science communication as a beneficial joint task

When compared to postdocs and professors, doctoral students rated their own research as less interesting to the public. They were also more likely to think that their careers would not benefit from science communication and that it should be done by experienced people. "As a doctoral student, you usually work on smaller research questions and, only as your expertise develops in your career, can you place them in larger contexts so that they also become interesting for people beyond the ," explains Friederike Hendriks.

She emphasizes that it is, therefore, important to design science communication formats and opportunities that are appropriate for doctoral students in terms of content and time. She explains how, in the research networks involved in the survey, this was achieved through, for example, lab workshops for high-school students and contributions to picture exhibitions.

She also highlights that the high level of outreach the scientists interviewed had engaged in shows that research networks can help establish a culture in which communication is seen as a valuable joint task rather than a burdensome additional task. Friederike Hendriks herself is currently working with her junior research group to develop training for early career researchers which teaches research-based strategies and skills to support researchers to engage in comprehensible and counterpart-involving conversations about science.

Sample and communication activities in the focus of the study

The team surveyed 75 scientists from various career stages and disciplines—including doctoral students, postdocs and professors from medicine, biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics and computer science—who collaborate in research networks across disciplinary boundaries. The participating networks included the Collaborative Research Centre 656 "Molecular Cardiovascular Imaging" and the "Cells in Motion" Cluster of Excellence at the University of Münster.

The focus of the study was on activities initiated by these networks. They ranged from laboratory tours, workshops and lectures for children, young people and adults to exhibitions with interactive exhibits and scientific images, to information media such as websites, brochures, audio and video formats, and press relations.

The study was conducted in 2016 and 2017 and has now been published in Science Communication.

More information: Friederike Hendriks et al, Researchers' Public Engagement in the Context of Interdisciplinary Research Programs: Learning and Reflection from Boundary Crossing, Science Communication (2022). DOI: 10.1177/10755470221137052

Provided by Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster

Citation: What do scientists gain from engaging in public communications? (2022, December 5) retrieved 14 December 2022 from https://phys.org/news/2022-12-scientists-gain-engaging-communications.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

Mon, 05 Dec 2022 05:15:00 -0600 en text/html https://phys.org/news/2022-12-scientists-gain-engaging-communications.html
Killexams : Investing in Communication Sector Stocks No result found, try new keyword!These five communication companies are worth a look for the long-term buy and hold investor. One of the primary keys to a civilized society is the ability to communicate. And today, there are more ... Mon, 21 Nov 2022 03:03:00 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.thestreet.com/market-sectors/communication-services Killexams : Dependability, Communications Skills and Willingness to Learn Deemed Essential Soft Skills for Applicants

A recent survey from The Harris Poll, commissioned by Express Employment Professionals, reveals the top soft skills hiring managers look for in candidates.

OKLAHOMA CITY, Nov. 16, 2022 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ -- Dependability (90%), communications skills (89%) and a willingness to learn (88%) are among the top soft skills hiring managers deem absolutely essential or very important in job applicants.

This is according to a survey from The Harris Poll commissioned by Express Employment Professionals.

Other important skills include problem-solving skills (85%), adaptability (85%), critical thinking (84%) and/or initiative (84%). More than 7 in 10 feel fitting with the company culture (79%), creativity (72%) and/or leadership skills (71%) are also of high importance to them.

However, instead of bringing on new hires, reskilling current employees has been continuing to entice U.S. hiring decision-makers since 2021. Nearly 4 in 5 (77%) would prefer to train their current employees for new roles before venturing outside the organization for employees—75% in the second half of 2021 and 72% in the first half of 2021.

Offering Training Opportunities
A hard work ethic, proper communication skills, teamwork, problem-solving, commitment and flexibility are soft skills that Express franchise owners Nancy Reed in Texas and Beth Cary in Virginia say are the most important soft skills in today's workers, but also the ones most lacking.

"Skills training and continuing education are incredibly important, but it's hard to say it's the responsibility of an employer to provide such opportunities," Cary said. "While many large organizations already provide this for their employees, it could be a hefty burden for small- to mid-size businesses that do not have the resources to provide it."

Reed believes it will take all employers to train the workforce on soft skills required for successful operations.

"If companies invest in more training, this will result in having the employees we need with the skills we need," she said. "It will Boost retention, work environments and increase profitability. If the current lack of professional development continues, the fallout will be high turnover, poor company culture and increased frustration with the available workforce."

Propriety training programs or uniform offerings from third parties would, however, allow for consistency of knowledge for every employee, Cary says.

"Everyone would be given the same information and operate from the same playbook," she added. "Despite the cost, a pitfall of not providing on-the-job training would be a workforce that is operating based on each individual's frame of reference, rather than by corporate standards."

Reskilling Current Employees
The desire to retrain current employees for new roles versus recruiting outside the company can be more efficient and prudent in the tight labor market because employers generally know the strengths of opportunities of their staff, according to Reed.

