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Exam Code: Platform-App-Builder Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
Platform-App-Builder Salesforce Certified Platform App Builder

The Salesforce Certified Platform App Builder test has the following characteristics:
 Content: 60 multiple-choice/multiple-select questions
 Time allotted to complete the exam: 105
 Passing Score: 63%
 Registration fee: USD 200, plus applicable taxes as required per local law
 Retake fee: USD 100, plus applicable taxes as required per local law
 Delivery options: Proctored test delivered onsite at a testing center or in an online proctored environment. Click here for information on scheduling an exam.
 References: No hard-copy or online materials may be referenced during the exam.
 Prerequisites: None required; course attendance highly recommended.

ABOUT THE SALESFORCE CERTIFIED PLATFORM APP BUILDER CREDENTIAL
The Salesforce Certified Platform App Builder credential is designed for individuals who would like to demonstrate their skills and knowledge in designing, building, and deploying custom applications using the declarative customization capabilities of the Lightning Platform. The candidate can create, manage, and update data models, application security, business logic, and process automation.
Here are some examples of the concepts you should understand to pass the exam:
 Design the data model, user interface, business logic, and security for custom applications
 Customize applications for mobile use
 Design reports and dashboards
 Deploy custom applications

The Salesforce Certified Platform App Builder credential is intended for an individual who has experience developing custom applications on the Lightning Platform, including practical application of the skills and concepts noted in the test objectives below.
The Salesforce Certified Platform App Builder generally has six months to one year of experience building applications on the Lightning Platform and/or on a similar technology platform.
The Salesforce Certified Platform App Builder candidate has the experience, skills, and knowledge outlined below:
 Familiarity with the capabilities of the Lightning Platform.
 Awareness of Salesforce license types and the related considerations.
 Ability to design applications to support business processes and reporting requirements.
 Familiarity with the social and mobile capabilities of the platform; accustomed to using and optimizing business applications on a mobile device.
 Familiarity with the Salesforce development environments and the options available to deploy applications and manage changes on the Lightning Platform.
 Study of the resources listed in this test Guide and the additional required study materials provided by Salesforce.
A candidate for this test is not expected to be able to administer Sales Cloud or Service Cloud, have programmatic development experience (Apex, Visualforce, etc.), design custom interfaces using Visualforce, or design custom Lightning components using Apex or JavaScript.

The Salesforce Certified Platform App Builder test measures a candidates knowledge and skills related to the following objectives. A candidate should have hands-on experience developing custom applications on the Lightning Platform and have demonstrated the application of each of the features/functions below.
SALESFORCE FUNDAMENTALS
 Describe the capabilities of the core CRM objects in the Salesforce schema.
 Given a scenario, identify the boundaries of declarative customization and the use cases for programmatic customization.
 Identify common scenarios for extending an org using the AppExchange.
DATA MODELING AND MANAGEMENT
 Given a scenario, determine the appropriate data model.
 Describe the capabilities of the various relationship types and the implications of each on record access, user interface, and reporting.
 Identify the considerations when changing a field's type.
 Given a set of requirements, identify the considerations and select the appropriate field type.
 Describe the capabilities and considerations of the schema builder.
 Describe the options and considerations when importing and exporting data.
 Describe the capabilities of and use cases for external objects.
SECURITY
 Describe the features and capabilities available to restrict and extend object, record, and field access.
 Given a set of business requirements, determine the appropriate sharing solution.
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SALESFORCE CERTIFIED PLATFORM APP BUILDER
BUSINESS LOGIC AND PROCESS AUTOMATION
 Describe the capabilities of and use cases for record types.
 Describe the capabilities of and use cases for formula fields.
 Describe the capabilities of, use cases for, and implications of roll-up summary fields.
 Describe the capabilities of and use cases for validation rules.
 Describe the capabilities of and use cases for approval processes.
 Describe the capabilities of and use cases for workflow, visual workflow, and Process Builder.
 Given a set of business requirements, recommend a solution to automate business processes.
 Describe the ramifications of field updates and the potential for recursion.
SOCIAL
 Describe the capabilities of and use cases for social features.
USER INTERFACE
 Describe the user interface customization options.
 Describe the capabilities of and use cases for custom buttons, links, and actions.
 Describe the declarative options available for incorporating Lightning Components in an application.
 Given a scenario, determine the appropriate user interface design.
REPORTING
 Describe the features and capabilities available when creating reports, report types, and dashboards.
MOBILE
 Describe the declarative customization options available for the Salesforce mobile application user interface.
 Given a set of requirements, determine the appropriate global and objectspecific actions and action layouts to optimize the Salesforce mobile
application user experience.
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Weighting 3%
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SALESFORCE CERTIFIED PLATFORM APP BUILDER
APP DEVELOPMENT
 Describe the key milestones and considerations when managing the application lifecycle.
 Describe the differences between and considerations when using the various types of sandboxes.
 Describe the capabilities of and considerations when using change sets.
 Describe the use cases of and considerations when using unmanaged packages.
 Given a scenario, determine the appropriate deployment plan.

Salesforce Certified Platform App Builder
Salesforce Salesforce plan
Killexams : Salesforce Salesforce plan - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/Platform-App-Builder Search results Killexams : Salesforce Salesforce plan - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/Platform-App-Builder https://killexams.com/exam_list/Salesforce Killexams : 'People come and people go,' says a defiant Benioff. And we're sticking with the Salesforce CEO despite the smoke

Salesforce cofounder and co-CEO Marc Benioff speaks during the grand opening of the Salesforce Tower, the tallest building in San Francisco, Calif., Tuesday, May 22, 2018.

Karl Mondon | Bay Area News Group | Getty Images

A series of executive departures at Salesforce (CRM) has spooked investors in accurate days, but we're sticking with the Club holding through the turnover and broader economic uncertainty because its enterprise software products remain integral to business in the digital age.

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 07:31:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.cnbc.com/2022/12/08/were-sticking-with-salesforce-and-benioff-despite-the-smoke-.html
Killexams : Inside Salesforce's succession crisis. Marc Benioff can’t let go and it’s driving away his top lieutenants.
  • Salesforce is experiencing an executive exodus as co-CEO Bret Taylor and others resign.
  • Salesforce insiders attribute these exits to Marc Benioff's response to accurate economic headwinds.
  • Some say an activist investor's performance pressure runs counter to Salesforce's "Ohana" culture.

Marc Benioff has lost his successor.

Last week, Salesforce revealed the heir apparent Bret Taylor's plans to leave the company — exactly one year after taking over as co-CEO alongside Benioff.

Since then, the exodus hasn't stopped. Five top executives from Salesforce and its subsidiaries, most notably Slack CEO Stewart Butterfield and Tableau CEO Mark Nelson, announced their departure just days after Taylor.

Company insiders attribute these departures to Benioff's response to the company's accurate economic headwinds: As Salesforce's outlook dips after a successful few pandemic years, the cofounder is exerting increasing control over the company, alienating his closest lieutenants while dialing up performance pressure on employees.

Insider spoke with a dozen current and former employees who requested anonymity because they weren't authorized to speak with the press. Their identities are known to Insider. Salesforce declined to comment for this story.

The departures have created a crisis in leadership at Salesforce. As the company tries repeatedly to make a succession plan for Benioff, the cofounder seemingly won't let go — and is increasing his influence with a recession looming.

"Now that the market is tough, Marc behaves as if he has complete control," a person close to Benioff told Insider, saying Benioff was increasingly interfering in the part of the business Taylor was meant to run and dialing up the pressure on sales teams.

Benioff is dialing up the pressure amid economic headwinds

Every quarter, Salesforce executives meet at locations around the world to review the business, from staffing to the company's various products. Lately, employees said, Benioff has turned those meetings into a tribunal for his sales executives.

Executives defend their team's performance, and if they miss their target, they must be apologetic and show contrition, one person who attended the meetings told Insider.

"If this happens for a couple of quarters, they are expected to leave," the person added.

While the coronavirus pandemic was a boon for the company, Salesforce has since trimmed its annual revenue projections to roughly $30 billion, down from the roughly $31 billion in May. The company's stock value has also plummeted, trading at half the value of its share price from this time last year.

Benioff sees the sales team as key to Salesforce's recovery.

"The sales organization is in Marc's eyes the most important within the company," the person who attended the quarterly meetings said. Benioff sees the sales team as the largest driver of growth at the company. "If the sales don't come in," the person said, "he's pretty impatient. People understand they live and die by the sword."

Benioff has always had high growth expectations for sales leaders, an employee who left recently said. "If you look at the track record of Marc and his patience with sales leaders, it's amazing how many he's gone through," the person said.

In November, Salesforce laid off hundreds of employees. One former employee, who was on the sales team, said the majority of cuts happened on their team targeting sales representatives who hadn't closed a significant deal within the past six quarters.

Rumors are swirling inside the company about another round of layoffs to come this month.

The sales representatives who remain have to meet what some insiders called unrealistic new mandates, like making daily in-person meetings throughout the holiday season and returning to working in the office despite Benioff's public statements saying workers were just as productive at home.

