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Fri, 15 Nov 2019 06:50:00 -0600en-ustext/htmlhttps://www.unr.edu/social-work/degrees-and-programs/master-of-social-work/licensing-requirements How To Become A Social Worker

Editorial Note: We earn a commission from partner links on Forbes Advisor. Commissions do not affect our editors' opinions or evaluations.

If you’re interested in pursuing a profession that empowers communities, encourages social development and cohesion and helps people Strengthen or overcome difficult circumstances, you may want to consider becoming a social worker.

Social work offers a variety of challenging yet rewarding career paths, with opportunities to explore different specializations that align with your interests, skills and professional goals. This article provides an overview of the steps, including education, certification and professional experience, required to become a licensed social worker.

What Does a Social Worker Do?

A social worker is a professional who advocates for individuals, families, groups and communities and helps them Strengthen their overall quality of life. They work in a variety of contexts and environments, including mental health clinics, community centers, prisons, schools, hospitals and private practices, to help their clients cope with challenges such as divorce, illness, substance abuse and unemployment.

In addition to conducting assessments to determine the appropriate resources, they often also customize a treatment plan to support the needs and development of their clients.

Social Worker Job Outlook

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), employment opportunities for social workers are projected to grow 7% through 2032, which is faster than the average projection for all occupations. The median salary of a social worker is $26.61 per hour, or $55,350 per year.

Top Skills for a Social Worker

Social workers work closely with individuals from a wide range of cultural, socioeconomic and religious backgrounds and must be able to assist their clients with sensitivity, compassion and understanding. Key skills for social workers include:

  • Verbal and nonverbal communication
  • Emotional intelligence
  • Active listening
  • Critical thinking
  • Organization
  • Advocacy

Types of Social Work Degrees

If you’re contemplating pursuing a career as a social worker, it’s crucial that you familiarize yourself with the licensure requirements of the specific state you’re planning to work in to determine the appropriate degree programs and certifications you’ll need.

It’s important to obtain degrees from institutions accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) because it demonstrates that your program follows best practices and meets the field’s established standards in rigor and quality.

Bachelor of Social Work (BSW)

Holding a bachelor’s degree is the minimum requirement to work as a social worker, though most states require a master’s of social work (MSW). Obtaining a BSW typically takes four years to complete and qualifies you for nonclinical, entry-level positions as a licensed baccalaureate social worker (LBSW). LBSWs must work under a clinical supervisor.

The curriculum for bachelor’s programs in social work provides a comprehensive overview of the theory, practices and ethics of the field through a combination of lectures and field work. In addition to the general course requirements unique to each university, the coursework typically covers a variation of the following topics:

  • Social and human rights policies
  • Behavioral science
  • Psychology
  • Sociology
  • Statistical analysis, including biostatistics

Many undergraduate social work programs include an internship or practicum component. You must pass the bachelor’s licensing test to become a LBSW.

Licensed Master of Social Work (LMSW)

Master’s degree programs in social work typically take two years to complete and allow graduates to work as a licensed master social worker (LMSW). The curriculum builds on the knowledge obtained during undergraduate programs, while also advancing practical skills.

Master’s programs in social work often offer specializations, such as mental health, child and family services, criminal justice, community and organization practice and school social work practice.

Coursework for master’s degree in social work typically includes subjects related to the following:

  • Social welfare policy
  • Human behavior and the social environment
  • Social work practice with groups and families
  • Psychopathology

Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW)

LCSWs hold a master’s degree in social work and have years of professional training and experience. In addition to fulfilling state-specific requirements, LCSWs must also successfully pass the national examination to obtain licensure. The LCSW designation makes you eligible to provide clinical services, such as diagnosing and counseling those dealing with mental, behavioral and emotional issues.

Requirements for a Social Work Certification

Becoming a licensed social worker requires licensure from your state licensing board. It’s essential to acquaint yourself with your state’s educational and professional licensing requirements.

After completing a master’s degree, applicants must pass the Association of Social Work Board (ASWB) test to earn an LSW. Generally, social workers need to gain up to 4,000 hours of supervised work experience, which typically takes over two years. You must then pass an additional clinical or advanced specialist ASWB exam, which leads to an LCSW. An LCSW must be renewed periodically. Renewal requirements vary by state.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What qualifications do you need for social work?

The qualifications needed to work as a social worker depends on the level of licensure you want to obtain and the certification requirements of the state you want to work in. A bachelor’s degree in social work qualifies you for nonclinical, entry-level positions, while a master’s degree and licensure expand your professional opportunities.

How do I start a career in social work?

Familiarizing yourself with your state’s licensing requirements and researching social work programs from accredited institutions is crucial. Earning a bachelor’s and master’s degree in social work and gaining professional experience provides the necessary foundation to start a career as a social worker. Next, obtaining licensure is required if you want to work as an independent clinical social worker.

How much does a social worker make?

According to the BLS, the average salary of a social worker is $26.61 per hour, or $55,350 per year. Your level of experience, specialization and location can affect your salary.

What do social workers do on a daily basis?

The day-to-day duties of a social worker vary depending on your specialization and work environment. Generally, duties entail counseling, administrative tasks and designing personalized treatment and care plans.

Sun, 10 Dec 2023 21:20:00 -0600 Mariah St John en-US text/html https://www.forbes.com/advisor/education/become-a-social-worker/
Social Work, Minor

Saint Louis University offers an undergraduate minor in social work that can be completed in 18 credits.

A minor in social work provides students with an understanding of the social work profession, the issues that social work addresses, and the values that drive the profession. 

Students considering pursuing an M.S.W. will not be able to obtain advanced standing toward the M.S.W. with a minor in social work. Only students with a Bachelor of Science in Social Work can obtain advanced standing.

Wed, 29 Jun 2022 18:11:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.slu.edu/social-work/academics/social-work/social-work-minor.php
Racism in social work

The Social Work Community Podcast is a new offering from Community Care.

