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Exam Code: PSM-I Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
PSM-I Professional Scrum Master I

The Professional Scrum MasterTM level I (PSM I) assessment is available to anyone who wishes to validate his or her depth of knowledge of the PictureScrum framework and its application. Those who pass the assessment will receive the industry recognized PSM I Certification to demonstrate their fundamental level of Scrum mastery.

Clear understanding of the rules of Scrum through the empirical foundation of Scrum
Act as Scrum Masters for Scrum Teams and stakeholders from an in-depth understanding of servant-leadership
Effectively start using Scrum
Increase the effectiveness of Scrum underway

Scrum theory and principles
The Scrum Framework
The Definition of Done
Running a Scrum project
Working with people and teams
Scrum in your organization
The role of the Scrum Master

Ensuring that goals, scope, and product domain are understood by everyone on the Scrum
Team as well as possible;
• Finding techniques for effective Product Backlog management;
• Helping the Scrum Team understand the need for clear and concise Product Backlog items;
• Understanding product planning in an empirical environment;
• Ensuring the Product Owner knows how to arrange the Product Backlog to maximize value;
• Understanding and practicing agility; and,
• Facilitating Scrum events as requested or needed.
Coaching the Development Team in self-organization and cross-functionality;
• Helping the Development Team to create high-value products;
• Removing impediments to the Development Teams progress;
• Facilitating Scrum events as requested or needed; and,
• Coaching the Development Team in organizational environments in which Scrum is not yet fully adopted and understood.
Leading and coaching the organization in its Scrum adoption;
• Planning Scrum implementations within the organization;
• Helping employees and stakeholders understand and enact Scrum and empirical product development;
• Causing change that increases the productivity of the Scrum Team; and,
• Working with other Scrum Masters to increase the effectiveness of the application of Scrum in the organization.
Attendees include the Scrum Team and key stakeholders invited by the Product Owner;
• The Product Owner explains what Product Backlog items have been “Done” and what has not been “Done”;
• The Development Team discusses what went well during the Sprint, what problems it ran into, and how those problems were solved;
• The Development Team demonstrates the work that it has “Done” and answers questions about the Increment;
• The Product Owner discusses the Product Backlog as it stands. He or she projects likely target and delivery dates based on progress to date (if needed);
• The entire group collaborates on what to do next, so that the Sprint Review provides valuable input to subsequent Sprint Planning;
• Review of how the marketplace or potential use of the product might have changed what is the most valuable thing to do next; and,
• Review of the timeline, budget, potential capabilities, and marketplace for the next anticipated releases of functionality or capability of the product.

Professional Scrum Master I
Scrum Professional guide
Killexams : Scrum Professional guide - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/PSM-I Search results Killexams : Scrum Professional guide - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/PSM-I https://killexams.com/exam_list/Scrum Killexams : Scrum Guide updates: Back to its roots

Two motivations drove the update to the Scrum Guide, which was delivered last month. The original creators of Scrum — Ken Schwaber and Jeff Sutherland — described their goals: 

  1. To provide better support for the growing number of teams using Scrum outside of Software Development. Scrum is being used by product teams working on problems ranging from gene editing, car design to spaceship development. It is also being used outside of the product world in marketing, legal, and even in the school classroom. The parts of the 2017 Guide applicable to those contexts contained language that made it harder for those teams, new to Scrum, to adopt the ideas. 
  2. As Scrum is used by thousands of people every day, those practitioners have provided feedback to Ken and Jeff encouraging changes. 

The 2020 Scrum Guide reflects those two motivations. The release notes take those motivations further, describing eight themes. 

  • Less prescriptive
  • One team focused on one product
  • The introduction of the Product Goal
  • Artifact commitments
  • Replacing self-organized with self-managed
  • Three Sprint Planning topics
  • And a general simplification of language. 

This release is intended by Ken and Jeff to make the Guide more usable, accessible, and inclusive. 

The fight against prescription and best practice

Ultimately, with the release of the 2020 Scrum Guide, Scrum has not changed. Yes, some of the words may be different and there has been some increased clarity on courses like Definition of Done and the addition of the Product Goal, but the essence of Scrum is the same. It is a framework-based empirical process for continuous inspection and adaption. The one thing the updated Guide did was remind everyone is that complex problems make a prescriptive process difficult. Over the last several years, lots of things were added to the Guide — things that make sense, or that help adoption; but for each thing that was added there was always the risk that this prescription did not apply to everyone. Every additional sentence added complexity and potentially challenged the use of Scrum. Ultimately the Scrum Guide wants to provide a definitive description of Scrum that can be applied in every situation where Scrum makes sense to be used. 