Some employees speculated much of these internal pressures might be related to the activist investor Starboard Value, which disclosed a significant stake in Salesforce in October, just before the layoffs. The firm first approached Salesforce this summer and spoke with some of its executives, and a person familiar with the matter told Insider it had since pushed for cost-cutting measures.

Employees said these changes were indicative of a larger cultural shift at Salesforce. Where once the company was rated one of the best firms to work for, they said, its welcoming "Ohana" culture is being replaced by a ruthless prioritization of metrics and sales targets. Perhaps fittingly, even its most accurate layoffs were referred to internally as a "performance management event."

But even in Benioff's internal note to employees addressing Taylor's departure, he stressed the importance of the sales team.

"More than ever, we need everyone across the company to stay laser-focused on working together to support our Sales team and deliver an incredible Q4," Benioff wrote. "This is our highest priority."

Salesforce's co-CEO model has failed

As Benioff puts pressure on sales executives, people close to him said he's exerting increasing control over C-suite executives.

According to an internal org chart, viewed by Insider, Taylor was supposed to oversee 10 top executives running five key parts of the company: finance, operations, engineering, staffing, and marketing. Benioff's reports include the executive in charge of Salesforce's philanthropic efforts, the Salesforce Advisory Board chair, and a person in charge of "trust and safety."

But according to a source close to Benioff, the co-CEO model wasn't working.

"They were stepping on each other's toes and getting in each other's way, not staying within the agreed-upon swim lanes, and the business wasn't performing," the person said. "Mix all of that together and there's one outcome: The junior guy goes."

Benioff and Taylor also disagreed on the fundamentals of running the company. One person said Taylor panic more about profitability and Benioff was more panic about growth. "Wall Street has been looking for significant improvement in operating margin, and that was Bret's focus." the person said.

Taylor didn't respond to a request for comment. Salesforce declined to make Benioff available for an interview.

It's not the first time the co-CEO model has failed for Salesforce.

Keith Block, the company's former co-CEO, resigned in 2020 after infighting with Benioff, a source close to Benioff said. While Benioff was supposed to remain CEO only for 18 months before Block took over entirely, Benioff had trouble letting go. Eventually, he asked that several executives continue to report to him rather than Block.

"You were either one of Keith's people or you were one of Marc's people," the person said. "In public, they would always portray this closeness — 'we finish each other's sentences' kind of thing. Behind the scenes, they were fighting."

The last straw came when Benioff tried to install Taylor, who was in his camp, as chief operating officer without consulting Block. Block chose to resign rather than take over as the sole CEO. Block didn't respond to a request for comment.

Salesforce's succession plan is in question

Taylor's departure has been less acrimonious than Block's. Benioff was "genuinely shocked and upset," a source close to both executives said. On the company's latest earnings call, Benioff made a passionate appeal to Taylor: "We love you deeply, you have a home here, we're going to try to get you back somehow. Don't think you're going to somehow get out of this alive, because you're not."

The person close to Taylor suggested the executive was also burned out from trying to run Salesforce while also navigating the takeover of Twitter, as the chairman of the social-media company's board. "The Twitter fight was worse and harder on him than expected," the person said.

Taylor's departure means Salesforce has to find a replacement not only for him but eventually for Benioff as well.

"Just when Benioff thought he had a succession plan all figured out, Taylor steps down," a high-level employee who left recently said. "That's going to hurt until they find someone else of that caliber to run Salesforce's main business."

Salesforce has a narrow bench of candidates for either, insiders said. Internally, some employees have speculated CFO Amy Weaver could take over for Taylor, while others think his exit is the end of the company's co-CEO model.

"Marc either has to be the sole CEO or just the chairman and bring in a CEO," the person said. "Anybody who has any sort of standing will ask, why did it fail so many times and why is it going to be different for me?"

Are you a Salesforce employee or do you have insight to share? Contact Ashley Stewart via email (astewart@insider.com) or send a secure message from a nonwork device via Signal (+1-425-344-8242).

Wed, 07 Dec 2022 08:21:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.businessinsider.com/salesforce-bret-taylor-tech-layoffs-marc-benioff-succession-crisis-2022-12
Killexams : Salesforce and Veeva Systems Are Set to Sever Ties. Here's What Investors Need to Know Salesforce and Veeva Systems Are Set to Sever Ties. Here's What Investors Need to Know © Provided by The Motley Fool Salesforce and Veeva Systems Are Set to Sever Ties. Here's What Investors Need to Know

Cloud software provider for the life sciences industry Veeva Systems (NYSE: VEEV) announced it's divorcing longtime partner Salesforce (NYSE: CRM) although Veeva hopes the two companies can remain friends.

The announcement was made concurrent with the company's third-quarter earnings update. Like Salesforce, Veeva has seen slowing growth amid global economic turmoil. Revenue rose 16% year-over-year in its latest quarter (ended October). For comparison, revenue was up 26% in the year ago period. So accurate results represent a slowdown as pharmaceutical and biotech customers spend more cautiously heading into 2023.

Still, Veeva should have plenty of ways to grow for years to come as migration to the cloud continues at a brisk pace. But what does the split with Salesforce actually mean? And how will it affect Salesforce? Here are some things to consider.

A planned break from a long-term partner

Veeva Systems was co-founded by CEO Peter Gassner back in 2007. Gassner was actually a Salesforce employee from 2003 to 2005, helping to build what is still the cloud-based customer relationship management (CRM) infrastructure software core to the cloud giant today. When starting Veeva as a specific CRM offering for the life sciences industry, Gassner partnered with the platform he helped build to handle the back-end data infrastructure. In exchange, Veeva CRM became Salesforce's referral partner for the life sciences industry. 

To this day, Veeva pays Salesforce for these behind-the-scenes services, listed as "cost of subscription services" on Veeva's income statements. Along with Amazon's (NASDAQ: AMZN) AWS cloud platform, cost of subscription services was $65.7 million in the last quarter, or nearly 12% of revenue. Veeva said in a statement that its current contract with Salesforce expires in September 2025, and it does not plan to renew. Instead, it will be migrating the back-end cloud management of Veeva CRM onto its own, newer cloud platform and application suite it calls Veeva Vault.

There is a five year wind-down period through 2030 in which Veeva CRM customers can continue using Salesforce, but Veeva expects it will migrate most over to Vault in short order. Consolidating down to one primary vendor (AWS) could save Veeva money, but Gassner and the top team explained that moving its CRM product over to Vault is more about delivering a better customer experience.

Veeva has disclosed in quarterly filings that both AWS and Salesforce have "experienced significant service outages in the past." Whittling down to just one major vendor could help reduce application down times -- plus, of course, possibly reduce some cost of revenue long-term.

Beyond 2025, Gassner hopes Salesforce and Veeva will continue to collaborate since they have many joint customers and complementary cloud products. However, it's worth noting that after September 2025, Salesforce could choose to become a competitor and design its own custom CRM and data management products for life sciences.

Salesforce: losing more than just infrastructure revenue

When Veeva starts migrating its CRM customers off of Salesforce in 2025, Salesforce will lose out on that revenue stream. However, losing Veeva may not amount to much. After all, Salesforce hauled in $30.3 billion in revenue over the last 12 months, and CEO Marc Benioff remains vocal about reaching $50 billion in revenue by 2025 even though Salesforce has also experienced a sharp slowdown as of late.

Its Q3 revenue was up just 14% year-over-year, or up 19% when excluding the effect of a record run-up in the value of the U.S. dollar. Basically, losing millions of dollars of business -- perhaps $120 million on an annual basis -- won't make much of a dent in Salesforce's empire in 2025. $120 million is just 0.24% of $50 billion (assuming Salesforce reaches that milestone).

But here's what is interesting. Veeva is but one accurate departure from Salesforce's ohana ("family" in Hawaiian), which is how Benioff likes to refer to the collaboration among Salesforce's employees, partners, and customers. After just one year, Co-CEO Bret Taylor announced his departure from the company. Stewart Butterfield -- co-founder and CEO of Slack, which was acquired over the summer of 2021 -- also announced he's leaving. And Mark Nelson, CEO of Tableau (acquired in 2019), has indicated he is leaving too. Other executives are vacating their seats  as well.

It suddenly doesn't sound like much of an "ohana" over at Salesforce right at the moment.  Or perhaps it's just a sign of the times. The nearly three years since the pandemic started have been stressful, to say the least. And now there's a bear market, hastened by the U.S. Federal Reserve's aggressive interest rate hikes, which are forcing companies like Salesforce to aggressively cut expenses to boost profitability. Many executives might just want a break from the pressure or to pursue other interests.

At any rate, the market is studying these executive departures negatively, and have sent Salesforce stock back down to multi-year lows. I'm certainly not saying loss of leadership is a good thing, but I'm not ready to call it a bad thing either. This still remains Benioff's company, and he's been at the helm since the beginning back in 1999. I have to believe he still knows what he's doing.

It's been a tough year for cloud stocks, Veeva Systems and Salesforce included, but the long-term thesis for investing in them remains intact. For now, I'm not planning on making any changes based on the pending breakup between Veeva and Salesforce.