This episode is about racism within social work. We speak to Nana and Ash, both children and family social workers, about their experiences of racism. There is discussion about racism from families they have worked with but also from within the organisations they have worked for.

  • What should a team manager do if a family asks for a different social worker based on their race or religion?
  • How much support is available for social workers who receive abuse from service users?
  • How important is allyship? Is there a need for more cultural competency within social work?
  • And how much has changed since the death of George Floyd?

They discuss this and much more in this unmissable episode.

More on racism in social work

Over a quarter of social workers faced racism from colleagues or managers in 12-month period, finds survey

My role as England’s first anti-racist lead practitioner

Conference calls on senior leaders to take action to embed antiracist practice

The podcast is available on most podcast platforms, including Spotify , Audible (Amazon) and Apple podcasts, or you can find it by putting ‘the social work community podcast’ into your search engine.

Listen now:

Listen to “Racism in social work” on Spreaker.

You can read the transcription here.

This podcast is also part of our new community site, The Social Work Community, which offers a safe, positive space to share careers guidance, network with peers and exchange experiences of social work. If you haven’t already, you can sign up now!

Did you catch the first two episodes? Listen back here:

The pros and cons of being a young social worker

What is the impact of negative media coverage of social work?

Mon, 01 Jan 2024 10:00:00 -0600 Sharmeen Ziauddin en-GB text/html https://www.communitycare.co.uk/2024/01/02/racism-in-social-work/
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PCCE information source - NFPA Paralegal CORE Competency test Updated: 2024

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PCCE NFPA Paralegal CORE Competency Exam

The format of the PCC test follows the proven structure
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The exam:

- is two and one-half hours in length;

- consists of 125 multiple choice questions;

- is computer administered with instant
preliminary results, followed by official scoring
run results provided at least quarterly;

- is widely available at many testing centers with
examinations given Monday – Friday, and in
some locations, weekends and evenings;

- consists of two domains:

~ Paralegal Practice – 52%

~ Substantive Areas of Law – 48%

- is based on information from coursework in various
paralegal programs and basic knowledge all
paralegals should possess as well as actual skills
considered essential to basic paralegal competency;

- is also a test of paralegal ethics, legal technology and
key terminology

to provide the groundwork for expanding paralegal
roles and responsibilities;

- to provide the public and legal community with
a mechanism to gauge the core competencies of
paralegals;

- to be used in states considering the regulation of
paralegals; and

- to be used by paralegal programs as an exit exam
or Assurance of Learning tool.

Bachelors degree in any subject, plus a paralegal certificate;

no experience or CLE required; OR

- Bachelors degree in paralegal studies; no experience or
CLE required; OR

- Bachelors degree in any subject, no paralegal certificate,
6 months experience and 1 hour of ethics taken in the year
preceding the test application date; OR

- Associates degree in paralegal studies, no experience or
CLE required; OR

- Associates degree in any subject, a paralegal certificate,
no experience or CLE; OR

- Associates degree in any subject, no paralegal certificate,
1 year experience and 6 hours of CLE, including 1 hour of
ethics taken in the year preceding the test application date; OR

- Paralegal certificate from a program that meets or exceeds
the requirements set forth in NFPAs Short Term Paralegal
Program Position Statement, 1 year experience and 6 hours of
CLE, including 1 hour of ethics, taken in the year preceding
the test application date; OR

- Active, duty, retired or former military personnel qualified
in a military operation specialty as a paralegal and 1.0 hour of
ethics CLE within the year preceding the test application; OR

- Candidates who are within two months of graduating and
registered for the PCC test by a Director of a paralegal
studies program participating in the PCCE Assurance of
Learning (AoL) Program at the Partner level; OR

- High school diploma or GED, 5 years experience and 12 hours
of CLE, including 1 hour of ethics, taken within 2 years
preceding the test application date.