"Training your current workforce on the soft skills gap will make them more loyal and create a better team and work environment," she said. "You know the gaps in your current workforce and bringing in new employees may result in new gaps and new challenges that will affect your ability to grow and profitability."

Current employees who already possess institutional knowledge and are successful in their positions have an advantage over potential new hires, Cary said.

"Recruiting and training a new employee is considerably more costly, timewise and financially, especially when there are no guarantees they will be a fit," she added.

Some positions, though, will be easier to transition with training than others regarding soft versus hard skills.

"Hard skills are difficult to teach if an incumbent employee cannot perform them," Reed said. "Like an accountant; you may not be able to teach them the technical skills required to do the job. Mistakes in this field could be very costly for the business."

While the structure of work may have changed drastically over the past few years, the makeup of quality employees is still paramount, Express Employment International CEO Bill Stoller said.

"Employees should take pride in their work and the soft skills expected of them create a more collaborative work environment for all and can translate into other areas of life," he added. "No matter the company structure, dependability, communications skills and willingness to learn are timeless attributes."

Survey Methodology
The survey was conducted online within the United States by The Harris Poll on behalf of Express Employment Professionals between May 3 and May 23, 2022, among 1,003 U.S. hiring decision-makers (defined as adults ages 18+ in the U.S. who are employed full-time or self-employed, work at companies with more than one employee, and have full/significant involvement in hiring decisions at their company). Data were weighted where necessary by company size to bring them into line with their actual proportions in the population.

***

If you would like to arrange for an interview with Bill Stoller to discuss this topic, please contact Sheena Hollander, Director of Corporate Communications and PR, at (405) 717-5966.

About Bill Stoller
William H. "Bill" Stoller is chairman and chief executive officer of Express Employment International. Founded in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, the international staffing franchisor supports the Express Employment Professionals franchise and related brands. The Express franchise brand is an industry-leading, international staffing company with franchise locations in the U.S., Canada, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand.

About Express Employment Professionals
At Express Employment Professionals, we're in the business of people. From job seekers to client companies, Express helps people thrive and businesses grow. Our international network of franchises offers localized staffing solutions to the communities they serve across the U.S., Canada, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand, employing 586,000 people globally in 2021 and 10 million since its inception. For more information, visit ExpressPros.com, and find more employment insights at ExpressPros.com/AmericaEmployed.

Media Contact

Sheena Hollander, Express Employment Professionals, (405) 840-5000, Sheena.Hollander@ExpressPros.com

Twitter, Facebook

SOURCE Express Employment Professionals

Tue, 15 Nov 2022 23:51:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/now/dependability-communications-skills-willingness-learn-135000546.html
Killexams : Communications Electronics Joins MCA

MCA Expands Presence in Maryland

SPARTANBURG, S.C., Nov. 22, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Mobile Communications America, Inc. ("MCA"), the leading provider of wireless communication solutions that enhance the safety, security, and operating efficiency of workplaces today, announces the acquisition of Communications Electronics, Inc. ("CEI"), a full-service communications provider headquartered in Timonium, Maryland.

Since 1976, Communications Electronics has been making mission-critical connections for some of the largest public safety agencies, schools, hospitals, and enterprises across the Mid-Atlantic.

"Forty-six years ago, Ruth and Glenn Cassell founded Communications Electronics with the mission to make a difference for our customers, employees, and the community.  Since then, three generations of our family, and the entire CE family of dedicated employees, have been committed to maintaining their high standards.  We are delighted to join the MCA family and grow that mission on a broader scale," said Roger Cassell, President and CEO of Communications Electronics. "With the same service-first mentality and with access to more resources, we look forward to expanding our services to both new and existing customers in the Mid-Atlantic market and beyond."

Vince Foody, MCA's CEO commented, "We are thrilled to welcome Communications Electronics to the MCA family.  Their reputation and experience supporting public safety and commercial customers is unmatched, and this partnership further supports our commitment to a service-first culture. We look forward to serving the Mid-Atlantic market together."

The addition of CEI strengthens MCA's footprint in the Mid-Atlantic region.

About MCA Mobile Communications America (MCA) is one of the largest and most trusted Motorola partners in the United States. More than 65,000 customers trust MCA to provide wireless communication solutions for a safe, secure, and more efficient workplace. As your trusted advisor, we reduce the time and effort needed to research, install, and maintain the right solutions to make your workplace better.

MCA offers a carefully researched portfolio of world class voice, data and video products and solutions. With more than twenty product lines and hundreds of solutions, our team of certified professionals across the United States deliver a full suite of reliable technologies with a service first approach. The MCA advantage is our extensive service portfolio to support the solution lifecycle from start to finish. www.callmc.com

Media Contact:
Lauren Santilli
8645047869
349227@email4pr.com

Cision

View original content to get multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/communications-electronics-joins-mca-301684550.html

SOURCE Mobile Communications America

Mon, 21 Nov 2022 23:35:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/communications-electronics-joins-mca-133300480.html
Killexams : Dependability, Communications Skills and Willingness to Learn Deemed Essential Soft Skills for Applicants

A recent survey from The Harris Poll, commissioned by Express Employment Professionals, reveals the top soft skills hiring managers look for in candidates.