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Wed, 07 Dec 2022 23:15:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/companies/salesforce-and-veeva-systems-are-set-to-sever-ties-heres-what-investors-need-to-know/ar-AA153nVl
Killexams : Salesforce COO Brian Millham - managing and transforming sales in a turbulent macro-economic climate
Brian Millham

Yesterday Salesforce released the fifth annual State of Sales report, based on the opinions of 7,700 sales professionals around the world. The study makes for interesting studying as to what’s happening in the sales industry - you can check out diginomica’s appraisal here.

By happenstance, on the same day the report was made public, the person heading up Salesforce’s own sales operation, Chief Operating Officer Brian Millham, was sharing his own thoughts on what the current and future landscape looks like, at the Barclays Global Technology Media and Telecommunications Conference.

Millham, as we’ve noted previously, has Salesforce - and sales - running through his veins. He was employee number 13 back in 1999 and he’s had around 18 years in various sales roles within the company, run the global business for the commercial division and headed up the Customer Success operation.

He was asked by Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff to take over the running of sales midway through the pandemic, at which point Millham didn’t feel able to take on the role for family reasons. But the offer was repeated in August this year and this time around Millham stepped into the post of COO with a brief from the top both to run the sales organization and transform it.

Elongation

It’s an interesting time for anyone to take on this challenge. Salesforce continues to grow, but the growth rate is inevitably vulnerable to the macro-economic climate, as CFO Amy Weaver reiterated this week, noting that the tough economic headwinds started to be felt around July. She and Benioff have both talked about a slowing down of the sales cycle, something that Millham says he’s experienced:

We had a CEO who was going to purchase, and had purchased previously the same product, just an expansion of the same-size transaction. We thought we checked every box with them and it turns out the Board had to approve it this time and they delayed the deal.

There is, he says, pressure from customers around deep inspection on every transaction, multiple layers of approval, and compression in deal size. This is not what Salesforce has been used to in accurate years:

Just in the incremental layers of approvals that are happening out there, and, certainly, elongating sales cycles, our customers are really putting us through incremental processes to get deals done today, and we, as an organization, need to pivot there. We need to make sure our people really understand how to navigate the new environment we are in. [It’s] all about value selling, ensuring that every customer understands the benefits that they are going to get back from the technology they purchase and how quickly they are going to get there.

As well as the evolving messaging, Millham has been making organizational changes, with perhaps the most notable development from an external perspective being a drive to get sales teams back together in the office. He explains:

I believe deeply that my organization needs to be back in the office. We need to be learning from each other and doing stand-and-delivers and practicing these pitches so that we can be better in front of our customers, that we can pick apart what’s working and what’s not. There’s learning that happens on the floors, the networking that happens in the connections. I really want to make sure that we are back in the office. So I will pivot a little bit back to the office. I want to make sure that we are back in front of our customers…It can be a differentiator for us as a business as we get out in front of our customers and go do this work.

Performance

Millham is also a great believer in performance management:

Sort of one of my trademarks as a leader in the Salesforce world for the past 23 years is I want to drive performance management in the organization. Maybe we didn’t do as much of that during the pandemic, maybe it was sort of maybe a softer approach, just people working from home - appropriately, I think.  As we get out of the backside of that and you look at these headwinds, I am very much about how do we make sure that we are asking our employees to do the work, our account executives to deliver the numbers? And frankly, when they don’t, we are going to have to find ways to move them out of the business.

Salesforce has recently made a round of redundancies, and inevitably there may be more to come. That got some negative publicity in November, but Millham is pragmatic about why it happened:

We moved some people out of the business and while it was sort of newsworthy, it really shouldn’t be, as we get into this rhythm, as we ask our employees to deliver the numbers….This is the way we should be running our business all the time, which is you are constantly looking at under-performing people and treat them with grace and dignity, but you have to move them out if they are not performing and that’s always been our culture. We want to make sure the best of the best are sitting in those seats. We pay them well and we expect them to go deliver. When they don’t, we want to help them find other roles, either within the company or outside the company, that’s fine.

And there is a lot being asked of sales, given the current economic climate, with pipeline coverage as a case in point. Millham argues:

I have a strong belief that, as we face these headwinds, I think we need twice as much pipeline if we are going to get to the numbers that we expect to get. If the close rates are dropping a little bit, [if] they are elongating a little bit, we better make sure that we have more pipeline as we enter these quarters to make sure we are delivering the numbers.

It’s all about addressing things that can be managed and controlled and not things that can’t, he adds:

Execution is something that we can control. My philosophy is, lean in on the things that you can control. You are not going to change the economy. You are not going to be the one that goes out and changes currency. Go fix the things that you can in your organization. That’s really been my mindset since I have taken over the organization.

Scale

An interesting challenge - or opportunity? - facing Millham and his team is the sheer size of the Salesforce portfolio of offerings today, a far cry from the founding days of 1999 and the early part of the ‘Noughties’. That has implications for how the sales organization is run:

We do have to be thoughtful about how much a single salesperson can know in that broad portfolio. And it’s always a conundrum of, ‘Hey, how do you not hire so many people that sell individual products, but also being expert in each of these areas as you go to market?’. I want to make sure we bring the specialization we need to go win the deals and differentiate from our competition, but also not show up with the bus of people.

I think if you talk to some of our larger customers, they would say, ‘It feels like a lot of people showing up and selling products!’. It’s one way to ensure that you get growth by products. Dedicate a sales force to it and you will get the growth of that product. At the same time, it’s not the most efficient model. So, how do we bring these things together as we think about our go-to-market strategies?

Some of it is bundling in the technology, but also it’s some of the way we put our people in the market and go after the opportunities out there. I think there’s some real efficiencies gained as we think about our acquired companies, how do we bring in these sales teams into the core, bring them into our core sales offerings, and make sure that we are going to market, not as separate organizations, but one organization to solve our customer’s problem and drive value with that?

Salesforce always looks at Total Addressable Markets (TAMs), says Millham:

I always talk about the TAM for sales force automation. When I started at this company, it was like $2 billion I think; now our cloud is almost $7 billion and growing at double-digit rates. It shows you what the opportunity is ahead. We do not believe that we are hitting any diminishing returns there. I think there’s a lot of opportunity for us to accelerate that. How do we do that for every single cloud as we think about sort of the expansion of our opportunity in these areas?

He cites Sales Cloud as a case in point:

Sales Cloud, in difficult times, it is the one that I think our customers lean on the most. Where’s my pipeline? How deep is my customer relationship? How do I make sure that we are closing every deal that’s out there? And so we see this renewed interest in Sales Cloud when the economy gets a little tough. We saw it back back in 2001, 2002. We actually got pulled up into the enterprise space at that time, because people couldn’t wait for their deployments. They really needed to see their pipelines and so Sales Cloud is becoming a horse for us again in the growth rate we showed.

Looking ahead to 2023, while there’s a lot that can’t be predicted, Millham has some priorities:

We think there’s a huge opportunity for us to go faster on industries. We saw seven of our 15 Industry Clouds grow greater than 50% in our third quarter. Customers want you to show up with relevant products that get me to value faster, and that’s the Industry Cloud. Speak their language, understand how we are going to go drive that forward. International, despite the currency headwinds, will continue to be a strategy for us. Currencies will come back, and we want to own those markets and so we want to go fast in that area.

Overall, after more than two decades with the company, Millham believes there is still a massive opportunity to expand the Salesforce footprint in every customer:

We have seen many customers saying to us, ‘Hey, I want to consolidate all these products that I have and put it on the Customer 360 platform. Make us a deal and we will move and migrate away from those technologies'. And so those are the strategies we want to go run. I am excited about the huge TAMs that we have, the incredible portfolio, killer culture, happy customer base. We think the future is very bright.

My take

I said when co-CEO Bret Taylor announced his surprise departure from Salesforce that Millham would be someone to keep front-and-center of attention in 2023. This latest role he’s taken on would be a critical one at any time, but particularly in the current climate, there’s an enormous amount riding on the kind of operational excellence he advocates. Final words to him:

We have got a plan. The plan is not owned by Bret. It’s owned by the company and the Executive Leadership Team, an Executive Leadership Team that is very, very strong right now.

Onwards!

Fri, 09 Dec 2022 00:44:00 -0600 BRAINSUM en text/html https://diginomica.com/salesforce-coo-brian-millham-managing-and-transforming-sales-turbulent-macro-economic-climate
Killexams : Salesforce CRM Review
  • Salesforce helps teams across departments stay organized with a central source of data to serve customers better.
  • Salesforce has a wide range of CRM products, features and tools designed to help small businesses sell smarter and grow.
  • Salesforce includes AI-powered tools with effective algorithms to help you serve the best deals to the right customers at the perfect time.
  • This review is for small business owners who are interested in implementing Salesforce as their CRM. 

Salesforce is among the earliest and best-known cloud-based customer relationship management (CRM) platforms. The software service provider has an expansive collection of CRM products for sales, service, marketing, commerce, sustainability, safety and experiences. In addition to its variety of need-based software solutions, Salesforce offers custom packages for businesses of every size to connect marketing, sales, commerce, service and IT teams with a unified solution for every phase of their customers’ journeys. In our review, we focused on what Salesforce has defined as its Small Business Solutions – the Essentials, Sales Professional, Service Professional and Marketing Cloud Account Engagement editions. Our Professional edition demo account was built for a sales team at a small business with fewer than 20 employees who need user accounts.