That means that the Guide has to describe the bare minimum. With the release of this version of the Guide, Ken and Jeff went back to the basics describing Scrum without the extra prescription. For example, asking the three questions at the Daily Scrum or always adding something from the Retrospective in the next Sprint might be very useful and can be used, but they should not be in the Guide as there are times that they do not make sense. Scrum is NOT a methodology, it is a framework. That means that people are required to add practices and prescriptions to make it work in their context. When solving complex problems, you don’t know everything that will happen and learn as you go, so an overly prescriptive methodology just doesn’t work.  Instead, Scrum provides a framework that allows people to add on top of, to result in a process that works in their context, for their team and organization.   

It is ultimately about delivering value
With the 2020 update to the Scrum Guide, commitments were added to each artifact. These commitments provide a place to put a ‘thing’ that helps Excellerate transparency. In the case of the Sprint Backlog, the commitment is the Sprint Goal. For the Increment, it is the Definition of Done. Both the Sprint Goal and Definition of Done were already in the Scrum Guide, though previously not directly connected to the artifact. 

For the Product Backlog, a new commitment was added called the Product Goal. In a nutshell, the Product Goal provides context to the Product Backlog. It can be thought of as the ‘why’ we are doing all this work and set a longer-term vision for where we are heading. It can be used as the elevator pitch to ‘what is the Scrum Team working on?’ The word Goal is intentional as it describes two things:

  1. It is something to strive for, and
  2. It is measurable when you have attained it.

The Scrum Guide does not prescribe what the details of a Product Goal are allowing; therefore Scrum Teams can form the goal for their context. For instance, some Scrum Teams may work toward a quarterly Product Goal that is very focused, another Scrum Team might have a Product Goal that is very aspirational and high level. Context is everything when determining the Product Goal. 

The addition of the Product Goal was motivated by the desire to make Scrum more usable for different contexts and to double down on the transparency required in Scrum. A Scrum Team by its very nature is formed in pursuit of something. That is universal for all Scrum Teams, immaterial of the context. By making that more explicit it will, I hope, make the use of Scrum more attractive to any team that has a goal in a complex environment. It also encourages a clearer connection between the Product Goal, the Scrum Team, and their work. This allows work to be inspected in the context of the Product Goal. This is particularly true of the Sprint Review, where the Increment is discussed. By having a Product Goal front and center at the Sprint Review, great clarity and learning is possible. 

How many times have you attended a review where everyone is so focused on what is being reviewed they forgot the ultimate context? Of course, great Scrum Teams have been doing this already, but adding a Product Goal makes it more explicit. 

It is Scrum, but clearer and more direct
Scrum turned 25 in October, and the first documented version was over 100 pages long. During those 25 years, it has shrunk and grown based on feedback and learning from a methodology to a framework. Elements were changed, new elements added and elements removed. But throughout that time the basics have never wavered. All you really need to remember is the simple idea of: 

  1. An empowered team
  2. Focused on a problem
  3. Working empirically. 

The framework provides the ‘dance steps’ to make it real, but then it is up to you to enhance it to meet your context. 

Thu, 01 Dec 2022 10:00:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://sdtimes.com/agile/scrum-guide-updates-back-to-its-roots/
Killexams : Scrum Master Salary, Job Outlook And Certification Requirements No result found, try new keyword!Earning a scrum master certification demonstrates competency in best practices, scrum principles and the industry’s established standards. This credential can help increase your earning ... Wed, 09 Nov 2022 10:00:00 -0600 text/html https://www.nasdaq.com/articles/scrum-master-salary-job-outlook-and-certification-requirements Killexams : Kanban Vs. Scrum: Which Is Right For You?

Editorial Note: We earn a commission from partner links on Forbes Advisor. Commissions do not affect our editors' opinions or evaluations.

Implementing Agile usually means ascribing to one of two distinct approaches: Kanban or Scrum. Each method enjoys its share of staunch supporters, but that doesn’t mean that one is inherently superior to the other. They each have good qualities that can aid you in getting your projects done on time. We will look at Kanban vs. Scrum, discuss the nature of each approach and offer suggestions to help you decide which Agile system is right for you.

Kanban vs. Scrum At a Glance

We’ll get into these concepts in more detail later on. For now, here’s a brief overview of how Scrum and Kanban stack up.

Comparing Scrum and Kanban makes it easy to see what each method emphasizes and where they strongly differ. But to understand further, you’ll need a better understanding of the philosophical breakdown of each and how teams typically approach one or the other.

What Is Kanban?

The simplest way to describe Kanban is the process of visualizing your workflow. It is one of the more popular project management methodologies used today, and can apply to teams in many different industries. It features a series of steps carefully laid out to monitor each part of an overall project as it moves toward completion. Kanban is an anti-bottleneck system where everyone keeps tabs on tasks, ensuring there are not too many items trapped in the “in progress” state.

Kanban not only allows you to lay the visual groundwork for how to complete tasks, but it also helps keep everyone accountable. Team members see what needs to be done and prioritize accordingly. Kanban helps you spot potential blockages, giving you a chance to strategize ways to remove them before the team gets bogged down.