NFPA Paralegal CORE Competency Exam
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Question: 69
The elements or parts of a reported case include, among other things,
______________________________.
A. The caption, the citation, and the opening brief.
B. The discussion, the opinion, and the holding.
C. The holding, the responding brief, and the caption.
D. The caption, the headnotes, and the holding.
Answer: D
The caption, the headnotes, and the holding. The parts of a reported case include
the following: The caption, the date of the decision, parallel citations (if any), the
headnotes, the statement of the facts, the court"s opinion, the holding, the
rationale, dicta, and the disposition of the case. Some opinions also include a
syllabus.
Question: 70
Which of the following possessives is NOT correct?
A. The rule in Shelley"s case.
B. He reviewed the ACP"s resume.
C. He repaired his mother"s-in-law car.
D. None of the above.
Answer: C
He repaired his mother"s-in-law car. Answer C is not correct because mother-in-
law is a singular term and the possessive is formed by adding an apostrophe and
s at the end. Answer A and Answer B are both correct because they are singular
terms and the possessive is correctly formed by adding an apostrophe and an s
at the end. Note that this grammatical rule applies to acronyms.
Question: 71
Which of the following is NOT a factor to be considered in determining whether a
lawyer is competent to handle a particular matter?
A. The length of time the lawyer has been practicing law.
B. The complexity and specialized nature of the matter.
C. The lawyer"s general experience.
D. The lawyer"s training and experience in the underlying subject matter.
Answer: A
The length of time the lawyer has been practicing law. The factors to consider
when determining whether a lawyer is competent to handle a particular matter
include, among other factors: (1) the complexity and specialized nature of the
matter; (2) the lawyer"s general experience; (3) the lawyer"s training and
experience in the underlying subject matter; (4) the preparation and study the
lawyer can devote to the matter; (5) whether it is feasible to associate with another
lawyer who is competent in the area. Model Rule 1.1, comment 1. A lawyer need
not necessarily have special training or prior experience to handle a legal problem
of a type with which the lawyer is unfamiliar. Model Rule 1.1, comment 2.
Answer A is the best choice because length of time as a practicing lawyer is not
considered a factor.
Question: 72
Which of the following sentences does NOT correctly use who or whom?
A. My supervisor knows Gary, with whom he has worked.
B. Samuel is the person to whom you should address your complaint.
C. Both of the above.
D. Neither of the above.
Answer: C
Both of the above. In this question, Answer A is correct because whom is used
in a clause that is subordinate to the main clause (note the comma). By contrast,
Answer B does not use a comma, so the clause is not dependent. If the clause is
restrictive (no comma), the best way to determine if who or whom is correct
is to revise the sentence without who or whom (e.g., You should address
your complaint to Samuel) and then determine if the sentence works with he or
she or works with him or her (e.g., She should address . . .). If he or
she works, then use who; if him or her works, then use whom.
Question: 73
A lawyer represented a client in a case involving a contract dispute. The lawyer
was successful in showing a breach of contract by the defendant and asserted a
claim for attorneys" fees under the contract. The defendant did not dispute that the
plaintiff was entitled to attorneys" fees, but argued that the lawyer overcharged his
client since the work performed was not worth the amount charged. At the hearing
on the motion for attorneys" fees, the defendant"s attorney called the plaintiff"s
lawyer as a witness. Can the lawyer testify in a case in which he is representing a
party?
A. Yes, because the testimony will be limited to the work performed and value of
the work performed.
B. Yes, if the plaintiff waives the conflict of interest.
C. No, because an attorney cannot act as an advocate for a party and a witness in
the same case.
D. No, unless the lawyer withdraws from representing the client.
Answer: A
Yes, because the testimony will be limited to the work performed and value of the
work performed. A lawyer shall not act as an advocate at a trial in which the
lawyer is likely to be a necessary witness unless . . . the testimony relates to the
nature and value of the legal service rendered in the case. Model Rule 3.7.
Answer A is the best choice because it states an exception that allows the attorney
to testify regarding the attorneys" fees. Answer B is not the best choice because an
attorney testifying in the same case in which he or she represents a client is not a
conflict of interest. Answer C is not the best choice because an exception to the
rule covers the situation in this factual scenario. Answer D is not the best choice
because an exception allows the attorney to testify.
Question: 74
Which of the following sentences correctly uses the past tense?
A. The governor will veto the bill.
B. The governor reads all bills passed by the legislature.
C. The state legislature overrode the governor"s veto.
D. The governor had expressed her opposition to the bill and has now vetoed it.
Answer: C
The state legislature overrode the governor"s veto. Verb tense indicates whether
an action or state of being occurred in the past, present, or future. The past tense is
formed by adding d or ed to the end of a verb or by using the past tense form
of an irregular verb. Answer C is the correct choice because overrode is the past
tense form of the irregular verb override. Answer A is not the correct choice
because it is an example of the irregular verb to be in the future tense. Answer
B is not the correct choice because it is an example of the verb to read in the
present tense. Answer D is not the correct choice because it is an example of the
present perfect tense.
Question: 75
Which of the following sentences properly uses a colon?
A. Oliver Wendell Holmes said: The life of the law is not logic; it is experience.
B. Sheldon kept knocking on Penny"s door: Penny, Penny, Penny.
C. George used the buzzer to call Jerry: Jerry let George in the building.
D. None of the above.
Answer: A
Oliver Wendell Holmes said: The life of the law is not logic; it is experience. A
colon is used to introduce a quote, a list, or a rule. Answer A is the correct choice
because it properly uses a colon to introduce a quote. Answer B is not the correct
choice because the language before the colon does not introduce the quotes. To be
proper, it should read: Sheldon kept knocking on Penny"s door and saying:
Penny," Penny," Penny." Answer C is not the correct choice because the colon
should be a semicolon.
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Master of Social Work student handbook

Academic integrity

The School of Social Work adheres to the University of Nevada, Reno Academic Standards Policy for Students concerning issues of academic integrity. Please see the UNR website for a complete description, definitions and policies regarding class conduct and academic dishonesty.

Accommodation for students with disabilities

Students who require additional support due to disabling conditions should discuss their needs with their instructors at the start of each semester. Accommodations for all reasonable requests will be made for documented disabling conditions. In addition, students are encouraged to contact the UNR Disability Resource Center at (775) 784-6000 to access a range of supportive services.

Attendance policy

The faculty of the School of Social Work believe that classroom attendance and participation are critical aspects of professional socialization. Students are responsible for assisting in the creation of a learning environment that promotes such socialization. To do so, students should assume responsibility for their own learning and be engaged within the course room. It is expected for students to log into the online classroom a minimum of three times a week to be successfully engaged. Attendance and participation will be part of grading, as determined by the course instructor. Opportunities for make-up assignments are determined at the discretion of individual instructors.

Confidentiality of case material outside of an agency

NASW Code of Ethics requirements regarding confidentiality of client information extend to the use of confidential information from field work in classes, seminars and in student assignments. Students may not divulge client, collateral or collegial information, disguising all names, demographic information and any case details that might identify a client or co-worker. Client files and records should never be removed from the agency for any purpose.

Nondiscrimination policy

The programs of the School of Social Work are conducted without discrimination on the basis of race, color, gender, creed, ethnic or national origin, disability, political orientation, or sexual orientation. This policy applies to the baccalaureate and master’s programs, the field education program, and all admission, employment, and financial aid decisions.

Retention

In its description of the Social Work major, the University of Nevada, Reno catalog states that:

“The admission and retention of students in the program is subject to the professional judgment of the social work faculty.”

Retention in the MSW Program is based on student performance in two general areas: academics and adherence to professional values and standards of behavior. Retention in the social work major requires students and maintain a 3.0 (B) overall grade point average—with a letter grade of “C” or higher in each of the graduate course, including the required 3 credits of electives. Additionally, students must adhere to the academic and professional standards outlined in UNR’s Student Handbook for Student Code of Conduct, the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics and the State Board of Examiners for Social Workers, Nevada Legislature’s Standards of Practice.

Dismissal policy

The School of Social Work adheres to the Dismissal Policy of the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) Code, Title 2, Chapter 11.

Academic standing and dismissal policy for master’s of social work graduate program

This policy is effective for the Spring 2024 Semester and beyond.