Salesforce’s Editor’s Score: 95/100

Ease of use 96
Features 96
Integrations 95
Pricing 95
Customer service 92

Why We Chose Salesforce for Small Businesses

Salesforce is among the industry leaders in cloud-based CRM solutions and has the widest variety of plans and features we’ve reviewed. Unlike the other industry giants, Salesforce gears many of its product offerings and its pricing toward small businesses that want to start with a simple and effective all-in-one sales and customer service tool. Salesforce learns and grows with your business, thanks to intelligent tools that Excellerate with each customer interaction. As a centralized source of data, Salesforce makes it easier to understand how to allocate marketing efforts and tailor messages for different customer segments with helpful AI-powered recommendations from Einstein. With easy-to-use automations, timesaving macros, AI-powered insights and detailed customer information, business owners and small sales teams can eliminate repetitive manual tasks and focus their energy on delivering personalized service and deals at the perfect times in their customers’ journeys.

Salesforce customer records
Salesforce keeps records of every customer interaction and communication, which any registered user in your company can access from any device.

Source: Salesforce

Pros

  • An expansive range of available CRM products means that Salesforce can grow with your company.
  • Salesforce acts as a single source of customer data for everyone in your company to Excellerate customer experiences and outcomes.
  • Salesforce has a targeted set of CRM products engineered for small businesses.

Cons

  • Larger businesses may have to pay additional fees to use Salesforce integrations effectively.
  • Most Salesforce plans require an annual commitment.
  • It could be difficult to get immediate technical assistance during nonbusiness hours.

Usability

Despite its potential complexity and advanced set of features, Salesforce is far from a difficult product to set up and use in a small business setting, even for first-time CRM account owners. However, if usability is your top priority, you may want to consider another CRM, such as Keap or monday.com Sales CRM, two of the top choices for ease of use (learn more in our Keap review and monday.com Sales CRM review). Once you’ve gone through the brief setup process to import your contacts and build your sales workflows, you can begin collecting new leads and making more sales with live in-product help to assist with any minor issues.

Even with Salesforce Essentials, the company’s entry-level edition, automated tools will log sales activities like emails and calendar entries with the AI-powered tool named Einstein. With all of your customer data stored in one location, it’s easy to develop effective sales strategies and keep track of every step of your customers’ journeys. On the support side, you can help your customers resolve common issues by publishing a searchable knowledge center from a readymade template.

As your small business grows, you can easily add features from the AppExchange or upgrade to a better-featured plan to suit the evolving needs of your customers and employees. All of your CRM features are available through the mobile CRM apps, letting you and your team work effectively from anywhere. [Related article: 12 Features to Look for in a CRM Solution]

Salesforce sales process
You can see and manage your entire sales process, from new leads to close, through any internet-connected device.

Source: Salesforce

Salesforce Features

You would be hard-pressed to find a popular CRM feature that’s not available with Salesforce in a standard edition or as an existing add-on. Even with the entry-level Essentials plan, you’ll have access to AI-powered features and automations with Einstein Activity Capture. These sorts of tools are typically reserved for more expensive, higher-tier plans with other service providers. All Salesforce plans include features for data syncing, sales tracking, customer support, mobile access, custom reporting, integrations and everything else you need to manage customer sales and support. We’ve highlighted a few of the features that are most effective for small business owners.

Sales forecasting Stay ahead of annual budgets and quarterly goals with real-time sales forecasting.
Lead management Go from lead to close with automated processes and intelligent deals.
Social intelligence Get insights into relevant and trending social engagement for your account.
Einstein recommendations Receive AI-powered, personalized product and service recommendations at the right time.

Sales Forecasting

Salesforce provides an accurate and up-to-date view of your entire business pipeline. You can motivate your sales reps to exceed their targets with up-to-the-minute leaderboards to encourage friendly competition. You can easily identify areas where your business is struggling through an objective, data-driven point of view to make necessary adjustments and stay on track with your revenue goals. The software builds forecasts with a set of weighted variables that can include the owner, time, forecast categories, product family and territory. According to Salesforce, sales leaders can usually expect to see accuracy within 10% of their forecasted data.

Salesforce progress
As a sales manager, you can see your team’s progress with quarterly and monthly goals, and dive into any piece of data for great insight.

Source: Salesforce

Lead Management

You can use landing pages and email to automatically add new leads and route them to the appropriate sales representative. Your reps will automatically have all the information they need to follow up with one click to email from a personalized template or make a call with the built-in dialer. You can customize your lead’s information pages to highlight the details that matter to your business, and guide your reps on what they should focus on and accomplish next. You can automate many manual tasks and set up complex macros to handle multiple time-consuming actions quickly in a single click. With key information and helpful automations, your reps can spend more time selling and less time learning about their customers.

Salesforce lead filtering
You can manually filter leads to determine the strongest opportunities.

Source: Salesforce

Social Intelligence

Available as an add-on for $25 per month, the unique Social Intelligence feature helps business owners and managers harness engagement across social media networks to make better sales decisions. This social listening tool uses natural language processing to gain an understanding of trending news and business events for your accounts, competitors and industry. You can use this tool to identify new leads, set reminders to reach out to a contact, search for account names, and use keywords to surface business events and key conversations to reach your customers where they congregate online.

Einstein Recommendations

Salesforce’s AI-powered recommendations combine user behavior from every recorded interaction with your business’s custom rules to develop comprehensive user profiles and deliver targeted content across email and web. To build a recommendation, you’ll need to select a product or service from your catalog, determine which audience segment will receive it, and define the type of data or past outcomes Einstein will use to make a recommendation. For example, a financial institution can recommend a banking product, like an auto loan, from its Salesforce catalog to all available contacts based on their bank account activity. Depending on each contact’s bank account information, Einstein can tailor an appropriate and unique offer to entice a purchase.

Salesforce catalog
You can select a sellable item from your Salesforce catalog, set your segmented contacts, and let Einstein dive into the data to make the best offers to the right prospects at the perfect time for a sale.

Source: Salesforce

Salesforce Cost

The Salesforce Small Business CRM has four plans with three distinct tiers. The entry-level Essentials edition, which has a limit of 10 user accounts, includes everything you’ll need from a CRM to run your business efficiently from one cloud-based platform. For the middle-tier Professional option, you can choose between the Sales Professional and the Service Professional, based on how you interact with your customers. Rather than a per-seat price, the upper-tier Marketing Cloud Account Engagement is priced by the number of contacts you manage and includes support for 10,000 contacts.

Key TakeawayFYI: Salesforce bases the pricing for some of its plans on the number of users, while others are priced by the number of customer contacts.

You can purchase add-ons for new features or extended capabilities for sales, service, marketing, commerce, analytics and more. Most plans require an annual payment plan.

Plan Starting price (per user per month) Features
Essentials $25 Lead management, duplicate blocking, web-to-lead capture, mass email, custom sales processes, mobile apps, offline functionality, custom dashboards, custom reports, file sharing, case management, 5 automation workflows per organization
Sales Professional $75 Everything in Essentials, custom sales console app, collaborative forecasts, forecasting app, contrats, orders, quotes, unlimited custom apps, custom roles, developer sandbox
Service Professional $75 Everything in Essentials, service contracts, entitlements, case milestone tracker, service orders, advanced case management, work order management, product tracking, custom profiles, unlimited custom apps, developer sandbox
Marketing Cloud Account Engagement $1,250 Up to 10,000 contacts, email marketing, drag-and-drop content creation, Sales Cloud integration, subscriber profiles, segmentation, event-triggered communications, automated workflows, basic reporting, A/B testing, personalized communications

Setup

The difficulty of setting up Salesforce is largely dependent on the product you select, size of your team, number of contacts and complexity of your CRM workflows. However, for a small business setting up an Essentials plan, Salesforce is considered fast and easy. The self-help resources include more than 350 YouTube videos, more than 120 webinars and a large collection of on-demand expert coaching videos to help you with everything from importing your contacts to building out automated sales processes. During the setup process, Salesforce provides to-do lists and recommended steps to help you connect to your email, set up your sales processes, customize fields, import data, and start collecting and nurturing leads.

Key TakeawayKey takeaway: Small businesses and anyone new to CRM features should have an easy time getting their Salesforce account up and running.

Customer Service

Salesforce’s customer service is available 24/7 by phone, email, and chat, but finding the help you need may take some time. Salesforce prefers customers to request a support call via online form to initiate a technical support case. (This is similar to what we saw in our review of Oracle NetSuite CRM.) While this practice helps ensure the correct person is available to resolve your issue, the waiting period may be frustrating if your sales or support activities are impacted and you need an immediate resolution.

When we called for technical support outside of normal business hours, we were informed that Salesforce was experiencing high call volume and were encouraged to seek a solution on our own at Help.Salesforce.com.

Drawbacks

Integrations on the Essentials plan are limited to DocuSign, Dropbox, HelloSign, CodeScience, ActiveCampaign and Zapier. While Zapier alone can cover many of the must-have CRM integrations, you’ll have to pay extra for a plan that offers more than 100 automated tasks per month.