Kanban Boards

As Kanban is a visual approach, teams tend to use boards to monitor tasks as they move through the value stream. It might be a physical board that includes pinned notecards or sticky notes, or a digital one with each section highlighted a different color.

It’s possible to label each column on a Kanban board according to the predictable “to do,” “in progress,” and “done” distinctions. However, it might also describe workflow according to orders received and the process of shipping them out.

Kanban boards are beneficial because they allow a team to see what they need to finish up. They also help Kanban users closely monitor how long it takes each aspect of the project to move across the board toward completion. These boards boost efficiency by allowing teams to decide what tasks are taking too long or might no longer be a priority.

Why Kanban Teams Often Lack Dedicated Roles

Unlike Scrum teams, Kanban teams do not necessarily require strict job roles. Priorities could shift, making it necessary to introduce new team members to complete specialized tasks and cycle out those who have completed their portion of the project. Kanban’s quick and straightforward approach to adaptability means that team members could exchange responsibilities rather than have everyone limited to a series of static duties.

Although specified roles aren’t necessary, there are a couple of notable positions that a Kanban team might feature:

  • Service Delivery Manager: Sometimes referred to as the SDM, Flow Manager, or Flow Master, this person is primarily concerned with improving workflow efficiency. They achieve this by holding regular meetings, monitoring the board to assure work tasks aren’t blocked and communicating with team members to ensure they’re hitting task deadlines.
    Additionally, service delivery managers look for opportunities to minimize waste and streamline the workflow process. They also keep track of policy compliance and track customer satisfaction.
  • Service Request Manager: While a service delivery manager strives to keep the team efficient, a Service Request Manager (SRM) is ultimately concerned with customer satisfaction. The SRM is typically in charge of the starting point of incoming projects. They lead discussions that prioritize each part of a project, ultimately with the intention to provide the best value to clients.

With the SDM and SRM roles, it’s entirely possible to appoint specific team members to these positions. However, it’s also possible to coordinate the entire team so everyone takes on at least one aspect of anticipated SDM and SRM responsibilities. If one were looking for a Scrum equivalent, the Service Delivery Manager would be closest to a Scrum Master, while the Service Request Manager could be compared to a Product Owner.

What Is Scrum?

If you ever played or watched rugby games, you’re probably familiar with a “Scrum.” In terms of Agile-centric practices, Scrum references a simple framework employed by organizations, businesses or individuals. Scrums break down complex, overarching projects into smaller increments, with each part completed over a predetermined block of time known as a “sprint.”

Scrums adhere to five fundamental values: courage, focus, commitment, respect and openness. It is up to team members, primarily the Scrum Master, to check that everyone is adhering to these core principles every step of the way.

While Kanban teams emphasize a continuous flow, Scrum teams are far more focused on the concept of empiricism. They are inclined to make decisions according to information gained from the process and customer feedback. This data is continuously looped in through each subsequent sprint, helping the group elevate end product quality moving forward.

Sprints

Sprints refer to a fixed box of time during which Scrum teams aim to finish an end product of the highest possible quality. Sprints may last a week or occupy an entire month. They’re crucial to chipping away at complex projects by breaking them down into a series of smaller tasks.

It is crucial to note that Scrum users do not use this method with real-time adaptability in mind. Whatever the starting goal is for the sprint, that’s what team members deliver at the end, all without sacrificing quality. Once the Scrum team analyzes related data and the Product Owner or customers share their feedback, that information gets used in planning future sprints.

Scrum Ceremonies

Scrum ceremonies, or Scrum meetings, play an essential part in the success of sprints. You can break these meetings into five types: sprint planning, daily Scrums (also called stand-ups), iteration reviews, retrospective and product backlog refinement.

  • Sprint planning: At the beginning of a sprint, the Product Owner, Scrum Master and Developers all meet. The Product Owner reveals the product backlog and associated priorities. Together, the team decides the length of the sprint according to how long they believe it will take to deliver a high-quality end product.
  • Daily Scrums or stand-ups: A quick morning meeting, usually 15 minutes on average. They are known as “stand-ups” because they are often so brief that no one has a chance to sit down. The Product Owner, Scrum Master and Developers quickly check in. Members share what they completed the previous day, what they hope to accomplish that day and inform the team of any potential issues. Though they go fast, these daily Scrums are crucial for transparency, accountability and avoiding any potential blockages.
  • Iteration reviews: These occur at the end of the sprint. Stockholders might join this meeting, but it’s generally not required. Reviews present a chance for the Scrum team to share what they accomplished. For quality control, team members should only highlight their work if it meets the minimum standards for completion. As so much hard work goes into sprints, the tone is generally one of congratulations and a sense of mutual pride.
  • Retrospective: Following reviews, the team gathers to take a careful look at the outcome of the sprint. What worked well or slowed down the process? What are customers saying about the end product? This internal and external feedback plays a crucial role in setting the tone for future sprints.
    It’s not just a matter of criticism; it’s critiquing in an actionable way, helping the Scrum team to accomplish more and at higher speeds.
  • Product backlog refinement: Product backlog refinement represents an opportunity to tidy up the product backlog by adding details, adjusting estimates or changing priorities. It’s not an official event, so it’s not always referenced. Typically, these meetings occur near the end of a sprint and often feature questions raised during the initial planning phase.

