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PMI-RMP PMI Risk Management Professional

The Project Management Institute (PMI)® offers a professional credential for project risk managers, known as the PMI Risk Management Professional (PMI-RMP)®. PMIs professional credentialing examination development processes stand apart from other project management certification examination development practices. PMI aligns its process with certification industry best practices, such as those found in the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing.
A key component of this process is that organizations wishing to offer valid and reliable professional
credentialing examinations are directed to use a role delineation study (RDS) as the basis for the creation
of the examination. This process uses knowledge and task-driven guidelines to assess practitioner
competence, and determine the level of salience, criticality, and frequency of each of the knowledge,
tasks, and skills required to perform to the industry-wide standard in the role of a project risk manager.
The role delineation study ensures the validity of an examination. Validation assures the outcome of
the test is in fact measuring and evaluating appropriately the specific knowledge and skills required to
function as a project risk management professional. Thus, the role delineation study guarantees that each
examination validly measures all elements of the project risk management profession in terms of real
settings.

PMI-RMP® credential holders can be confident that their professional credential has been developed
according to best practices of test development and based upon input from the practitioners who
establish those standards. Please see Appendix A for a detailed description of the process.
The PMI-RMP examination is a vital part of the activities leading to earning a professional
credential; thus, it is imperative that the PMI-RMP examination reflect accurately the practices of the
project risk management professional. All the questions on the examination have been written and
extensively reviewed by qualified PMI-RMP credential holders and are supported by current project risk
management published references. These questions are mapped against the PMI-RMP Examination
Content Outline to ensure that an appropriate number of questions are in place for a valid examination.
PMI retained Professional Examination Service (PES) to develop the global PMI-RMP Examination
Content Outline. Since 1941, PES has provided a full range of assessment and advisory services to
organizations across a broad range of professions, in support of professional licensure and certification,
training, and continuing professional education. PES is dedicated to promoting the public welfare
through credentialing as a mission-driven, not-for-profit organization.
Finally, while the PMI-RMP Examination Content Outline, the Practice Standard for Project Risk
Management and PMBOK® Guide have commonalities, it is important to note that those involved in the
study described previously were not bound by the Practice Standard for Risk Management and/or
PMBOK® Guide. They were charged with defining the roles of individuals assessing and identifying
project risks, mitigating threats and capitalizing on opportunities, and using their experience and
pertinent resources to help in this task. Although many of the domains, tasks, knowledge, and skills outlined by the PMI-RMP Examination Content Outline are also covered by the Practice Standard for Project Risk Management and PMBOK®
Guide, there are some that are unique to the PMI-RMP Examination Content Outline. Candidates
studying for the examination will certainly want to include the current edition of the Practice Standard
for Project Risk Management and PMBOK® Guide as two of their references, and would be well advised
to read other current titles on project risk management.



Risk Strategy and Planning 19–20%

Stakeholder Engagement 19–20%

Risk Process Facilitation 25–28%

Risk Monitoring and Reporting 19–20%

Perform Specialized Risk Analyses 14–16%

Total 100%



Tasks Risk Strategy and Planning (19–20%)

Task 1 Develop risk assessment processes and tools that quantify stakeholder risk
tolerances in order to assess and determine risk thresholds for the project
and set criteria for risk levels.
Task 2 Update risk policies and procedures using information such as lessons
learned from projects and outputs of risk audits in order to Boost risk
management effectiveness.
Task 3 Develop and recommend project risk strategy based on project objectives in
order to establish the outline for the risk management plan.
Task 4 Produce risk management plan for the project on the basis of inputs such as
project information, external factors, stakeholder inputs, and industry policies
and procedures in order to define, fund, and staff effective risk management
processes for the project that align with other project plans.
Task 5 Establish evaluation criteria for risk management processes based on project
baselines and objectives in order to measure effectiveness of the project risk
process.

Knowledge of:

 Continuous process improvement as applied to risk management

 Knowledge management techniques for organizing and providing access to project risk information

 Metrics for measuring effectiveness of project risk process

 Risk attitude concepts

 Risk Breakdown Structure (RBS)

 Risk tolerance concepts

 Barriers to effective risk management

 Project risk management inputs, tools, techniques, and outputs

 Project risk contingency and management reserve

 Research and analysis techniques

 Basic strategy development methodologies



Tasks Stakeholder Engagement (19–20%)

Task 1 Promote a common understanding of the value of risk management by using
interpersonal skills in order to foster an appropriate level of shared
accountability, responsibility, and risk ownership.

Task 2 Train, coach, and educate stakeholders in risk principles and processes in
order to create shared understanding of principles and processes, and foster
engagement in risk management.

Task 3 Coach project team members in implementing risk processes in order to
ensure the consistent application of risk processes.

Task 4 Assess stakeholder risk tolerance using processes and tools such as
interviewing stakeholders and reviewing historical stakeholder behaviors in
order to identify project risk thresholds.

Task 5 Identify stakeholder risk attitudes and cognitive biases using stakeholder
analysis techniques in order to manage stakeholder expectations and
responses throughout the life of the project.

Task 6 Engage stakeholders on risk prioritization process based on stakeholder risk
tolerance and other relevant criteria, in order to optimize consensus
regarding priorities.

Task 7 Provide risk-related recommendations to stakeholders regarding risk strategy
and planning, risk process facilitation, risk reporting, and specialized risk
tasks by using effective communication techniques in order to support
effective risk-based decision making.

Task 8 Promote risk ownership by proactively communicating roles and
responsibilities and engaging project team members in the development of
risk responses in order to Boost risk response execution.

Task 9 Liaise with stakeholders of other projects by using effective communication
techniques and sharing information on project risk performance in order to
inform them of implications for their projects.

Knowledge of:

 Information resources, both internal (for example, OPA) and external (for example, EEF)

 Project performance information

 Stakeholder sensitivity analysis models

 Training and coaching techniques

 Types of stakeholder risk attitudes (including but not limited risk seeking, risk tolerant, and risk averse)

 Group decision making

 Group creativity (including but not limited to brainstorming, nominal group technique, Delphi technique, idea/mind mapping, and affinity diagram)

Skills in:

 Assessing stakeholder risk tolerance (appetite and attitude)

 Collaborating with stakeholders

 Managing teams in multicultural environments

 Influencing change



Tasks Risk Process Facilitation (25–28%)

Task 1 Apply risk assessment processes and tools in order to quantify stakeholder
risk tolerances and determine risk levels.