The majority of Salesforce’s products require an annual subscription. Most CRM providers offer annual and monthly payment options for most of their plans (see examples in our HubSpot review and Zoho CRM review).

Methodology

Our editorial team and contributing writers considered all of the major CRM software providers in 2022 for review. After performing our initial research into each platform, we selected 11 of the leading CRM solutions available today for small businesses: Salesforce, monday.com Sales CRM, Freshworks, Keap, Zoho, Oracle NetSuite, HubSpot, Insightly, Pipedrive, SugarCRM and Zendesk. After spending many hours participating in live product demos and testing each platform, we identified the best use case for 11 providers to help small businesses owners and managers choose the best CRM for their needs. We’ve also taken a deeper dive with six of our top performers, providing greater insight into the features and tools that separate these CRMs from the rest of the competition. Salesforce meets the needs of small businesses and teams with easy-to-use features to manage leads, stay on top of sales goals and automatically identify insights into the social trends that are relevant to your company. The platform’s features are expansive, ensuring you’ll always have access to the CRM tools you need as your business evolves.

Salesforce FAQs

Does Salesforce have a free version?

No, Salesforce does not currently offer a free version of its CRM software. However, it does offer a free 14-day or 30-day trial for most products so you can test them rigorously. The lowest-priced plan offered by Salesforce, Essentials, costs $25 per user per month when billed annually and includes a 14-day free trial.

Is Salesforce a cloud-based platform?

Yes. In fact, Salesforce was one of the early cloud-based software service providers. Its cloud-based software solutions cover CRM, sales, enterprise resource planning, marketing automation and analytics.

Which companies use Salesforce?

According to the customer success stories on Salesforce’s website, many global companies use the cloud-based service for sales, marketing, communications and more. Those companies include IBM, Mercedes-Benz, NBC, Herman Miller, RBC, Morgan Stanley, PayPal, AT&T, 3M, ADP, Adidas, AWS, American Express, American Red Cross and Asana.

Overall Value

We recommend Salesforce CRM for …

  • New businesses looking for their first CRM platform.
  • Small businesses shopping for a basic all-in-one sales and support platform.
  • Scaling businesses expecting steady growth and looking for a flexible CRM to meet their evolving needs.

We don’t recommend Salesforce CRM for …

  • Businesses in niche industries that don’t segment their audience.
  • Businesses seeking an equal mix of sales and customer service from their CRM.
  • Enterprise-level businesses that want a lot of customizable features and tools.
Thu, 01 Dec 2022 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/7840-best-crm-software-small-business.html
Killexams : Confirmed: Slack CEO Stewart Butterfield stepping down in January

Just days after Salesforce co-CEO Bret Taylor announced his resignation, Slack CEO Stewart Butterfield announced that he will be stepping down in January. Business Insider first reported the news. TechCrunch has confirmed the news with Salesforce by email.

The company also announced that Lidiane Jones, who has been the executive VP and GM for digital experiences clouds at Salesforce, would be taking over for Butterfield, leaving a succession plan that had apparently been lacking when Taylor surprised everyone by stepping down last week.

"Stewart is an incredible leader who created an amazing, beloved company in Slack. He has helped lead the successful integration of Slack into Salesforce and today Slack is woven into the Salesforce Customer 360 platform," the company said in a statement.

The statement went on to discuss the succession plan: "Stewart also was instrumental in choosing Lidiane Jones as the next Slack CEO to lead it into its next chapter. Lidiane has a strong background in customer and enterprise tech and has been among Salesforce’s leadership for over three years. We’re grateful for Stewart and excited for Lidiane as she takes over the reins at Slack."

She had this to say about her new job in a tweet today:

Butterfield came to Salesforce when the company bought Slack for $27 billion at the end of 2020. This comes on top of the news on Thursday, that Tableau CEO Mark Nelson would also be moving on. It makes you wonder, what is going on in the C-suite at Salesforce.

Brent Leary, founder and principal analyst at CRM Essentials, who has been watching Salesforce since its earliest days, says this could explain why Benioff looked so upset at last week's earnings' call, even beyond the initial shock of Taylor's announcement. "My first thought was that things like this usually happen in threes -- first was Bret, the next day the Tableau CEO, Mark Nelson, and now this. But with the Bret being the architect of the $27 billion Slack acquisition and now the founder/CEO announcing his departure within days of each other, you kind of feel like this was the other shoe to drop. And this news must've been another reason why Marc was so visibly shaken last week when he announced Bret was stepping down," Leary told TechCrunch.

Butterfield began is entrepreneurial journey when he helped found the photo-sharing site Flickr in 2004. He sold that company to Yahoo a year later (the current version of Yahoo owns this publication). He would later found a game called Glitch. The game didn't go anywhere, but the company's internal communication platform would later become Slack, the company he named in around 2013. It quickly grew in popularity and eventually went public in 2019 before Salesforce bought it in late 2020.

He told TechCrunch at the time of the sale that he had originally approached Taylor about buying Quip from Salesforce. Instead, that discussion led to Salesforce buying his company.

"I actually talked to Bret in the early days of the pandemic to see if they wanted to sell us Quip because I thought it would be good for us, and I didn’t really know what their plans were [for it]. He said he’d get back to me, and then got back to me six months later or so,” Butterfield said.

At that point, the conversation flipped and the companies began a series of discussions that eventually led to Salesforce acquiring Slack.

Now Butterfield is stepping away. Perhaps the timing of all these announcements is all a huge coincidence, but it sure feels like piling on at the moment. Salesforce has always had a deep bench of executives, but that talent pool is more than a bit thinned out after these three announcements in quick succession.

Butterfield was not the only one taking the opportunity to leave. In addition chief product officer Tamar Yehoshua and senior vice president in charge of marketing, brand and communications Jonathan Prince, are also leaving the company next month.

Salesforce stock is down almost 5% this morning.

Mon, 05 Dec 2022 02:58:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/news/confirmed-slack-ceo-stewart-butterfield-165856552.html
Killexams : Is Salesforce papering over cracks?

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Thu, 01 Dec 2022 19:13:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.enterprisetimes.co.uk/2022/12/02/is-salesforce-papering-over-cracks/
Killexams : Wall Street ends mixed; Salesforce selloff pressures Dow
  • Salesforce drops on co-CEO exit plan
  • Dollar General falls on slashing annual profit view
  • U.S. manufacturing shrinks for first time in 2-1/2 years in Nov
  • Indexes end: S&P 500 -0.08%, Nasdaq +0.13%, Dow -0.56%

Dec 1 (Reuters) - Wall Street ended mixed on Thursday as a selloff in Salesforce weighed on the Dow, while traders digested U.S. data that suggested the Federal Reserve's interest rate hikes are working.

On Wednesday, the S&P 500 surged over 3% on optimism the Fed might moderate its campaign of interest rate hikes.

U.S. manufacturing activity shrank in November for the first time in 2-1/2 years as higher borrowing costs weighed on demand for goods, data showed, evidence the Fed's rate hikes have cooled the economy.

The personal consumption expenditures (PCE) price index rose 0.3%, the same as in September, and over the 12 months through October the index increased 6.0% after advancing 6.3% the prior month.

Excluding the volatile food and energy components, the PCE price index rose 0.2%, one-tenth less than expected, after gaining 0.5% in September.

"On a normal day, the package of data this morning would be pretty risk-on, but after the rally yesterday, I think it's not quite good enough to push another leg higher," said Ross Mayfield, an investment strategy analyst at Baird. Wednesday's rally drove the S&P 500 index (.SPX) above its 200-day moving average for the first time since April after Fed Chair Jerome Powell said it was time to slow the pace of interest rate hikes.

Traders now see a 79% chance the Fed will increase its key benchmark rate by 50 basis points in December and a 21% chance it will hike rates by 75 basis points.

Salesforce Inc (CRM.N) tumbled 8.3% after the software maker said Bret Taylor would step down as co-chief executive officer in January.

Dollar General Corp (DG.N) fell 7.5% after the discount retailer cut its annual profit forecast, while Costco Wholesale Corp (COST.O) dropped 6.6% after the membership-only retail chain reported slower sales growth in November.

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York City, U.S., November 29, 2022. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

The S&P 500 declined 0.08% to end the session at 4,076.79 points.

The Nasdaq gained 0.13% to 11,482.45 points, lifted by gains of over 1% each in Nvidia (NVDA.O) and Facebook-owner Meta Platforms (META.O).

Dow Jones Industrial Average declined 0.56% to 34,396.53 points, pulled lower by Salesforce.

Of the 11 S&P 500 sector indexes, seven declined, led lower by financials (.SPSY), down 0.71%, followed by a 0.47% loss in consumer staples (.SPLRCS).

A U.S. Labor Department report on Thursday showed initial claims for state unemployment benefits dropped 16,000 to a seasonally adjusted 225,000 for the week ended Nov. 26.

Investors now await nonfarm payrolls data on Friday for clues about how rate hikes have affected the labor market.

With a month left in 2022, the S&P 500 is down about 14% year to date, and the Nasdaq has lost about 27%.

Advancing issues outnumbered falling ones within the S&P 500 (.AD.SPX) by a 1.1-to-one ratio.