OKLAHOMA CITY (PRWEB) November 16, 2022

Dependability (90%), communications skills (89%) and a willingness to learn (88%) are among the top soft skills hiring managers deem absolutely essential or very important in job applicants.

This is according to a survey from The Harris Poll commissioned by Express Employment Professionals.

Other important skills include problem-solving skills (85%), adaptability (85%), critical thinking (84%) and/or initiative (84%). More than 7 in 10 feel fitting with the company culture (79%), creativity (72%) and/or leadership skills (71%) are also of high importance to them.

However, instead of bringing on new hires, reskilling current employees has been continuing to entice U.S. hiring decision-makers since 2021. Nearly 4 in 5 (77%) would prefer to train their current employees for new roles before venturing outside the organization for employees—75% in the second half of 2021 and 72% in the first half of 2021.

Offering Training Opportunities
A hard work ethic, proper communication skills, teamwork, problem-solving, commitment and flexibility are soft skills that Express franchise owners Nancy Reed in Texas and Beth Cary in Virginia say are the most important soft skills in today's workers, but also the ones most lacking.

"Skills training and continuing education are incredibly important, but it's hard to say it's the responsibility of an employer to provide such opportunities," Cary said. "While many large organizations already provide this for their employees, it could be a hefty burden for small- to mid-size businesses that do not have the resources to provide it."

Reed believes it will take all employers to train the workforce on soft skills required for successful operations.

"If companies invest in more training, this will result in having the employees we need with the skills we need," she said. "It will Boost retention, work environments and increase profitability. If the current lack of professional development continues, the fallout will be high turnover, poor company culture and increased frustration with the available workforce."

Propriety training programs or uniform offerings from third parties would, however, allow for consistency of knowledge for every employee, Cary says.

"Everyone would be given the same information and operate from the same playbook," she added. "Despite the cost, a pitfall of not providing on-the-job training would be a workforce that is operating based on each individual's frame of reference, rather than by corporate standards."

Reskilling Current Employees
The desire to retrain current employees for new roles versus recruiting outside the company can be more efficient and prudent in the tight labor market because employers generally know the strengths of opportunities of their staff, according to Reed.

"Training your current workforce on the soft skills gap will make them more loyal and create a better team and work environment," she said. "You know the gaps in your current workforce and bringing in new employees may result in new gaps and new challenges that will affect your ability to grow and profitability."

Current employees who already possess institutional knowledge and are successful in their positions have an advantage over potential new hires, Cary said.

"Recruiting and training a new employee is considerably more costly, timewise and financially, especially when there are no guarantees they will be a fit," she added.

Some positions, though, will be easier to transition with training than others regarding soft versus hard skills.

"Hard skills are difficult to teach if an incumbent employee cannot perform them," Reed said. "Like an accountant; you may not be able to teach them the technical skills required to do the job. Mistakes in this field could be very costly for the business."

While the structure of work may have changed drastically over the past few years, the makeup of quality employees is still paramount, Express Employment International CEO Bill Stoller said.

"Employees should take pride in their work and the soft skills expected of them create a more collaborative work environment for all and can translate into other areas of life," he added. "No matter the company structure, dependability, communications skills and willingness to learn are timeless attributes."

Survey Methodology
The survey was conducted online within the United States by The Harris Poll on behalf of Express Employment Professionals between May 3 and May 23, 2022, among 1,003 U.S. hiring decision-makers (defined as adults ages 18+ in the U.S. who are employed full-time or self-employed, work at companies with more than one employee, and have full/significant involvement in hiring decisions at their company). Data were weighted where necessary by company size to bring them into line with their actual proportions in the population.

***

If you would like to arrange for an interview with Bill Stoller to discuss this topic, please contact Sheena Hollander, Director of Corporate Communications and PR, at (405) 717-5966.

About Bill Stoller
William H. "Bill" Stoller is chairman and chief executive officer of Express Employment International. Founded in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, the international staffing franchisor supports the Express Employment Professionals franchise and related brands. The Express franchise brand is an industry-leading, international staffing company with franchise locations in the U.S., Canada, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand.

About Express Employment Professionals
At Express Employment Professionals, we're in the business of people. From job seekers to client companies, Express helps people thrive and businesses grow. Our international network of franchises offers localized staffing solutions to the communities they serve across the U.S., Canada, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand, employing 586,000 people globally in 2021 and 10 million since its inception. For more information, visit ExpressPros.com, and find more employment insights at ExpressPros.com/AmericaEmployed.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: https://www.prweb.com/releases/dependability_communications_skills_and_willingness_to_learn_deemed_essential_soft_skills_for_applicants/prweb19012594.htm

© 2022 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

Wed, 16 Nov 2022 00:02:00 -0600 text/html https://www.benzinga.com/pressreleases/22/11/p29747848/dependability-communications-skills-and-willingness-to-learn-deemed-essential-soft-skills-for-appl
RCDD-001 exam dump and training guide direct download
Training Exams List