Some Scrum ceremonies may run for hours or a few minutes; it typically depends on the nature of the meeting and the allotted time for the sprint in question.

Scrum Team Roles

While the average Scrum team includes between three and nine members, there’s technically no limit to how many or few people an organization can add. That said, there are three roles that are essential to Scrum team collaboration and success:

Product Owner

The most important part of a Product Owner’s job is making sure the Scrum team collaborates efficiently and that they’re delivering high-quality results. They do this by monitoring and adding to the Scrum backlog and helping to determine what items will be pulled from it and assigned to the development team.

Product Owners also handle the planning process, which includes determining the end goals for each sprint. As these end products could be delivered any time during a sprint, this Scrum team member must pay close attention to how customers receive the result and share that information with team members tasked with upgrades and improvements.

Product Owners must also maintain stakeholder expectations, often communicating with them throughout the project process and updating the team regarding feedback and any necessary future changes.

Scrum Master

Scrum Masters are chiefly concerned with team management and ensuring the Scrum is progressing successfully. They act as the link between Developers and Product Owners.

When connecting with Developers, they break down the project into a series of increments, organize Developers’ specific roles and discuss expectations toward achieving a specific outcome. Scrum Masters behave as subordinates to Product Owners, helping them to not only manage the backlog, but also with planning and breaking down projects into achievable increments.

Scrum Masters act as cheerleaders for Scrum, promoting the concept to the rest of the company and helping everyone to better understand its value and the best ways to make it work.

Developers

Developers are ultimately responsible for getting everything done. It could be one person in the role or a team made up of several people. They are encouraged to self-organize, meaning they can behave confidently in their role and even expand beyond it at times. In meetings, Developers share where they are with their parts of the project, contributing to team transparency and accountability. This helps everyone recognize potential problem areas and brainstorm solutions.

Kanban vs. Scrum: Key Differences

Kanban and Scrum are both Agile frameworks, but each system has its values and priorities. Understanding their main differences makes it easier to determine what each method offers and which might work better for your company or organization.

Scheduling Cadence

Scrum cadences are all about speed, while Kanban cadences focus on flow. Scrum sprints combine velocity with efficiency as the end of each experience brings valuable data to make future sprints faster and more effective. It’s not that Kanban teams move slower; their method allows team members to adapt to issues and change during the process rather than at the end.

Important Metrics

Kanban and Scrum metrics are useful in their own ways, helping teams keep track of success according to what each Agile method chooses to prioritize.

Kanban Metrics

Kanban is all about a constant, ever-looping flow, so bottlenecks are an ongoing concern. For that reason, the Work In Progress (WIP) limit is a vital metric, preventing too many projects from sitting in the “in progress” column. The Cumulative Flow Diagram (CFD) also aids in reducing bottleneck problems by visualizing workflow and letting Kanban teams keep track of each item.

Although Kanban doesn’t emphasize speed to the same degree as Scrum, it does matter. Lead time and cycle time are metrics that matter to Kanban teams as they play a direct role in shortening project completion time.

Scrum Metrics

In Scrum, teams measure outcomes using velocity, which is the total number of story points completed in a sprint. Referencing story points, instead of setting deadlines based on dates and times, helps teams only commit to taking on as much product backlog as they feel they can reasonably handle during a sprint. A team with a velocity of 35 points would struggle with a backlog of 50 points.

Philosophy Regarding Change

Though both are Agile, Kanban and Scrum methodologies strongly disagree on how to handle change. Scrum users take the need to make changes into consideration, but only at the end of a process. Meanwhile, Kanban teams adapt immediately and as needed.

Popular Software Tools

Kanban users want software that allows them to see the process and each step from beginning to end. Many of today’s most popular project management tools offer Kanban functionality. Additionally, they’ll want a product that lets them spot problems such as bottlenecks and quickly plan ways around them. Some of the most popular Kanban-related software includes:

Not only do Scrum teams rely on programs to aid with sprints, but Scrum-based software also typically includes helpful tools such as backlog management, time estimations and Scrum boards. Some of the most popular Scrum software services are:

Atlassian’s Trello and Jira Software get recommended to both Kanban and Scrum teams, which isn’t too surprising. They each possess the visual, bottleneck avoiding qualities that would appeal to Kanban teams while also offering Scrum teams a method to stay organized and break down tasks into more manageable, bite-sized chunks.

Which One Is Best for You?

Knowing which method works best for you is as simple as understanding which one better aligns with your organization’s philosophy and preferred approach to completing complex projects.