Task 2 Facilitate risk identification using a variety of techniques in order to enable
the project team and stakeholders to understand and determine the risk
exposure of the project.

Task 3 Facilitate the project teams evaluation of the identified risks attributes using
qualitative and quantitative tools and techniques in order to prioritize the
risks for response planning.

Task 4 Facilitate the development of an aligned risk response strategy and related
risk actions by risk owners from the information gathered during risk analysis
in order to ensure timely and defined action when required.

Task 5 Facilitate the formulation of project contingency reserve based on the risk
exposure of the project in order to have the capability and resources to
respond to realized risks.

Task 6 Provide risk data to cost and schedule analysts/estimators to ensure that
project risk is properly reflected in cost and schedule estimates for the
project.

Task 7 Use scenarios to validate potential risk responses and evaluate key
dependencies and requirements in order to enhance the likelihood of project
success.

Knowledge of:

 Basic risk identification tools and techniques for both threats and
opportunities (including but not limited to brainstorming, checklists,
prompt lists, assumptions and constraints analysis, interviews,
questionnaires, cause and effect analysis, SWOT analysis, document
review, affinity diagrams, and lessons-learned review from similar
projects)

 Basic qualitative risk analysis tools and techniques (including but not
limited to probability-impact matrices, risk scoring, Risk Breakdown
Structure analysis, root cause analysis, Pareto prioritization analysis, and
risk metric trend analysis)

 Basic quantitative risk analysis tools and techniques (including but not limited to Monte Carlo analysis, decision trees, FMEA/FMECA/Fault Tree
analysis, and sensitivity analysis)

 Heuristics and other dynamic sources of cognitive biases and their associated effects on risk perception and behavior

 Risk response strategy types

 Contingency management tools and techniques

 Risk monitoring and control techniques

 Group decision making

 Group creativity (including but not limited to brainstorming, nominal group technique, Delphi technique, idea/mind mapping, and affinity diagram)

Skills in:

 Using analytical software tools for project risk management

 Managing teams in multicultural environments

 Estimating probability and impact of identified risks



Task 1 Document and periodically update project risk information using standard
tools (including but not limited to risk register, risk database) and techniques
in order to maintain a single, current repository of all project risk information.

Task 2 Coordinate with project manager using communication techniques in order to
integrate risk management throughout the project.

Task 3 Create periodic standard and custom reports using risk-related metrics as
specified in the risk management plan in order to communicate risk
management activities and status.

Task 4 Monitor risk response metrics by analyzing risk response performance
information, and present to key stakeholders in order to ensure resolution of
risk and develop additional risk response strategies to address residual and
secondary risks.

Task 5 Analyze risk process performance against established metrics in order to
drive risk process improvements.

Task 6 Update the project risk management plan using relevant internal and external
inputs in order to keep the plan current.

Task 7 Capture risk lessons learned through comprehensive review of the project
risk management plan, risk register, risk audits, risk process performance
reports, and other associated reports in order to incorporate into future risk
planning.

Knowledge of:

 Continuous process improvement and quality management as applied to risk management

 Knowledge management techniques for organizing and providing access to project risk information

 Alternative formats for project risk reports (for example, Top Risk List, Risks Transitioned to Issues, Response Plans Behind Schedule, Risk Triggers, and Risk Outcomes)

 Requirements for risk register data fields

 Risk statement construction

 Risk response activity construction

 Risk response metrics

 Risk process performance metrics

 Risk assessment analysis metrics

 Risk management reserves



Tasks Perform Specialized Risk Analyses (14–16%)

Task 1 Evaluate the attributes of identified risks using advanced quantitative tools
and specialized qualitative techniques in order to estimate overall risk
exposure of the project.

Task 2 Analyze risk data produced during the project using statistical analyses and
expert judgment in order to determine strengths and weaknesses of risk
strategy and processes and recommend process improvements when
indicated.

Task 3 Perform specialized risk analysis using advanced tools and techniques in
order to support stakeholder decision making for the project.

Knowledge of:

 Advanced risk identification tools and techniques for both threats and
opportunities (including but not limited to force field analysis, scenario
planning, futures thinking, visualization, Delphi groups, and nominal
group technique)

 Advanced quantitative risk analysis tools and techniques (including but
not limited to, integrated cost/schedule analysis, advanced Monte Carlo
analysis, system dynamics, bowtie analysis, analytical hierarchy process,
risk-based earned value analysis, risk-based critical chain analysis, and
multi-factor regression analysis, modeling techniques, advanced risk
metric analysis [including statistical process control])

 Tools and techniques for identifying and analyzing overall project risk
(including but not limited to risk efficiency index, risk tolerance analysis,
risk reserve analysis, risk metric trend analysis, risk taxonomy, risk
connectivity analysis, Monte Carlo analysis against overall project
objectives, project risk surveys, and correlation analysis)

 Basic and advanced statistics

 Estimation tools and techniques to support risk decision making
(including but not limited to prioritization, cost-benefit analysis,
analogous, parametric, and bottom-up)

 Advanced theory of heuristics and other sources of cognitive bias

 Variance/Earned Value Analysis



Knowledge of:

 Project risk management processes, frameworks, and theory (in line with
the PMI Practice Standard for Project Risk Management)

 Basic project management theory, methodologies, and practice (as
described in the PMBOK® Guide)

 Risk principles and guidelines as described in ISO31000

 Communication tools, techniques, models, and channels

 Facilitation tools and techniques

 Negotiation tools and techniques

 Leadership theory as it relates to risk management

 Organizational theory as it relates to risk management

 Risk taxonomy

 PMI Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct

Skills in:

 Effective oral, graphical, and written presentation

 Tailoring information to all levels of stakeholders

 Conducting effective interviews

 Gathering, managing, analyzing, and validating data

 Problem solving

 Active listening

 Conflict resolution

 Expressing complex and abstract information

 Influencing without authority

 Coaching and mentoring
PMI Risk Management Professional
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Question #428
In what way can the risk manager determine when poor risk planning techniques are influencing the scope, schedule, quality, and/or
budget of the project?
A. Evaluate the results of the Monte Carlo analysis.
B. Document and periodically update project risk information
C. Monitor project metrics and performance information.
D. Update the risk management plan.
Answer: C
Question #429
How can the project manager rank competing stakeholder priorities for all the identified risks?
A. Perform qualitative and quantitative risk analysis.
B. Engage the project sponsor to decide.
C. Refer to stakeholder analysis prioritization tree.
D. Perform a review of organizational process assets.
Answer: A
Question #430
A project team is conducting initial risk planning. What other risk-related task should the project manager perform?
A. Identifying the risk threshold
B. Determining the risk register headings
C. Scoring the risks utilizing the risk matrix
D. Prioritizing the risks in the risk register
Answer: A
Question #431
What are the critical success factors for the Plan Risk Management process?
A. Mitigate all risks, engage stakeholders, and follow organizational policies.
B. Identify and address barriers, engage stakeholders, and follow organizational policies.
C. Contingency reserves engage stakeholders and follow organizational policies.
D. Identify and address barriers, engage stakeholders, and follow government regulations.
Answer: B
Question #432
A project team's risk facilitator identifies a number of risks and must prioritize them based on the organization's risk appetite levels.
Which technique should be used?
A. PERT
B. Stakeholder risk profile analysis
C. Project scope statement analysis
D. Monte Carlo technique
Answer: B
Question #433
A risk manager wants to determine which risks are going to have the highest impact on a project. Which of the following
techniques should the risk manager use?
A. Assumptions analysis
B. Sensitivity analysis
C. Root cause analysis
D. Prioritization matrices
Answer: D
Question #434
The project manager wants risk metrics established for the new project. Which of the following metrics listed is best suited for this
purpose?
A. Effectiveness of the work breakdown structure
B. Number of approved project change requests
C. Number of detects identified
D. Effectiveness of response plans
Answer: D
Question #435
Which of the following would a proactive risk manager do during the Monitoring and Controlling Process?
A. Develop risk responses, create risk management plan, and stay alert for risk events.
B. Update the lessons learned documents, develop risk responses, and create the risk management plan.
C. Review identified risks, stay alert for risk events, and remind team members to keep the risk manager informed about risk
triggers.
D. Review lessons learned document to identify risks, quantity risks, and lower impact ratings.
Answer: C
Question #436
A cost analyst team member asks the project manager for the latest risk data for inclusion with the cost estimates for the project.
Which tool should the cost analyst team member use to identify the probability of achieving specific cost targets?
A. Monte Carlo analysis
B. Decision tree analysis
C. Analogous estimating
D. Brainstorming
Answer: A
Question #437
Most risks are assessed for probability and impact. Which of the following are other factors that should be considered?
A. Urgency and complexity
B. Manageability and cost
C. Urgency and manageability
D. Manageability and complexity
Answer: C
Question #438
A pharmaceutical company undertakes a new, year-long research and development (R&D) project. The company pursues high
margins on investments and an aggressive growth strategy. They maintain a central program management office (PMO) to assist
with new projects and record data on past project performance.
The company leadership regularly makes decisions regarding the full suite of company projects and requires comparative data and
reports. Project leadership is well-versed in risk management and the PMO requires full documentation of project management
artifacts.
Based on the characteristics of this new project, which of the following best describes the risk strategy for the project?
A. Low stakeholder risk appetite, leverage historical project planning data, develop standard metrics and reports, and develop
a formal risk management plan.
B. High stakeholder risk appetite; leverage historical project planning data, develop standard metrics and reports, develop a
formal risk management plan.
C. High stakeholder risk appetite; leverage historical project planning data, utilize informal metrics and reports, develop risk
management training.
D. Low stakeholder risk appetite; collect new project data, create custom metrics and reports, and develop a formal risk
management plan.
Answer: B
Question #439
Which of the following should the risk manager consider as external environmental factors when creating the risk management
plan?
A. Government regulations, industry best practice templates, organizational standard processes, and competitor landscape
B. Government regulations, industry standards, conditions of the marketplace, and competitor landscape
C. Government regulations, risk categories, organizational standard processes, and competitor landscape
D. Government regulations, human resource policies and procedures, organizational standard processes, and competitor
landscape
Answer: B
Question #440
A project manager is leading a project review meeting with the risk manager and the other project stakeholders. Which of the
following are typical risk-related agenda items for a project review meeting?
A. Enterprise environmental factors and the risk register
B. Risks closed in the last period and the risk appetite of the organization
C. Organizational process assets and the risk register
D. Risks closed in the last period and the trigger conditions that have occurred
Answer: D
Question #441
As part of identifying the risk appetite of project stakeholders, the project manager must first identify the stakeholders. Which of the
following inputs are used to identify project stakeholders?
A. Project charter, management reserve, enterprise environmental factors, and organizational process assets
B. Project management plan, human resource plan, enterprise environmental factors, and organizational process assets
C. Project charter, bid documents, enterprise environmental factors, and organizational process assets
D. Project charter, communications management plan, enterprise environmental factors, and organizational process assets
Answer: C
Question #442
The project manager receives an updated project schedule from a sub team detailing the deliverables, dates, and durations for a
critical milestone on the development and testing for offshore activities. This report is received one hour before a meeting with the
chief executive officer (CEO) to present an updated master schedule of the critical path. The CEO has been promised a discussion
on the project schedule several times. However, based on the exact update from the off-shore team, the project manager realizes
this new schedule is not realistic. There are new risks associated with it and it is not well thought out. Some key stakeholders want
to present this revised plan to the CEO. This meeting has been postponed twice already.
Which action should the project manager take before meeting with the CEO?
A. Talk to the stakeholders before the meeting to discuss the options and ask their opinion.
B. Present the revised master schedule to the CEO with the caveat that its being updated as new information is received, and
these are the current dates at this point.
C. Request the meeting be re-scheduled before presenting the master schedule to the CEO, stating that new major risks were
identified and need to be assessed thoroughly.
D. Present the revised schedule to the CEO and only answer questions about validity, if asked.
Answer: A
Question #443
Which of the following are examples of relevant data gathering tools?
A. Risk response plan and interviews
B. Questionnaires and historical data
C. Work breakdown structure an historical data
D. Work breakdown structure and interviews
Answer: B
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The Project Management Institute (PMI) administers PMI certifications to those who work or are planning to work in project management. PMI certifications are recognized around the world and qualify recipients to work in many industries.