The S&P 500 posted 32 new highs and no new lows; the Nasdaq recorded 118 new highs and 91 new lows.

Volume on U.S. exchanges was relatively heavy, with 11.7 billion shares traded, compared to an average of 11.3 billion shares over the previous 20 sessions.

Reporting by Ankika Biswas and Shreyashi Sanyal in Bengaluru, and by Noel Randewich in Oakland, Calif.; Editing by Shounak Dasgupta and David Gregorio

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Thu, 01 Dec 2022 08:54:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.reuters.com/markets/us/futures-flat-after-strong-wall-street-rally-salesforce-slides-2022-12-01/
Killexams : Salesforce, Inc. (CRM) Management Presents at Barclays Global Technology, Media and Telecommunications Conference (Transcript)

Salesforce, Inc. (NYSE:CRM) Barclays Global Technology, Media and Telecommunications Conference Transcript December 8, 2022 3:10 PM ET

Company Participants

Brian Millham - President and COO

Conference Call Participants

Raimo Lenschow - Barclays Capital

Raimo Lenschow

All right. Hey, welcome to our lunch session. I hope you are enjoying lunch. I am really happy to have a very distinguished speaker here today and I have all these questions prepared for you, Brian.

Question-and-Answer Session

Q - Raimo Lenschow

But I need to ask you, first, given current events, like, how do you feel? You still here, that’s good. It’s more -- and it’s more what’s the -- we had the news around departures. Maybe you can shed some light on there in terms of what’s the kind of more official version, because like we are kind of getting like, everyone has theories, but it would be nice to hear from you in terms of like Bret’s departure…

Brian Millham

Sure.

Raimo Lenschow

… and what are you seeing in the organization.

Brian Millham

Sure. Yeah, obviously, a pretty big surprise for us, a shock for the organization, pretty sad for me personally, Bret’s a good friend and has been a mentor, a great guy to work with. For me, though, I have been at the company now for 23 years. I have seen a lot of executives come and go. Sort of shed a tear and we have a business to run, is sort of how I think about it.

Bret’s going to go pursue what he wants to pursue. We have a great opportunity ahead of us to go accelerate this business, and so, obviously, disappointed. Love him. He will remain a friend. We actually live in the same neighborhood. I will see him personally. But we have got a plan. The plan is not owned by Bret. It’s owned by the company and the executive leadership team…

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah.

Brian Millham

… an executive leadership team that is very, very strong right now. And so I feel very comfortable with where we are and hate to see him go, but looking forward to the future.

Raimo Lenschow

Okay, perfect. And then to start maybe a little bit, Brian, you have been in the company for quite a while.

Brian Millham

Yeah.

Raimo Lenschow

Talk a little bit about the evolution of your role.

Brian Millham

Sure.

Raimo Lenschow

And you took over, when was it in August…

Brian Millham

Yeah.

Raimo Lenschow

… kind of the expanded responsibility, maybe talk to that first?

Brian Millham

Sure. Happy to do it. I joined the company back in September of 1999 as the 13th employee.

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah.

Brian Millham

Has been a hell of a run for me and most of my career at Salesforce has been on the sales side, sort of 18 years of various roles within the sales organization, ran the Americas business for our Commercial division, then ran that globally. Came back to the Americas when we regionalized our go-to-market strategy, ran all of the Americas.

And then I think in maybe 2018, stepped away for a six-month sabbatical, take a breather, and then came back and ran all of our success operation and that includes our professional services organization, our support operation, our partner and alliance channel and our success motion.

It was great to get to see the other side of this. Marc came, asked me to go run it, because I have always believed deeply in sort of our North Star of customer success. And he said, I really would like you to go run this organization and transform it. You have seen the numbers on the attrition side, something that’s really important to me is that…

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah.

Brian Millham

… we continue to invest in our customer success, the value they are getting from our platform has been a big area of focus for me. Fast forward in August, by the way, in the middle of the pandemic, I was asked to take over all the sales organization. For me personally, it was not a time that I was willing to go do the job, because I had some younger kids that were still around and I want to make sure I saw them off to college. That is now done and I am now sitting squarely in the seat, running all of sales and all of our success motion globally.

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah, yeah. Okay. That’s a good -- yeah, that’s a good journey. That’s a really exciting journey…

Brian Millham

Yeah. Thank you. Greatly appreciate it.

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah. And a couple of weeks ago, you had -- no, it was last week actually, time’s flying, like, you had…

Brian Millham

Yeah.

Raimo Lenschow

… -- Q3 results, like…

Brian Millham

Yeah.

Raimo Lenschow

…and everyone has -- the Bret news kind of had overshade that a little bit. Can you talk a little bit about what you saw in Q3?

Brian Millham

Yeah. A solid quarter for us, particularly given the macro headwinds, double-digit growth on top line and bottom line, $7.84 billion, which is a solid revenue number, 22.7% in op margin, which is a record for us and showing our commitment to operating margin improvement at the company level and we raised the full year guidance. Still committed to all the customer initiatives that we have, very focused on customer success, gave back a little bit to our shareholders on $1.7 billion share repurchase, which was great in the quarter. So a lot of really positive signs in the quarter, solid performance as an organization.

Raimo Lenschow

And from you, like, kind of talking with the fields leaders during the quarter, et cetera, how does Q3 feel compared to Q2?

Brian Millham

Yeah, good question, Raimo. I -- we -- as we talked in Investor Day at Dreamforce, we started to feel the impact of some economic headwinds really in July. They are sort of starting to happen, but really felt them increase in July. We are seeing that increase in Q3. We really felt like this pressure from our customers about deep inspection on every transaction that we are trying to get done with them. We saw compression in deal size of our largest deals sort of getting smaller, multiple layers of approvals, which was unique to us.

I was telling the team, some surprises had happened in the quarter. We had a CEO who was going to purchase and had purchased previously same product, just an expansion of the same-size transaction. We thought we checked every box with them and turns out the Board had to approve it this time and they delayed the deal.

So just in -- just incremental layers of approvals that are happening out there, and certainly, elongating sales cycles, our customers are really putting us through incremental processes to get deals done today and we, as an organization, need to pivot there.

We need to make sure our people really understand how to navigate the new environment we are in. All about value selling, ensuring that every customer understands the benefits that they are going to get back from the technology they purchase and how quickly they are going to get there is really important to us, too.

And so a big effort on the enablement side, too, to pivot away from what was, not completely away, but a messaging around growth for the past couple of years really needs to be about cost efficiencies, about productivity, about automation and about value saved, sort of value delivered against dollars saved in the business.

Raimo Lenschow

And the -- just one last question on that one and I promise to kind of move on, then the -- like when you said July, you got -- you saw it in July and it was kind of -- is it kind of on that level? Or do you think it got a little bit weaker from that?

Brian Millham

Kind of on that level.

Raimo Lenschow

Okay.

Brian Millham

And same -- July was incrementally more difficult than June and May.

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah.

Brian Millham

But then sort of like as we think about the future, we are sort of on that same trajectory as July. Challenging times for us to go get deals done.

Raimo Lenschow

And the -- I mean there’s -- what, like, everyone is kind of working in this environment where deals are more scrutinized, et cetera, and like you have to live with that and customers have to do what’s best for them. But they are same for you the stuff that you can control, like…

Brian Millham

Yeah.

Raimo Lenschow

… and that’s -- and you started talking a little bit about value selling as well. I can imagine as a lot of your sales guys have never probably seen anything like this and et cetera. So what are the -- you mentioned a little bit the value selling, but like what does that concrete mean for you guys to in the organization to kind of switch it a little bit up and just kind of sell differently now?

Brian Millham

Well, first, it’s all -- we are really going back to pivoting our product marketing messaging to this value orientation. A deep investment in enablement right now, if any of you are on the all-hands calls, sorry, on our earnings call, you may have heard I sort of disagreed with our CEO’s stance that we don’t all need to be back in the office. I believe deeply that my organization needs to be back in the office. We need to be learning from each other and doing stand-in delivers and practicing these pitches. So that we can be better in front of our customers that we can pick apart what’s working and what’s not. There’s learning that happens on the floors, the networking that happens in the connections. I really want to make sure that we are back in the office.

So I will pivot a little bit back to the office. I want to make sure that we are back in front of our customers. I know that it sounds like this is the first time you guys have been back together in a couple of years and that feeling of being back together I think is really important. It can be a differentiator for us as a business as we get out in front of our customers and go do this work.

I also believe deeply in performance management and operational excellence. It’s sort of one of my trademarks as a leader in the Salesforce world for the past 23 years is I want to drive performance management in the organization. And maybe we didn’t do as much of that during the pandemic, maybe it was sort of maybe a softer approach, just people…

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah. Happy…

Brian Millham

… working from home and yeah -- appropriately, I think. As we get out of the backside of that and you look at sort of these headwinds, I am very much about how do we make sure that we are asking our employees to do the work, our account executives to deliver the numbers. And frankly, when they don’t, we are going to have to find ways to move them out of the business. You saw some of the action that we took in November.

We move some people out of the business. And while it was sort of newsworthy, it really shouldn’t be as we sort of get into this rhythm as we ask our employees to deliver the numbers. And then on the operational excellence side, a big pivot for us is sort of deep inspection. I -- in these times, we have to make sure every deal is being managed the right way.