Scrum is best if you:

  • Care about customer feedback and wish to make improvements accordingly
  • Are concerned with breaking down projects into a series of increments
  • Prefer to make changes after completing a sprint rather than adapting in real time
  • Want to use story points instead of date- and time-based deadlines
  • Want clearly defined roles for team members and cross-functional capabilities

Kanban, meanwhile, is more suited to your needs if you:

  • Want to guard against bottlenecks and too many projects “in progress”
  • Seek a method that allows you to visualize everything from beginning to end
  • Want to be able to adapt to change quickly and course-correct as necessary
  • Aren’t interested in cross-collaboration or having purely defined team roles
  • Create feedback loops that contribute to long-term efficiency and streamlining

It might be possible that you combine aspects of each approach. For instance, a Scrum team might make use of Kanban boards. But in the end, it comes down to beliefs and probably testing which system meets your specific needs the best.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is Kanban better than Scrum?

Neither methodology is “better” than the other outright; rather, each is best suited for different situations. Kanban approaches projects with the concept of visualizing the entire process from beginning to end while avoiding having too many objectives as “in progress.” Meanwhile, Scrum teams break up complex projects into a series of “sprints.”

Are Kanban and Scrum part of Agile methodology?

Both Kanban and Scrum are considered to be Agile in nature; it’s just that the priorities in each methodology and approach to completing tasks differ significantly.

How many people should you add to a Scrum team?

There are three basic roles in Scrum: Product Owner, Scrum Master and Developer. Therefore, it is common for teams to have at least three people. On average, teams have between three and nine members.

How do you choose between Kanban and Scrum?

It helps to have a basic understanding of both methodologies before making a decision. Kanban is a great choice if you want to view the status of many parts of a project at once, but only focus on a few tasks at a time. Agile is better for teams that want to use “story points” instead of dates & times to set deadlines, and want to use retrospectives for constant cycles of feeback.

Is Agile for software development only?

No. Others have found success with Agile—or at least using certain components of Agile—outside of software development. Folks in the automotive, R&D, and other industries have found success in Agile. Stand-up meetings are common in a variety of work environments, from restaurants to boardrooms. Kanban boards are popping up everywhere, like on whiteboards at law offices and on windows in property management offices.

Are there other types of project management methodologies to consider besides Kanban and Scrum?

Yes, there are several options available when it comes to project management methodologies. For example, there is the waterfall method, which follows a linear path and often has between five or six different phases that rely on the deliverables provided by the previous phase. Another option is the lean method, of which the Kanban is part. The lean project management method is geared toward reducing waste and delivering value in a short period of time. Others that you might consider include extreme programming (XP), critical path method (CPM) rapid action development, Six Sigma or a hybrid of two or more of these methods.

Mon, 05 Dec 2022 11:24:00 -0600 Toni Matthews-El en-US text/html https://www.forbes.com/advisor/business/software/kanban-vs-scrum/
Killexams : Scrum Master at QES

My client based in Cape Town (North) is currently looking for a Scrum Master to join them on a contract basis

  • The Scrum Master will be responsible for 1-2 workstream teams using the Scrum framework. The following outcomes are expected to be achieved by the Scrum Master: – Assist in forming a self-managed team that is happy, predictable, transparent, consistently delivers quality work and continually inspects and adapts to Excellerate and maximize throughput whilst upholding the values, principles, and practices of Scrum – Facilitate the removal of impediments teams face when performing analysis, designing, and developing solutions – Implement Scrum best practices within a team – Help the team to develop a culture of collaboration – Support the team to be self-organising and function as an accountable, high-performance team. – Collaborate with the Vendor leads, Project Managers and SME’s to manage and groom the product backlog on Jira to ensure that work flowing into the team complies to the Definition of Ready and aligns with the business objectives – Schedule and facilitate the Scrum ceremony meetings (i.e. daily stand-ups, sprint reviews, retrospectives, sprint planning, backlog grooming) – Report on the progress of the team and deliverables using scrum metrics (burndown charts, predictability via team velocity) – Timeous and effective communication with Project Manager(s), Business Owner(s), Delivery and Design teams – Guide/coach/mentor the team to take on the responsibilities of the process and the ownership of the product – lead the team to a self-organised state – Ensuring that sufficient capacity is available in sprints for support and maintenance when required – Managing dependencies across delivery teams when required Required – – A relevant IT qualification – – A solid understanding of Agile development best practices – – A solid technical background in re-platforming including Integrations – – Demonstrable Scrum master experience essential – – Agile development experience is an advantage – – People Management experience – – Leadership – – Communication – – Building and maintaining relationships – – Influencing and gaining commitment – – Decision Making – – Planning and organising – – Teamwork – – Performance Driven – – Analytical Thinking Function independently

Desired Skills:

Desired Work Experience:

Desired Qualification Level:

Learn more/Apply for this position

Thu, 24 Nov 2022 10:00:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://it-online.co.za/2022/11/25/scrum-master-at-qes-10/
Killexams : Scrum Master at QES – Western Cape Bellville

My client based in Cape Town (North) is currently looking for a Scrum Master to join them on a contract basis