You can choose from a variety of PMI certifications depending on your experience, skills and career goals. From entry-level professionals to senior leaders, project management professionals can pursue certification to develop their skills, gain experience and build on their expertise.

What Are PMI Certifications?

PMI certifications help project management professionals learn new skills and grow in their careers. Each certification serves its own purpose within the realm of project management. Below are descriptions of PMI certification options.

Project Management Professional (PMP)®

PMP certification shows that you are qualified to lead and direct projects as a project management professional.

PMP Certification Requirements

  • A bachelor’s degree
  • 36 months of project leadership
  • 35 hours of project management training or CAPM® certification

or

  • A high school diploma, an associate degree or equivalent coursework
  • 60 months of project leadership
  • 35 hours of project management training or CAPM

PMP test Cost

The exam fee is $405 for PMI members and $575 for nonmembers.

PMP Time Commitment

Time commitment varies depending on your education and experience. You should earn a degree, complete three to five years of project leadership, undergo 35 hours of project management training and study and take the certification exam. You are allowed up to 230 minutes to take the exam.

Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM)®

This certification shows that you understand the fundamentals of project management and have the skills to manage projects in various environments.

CAPM Certification Requirements

  • A secondary degree, which may be a high school diploma, an associate degree or equivalent coursework
  • 23 hours of project management education or training

CAPM Cost

The test fee is $225 for PMI members or $300 for nonmembers.

CAPM Time Commitment

You have three hours to complete the exam.

Program Management Professional (PgMP)®

PgMP certification shows that you have the skills and experience to coordinate and manage multiple projects within an organization.

PgMP Certification Requirements

  • A secondary degree, which could be a high school diploma, an associate degree or coursework that is globally equivalent
  • 48 months of experience in project management or PMP
  • 84 months of experience in program management within the past 15 years

Or

  • A bachelor’s degree
  • 48 months of experience in project management or PMP
  • 48 months of experience in program management within the past 15 years

PgMP Cost

The test fee is $800 for PMI members or $1,000 for nonmembers.

PgMP Time Commitment

You have four hours to complete the exam.

Portfolio Management Professional (PfMP)®

This certification shows that you demonstrate the skills and knowledge to coordinate and manage one or more portfolios that align with an organization’s strategic objectives.

PfMP Certification Requirements

  • A secondary degree, which can be a high school diploma, an associate degree or equivalent coursework
  • 96 months of professional business experience within the past 15 years
  • 84 months of experience in portfolio management

or

  • A bachelor’s degree
  • 96 months of professional business experience
  • 48 months of experience in portfolio management

PfMP Cost

The test fee is $800 for PMI members or $1,000 for nonmembers.

PfMP Time Commitment

You have four hours to complete the exam.

PMI Professional in Business Analysis (PMI-PBA)®

This certification signifies that you have the business analysis skills needed to manage projects according to a business’s requirements.

PMI-PBA Certification Requirements

  • A secondary degree such as a high school diploma, an associate degree or equivalent coursework
  • 60 months of experience in business analysis
  • 35 hours of education or training in business analysis

or

  • A bachelor’s degree
  • 36 months of experience in business analysis
  • 35 hours of education or training in business analysis

PMI-PBA Cost

The test fee is $405 for PMI members and $555 for nonmembers.

PMI-PBA Time Commitment

You have four hours to complete the exam.

PMI-PBA Risk Management Professional (PMI-RMP)®

This certification signifies that you demonstrate expertise in identifying and managing risks to reach successful project outcomes.

PMI-RMP Certification Requirements

  • A secondary degree like a high school diploma, an associate degree or equivalent coursework
  • 36 months of experience in risk management within the past five years
  • 40 hours of education or training in project risk management

or

  • A bachelor’s degree
  • 24 months of experience in project risk management within the past five years
  • 30 hours of education or training in project risk management

PMI-RMP Cost

The test fee is $520 for PMI members and $670 for nonmembers.

PMI-RMP Time Commitment

You have 3.5 hours to complete the exam.

PMI Scheduling Professional (PMI-SP)®

This certification shows that you have the skills to develop and manage project schedules.

PMI-SP Certification Requirements

  • A secondary degree such as a high school diploma, an associate degree or equivalent coursework
  • 40 months of experience in project scheduling within the past five years
  • 40 hours of education or training in project scheduling

or

  • A bachelor’s degree
  • 24 months of experience in project scheduling within the past five years
  • 30 hours of education or training in project scheduling

PMI-SP Cost

The test fee is $520 for PMI members and $670 for nonmembers.

PMI-SP Time Commitment

You have 3.5 hours to complete the exam.

PMI Agile Certified Practitioner (PMI-ACP)®

This certification shows that you are knowledgeable and skilled in agile project management principles and techniques.

PMI-ACP Certification Requirements

  • A secondary degree, which could include a high school diploma, an associate degree or equivalent coursework
  • 12 months of experience in general project management within the past five years or a current PMP or PgMP certification
  • Eight months of experience in agile project management within the past three years
  • 21 hours of education or training in agile practices

PMI-ACP Cost

The test fee is $435 for PMI members and $495 for nonmembers.

PMI-ACP Time Commitment

You have three hours to complete the exam.

PMI Project Management Ready™

This entry-level certification introduces the fundamentals of project management to high school and postsecondary school students.

PMI Project Management Ready Certification Requirements

  • You must be a high school or postsecondary student.
  • You must be computer-literate and read at the ninth-grade level.
  • You must be able to engage in training activities and take exams.