According to the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) Code, Title 2, Chapter 11, “a student may be dismissed from a program for academic reasons which may include but are not limited to inadequate grades or failure to remain in academic good standing as defined by the program, a lack of professionalism or unethical conduct, or failure to comply with other specific program requirements. Failure to comport with professional and/or ethical standards applicable to the particular discipline or program may be grounds for dismissal from a program.” The NSHE Code authorizes programs to establish their own written dismissal policies, procedures and sanctions for program dismissals. The School of Social Work (SSW) herein sets forth the Dismissal Policy for graduate students in SSW Graduate Social Work Program (MSW Program).

A. Definitions

The term “Academic Policies” is defined as those policies, procedures, and regulations of the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE), the University of Nevada, Reno, the University of Nevada, Reno Graduate School (“Graduate School”) and particular graduate departments or graduate programs.

The term “Recommending Party” shall refer to the person within the college or Interdisciplinary Graduate Program who shall make the recommendation to the Graduate School for a student to be placed on probation or be dismissed from the MSW Program. For purposes of this Policy, the Recommending Party shall be the dean of the SSW. 

The term “dismissed” shall mean removal from the student’s Graduate Program and removal from the Graduate School. If a student is dismissed, the student needs to reapply to the Graduate Program and the Graduate School. 

The term “discontinuation” shall mean the suspension of the student’s active status in the Graduate Program and Graduate School. If a student is discontinued, the student does not need to reapply to the Graduate Program and the Graduate School. A student can be reinstated at the discretion of the Graduate Program and the Graduate School.

B. General

A student may be placed on probation and/or dismissed from the MSW Program for numerous reasons, which may include, but are not limited to:

  1. Failure to maintain good academic standing as defined by this Dismissal Policy.
  2. Failure to make satisfactory progress as defined by the standards in this Dismissal Policy.
  3. Failure to meet the conditions of academic probation as described in the Academic Probation Notice.
  4. Unsatisfactory performance as a graduate teaching assistant, graduate research assistant, or graduate project assistant.
  5. Failure to comply with professional or ethical standards applicable to the MSW Program while the student is in a practicum or professional fieldwork setting.
  6. Violations of University Student Code of Conduct or the Academic Standards Policy for academic dishonesty (UAM 6,502) where the disciplinary sanction is expulsion.

All probation and dismissal recommendations shall be submitted by the SSW to the Graduate School. Only the Graduate School may officially place students on probation or dismiss students. SSW and the MSW Program may not place students on probation, nor dismiss students from graduate programs unless authorized to do so by the Graduate School.

C. Academic Standards

  1. Academic Good Standing

A student may be placed on probation and dismissed from the MSW Program for failure to maintain academic good standing. To be considered in good academic standing, graduate students shall:

  1. Maintain a University graduate cumulative grade-point average (GPA) of at least 3.0.
  2. Complete each MSW course with a grade of “C” or higher.
  3. Maintain a passing grade in the clinical or practicum course.
  4. Have not been placed on probation by the Graduate School for academic deficiencies or practicum or professional fieldwork placement deficiencies.

2. Failure to Make Satisfactory Progress

A student may be placed on probation and dismissed from the MSW Program for failure to make satisfactory progress in their course of study. Failure to make progress is indicated by one or more of the following academic progress standards (“Academic Progress Standards”):

  1. Failure to complete three (3) graduate credits per semester toward MSW Program; if an exception has been issued allowing a student to enroll for fewer than three (3) graduate credits, failure to complete the agreed-on number of graduate credits.
  2. Unsatisfactory grades (including grades below C or its numerical equivalent
  3. Repeated withdrawals from courses.
  4. Failure to consult with their advisor when requested.
  5. Failure to develop an official, approved program of study.
  6. Failure to comply with other specific MSW Program requirements or policies as stated in the MSW Program’s student handbook and website.
  7. Failure to meet the SSW’s milestone or benchmark within the timeframe specified by the MSW Program.
  8. Failure to correct or remediate an “out-of-status” course per the student’s Program of Study or the MSW Program.
  9. Failure to perform at a level commiserate with the training received from either the MSW Program or the practicum or professional fieldwork site while the student is in a practicum or professional fieldwork setting.
  10. Failure to maintain the standards of academic and professional integrity expected in for social workers, as described in the MSW Program’s student handbook and SSW website, while the student is in a practicum or professional fieldwork setting. 

The MSW Program competencies for the Academic Progress Standards are stated in the MSW Handbook and SSW website. The competencies or requirements for the Academic Progress Standards shall be consistent with MSW Program requirements, standards in the field and as specified in the MSW Program handbook and on the SSW website for the MSW Program. 

The MSW Program shall review the academic performance and progress of the graduate student at least once per year.

D. Probation and Dismissal.

A Recommending Party may request the Graduate School place the student on probation and/or dismissed for failure to maintain academic good standing as stated in Section (C)(1) and/or failure to make satisfactory progress as stated in Section (C)(2).

  1. Failure to Maintain Academic Good Standing.

If the student's cumulative grade-point total falls below a 3.0, the student shall be placed on probation following the process stated in Section (D)(2)(a). The student must then raise their cumulative graduate GPA to 3.0 by the end of the following semester during which the student is enrolled or the student shall be summarily dismissed from the Graduate School and the MSW Program with no further process or appeal. 

If the student receives a U grade of 83% or lower in a practicum or professional fieldwork course, the student shall not be placed on probation. The student shall be summarily dismissed from the MSW Program and the dismissal procedures described below in Section II(H), shall not apply.

GPA calculator

 The student’s only recourse to challenge a grade is to utilize the University’s grade appeal process. If the student’s grade appeal is successful, the student shall be reinstated in the MSW Program.