  • The Scrum Master will be responsible for 1-2 workstream teams using the Scrum framework. The following outcomes are expected to be achieved by the Scrum Master: – Assist in forming a self-managed team that is happy, predictable, transparent, consistently delivers quality work and continually inspects and adapts to Excellerate and maximize throughput whilst upholding the values, principles, and practices of Scrum – Facilitate the removal of impediments teams face when performing analysis, designing, and developing solutions – Implement Scrum best practices within a team – Help the team to develop a culture of collaboration – Support the team to be self-organising and function as an accountable, high-performance team. – Collaborate with the Vendor leads, Project Managers and SME’s to manage and groom the product backlog on Jira to ensure that work flowing into the team complies to the Definition of Ready and aligns with the business objectives – Schedule and facilitate the Scrum ceremony meetings (i.e. daily stand-ups, sprint reviews, retrospectives, sprint planning, backlog grooming) – Report on the progress of the team and deliverables using scrum metrics (burndown charts, predictability via team velocity) – Timeous and effective communication with Project Manager(s), Business Owner(s), Delivery and Design teams – Guide/coach/mentor the team to take on the responsibilities of the process and the ownership of the product – lead the team to a self-organised state – Ensuring that sufficient capacity is available in sprints for support and maintenance when required – Managing dependencies across delivery teams when required Required – – A relevant IT qualification – – A solid understanding of Agile development best practices – – A solid technical background in re-platforming including Integrations – – Demonstrable Scrum master experience essential – – Agile development experience is an advantage – – People Management experience – – Leadership – – Communication – – Building and maintaining relationships – – Influencing and gaining commitment – – Decision Making – – Planning and organising – – Teamwork – – Performance Driven – – Analytical Thinking Function independently

Desired Skills:

Desired Work Experience:

Desired Qualification Level:

Learn more/Apply for this position

Thu, 24 Nov 2022 10:00:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://it-online.co.za/2022/11/25/scrum-master-at-qes-western-cape-bellville-5/
Killexams : South Africa made the scrum their weapon against England but rugby’s set piece remains an eyesore

A very fine and famous coach once said to me, “What’s the point of a fat prop?” The clarion call for the scrum technicians – another way of describing props whose functions extend little further than the sport’s trademark set piece – resounded loud and clear a week ago in Cardiff as Georgia’s scrum steamrolled Wales to defeat. Prop power overturned the hosts as history was made.

But exceptions prove rules. Scrums have not been the dominant force of the November internationals; mostly a way to restart the game after an error or an attempt to kid the referee into awarding penalties that lead to kicks to the corner or at goal. Cynical coaching has damaged the scrum’s reputation. In the minds of some, it

Sat, 26 Nov 2022 08:22:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/south-africa-made-the-scrum-their-weapon-against-england-but-rugbys-set-piece-remains-an-eyesore-l8rrth00j
Killexams : Autozam Scrum monster truck is the 2022 Hot Wheels Legends Tour winner

After spending months touring the planet in search of the wildest custom-built vehicle, Hot Wheels has selected the winner of the 2022 Legends Tour. It chose a 1992 Autozam Scrum nicknamed Texas Toot that was transformed into a massive, one-of-a-kind monster truck.

Before it earned a spot in the Hot Wheels catalog of 1/64-scale cars, Texas Toot lived a humble life as one of the countless mini-trucks zig-zagging across Japan. It was designed to comply with the country's strict kei regulations, so it's seriously small: It stretches around 130 inches long and 55 inches wide in its standard configuration and is powered by a mid-mounted, 660-cubic-centimeter three-cylinder engine.

That was in 1992. Fast-forward to 2020 and this Scrum found its way to the United States and ended up in Craig Meaux's garage in Beaumont, Texas. It gained 30-inch wheels wrapped by tractor tires, a five-foot suspension lift, a Chevrolet-sourced 454-cubic-inch V8 engine, and a 250-shot nitrous kit, among numerous other modifications. It's hard to miss, and train horns ensure it's heard as well as seen.

"I wasn't expecting to win, so this is a dream come true. I wanted to create something that no one else had. I didn't have previous experience with this sort of fabrication, so it's awesome that it came out the way it did and to have everybody enjoy the truck," Meaux said.

Texas Toot beat some seriously impressive cars. The list of 2022 Legends Tour finalists includes a Buick V8-powered 1956 Volkswagen Beetle, a 3,000-horsepower Porsche 928-based dragster, and a 1927 Wayne Ford school bus. Like previous winners, Texas Toot will join the Hot Wheels catalog of 1/64-scale cars in the coming months, so it will appear in toy chests and model-car collections all over the world.

"The competition was strong in 2022, but turning a Japanese mini truck into a monster truck was hard to beat," said Ted Wu, Mattel's global head of design for vehicles, in a statement. "As the first truck to be crowned since the inception of the Hot Wheels Legends Tour, we hope Craig’s passion project inspires builders and fans from around the world to set big goals and follow their dreams."