PMI Project Management Ready Cost

School and Exam Center administrators can find out more information about coursework, learning materials, pricing, practice tests and certification exams through Certiport. For individuals, the test costs $118, with optional add-ons for practice tests, training and test retakes.

PMI Renewal Costs

The cost to renew your PMI certification is $60 for PMI members and $150 for nonmembers. To maintain certification, you must also earn professional development units (PDUs). You can earn PDUs through education or by working as a project management practitioner, speaking at conferences, mentoring others or volunteering.

To renew certification, you must typically earn between 15 and 60 PDUs every three years. The costs of earning these PDUs vary and are in addition to the PMI certification renewal fees.

How to Sign Up for PMI Certifications

You can sign up for PMI certifications through the Project Management Institute’s website. Before registering, you may want to purchase a PMI membership, which gives you access to webinars, project plans, templates, free downloads, networking events and other valuable resources. Membership also provides reduced rates for your exams.

Is a PMI Certification Worth It?

For many project management professionals, earning a PMI certification is worth it. Here are some things to keep in mind as you decide if this path is right for you.

Consider Your Career

If you’re a current or prospective project management professional, you should consider earning a PMI certification. Whether you are an entry-level project manager or a seasoned professional, certification can help you take your career to the next level.

Look at Earning Potential

According to a Project Management Institute survey, professionals with PMI certifications earned salaries that were 33% higher than those who were not certified.

Build Your Resume

Once you earn a PMI certification, make sure to include it on your resume. A certification can set you apart from other candidates by demonstrating competency and success in your project management activities. Your resume should also include information showing that you know how to use resources, tools and project management methods to achieve the best results.

Expand Your Network

As you build your career, you may encounter challenges during your projects. It’s important to take time to network with other project management professionals. You may be able to consult with others in your network who can share their knowledge and ideas to help you with your projects. You may also connect with those who can benefit from your expertise and advice.

Sun, 31 Dec 2023 23:33:00 -0600 Sheryl Grey en-US text/html https://www.forbes.com/advisor/education/pmi-certification/
Best Free Project Management Training Materials for IT Pros

Project management and information technology (IT) have a complicated relationship. While it’s not exactly a core subject for related academic curricula, project management is something that touches deeply and directly on most IT activities. That probably explains why project management certifications command a constant presence among the top 10 top-paying certifications of interest to IT professionals over the past decade. 

Given the incredible popularity and demand for project management skills and knowledge, it is no surprise that one can find commercial project management training courses to fit nearly every schedule and budget. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t good choices available for free training. In this article, you’ll learn about some of the best project management training systems and certifications to help you become a better IT manager.

What are some free project management training options?

An online education phenomenon is reshaping the training landscape as we know it. It’s based on free online training courses called MOOCs, short for massively online open courses. These are housed on open, high-volume, high-capacity, cloud-based training platforms, such as edX, Moodle and Udemy.

While monetization of training is possible on some of these platforms, a MOOC is supposed to be free for the taking. Organizations or institutions that offer such free courses can still charge fees for testing, certificates of completion and other add-ons, but the basic course materials remain free to all interested parties.

Here’s a list of some of the best project management offerings.

Cybrary Course CYB-2010: Project Management Professional 

Professional instructor Vincent McKeown delivers a 10-module series of video lectures, each of which maps to a domain in the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) for the Project Management Institute Project Management Professional (PMI PMP) certification. At just over five hours, the course is neither incredibly detailed nor extensive, but it does provide a useful orientation for those just getting started on the subject.

ALISON: Diploma in Project Management

With more than 282,000 students having either taken or now taking this course, this MOOC has seen some serious traction to mostly positive reviews. The course contains three modules, covers 28 courses and takes 10 to 15 hours to complete. While it doesn’t map directly to the PMP or other project management credentials, it does provide a useful introduction to the subject matter.

Other ALISON courses on project management 

As a full-fledged MOOC delivery platform, ALISON offers a project management page among its course listings. In addition to the previous diploma item, it has courses about project management fundamentals, skills, resource management and a host of other topics. 

Udemy 

Udemy courses are not always or even often free, but many are inexpensive. A search for project management on Udemy produces hundreds of courses. Most cost between $20 and $50 each, although we found many as low as $10 and a few on the high end at $200. A search on PMP produces more than 2,600 free and paid courses. You’ll spend a lot of time fiddling with the search engine to find what you want, but there are plenty of choices here.

edX.org 

EdX gets many of its project management courses via Microsoft these days. As a result, despite a huge catalog of offerings, many of the project management courses relate to Microsoft Project and Microsoft Project Portfolio Management (PPM). We did find a few project management courses from institutions such as the University of Adelaide, the Rochester Institute of Technology, the Australian National University and the University of Washington.

The best online project management software can help companies organize their work and monitor tasks big and small. 

MIT OpenCourseWare 

A search on MIT OpenCourseWare produces thousands of results for project management courses, many of which show a profound focus on engineering and business management topics. Nevertheless, there’s a lot of interesting stuff here that’s well worth trawling through for those seeking top-notch offerings.

ProjectManager.com 

ProjectManager.com has 30 guides designed to help you learn the basics of project management. Inside many of these guides are video tutorials that provide more information about their respective topics. You’ll need some time and willpower to stitch a curriculum together here, but there’s lots of good material available. The company also maintains a YouTube channel, where you can easily find training videos.

YouTube 

YouTube is rife with project management training videos. Searches on YouTube for “project management” or “PMP” produce hundreds of thousands of results.

MOOC List 

The MOOC List allows you to execute a consolidated search for trainings available in the next 30 days. Most courses are offered with specific starting dates, so this database points only to relevant courses starting in the near term.

Oxford Home Study Short Course 

The Oxford Home Study Centre offers several project management courses that introduce candidates to the many aspects of project management, project life cycles and project management roles. A certificate is issued at the end of each course.

Saylor Academy 

Saylor Academy has two project management courses: one in the business field and the other in software engineering. The first course requires 62 hours and covers the key elements of project management and its more technical details. The software engineering course totals 41 hours and presents courses ranging from life cycle models to design quality assurance. Upon completing either course, you’ll receive a free certificate.