  1. Failure to Make Satisfactory Progress.

a. Probation

If the MSW Program determines that the student has failed to make satisfactory progress, the Recommending Party shall make a written request to the Director of Operations of the Graduate School (“Director of Operations”) to place the student on probation. In the request, the Recommending Party shall provide documentation of the student’s failure to meet the specific provisions(s) of this Dismissal Policy, where applicable, warranting probation. The Recommending Party also shall provide specific requirements and/or conditions, including deadlines, which the student shall complete in order for the Graduate School to remove the student from probation. If the student is placed on probation, the student shall not be allowed to participate in field work at a field or practicum setting or site while the student is on probation. 

If the Graduate School approves the request to place the student on probation, the Recommending Party shall notify the student in writing that the student has been placed on academic probation (the “Academic Probation Notice”). The Recommending Party shall forward the Academic Probation Notice to the Graduate School.

The Academic Probation Notice shall outline what the student must do and the dates by which the student must do so in order to return to good standing in the MSW Program. The Academic Probation Notice shall inform the student that while the student is on probation, they shall not be allowed to participate in field work at a field or practicum setting or site. The Academic Probation Notice also shall inform the student that if the student does not meet the conditions of probation, the student shall be dismissed from the MSW Program, contain information about the MSW Program dismissal appeal process that shall be used and provide the student with the contact information for the Director of Operations for any questions or concerns the student may have. The Academic Probation Notice also shall inform the student of the student’s right to participate in a review conference with MSW Program to discuss the terms and conditions of the probation and that the student must submit, within ten (10) Working Days from the date of the Academic Probation Notice, a written request to the SSW to have a review conference (“Review Conference Request”).

The student shall be afforded the opportunity for a review conference, which shall be administered by the Recommending Party or the Recommending Party’s designee who shall be a department chair, program director or associate dean (“Review Conference Administrator”). The student shall have ten (10) Working Days from the date of the Academic Probation Notice to submit a written request to the SSW for a review conference (“Review Conference Request”). The SSW shall direct the Review Conference Administrator to schedule the Review Conference to occur no later than ten (10) Working Days from receipt of the Review Conference Request.

b. Dismissal

If the student fails to meet the requirements and/or conditions of probation, violates the terms of the probation or is recommended for dismissal without probation under SectionE), the Recommending Party shall make a written request to the Graduate School to dismiss the student from the MSW Program and Graduate School. In the request, the Recommending Party shall provide documentation of the student’s failure to meet the terms of the probation, the student’s violation of the terms of the probation, or the grounds for dismissal without probation as stated in Section (E).

If the Graduate School approves the request to dismiss the student, the Recommending Party shall notify the student in writing that the student is being dismissed from the MSW Program and Graduate School (“Dismissal Notice”). The Dismissal Notice shall include a written statement of reasons for the dismissal action, information about the applicable appeal procedures and the time period by which the student shall file an appeal (set forth in Section (H) below).

E. Dismissal Without Prior Probation

In rare instances, a student may be recommended for dismissal from the Graduate School and the SSW without being placed on probation. These instances include the following circumstances:

  1. When a student receives a U grade of 83% or lower in a practicum or professional fieldwork course.
  2. When a student’s behaviors or actions while in a practicum or professional fieldwork setting endanger the life, health, well-being or safety of any person at the practicum or professional fieldwork setting.
  3. Failure to pass required courses in the number of attempts allowed by the MSW Program.
  4. Failure of comprehensive and/or qualifying exams in the allowable number of attempts specified by the MSW Program.
  5. Failure to pass the culminating experience in the allowable number of attempts specified by the MSW Program. The term culminating experience does not include: thesis, dissertation, comprehensive exam, clinical, practicum, fieldwork or internship.
  6. Failure to complete all degree requirements within a timeframe required by the MSW Program not shorter than 6 years for Masters students.
  7. When a sanction of expulsion is issued by the Office of Student Conduct resulting from a student conduct issue or a violation of the Academic Standards policy (UAM 6,502) for academic dishonesty.

For those instances involving a disciplinary sanction of expulsion by the Office of Student Conduct, the student is subject to the procedures as outlined in Section II(F).

For the other instances described above the student is subject to the same procedures as outlined in Section (D)(2) for MSW Program dismissal. The student shall be provided with a Dismissal Notice which shall include information about the appeal procedures, the appeal conference and the time period by which the student shall file an appeal (set forth in Section II(H) below).

F. Dismissal for Violation of UNR’s Student Code Conduct or University’s Academic Standards Policy (UAM 6,502)

All disciplinary issues relating to a student’s alleged violations of the Student Code of Conduct and the Academic Standards Policy are processed through the Office of Student Conduct and not the SSW or the Graduate School. The SSW and the Graduate School and the SSW do not dismiss students from the MSW Program or the Graduate School as a result of a finding of responsibility of violations of the Student Code of Conduct or the Academic Standards Policy. The Graduate School does dismiss a student from the student’s MSW Program and Graduate School upon direction from the Office of Student Conduct after all conduct hearings and appeals have been completed and the Office of Student Conduct notifies the Graduate School that the sanction imposed against the student is expulsion from the University and therefore, dismissal from the student’s MSW Program.

G. Probation or Dismissal/ for Lack of Professionalism or Professional Misconduct in a Practicum or Field Placement Setting

Probation and/or dismissal from the MSW Program for lack of professionalism or professional misconduct while in a practicum or professional fieldwork setting shall be allowed for the MSW Program. The SSW has established its own benchmarks or requirements for professionalism, consistent with its MSW Program requirements, licensing, accreditation and national standards. These benchmarks and requirements are stated in the MSW Program student handbook and the MSW Program website.

All probation and/or dismissal recommendations based upon lack of professionalism or professional misconduct in a practicum or professional fieldwork settling shall be submitted to the Graduate School and only the Graduate School may officially place students on probation or dismiss students. The SSW and the MSW Program may not place students on probation, nor dismiss students from the MSW Program unless authorized to do so by the Graduate School.

A recommendation for probation and/or dismissal due to lack of professionalism or professional misconduct shall follow the procedures stated in this Dismissal Policy for dismissals based upon failure to make adequate progress as stated in Section D(2) or dismissal without probation as stated in Section E, whichever section is applicable. 