On our pipeline coverage, for example, I have a strong belief that, as we face these headwinds, I think, we need twice as much pipeline. If we are going to get to the numbers that we expect to get, we will be better. If the close rates are dropping a little bit, they are elongating a little bit, we better make sure that we have more pipeline as we enter these quarters to make sure we are delivering the numbers.

So operational excellence, some performance management, obviously, a big investment in our enablement efforts or repositioning of our product and our technology in C360, I feel very lucky that we have a broad portfolio of products that we can go out and talk to our customers about and that we can talk to them about cost savings and we can talk to them about efficiencies gains and productivity gains in the organization. So I am excited about going in and accelerating that motion with our customers to make our numbers.

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah. And when you joined in August, like usually you come in -- as a new leader, you come in and you take stock and then you kind of saying, okay, this one [ph]. The point that you just mentioned, was that kind of what you had in mind when you kind of started in August or has the pandemic or all the trouble that kind of started then kind of changed that a little bit?

Brian Millham

Yeah. I mean, I have always had this mindset, as I said, around, hey, I want the performance manage the teams. And so I looked at the numbers and certainly looked at the results in the second quarter and said, hey, are there pockets of performance that we can manage? I love that you said, hey, there are things that you can’t control and there are things that can control. Execution is something that we can control.

And so my philosophy is lean in on the things that you can control. You are not going to change the economy. You are not going to be the one that goes out and changes currency. Go fix the things that you can in your organization. That’s really been my mindset since I have taken over the organization.

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah. And then, like, as a leader, you kind of have to kind of start looking forward a little bit as well. If you -- and you mentioned a great -- the broad product portfolio, like, if you think about the drivers of growth in the future, I mean, it’s going to be a bigger organization. Law of large numbers is coming your way or is the -- against you, like, how do you think about like Salesforce sales motion going forward in terms of positioning the product, positioning their clients?

Brian Millham

Yeah. It’s a broad portfolio and our -- Marc does not believe that the law of large number apply to us. So he still expects the growth rates to be where they should be and I want to sort of embrace that. We have a big portfolio. We have a lot of organic products that we deliver to the market. Genie is an incredible innovation that we can start talking to, to our customers.

We do have to be thoughtful about how much a single salesperson can know in that broad portfolio. And it’s always a conundrum of like, hey, how do you not hire so many people that sell individual products, but also being expert in each of these areas as you go to market.

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah.

Brian Millham

I want to make sure we bring the specialization we need to go win the deals and differentiate from our competition, but also not show up with the bus of people. And one of the ways that we are talking about doing that is bundling products together.

We have done a really nice job in the last year putting products together, like, revenue intelligence, the Sales Cloud products connected and bundled together and fully integrated with our Tableau product and go sell that SKU. So you are bringing more product together, so it’s easier to sell and solving problems for our customers in that context.

We announced today at World Tour in New York a new product called Tableau Genie, again, fully integrated Tableau with our Genie technology. So more products brought together make it easier for our account executives to sell that technology in the market.

Raimo Lenschow

And then the -- I mean, the one success -- not the one, we have like many, but like the one that kind of caught my attention most was the Sales Cloud evolution over the last few years. Because it was, I remember, like a few years back, it kind of law of large numbers, although it doesn’t exist and decelerate into high single and then you changed the approach in terms of packaging it kind of creating bundles, et cetera. Is that kind of a playbook for the whole organization a little bit? Is that kind of what you can...

Brian Millham

Raimo, like you are inside the four walls.

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah, yeah.

Brian Millham

It’s exactly what we think about. I mean, the -- when we looked at what we call the OG cloud, the Sales Cloud and at Salesforce, we didn’t like those growth numbers going to single digits. Surrounding that technology with new offerings really an important strategy for us, how we bundle those products together really an important strategy for us. We always look at TAMs. I always talk about the TAM for Salesforce automation. When I started this company, it was like $2 billion I think.

And now our cloud is almost $7 billion and growing at double-digit rates. It shows you sort of what the opportunity is ahead. We do not believe that we are hitting any diminishing returns there. I think there’s a lot of opportunity for us to accelerate that. How do we do that for every single cloud as we think about sort of the expansion of our opportunity in these areas?

Also tell you, Sales Cloud is, in difficult times, it is the one that I think our customers lean on the most. Where’s my pipeline? How deep is my customer relationship? How do I make sure that we are closing every deal that’s out there? And so we see sort of this renewed interest in Sales Cloud when the economy gets a little tough.

We saw it back – actually back in 2001, 2002. We actually got pulled up into the enterprise space at that time, because people couldn’t wait for their deployments. They really needed to see their pipelines. And so Sales Cloud is becoming a horse for us again in the growth rate showed.

Raimo Lenschow

Is that in a way also the one thing that should provide investor confidence, because if you can take the sales cost [Technical Difficulty] and just kind of, through your own action kind of accelerate the growth against to some really, really healthy numbers, well, you just have to do it for the other clouds, which are less mature and hence you should be able to do it there.

Brian Millham

It’s a great playbook for us, absolutely. And you think about Service Cloud, which is our largest cloud now. I will provide you an example, Slack, fully integrated to do case swarming for our customers. That should be a bundle that we go to market with and expand the opportunity for the total addressable market for Service Cloud. Marketing Cloud has always been that way, a core e-mail engine, but adding a lot of functionality associated with that as well. We have offered our customers incremental product around MuleSoft as an example as well.

So this is a play that we need to go around and continue to accelerate the growth of each of these clouds.

Raimo Lenschow

And then like more going back to your position, like, there’s the product side and you need to kind of work on that, like, but the other thing is like, how do you get it into the market? And there, you need to think about sales, sales enablement, like do you split your Salesforce into kind of experts, like, how many people are touching on an account?

Brian Millham

Yeah.

Raimo Lenschow

Like where are you on that journey or how happy are you with the current positioning there?

Brian Millham

Yeah. Progress, no doubt about it. We are seeing progress in this area. I think if you talk to some of our larger customers, they would say, it feels like a lot of people showing up and selling products.

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah.

Brian Millham

It’s one way to ensure that you get growth by products. Dedicate a Salesforce to it and you will get the growth of that product. At the same time, it’s not the most efficient model and so how do we bring these things together as we think about our go-to-market strategies as we launch into February 1 into next year?

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah.

Brian Millham

Some of it is bundling in the technology, but also it’s some of the way we put our people in the market and go after the opportunities out there.

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah.

Brian Millham

I think there’s some real efficiencies gained as we think about our acquired companies, how do we bring in these sales teams into the core, bring them into our core sales offerings and make sure that we are going to market not as separate organizations, but one organization to solve our customer’s problem and drive value with that.

Raimo Lenschow

And then on that note, like, how -- is then like Customer 360, Genie, et cetera, not like, but especially Customer 360, the one ring that binds them all in a way?

Brian Millham

Yeah. Yeah.

Raimo Lenschow

And then from that perspective, is -- can you then sell it more top down in terms of like account management kind of Customer 360, you need to bring it all together or you need all the other products around it?

Brian Millham

And I’d love to be able to make one sale…

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah. yeah.

Brian Millham

… talk to the CEO, a little bit of headwinds on the big transformations happening right now.

Raimo Lenschow

Okay.

Brian Millham

So first thing in head, maybe I will start smaller and build into that.

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah.

Brian Millham

I think the vision is really important though, Raimo. I think you have to go paint the vision for what’s possible and then if you need to spill in some of the products over time, I think, that’s fine. We want to be the single source of truth for our customers.

We want all customer data flowing to our data lake, Genie, and then making excellent decisions as a sales leader or a head of marketing or head of service based on this data that is flowing in from every source, both internally within your company or externally from the website. How does all that data inform you to make better decisions about the way you support your customers, how you sell to them and how you market to them.

Raimo Lenschow

Okay. The one thing that is kind of a lot more on investor’s mind is now margins.

Brian Millham

Yeah.

Raimo Lenschow

And we can look at your margin structure. Your gross margins are really good, R&D solid.

Brian Millham

Yeah.

Raimo Lenschow

G&A, maybe I can cut a little bit, not me. Sales and marketing is the one area and kind of -- you were kind of far, I know, and the right part of that, like how do you think about that?

Brian Millham

Yeah. It’s a good question. The way I think about it is I am fully accountable to delivering against the plan that we have.

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah.

Brian Millham

We -- I think we told you at Investor Day, we would be sub 35% cost of revenue in the S&M, sales and marketing world. We have some plans, we are going to go look at every aspect of our business and make sure that we are more cost effective and more efficient in the way that we operate.

I will provide you some examples. Self-service is a play for us that many other companies do a lot better than we do. Slack is an example of a company that has an excellent self-service motion that we are learning from. We think we can serve the bottom end of our market very well with a self-service motion.

We can also serve other large enterprises who want to interact with us in that way, everyone sort of thinks about self-service being SMB motion, it actually is how many large customers want to add licenses. They want to just add a few licenses. They don’t want to talk to a salesperson…

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah.