GoSkills 

GoSkills pulls up 30 project management courses when searching for project management. These courses span basic frameworks, software programs and process control. Each course includes video tutorials along with tests and quizzes to help you prepare for project management exams and earn learning hours toward your certification.

Various online platforms offer free training, lessons and certification prep for deeper dives into project management skills and practices. It’s just a matter of sorting through the available options to find the ones that appeal to you.

What are some low-cost project management training options?

If you’re willing to spend a small sum of money, there are some appealing low-cost project management training options. For example, most Coursera courses are $49, and multicourse bundles are also available (such as UC Irvine’s Introduction to Project Management Principles and Practices). The Master of Project Academy offers numerous free online training courses for project management certifications, such as the PMP, CAPM, Six Sigma and Prince 2. However, for $397 per month, you can purchase an all-course bundle that includes all Master of Project Academy courses.

Like UC Irvine, many colleges and universities offer courses aimed at the PMP and related PMI certifications, such as CAPM and PMP add-ons for portfolio and program management, as well as other credentials for risk management, scheduling and so forth. These courses cost the same as other college courses and are taught in a similar fashion. That puts them halfway between low-cost/no-cost options and short-term, higher-priced intensive courses from traditional training outlets such as Global Knowledge, New Horizons and Learning Tree.

What are some higher-priced project management training options?

Hundreds to thousands of other offerings for project management training at higher costs are readily available around the globe. For PMP or other PMI certifications, there’s a whole network of partners that teach an official curriculum. Some are in academia; others offer purely commercial courses. All the biggest training companies offer PMP and related certification training, as do the major online training players (such as LinkedIn Learning, Simplilearn and Pluralsight).

Our project management software buying guide is designed to help small businesses find the right product for managing their operations.

What skills do I need to become a project manager?

Project management software is at the heart of most IT activities, including system design and development, deployment, and maintenance. All of these routine activities can also be characterized as projects – some of massive scope and duration, others more quick and evanescent. Indeed, that’s why project management skills and knowledge are in high demand among IT professionals in nearly every specialty and area of technical focus in that field.

The best project managers possess a great eye for detail and are highly organized. Masters of soft skills, they are clear, concise and effective communicators in both speaking and writing. These professionals are excellent problem-solvers and negotiators. It’s also helpful if they have an understanding of cross-functional areas – such as supply chain, HR and resource constraints; procurement; finance; and change orders – which may impact overall project outcomes.

What are some popular project management methodologies?

As a project management professional, you’ll find no shortage of methodologies. There is no one “right” methodology, and the one you choose to practice will be influenced by factors like the type of project, industry sector and your business’s preference. When choosing project management training materials, look for courses that complement the methodology you want to practice.

These are some of the most popular project management styles and frameworks:

  • Waterfall is a traditional project management methodology with a linear downward process flow. Design changes are difficult to implement. Project phases include system and software requirements, analysis, design, coding, testing, and operations. It’s often used with large projects where defined schedules are required and few changes are expected. 
  • Six Sigma project managers (usually referred to as Black, Green or Yellow belts) focus on improving quality and efficiency by identifying what doesn’t work and removing it from the process. A Six Sigma Black Belt, for example, would define the problem, measure the current process, analyze data, Boost the process and then control the future process. 
  • Agile was introduced in 2001 as a response to the Agile Manifesto and originally geared toward software development. In the Agile framework, teams are collaborative and self-organizing. Projects are incremental and iterative, enabling team members to move quickly and respond to change.
  • Scrum, a type of Agile framework, focuses on five core values – courage, commitment, openness, respect and focus. As with Agile, teams are collaborative. Iterations are organized into short blocks of time called “sprints,” which enable great flexibility to respond to design change. A Scrum master (a servant-leader) holds daily meetings where team members discuss what they did the day before and what they plan to accomplish each day. [Related article: What Is Agile Scrum Methodology?]
  • Kanban, another type of Agile framework, is popular in manufacturing environments. Teams are collaborative and self-managing. Kanban practices include visualization, limiting work in progress, flow management, making policies explicit, feedback and collaborative evolution.
  • PMI PMBOK (the Project Management Institute’s Project Management Body of Knowledge), while not strictly a project management methodology, is a well-known and respected standard for project management practices. PMI’s certifications, especially its PMP credential, are among the most coveted project management credentials. PMBOK practices focus on five primary process areas: initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, and closing.

While project management is all about managing workflow, project resource management is about ensuring resources are being used efficiently.

How long does it take to get a project management certification?

Requirements to earn a project management certification are set by the individual certification provider and may include a combination of exams, specific training courses, and minimum education level or experience. The requirements to earn advanced certifications are generally more than those for entry-level credentials. For example, the Project Management Professional is one of the most highly prized certifications available. In addition to passing a rigorous exam, candidates must also possess a combination of education, project management education and experience.

CompTIA’s Project+, an entry-level certification, recommends that candidates have 12 months’ experience before attempting the exam. However, since this is a recommendation only, candidates can obtain this certification by sitting for the test regardless, which makes it the only one we found that is available without requiring additional training, education or experience.

In the table below, you’ll find information on obtaining five popular project management certifications. 

Certification Skill level Exams Education/experience
CompTIA Project+ Entry 1 12 months’ experience recommended
Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM) Entry 1 High school diploma and 1,500 hours of project experience or 23 hours of project management education
Certified ScrumMaster (CSM) Entry 1 Two-day, fee-based training course
Project Management Professional (PMP) Advanced 1 Four-year college degree, 4,500 hours leading and directing projects, and 35 hours of project management education or CAPM certification or High school or associate’s degree, 7,500 hours leading and directing projects, and 35 hours of project management education or CAPM certification
Certified Six Sigma Black Belt (CSSBB) Advanced 1 Three years of experience in one or more of the Six Sigma Body of Knowledge areas, plus one completed project with signed affidavit or two completed projects with signed affidavits and three years of work experience

There are several types of project management certifications. Some are more difficult than others, and each one has its own requirements for candidates.

Are IT certifications necessary?