H: Appeal Process

  1. Student’s Appeal Request.

The student shall have ten (10) Working Days from the date of the Dismissal Notice to submit an appeal to the SSW. The SSW then shall have ten (10) Working Days to submit the student’s appeal to the Graduate School. Within ten (10) Working Days of receipt of the student’s written request for appeal, the dean of the Graduate School (“Graduate Dean”) shall review the student’s appeal and provide the student with written notification of the opportunity for a review conference on the appeal (“Appeal Conference”). 

  1. Appeal Conference.

The Appeal Conference shall be administered by the Graduate Dean. The Appeal Conference is a meeting that is not intended to be adversarial in nature. The student may be accompanied by an advisor during the Appeal Conference, who may serve in a support role to the student during the Appeal Conference. In this process, the advisor has no right to speak during the Appeal Conference except to the student.

If a student, who has been given notice does not appear for the Appeal Conference with the Graduate Dean, then the review conference shall proceed in the absence of the student.

The Appeal Conference is the time for presentation of the information, documents or witnesses in support of the dismissal. The Appeal Conference is the time at which the student is afforded the opportunity to present information, documents or witnesses on the student’s behalf. Witnesses may present a statement to the Graduate Dean; however, only the Graduate Dean is allowed to ask questions of any witnesses. Furthermore, the Recommending Party has the opportunity to participate in the Appeal Conference and may present information, documents or witnesses in support of the dismissal recommendation. The Graduate Dean also may include representatives from the MSW Program in the Appeal Conference.

The Appeal Conference shall occur within thirty-five (35) Working Days but no earlier than ten (10) Working Days after the date the Dismissal Notice was sent to the student by email or by personal delivery. The student can make a written request to the Graduate Dean asking that the 10-day period be waived if the student wants the Appeal Conference to occur sooner. If necessary, the student can make a written request to the Graduate Dean for an extension of time for the Appeal Conference and the Graduate Dean in their sole discretion, may grant the extension with regard to the Appeal Conference. If an extension of time for the Appeal Conference has been granted by the Graduate Dean, the Appeal Conference shall take place no later than forty-five (45) Working Days from the date of the Dismissal Notice.

  1. Written Decision.

After a review of all the materials, statements and relevant circumstances, the Graduate Dean shall issue a written decision setting forth the reasons upon which the final decision is based. The Graduate Dean’s determination shall be made on the basis of whether it is more likely than not that the student engaged in behavior or actions related to the MSW Program that warrant dismissal.

If the Graduate Dean does not uphold the recommendation for dismissal, the student shall be reinstated in the MSW Program. The Graduate Dean shall provide the written decision to the student and the MSW Program within five (5) Working Days after the Appeal Conference.

  1. Decision Final.

The decision of the Graduate Dean is final and is not subject to appeal.

I: Discontinuation for Non-Enrollment

Pursuant to the Academic Policies of the Graduate School, a student is required to be enrolled in either: (1) three (3) graduate-level credits per semester; or (2) the minimum number of credits agreed to by the Graduate School and the student prior to the beginning of the semester (the “Continuous Enrollment Policy”). Any student in violation of the Continuous Enrollment Policy is subject to discontinuation from the MSW Program and the student’s academic record shall be closed.

The Graduate School shall notify a student prior to the beginning of the next semester if they are in danger of violating the Continuous Enrollment Policy (“Discontinuation Notice”). The Discontinuation Notice shall be issued by the Graduate School within 10 (ten) business days prior to the beginning of the semester. The Discontinuation Notice shall inform the student that failure to register for the minimum number of credits violates the Continuous Enrollment Policy and will result in their discontinuation. If thereafter, the student fails to register for the minimum number of required credits, the student is discontinued from the MSW Program.

If a student is unable to enroll in the minimum number of credits the next semester, the student shall submit a Leave of Absence Form signed by the MSW Program and the Graduate School prior to the start of that next semester. 

Failure to timely submit the Leave of Absence form or failure to return to the MSW Program after the leave of absence has expired shall result in discontinuation from the MSW Program and the student’s academic record shall be closed.

J: Reinstatement Following Discontinuation

Students who were discontinued due to non-enrollment and whose academic record was previously closed may request reinstatement to the MSW Program. A Notice of Reinstatement to Graduate Standing form must be received by the Graduate School no later than the last day of enrollment for the semester in which the reinstatement is to begin.

The decision to reinstate occurs at the discretion of the MSW Program and the Graduate School. The MSW Program may deny the request for reinstatement and require the student to reapply to the MSW Program.

Students whose request for reinstatement is approved by the MSW Program and the Graduate School must pay a reinstatement fee which is equivalent to the application fee.

In some instance, there will have been changes in the MSW Program’s curricular requirements between the time at which the student was enrolled last, and the time when the student is being reinstated. A reinstated student is required to follow the curriculum that was applicable when the student was last enrolled in the program unless the MSW Program agrees in writing to allow the student to follow the most recent curriculum.

A student who has been dismissed from the MSW Program is not permitted to request reinstatement to the MSW Program from which they were dismissed.

Professionalism and professional conduct in field practicum

This policy is effective for the Spring 2024 Semester and beyond.

Introduction about these policies set the tone for professionalism and professional conduct for the student while in practicum setting. These policies comprise the benchmarks or criteria for professionalism and professional conduct as stated in Section G of Article III (Dismissal Policy) and can form the basis for a recommendation for probation or dismissal.

A. Field Practicum Setting

  1. Absence Policy

In the event a student misses practicum for any reason, the Student must do the following: (1) Notify their field instructor and/or task supervisor prior to their absence; and (2) follow up with the faculty liaison regarding their absence within 24 hours.

Students are responsible to make up absences(s) with their field instructor and/or task supervisor before the semester deadline. Failure to complete 225 field hours by the end of the semester deadline may result in failing their field seminar course.

Students who falsify their recorded field hours in their time log may be charged with academic dishonesty and sanctioned pursuant to UAM 6,502 (Academic Standards).