Brian Millham

… and then get the quote back and very manual in process. They want to just transact with us. Indirect channels is another area where I think we can drive some cost down. As we think about the very interesting opportunity, we have to increase the amount of revenue coming from our international markets. We don’t always have to go direct. We can look at ways to leverage in indirect channel and drive our cost down a little bit in markets where reach is probably better through an indirect channel.

There are other areas I am certainly looking at, all the cost structure of my sales organization. If you think about all the ratios in the organization, we -- that support our sale -- selling motion. Have those gotten out of whack and could we go back and look at those layers of management…

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah.

Brian Millham

… within the organization, can we look at that, and certainly, the acquired companies, are there ways to bring them in and drive some cost efficiencies and accelerate the business. It’s not just about taking cost out. It’s also about driving topline growth as well.

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah.

Brian Millham

And so nothing is -- let me put it, everything is on the table as we look at sort of our cost structures here. And a big focus of mine -- I didn’t mention it, but my background was finance and so I started…

Raimo Lenschow

Okay.

Brian Millham

… my career in finance, so I have a -- I managed P&Ls for a very long time and so I am going to look at every aspect of our business to make sure we are driving costs out of it.

Raimo Lenschow

And on that note, like, how do you think about sales capacity at the moment?

Brian Millham

Yeah.

Raimo Lenschow

And I am telling you like the comment you get from everyone is, like that everyone quotes is like, well, Marc Benioff famously said, 2008 biggest mistake, not investing in the downturn…

Brian Millham

Yeah.

Raimo Lenschow

… because you didn’t have then the capacity to kind of sell out.

Brian Millham

Yeah.

Raimo Lenschow

Like where are we now with Salesforce?

Brian Millham

I feel like our capacity is solid right now. There’s another piece of that equation, which is productivity per rep…

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah.

Brian Millham

… and I am very focused on that right now. As I think about our enablement efforts and where I want to dedicate resources. I feel good about our -- the number of people we have on the sales organization. The capacity is solid.

We have hired a lot of people over the last couple of years. I feel like we can go deliver the results with the capacity we have. I want to drive the productivity number as well. I want to make sure that we are enabled and we are selling or managing our people and that’s a number that I look at when I talk about performance management.

What is the productivity per rep and if you are below a certain threshold, it’s not really what we want in the business. We expect better results from you and so productivity is a driver for our business. Capacity certainly is too, but so is productivity and that will be the investment in enablement and deep inspection in our business will drive higher productivity and drive the results for the company.

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah. As part of that, it is also the action you took on headcounts like a while ago, little bit part of that is like, look, I am going to work in investment bank. There was always that 5% rule at the end of the year. In sales for sure, that was always a rule.

Brian Millham

Yeah.

Raimo Lenschow

Is that kind of we are going back a little bit to kind of...

Brian Millham

Absolutely right. And as I said, it shouldn’t have been newsworthy, because this is the way we should be running our business…

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah. Yeah.

Brian Millham

… all the time, which is you are constantly looking at underperforming people and treat them with grace and dignity, but you have to move them out if they are not performing and that’s always been our culture.

We want to make sure the best of the best are sitting in those seats and we pay them well and we expect them to go deliver and when they don’t, we want to help them find other roles, even in within the company or outside the company, that’s fine.

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah.

Brian Millham

But we need to deliver the results and some of that is take that capacity, we take some out and make sure that we are driving better topline growth.

Raimo Lenschow

And remind us like how much of this is an organizational thing, like, you probably know our side, like, the investors think or now we have Amy, she’s poor woman is in charge, everyone else is still out and partying.

Brian Millham

Yeah.

Raimo Lenschow

Like how does the real life situation look, like how serious is the management team on margins?

Brian Millham

It’s not Amy’s plan.

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah.

Brian Millham

It’s our plan, collectively. We all think about it. You asked me about the driving the cost down in sales and marketing. That is my job. I own a big chunk of the headcount in the business right now. How am I going to go deliver and help Amy talk to all of you about better results on op margin?

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah.

Brian Millham

But she also owns G&A and she’s going to drive that cost out. Our product teams are under David Schmaier and he has to go drive costs out. Our marketing organization is looking at all the things that we do and spend money on, and Sarah Franklin as our CMO, is going to take cost out.

So this isn’t an Amy plan. This is a company plan. And by the way, you will notice Marc Benioff is also very much on this journey with us right now and talking a lot about better op margin for the company.

Raimo Lenschow

Okay. And another factor on that is like, and you touched on it a little bit, is like how do we think about the acquisitions like a MuleSoft, like a Tableau, like a Slack now and getting the value out of that?

Brian Millham

Yeah.

Raimo Lenschow

Like the setup that you have at the moment, is that kind of or you kind of, are you happy with that, like, what are you thinking about like those assets in the future?

Brian Millham

I think it’s a big opportunity for us. We are looking at this for next year. We have already started some of the experiments of ways that we can drive more efficiencies. I will provide you an example. In our Japan business, we have moved those sellers from Slack, from Tableau and from MuleSoft, now work for that country leader. It’s no longer a global structure. Those teams now work for Kodison [ph]. We expect better growth that way, more ownership of the growth of those products…

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah.

Brian Millham

… because it’s owned by that individual in that market and there should be some efficiencies in headcount they are getting in the back.

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah.

Brian Millham

There should be some efficiencies in the headcount as we think about driving those results for the organization. Can we take out some layers of management? We put teams together that sell higher price tags per transaction, because they are including more of our, recall the Customer 360 in every transaction?

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah. And then where are we on the terms of kind of bringing, like, MuleSoft, Tableau were kind of more on-premise solutions for a while.

Brian Millham

Yeah.

Raimo Lenschow

Like how do you bring that into like the Salesforce Cloud world?

Brian Millham

Yeah. There’s an active migration. We are really trying to push every net new sale to be cloud for both of those products, but also helping our customers, their customers, our customers jointly move to the cloud offerings. We like our cloud model.

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah.

Brian Millham

And I think we better support our customers when we know more about them, when they are in cloud, we can see how they are using the technology with adoption they are getting from the clouds that they have. And so it’s a big strategy for us to continue to migrate the on-premise customers and products. Those that are -- customers that are using those products, but making sure the net new products are all cloud based…

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah.

Brian Millham

… as we drive forward into next year and beyond.

Q - Raimo Lenschow Raimo Lenschow

And then the other last acquisition is obviously Slack and then we just had the news there, like how -- like, obviously, it’s a loss to you kind of have Stuart and team kind of move. But on the other hand, you owned the asset for a while…

Brian Millham

Yeah.

Raimo Lenschow

… so that’s kind of a normal natural reaction, like how integrated is Slack now and how much of a kind of path ahead do you still have for that one?

Brian Millham

Yeah. So, obviously, the last acquisition we did, so it’s the least integrated of the products.

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah.

Brian Millham

And Slack, sorry, Stuart’s departure from Slack was not a surprise. We had a successor that was ready to go and Lidiane is an amazing leader and really excited that we have taken someone from our core business at Salesforce and put them over the top of Slack and it will be an accelerator on the integration.

As you probably know, Raimo, the majority of their existing customers sort of sit in the product and dev world, a place where Salesforce traditionally has not played. So when you think about an integrated Slack to Sales Cloud or Service Cloud or Marketing Cloud, it’s all upside for us.

And so how do we go faster on those integrations is absolutely part of our strategy when you think about rolling into next year and Lidiane will be a huge partner in that as we drive that forward.

Raimo Lenschow

Okay. Perfect. And I see my time is almost up. Like maybe one last question on, as we think about 2023, you are not going to guide for me here on stage, it’s fine. But like what are the factors that you are thinking about like to kind of run the business and kind of work...

Brian Millham

Yeah. Some of them are ones I mentioned, performance management, operational excellence. I really want to lean into that into next year. We didn’t talk a lot about our industry plays and we think there’s a huge opportunity for us to go faster on industries.

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah.

Brian Millham

We saw seven of our 15 industry clouds grew greater than 50% in our third quarter. Customers want you to show up with relevant products that get me to value faster and that’s the industry cloud, speak their language, understand how we are going to go drive that forward.

International, despite the currency headwinds, will continue to be a strategy for us. Currencies will come back and we want to own those markets and so we want to go fast in that area. I still believe we have a massive opportunity to expand our footprint in every customer.

We have seen many customers saying to us, hey, I want to consolidate all these products that I have and put it on the Customer 360 platform. Make us a deal and we will move and migrate those -- migrate away from those technologies. And so those are the strategies we want to go run. I am excited about the huge TAMs that we have, incredible portfolio, killer culture, happy customer base. We think the future is very bright.

Raimo Lenschow

Yeah. Perfect. Hey. That’s a great summary statement and hey, thanks all for joining us.

Brian Millham

Raimo, thank you so much.

Raimo Lenschow

Thanks.

Brian Millham

I really appreciate it.

Raimo Lenschow

Thanks, Brian. Thank you.

Brian Millham

Thanks so much. Thank you all.

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 11:18:00 -0600 en text/html https://seekingalpha.com/article/4563403-salesforce-inc-crm-barclays-global-technology-media-and-telecommunications-conference
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