You don’t necessarily need an IT certification to lead projects in the field. However, obtaining an IT certification can help you gain more knowledge and skills for effectively managing projects and leading your team. Getting an IT certification can also result in a salary increase and make your résumé more appealing to employers.

If you believe an IT certification could be a good addition to your career, the first step is to choose the area in which you want to receive a certification; project management is hardly the only option. Below are more than a dozen of the best certification areas for IT professionals.

  • Big data
  • Business continuity and disaster recovery
  • Cloud IT
  • Computer forensics
  • Computer hardware
  • Computer networking
  • Data center
  • Databases
  • Enterprise architect
  • Healthcare IT
  • Help desk
  • Information security
  • IT governance
  • IT trainer
  • Linux
  • Mobile app development
  • Mobility
  • Programming
  • Project management
  • Storage
  • System administrator
  • Telecommunications
  • Unified communications
  • Virtualization certifications
  • VoIP and telephony
  • Web
  • Wireless networking

How should I get started with project management training?

Start digging into the outlets and offerings that interest you most. When training is free, the only thing you have to lose is your time and energy. Thus, you can try things out and stop at any time if they don’t work for you. When it comes to paid training, we recommend looking at online reviews, seeking personal recommendations from people you know and trust, and requesting feedback from former course attendees or materials users to help steer you toward the right choice.

Shayna Waltower contributed to the writing and research in this article. 

Tue, 19 Dec 2023 09:59:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/6319-free-project-management-training-materials.html
PMP Certification Salary And Requirements

Editorial Note: We earn a commission from partner links on Forbes Advisor. Commissions do not affect our editors' opinions or evaluations.

The project management field has experienced a great deal of growth and change in exact years. As companies move to project-based scheduling and orientation, they need skilled managers to lead efficient teams. The World Economic Forum lists project management as one of the fastest-growing career paths through 2027, as highlighted in its 2023 Future of Jobs report.

If you’re considering becoming a certified Project Management Professional (PMP)®, now is a great time to do so. PMP certification takes hard work, but it brings many benefits as well, including greater earning power. This article explores PMP certification requirements and PMP certification salary averages.

What Is PMP Certification?

PMP is considered the gold standard in the field of project management. The Project Management Institute (PMI), the leading organization in project management, administers this certification. PMI publishes the Project Management Book of Knowledge (PMBOK®), which establishes best practices for project management specialists.

PMP certification demonstrates that you have up-to-date knowledge of modern concepts in project management and scheduling. This credential is widely recognized and can help you stand out against other project management workers.

Getting PMP-certified can help you learn about concepts like agile, waterfall project scheduling, leadership and business management. Moreover, PMI reports that globally, project managers who hold PMP certification make about 33% more each year than their non-certified peers. In the U.S., PMPs make 44% more than noncertified project management specialists.

PMP Certification Salary

PMP certification salary statistics show that this certification is well worth the effort for many professionals. According to PMI, noncertified project managers in the U.S. earn a median annual salary of $9,000. PMPs earn a median wage of $130,000 per year—a 44% increase over their noncertified colleagues.

This PMP certification salary increase is justified by the following:

  • PMP certification equips you to effectively lead a team.
  • PMP certification gives you the skills to reduce project spending and increase company profits.
  • Most companies are relying more heavily on project-oriented scheduling and task distribution.
  • PMP certification can help you lead your company to a higher return on their  investment.

PMP Certification Requirements

The PMP certification process involves a combination of work experience, targeted training and a certification exam. Below, we’ll break down how to get PMP certification, including the experience and credentials required.

Work Experience

The PMP certification process begins with several years of relevant work experience. Candidates with high school diplomas or associate degrees must have five years of experience leading projects before they can apply to take the PMP exam. Those with bachelor’s degrees need only three years of project management experience.

Project Management Training

Before sitting for the PMP exam, you must complete 35 “contact hours,” or professional development through a PMP certification training course. You may complete these hours either online or in person. Tuition rates for these courses vary. Free PMP certification training is available, but usually on a trial basis only.

Application Processing Time

How long does it take to get PMP certification exam-approved? Once you’re ready to sit for the PMP exam, you must apply to do so through PMI. This process involves submitting an application along with documentation to show relevant work experience. It typically takes three to five days to hear back from PMI regarding the status of your application.

Study Time

Once you’ve met the experience and education requirements for the PMP exam, you should set aside additional time to study. While there’s no set or “correct” amount of time to spend on PMP test prep, you should prepare yourself as much as possible by browsing a study guide and taking practice exams.

FAQ About PMP Certification Requirements and Salary

Can I take the PMP test without experience?

No. The Project Management Institute does not allow people to sit for the PMP test if they have not completed three to five years of professional experience leading projects, with exact requirements depending on candidates’ education level.

How much experience do you need for PMP certification?

If you hold a high school diploma or associate degree, PMI requires you to have five years of experience leading projects, including 7,500 hours of project management work. If you have a bachelor’s degree, this requirement reduces to three years and 4,500 hours of project management experience.

Do I need to be a project manager to get a PMP certification?

Not necessarily. Working as a project manager can help you meet PMP certification requirements, but PMI only requires that you have professional experience leading projects—it does not specify what your title should be. Taking the lead on a particular task or overseeing a minor project can count as relevant leadership experience.

Do I have to be a PMI member to earn PMP certification?

No, you don’t have to be a PMI member to earn PMP certification. However, PMI membership can save you money when you register for the exam. The PMP test cost is $405 for PMI members or $575 for nonmembers. Retaking the test costs $275 for PMI members and $375 for nonmembers. PMP renewal fees are cheaper for PMI members as well.

How long does it take to process the PMP application?

Once you apply to PMI for permission to take the exam, it typically takes three to five days to hear back.

Do I need to renew my PMP certification?

Yes, you must renew your PMP certification every three years. During those three years, you must complete 60 professional development units. PMI members pay a renewal fee of $60, and nonmembers pay $150.

Sun, 31 Dec 2023 22:41:00 -0600 Christin Perry en-US text/html https://www.forbes.com/advisor/education/pmp-certification-salary/
Project Management Professional (PMP)®

Project Management Professional (PMP) is an industry-recognised certification for project managers.