  1. Dress Code

The University of Nevada, Reno, School of Social Work expects students to reflect professionalism and maintain standards of professional appearance and grooming in all field practicum settings. Students who do not adhere to this policy will not be permitted to participate in field practicum.

Standard Attire: Student’s attire must be neat, clean and odor-free for all field practicum activities. Students must adhere to practicum site’s dress code.

  1. Field Practicum Settings Requiring Professional Attire: Business casual is expected in most field practicum sites. This means dress slacks, khakis, dress shirt or blouse, open-collar or polo shirt, optional tie or seasonal sport coat, a dress or skirt at knee-length or below, a tailored blazer, knit shirt or sweater.

The following attire is not acceptable for a professional attire setting:

  • Jeans/western cut pants
  • Leggings, athletics pants (i.e. sweats, yoga pants)
  • Shirts and/or sweatshirts with logos
  • Sleeveless shirts (or shirts of underwear type)
  • See-through clothing
  • Clothing exposing a bare midriff, back, or chest
  • Clothing exposing undergarments

Shoes: Footwear must provide safe, secure footing and offer protection against hazards. Footwear should be closed toed, closed heel uniform or shoes with no openings, clean and in good repair.

  1. General Appearance Guidelines
  1. Hair
    1. Hair is to be clean and well groomed. Student should adhere to practicum site’s policy about hair grooming.
  2. Tattoos: 
    1. Visible tattoos are permitted, with the exception of those that may be prohibited by the practicum site or facility. The clinical placement site or facility may require students to cover their tattoos at all times while in the clinical setting.
  3. Other appearance
    1. Good hygiene is expected at all times.
  1. Technology
  1. Students must consider pedagogical theory and research on the use of technology, to make decisions about whether and how to use technology for educational purposes.
  2. Students must adhere to practicum site’s policies and procedures about technology use.
  3. Students must comply with relevant laws, regulations, and ethical standards to ensure protection of confidential information.
  4. Students must consider relevant needs, risks and challenges to use of technology at their practicum setting.
  5. Students must not utilize practicum site’s technology and/or database for personal purposes.
  1. Social Media

The School of Social Work adheres to NASW Standards for Technology in Social Work Practice. All students must comply with school policies and regulations related to academic and field/clinical performance.

The term social media defines activities that integrate technology, social interaction and construction of words, symbols and pictures. Internet-based electronic application and person website sites that allow the creation and exchange of user-generation content such as but not limited to: profiles, opinions, insights, pictures, videos, experiences, perspectives and media itself. All social media sites are trackable, traceable, and once posted on the internet things can live forever. The following is the School of Social Work, media guidelines for when the student is in a clinical setting:

  • The student shall abide the law and respect copy rights.
  • The student shall be compliant with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and will not use or disclose any patient identifiable information or any patient scenarios of any kind on any social media.
  • Logos from practicum sites may not be utilized by students without written consent from that site.
  • The student is obligated to report suspected violation of this policy to the Field Office.
  • Students utilizing approved video or audio recording through the University of Nevada, Reno, Disability Resource Center, will comply with the alternative media service agreement.
  • It is not appropriate to establish relationships on social media with clients, families, or any practicum site contacts.

Inappropriate use of the internet and social media may result in program probation and/or dismissal.

  1. Informed Consent, Dual Relationships and Conflict of Interest in Field Education
  • For the purpose of this policy, dual relationship is defined when a student relates to clients and/or supervisor in more than one relationship, whether personal, professional, social, or business. Dual or multiple relationships can occur simultaneously or consecutively. Students must comply to relevant laws, regulations and ethical standards related to , dual relationships and conflicts of interest.
  • Students shall adhere to practicum setting’s policies and procedures relating to professional standards and dual relationships.
  • Students shall not, under any circumstance engage in sexual activities, inappropriate sexual communication through the use of technology or in person, or sexual contact with current clients, whether such contact is consensual or forced.
  • Students should not provide services to individuals with whom they have a prior sexual relationship.
  • Students must notify practicum site of any dual relationship with a client to ensure there are no disruption of service delivery to client.
  • Students should not engage in any dual or multiple relationships with field instructors, task supervisors and/or off-site supervisors during field education to reduce potential harm to student and/or clients.
  • Students must disclose any dual relationship(s) with practicum setting and the Field Office.

Failure to notify practicum site and the Field Office may result in in program probation and/or dismissal.

  1. Unsafe Conduct or Practices

Any of the following behaviors by the student while in the field practicum are sufficient grounds for the Field Office to determine that a student is clinically unsafe and cannot continue in field practicum or not competent to continue in the field practicum, either of, which may lead to the student being removed from the field practicum, placed on probation and/or dismissed from the Program.

  • Failure to meet social work professional standards in field education.
  • Refusal/failure to follow School of Social Work regulations and agency protocols.
  • Violating federal, state and practicum confidentiality and privacy laws/policies.
  • Failure to execute critical elements of procedures/protocols/social work practice.
  • Inability to articulate rationale utilizing NASW Code of Ethics for not providing services to diverse and marginalized individuals, families, communities and/or organizations.
  • Failure to disclose dual relationships.
  • Failure to comply with Academic Probation Notice.

When a student’s behaviors or actions while in practicum setting endanger the life, health, well-being or safety or any person at the practicum setting, the student may be removed from the practicum and summarily dismissed from the Program, without probation.

Foundation competencies & associated practice behaviors

Competency 1: Demonstrate ethical and professional behavior

Social workers understand the value base of the profession and its ethical standards, as well as relevant laws and regulations that may impact practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. Social workers understand frameworks of ethical decision-making and how to apply principles of critical thinking to those frameworks in practice, research, and policy arenas. Social workers recognize personal values and the distinction between personal and professional values. They also understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions influence their professional judgment and behavior. Social workers understand the profession’s history, its mission, and the roles and responsibilities of the profession. Social Workers also understand the role of other professions when engaged in inter-professional teams. Social workers recognize the importance of life-long learning and are committed to continually updating their skills to ensure they are relevant and effective. Social workers also understand emerging forms of technology and the ethical use of technology in social work practice.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Make ethical decisions by applying the standards of the NASW Code of Ethics, relevant laws and regulations, models for ethical decision-making, ethical conduct of research, and additional codes of ethics as appropriate to context.
  • Use reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations.
  • Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior; appearance; and oral, written, and electronic communication.
  • Use technology ethically and appropriately to facilitate practice outcomes.
  • Use supervision and consultation to guide professional judgment and behavior.