Tue, 15 Nov 2022 03:42:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.autoblog.com/2022/11/15/hot-wheels-legends-2022-winner-autozam-kei-monster-truck-texas-toot/
Killexams : Billy Corgan Addresses Tony Khan Not Stopping CM Punk's AEW All Out Scrum

Following AEW's All Out pay-per-view in early September, CM Punk took part in the media scrum that AEW does after each PPV event. Punk's caustic comments led to a backstage brawl, multiple suspensions, and vacated titles.

During the media scrum, Punk shared his criticisms of The Elite as Executive Vice Presidents. AEW CEO Tony Khan was right next to Punk during his entire tirade but never stepped in to end Punk's tirade. Some believe Khan should have put an end to the verbal fireworks, while others lean more on the side of Khan sticking it out.

Appearing on "Ten Count," NWA owner Billy Corgan addressed Khan not stopping Punk during the media scrum.

"I think that's an unfair question because we don't know a lot of things that only Tony and Punk would know," Corgan said. "If I was in a similar situation, to answer the spirit of the question, I think I would be calculating, 'Is the controversy of what this person is saying gonna be good for the talent and for business,' because there were aspects of what Punk said that were good for business because wrestling likes heat, or, as Eric Bischoff says, 'Controversy creates cash."

Corgan also discussed if he believes the press conferences have been positive.

"I would caution fans to remember that ... the wrestling business is a lot more complicated than fans realize that it is," Corgan said. "Tony's got a ton of publicity from those post-show press conferences. What he's done has been very good for AEW and for the business of AEW. So, if you're Tony, and I'm not Tony, that's been a good thing."

If you use any quotes in this article, please credit "Ten Count" with an h/t to Wrestling Inc. for the transcription.

Fri, 11 Nov 2022 19:32:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.wrestlinginc.com/1098551/billy-corgan-addresses-tony-khan-not-stopping-cm-punks-aew-all-out-scrum/
Killexams : Denis Buckley: Connacht's scrum turning into a major weapon

Denis Buckley has never scrummaged so much. Which is quite something for a prop who is in his 12th season as a professional.

But all that hard work is certainly paying off. With a 95% success rate, Connacht boast the fourth-best scrum in the BKT United Rugby Championship, and the best of the Irish provinces.

Colm 'Cullie' Tucker took over as scrum and contact coach as part of Connacht's coaching rejig during the summer and Buckley says the Limerickman has brought their set-up "up another level".

It was the Connacht scrum that lay the platform against Munster last month in Galway, where two early penalties put the Westerners on course for their first victory of the season.

Now they will try to replicate that at Thomond Park on Saturday as they target a fourth win over their neighbours in five attempts.

Buckley says Connacht's scrum is going from strength to strength

"It has gone well, we’ve put a lot of time and effort into the scrum," Buckley told RTÉ Sport. "In that first game [of the season] against Ulster maybe we didn’t quite get it right and do some of the things we’d been working on.

"But this season so far, it’s probably the most time I’ve spent scrummaging. We just put more time into it than other years and I think that’s starting to be reflected out on the pitch in games. It’s starting to turn into a big weapon for us.

"The last time we played Munster it was a big part of winning that game. Obviously it’s an area we want to use as a weapon every week.

"Munster have a good scrum and it’s an area they’ll probably be targeting as well. We’re under no illusions about that, that we’ll just go and it’ll happen for us. We have to make it happen.

"It’s something we’ve spoken about and put a lot of time into, and we’re starting to see the benefits."

Connacht headed into the international break on the back of successive wins over the Scarlets and Ospreys

Buckley, 32, has featured in all seven of Connacht’s games this campaign, forming an impressive front row with Ireland internationals Dave Heffernan and Finlay Bealham.

After a rocky start where they lost three games on the road and failed to collect a single point, Andy Friend’s side have won three of their last four, with the set-piece playing a major role.

"That combination of myself, Dave Heffernan and Finlay, the three of us really enjoy scrummaging and working together," said Buckley.

"Even in the loose, when you play in a combination like that for so long, you really do start to learn each other’s games inside-out and how you bounce off and complement each other in your strengths."

The trip to Limerick marks the start of a demanding 10-game block for Connacht, which includes Challenge Cup fixtures and another couple of interprovincial derbies.

They headed into the November break on the back of successive wins over the Scarlets and Ospreys, but Buckley says that will count for little against a Munster side who are desperate for points after five defeats in seven games.

"It’s almost must-win for both teams," said the Roscommon native. "We had a poor start to the season, losing our first three, and Munster were similar. We’re probably a bit lower down the table than where we’d like to be.

"It really is an important game for both teams. It’s one we’re looking forward to but no doubt they’re targeting this game massively as well. It’s going to be tough."

Listen to the RTÉ Rugby podcast on Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts.