Globally recognised and demanded, the PMP credential demonstrates that you have the experience, education and competency to successfully lead and direct projects.

The PMP® certification is renowned throughout the world. Part of that marketability comes from the prestige of PMI® certifications; achieving the globally recognised Project Management Professional (PMP)® certification will provide evidence of an individual’s knowledge, experience and ability to successfully manage a project.

Who should attend?

The PMP credential recognises demonstrated competence in leading and directing project teams. Experienced project managers should consider this qualification to consolidate their skills and allow them to demonstrate and be recognised as capable project managers.

Pre-requisites
If you wish to take the PMP exam, PMI does require that you either hold:

  • A four-year degree (Bachelor’s or the global equivalent) and at least three years of project management experience, with 4,500 hours leading and directing projects and 35 hours of project management education, or
  • A secondary diploma (high school or the global equivalent) with at least five years of project management experience, with 7,500 hours leading and directing projects and 35 hours of project management education.

You also have to apply to the Project Management Institute (PMI) before you can sit the exam. There’s a strict protocol as they have to authenticate that the above criteria has been met prior to test attendance.

How will I benefit?

At the conclusion of the course students will:

  • Have sufficient knowledge and understanding to work as an informed member of a project team undertaking a variety of project management roles
  • Be able to examine and analyse the inputs, tools and techniques of the processes and knowledge areas of the PMBOK® Guide
  • Be prepared for the PMP examination having completed the required 35 contact hours
  • Be able to describe each process group and knowledge area of the PMBOK® Guide.

About the Project Management Professional (PMP)®

Please note, this eLearning programme will prepare you to sit the PMP examination which is organised directly with PMI at an additional cost.

eLearning 
Price: £460 + VAT (a 10% discount is available to members of the Institution)

Wed, 18 Oct 2023 00:43:00 -0500 en text/html https://imeche.org/training-qualifications/training-details/project-management-professional-(pmp)
Project Management, Certificate

Acquire the project management knowledge and skills needed in modern organizations with a certificate in project management from Saint Louis University's School for Professional Studies. Whether your career is in technology, manufacturing, sales or service, you’ll gain the leadership, data and management competencies you need to succeed in a growing field.

As part of the Saint Louis University School for Professional Studies, this program offers enterprising adults like you a flexible option to meet your personal and career goals. With multiple start dates available, you can begin working toward your certificate at any time. All courses are offered in eight-week terms through SLU Online, making advanced education more accessible for working professionals.  

Faculty

As a student in the School for Professional Studies at Saint Louis University, you’ll learn from exceptional faculty who are leading experts in their fields. They bring real-world knowledge to the classroom and are dedicated to your professional success. Learn more on our faculty page.

Careers

Project management skills are needed across multiple disciplines. In 2021, the Project Management Institute projected that 25 million new project professionals would be needed worldwide by 2030.

Tuition

Tuition Cost Per Credit
Undergraduate Tuition
Standard Tuition $650
Active Duty/Veteran (TA eligible or GI Bill); First Responders $295

Additional charges may apply. Other resources are listed below:

Net Price Calculator

Information on Tuition and Fees

Miscellaneous Fees

Information on Summer Tuition

Scholarships and Financial Aid

There are two principal ways to help finance a Saint Louis University education:

  • Scholarships: Scholarships are awarded based on academic achievement, service, leadership and financial need. The School for Professional Studies offers numerous scholarships and awards specifically for new students.
  • Financial Aid: Financial aid is provided in the form of grants and loans, some of which require repayment.

To determine eligibility for financial assistance, submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) early for maximum consideration. FAFSA is available online at https://studentaid.gov/h/apply-for-aid/fafsa.

For information on other scholarships and financial aid, visit the student financial services office online at https://www.slu.edu/financial-aid.

Admission Requirements

  • Completed application
  • High school diploma or composite GED score of at least 2250
  • Minimum transfer cumulative GPA of 2.5 (unless qualified for conditional admittance)
  • Official transcript from the most exact institution attended

Upon admission, a new student must successfully complete a virtual meeting with their academic coach to be enrolled in first-term coursework.
 

The School for Professional Studies welcomes adult learners who are seeking an undergraduate education after life circumstances interrupted their educational journey. Adult life circumstances, for the purposes of admission, would include individuals with at least one of the following characteristics:

  • Delayed enrollment in post-secondary education
  • Attends part-time for at least part of the academic year
  • Works full-time (35 hours or more/week) while enrolled
  • Is financially independent
  • Has dependents other than a spouse
  • Is a single parent
  • Has other demands that make traditional education less feasible

Program Requirements 

PMGT 1010 Fundamentals of Project Management 3
PMGT 1030 Project Selection and Scope 3
PMGT 2010 Communication-Stakeholder & Quality Management 3
PMGT 2020 Project Data Analysis 3
PMGT 3020 Time, Cost and Risk Management 3
PMGT 4030 Project Management Laboratory 3
Total Credits 18

Continuation Standards

Students must maintain a minimum of 2.00 GPA and receive a C or better in all certificate classes. 

Roadmaps are recommended semester-by-semester plans of study for programs and assume full-time enrollment unless otherwise noted.  

Courses and milestones designated as critical (marked with !) must be completed in the semester listed to ensure a timely graduation. Transfer credit may change the roadmap.

This roadmap should not be used in the place of regular academic advising appointments. All students are encouraged to meet with their advisor/mentor each semester. Requirements, course availability and sequencing are subject to change.

Fri, 27 Oct 2023 05:06:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.slu.edu/professional-studies/programs/project-management-cert.php
Online Project Management Bachelor's Degree No result found, try new keyword!Students who complete an online project management ... that help in project planning; cost and time management; risk management; and budgeting, contracts and procurement. A exact study by the ... Sun, 09 Apr 2023 21:00:00 -0500 https://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/project-management-bachelors-degree Best project management software of 2024

The best project management software makes it simple and easy for teams to organize projects and tasks.

Best project management software: quick menu

With the normalization of home working following the pandemic, project management software is more important than ever, giving remote teams an easy way to manage projects and tasks.





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