Watch Leinster v Glasgow Warriors (Saturday, 3.15pm) live on RTÉ1 and RTÉ Player, or listen commentary on Saturday Sport on RTÉ Radio 1.

Listen to live commentary of Munster v Connacht (Saturday, 7.35pm) on RTÉ Radio 1 Extra.

Sat, 26 Nov 2022 04:29:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.rte.ie/sport/united-rugby-championship/2022/1125/1338348-buckley-connachts-scrum-turning-into-a-major-weapon/
Killexams : Andy Warwick challenges Ulster to set the tone from first scrum in crucial top of the table clash against Leinster

Let’s start with the scrum.

t can be bewildering or just frustrating to behold and, depending on how things are going, a useful weapon or impediment to remaining on the front-foot in any given game.

It’s also worth pointing out that it is often spoken of as an area no-one knows much about really, save the front rows.

Scrums may resemble little more than a tangle of limbs which inevitably flop to earth but, don’t be beguiled, the engagement is highly technical and a fundamental function for those who are paid to be at the very coalface, the place of direct engagement between the props and hookers on either team.

Andy Warwick has accumulated quite some knowledge on matters pertaining to the scrum over what is more than a century-and-a-half of appearances.

Yes, but, as with all the modern game’s props, there is so much more to be done around the field with ball-carrying, hitting rucks and defending as well as mauling both front and back-foot, all to be delivered when going about one’s work.

All true, but it still all boils down to the scrum.

“I’d say the first scrum sets the tone for the rest of the game,” Warwick explains.

“If you go well in it, confidence rises in the front row and whole team. The other way round and boys are thinking they’re maybe going to have a bad day, so the first scrum is very important.”

Warwick expands on the theory that all can stem from how the front row are going.

“For us as a front row unit, it’s all about connections, being together and making sure we do the same thing, depending on what we’re wanting to do, and that we’re all on the same page.

"I think we’ve put a lot of work into that.”

It’s just the same with the maul.

He explains: “We drill it enough and know exactly where we should be, there’s an odd time something can go wrong but we know where we should be, and you have to get as quickly into position as you can and add your weight and make sure you’re specific at what you’re doing.

“In the last game against Leinster,” he adds referring to September’s defeat to Leo Cullen’s squad, Ulster only reverse so far this season, “some of it didn’t go according to plan but hopefully we can learn from that and bring it into this week.”

Yes, tomorrow it’s Leinster again.

It’s worth noting that Warwick started in both games against them in the previous term when Ulster managed a rare thing of beating their southern neighbours both home and away.

Indeed, November 2021’s victory in Dublin was the first one since 2013 with the one prior to that having been registered at the backend of the previous century.

Last season’s meeting at the RDS pitted Warwick up against Tadhg Furlong and he could be going up against the Ireland tighthead again tomorrow which, obviously, entails a certain amount of cramming on what Leinster are doing at scrum-time, as is the usual process when preparing to play any team, really.

“You have to analyse them (potential opponents) because they probably do change things every season, whatever angles they are deciding to go with as a unit and then what we do to counteract that,” adds the 31-year-old Ballymena native.

“It’s always a challenge against Leinster, going up against a British and Irish Lions front row basically.

"But I enjoy coming up against them and you definitely learn from each game.

“They are some of the best and I enjoy coming up against them because I see it as a real challenge.

"And I love going down to Leinster and playing that away game because I know it’s such a challenge.

"But we have to go and prove a point.”

Warwick provided a reminder of his versatility in the closing minutes of last Friday’s victory over Zebre when he switched from loosehead to the tighthead side of the scrum following Jeff Toomaga-Allen’s injury-enforced departure, which was probably no bad thing to demonstrate to the coaching staff with Rory Sutherland around and Steven Kitshoff to come post-World Cup.

As Warwick explains: “When you prep the whole week for it, it’s a lot easier and you have been through the process, but it (the Zebre late switch) shows that any eventuality can happen, and you have to be prepared for it.”

Though he admits his one scrum at tighthead against the Italians didn’t go too well, it is a position Warwick is familiar enough with and he recalls packing down against Cian Healy in the early days of the Ulsterman’s career back in 2014.

Still, he has to address the fact that regarding his primary position, at loosehead, a Scotland international and British and Irish Lion is currently at Ravenhill and a Springbok World Cup winner is on his way.

“It’s great having that quality coming in,” he adds, referring to Sutherland and Kitshoff, “and it’s going to make the squad better and make me better to see what they do and how they approach the game and how they approach the scrum.

“And, look, all I can do is try and do my best and that’s all you can worry about.

“I’ll try to keep on improving. That’s all you can do really but they’ll add to the squad and there’ll be a lot of competition so that will be good.”

Tomorrow, though, watch for when that first scrum arrives.

Thu, 01 Dec 2022 21:53:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/sport/rugby/pro14/andy-warwick-challenges-ulster-to-set-the-tone-from-first-scrum-in-crucial-top-of-the-table-clash-against-leinster-42189764.html
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