Competency 2: Engage diversity and difference in practice

Social workers understand how diversity and difference characterize and shape the human experience and are critical to the formation of identity. The dimensions of diversity are understood as the intersectionality of multiple factors including but not limited to age, class, color, culture, disability and ability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, immigration status, marital status, political ideology, race, religion/spirituality, sex, sexual orientation, and tribal sovereign status. Social workers understand that, as a consequence of difference, a person’s life experiences may include oppression, poverty, marginalization, and alienation as well as privilege, power, and acclaim. Social workers also understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination and recognize the extent to which a culture’s structures and values, including social, economic, political, and cultural exclusions, may oppress, marginalize, alienate, or create privilege and power.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Apply and communicate understanding of the importance of diversity and difference in shaping life experiences in practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels.
  • Present themselves as learners and engage clients and constituencies as experts of their own experiences.
  • Apply self-awareness and self-regulation to manage the influence of personal biases and values in working with diverse clients and constituencies.

Competency 3: Advance human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice

Social workers understand that every person regardless of position in society has fundamental human rights such as freedom, safety, privacy, an adequate standard of living, health care, and education. Social workers understand the global interconnections of oppression and human rights violations, and are knowledgeable about theories of human need and social justice and strategies to promote social and economic justice and human rights. Social workers understand strategies designed to eliminate oppressive structural barriers to ensure that social goods, rights, and responsibilities are distributed equitably and that civil, political, environmental, economic, social, and cultural human rights are protected.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Apply their understanding of social, economic, and environmental justice to advocate for human rights at the individual and system levels.
  • Engage in practices that advance social, economic, and environmental justice.

Competency 4: Engage in practice-informed research and research-informed practice

Social workers understand quantitative and qualitative research methods and their respective roles in advancing a science of social work and in evaluating their practice. Social workers know the principles of logic, scientific inquiry, and culturally informed and ethical approaches to building knowledge. Social workers understand that evidence that informs practice derives from multi- disciplinary sources and multiple ways of knowing. They also understand the processes for translating research findings into effective practice.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Use practice experience and theory to inform scientific inquiry and research.
  • Apply critical thinking to engage in analysis of quantitative and qualitative research methods and research findings.
  • Use and translate research evidence to inform and Strengthen practice, policy, and service delivery.

Competency 5: Engage in policy practice

Social workers understand that human rights and social justice, as well as social welfare and services, are mediated by policy and its implementation at the federal, state, and local levels. Social workers understand the history and current structures of social policies and services, the role of policy in service delivery, and the role of practice in policy development. Social workers understand their role in policy development and implementation within their practice settings at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels and they actively engage in policy practice to effect change within those settings. Social workers recognize and understand the historical, social, cultural, economic, organizational, environmental, and global influences that affect social policy. They are also knowledgeable about policy formulation, analysis, implementation, and evaluation.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Identify social policy at the local, state, and federal level that impacts well-being, service delivery, and access to social services.
  • Assess how social welfare and economic policies impact the delivery of and access to social services.
  • Apply critical thinking to analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice.

Competency 6: Engage with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities

Social workers understand that engagement is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers value the importance of human relationships. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge to facilitate engagement with clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand strategies to engage diverse clients and constituencies to advance practice effectiveness.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks to engage with clients and constituencies.
  • Use empathy, reflection, and interpersonal skills to effectively engage diverse clients and constituencies.

Competency 7: Assess individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities

Social workers understand that assessment is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in the assessment of diverse clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand methods of assessment with diverse clients and constituencies to advance practice effectiveness. Social workers recognize the implications of the larger practice context in the assessment process and value the importance of inter-professional collaboration in this process. Social workers understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions may affect their assessment and decision-making.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Collect and organize data, and apply critical thinking to interpret information from clients and constituencies.
  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the analysis of assessment data from clients and constituencies.
  • Develop mutually agreed-on intervention goals and objectives based on the critical assessment of strengths, needs, and challenges within clients and constituencies.
  • Select appropriate intervention strategies based on the assessment, research knowledge, and values and preferences of clients and constituencies.

Competency 8: Intervene with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities

Social workers understand that intervention is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers are knowledgeable about evidence-informed interventions to achieve the goals of clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge to effectively intervene with clients and constituencies. Social workers understand methods of identifying, analyzing and implementing evidence-informed interventions to achieve client and constituency goals. Social workers value the importance of interprofessional teamwork and communication in interventions, recognizing that beneficial outcomes may require interdisciplinary, interprofessional, and inter-organizational collaboration.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Critically choose and implement interventions to achieve practice goals and enhance capacities of clients and constituencies.
  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in interventions with clients and constituencies.
  • Use inter-professional collaboration as appropriate to achieve beneficial practice outcomes.
  • Negotiate, mediate, and advocate with and on behalf of diverse clients and constituencies.
  • Facilitate effective transitions and endings that advance mutually agreed-on goals.

Competency 9: Evaluate practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities

Social workers understand that evaluation is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. Social workers recognize the importance of evaluating processes and outcomes to advance practice, policy, and service delivery effectiveness. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in evaluating outcomes. Social workers understand qualitative and quantitative methods for evaluating outcomes and practice effectiveness.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Select and use appropriate methods for evaluation of outcomes.
  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the evaluation of outcomes.
  • Critically analyze, monitor, and evaluate intervention and program processes and outcomes.
  • Apply evaluation findings to Strengthen practice effectiveness at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels.

Grievance procedure

Under the remediation policy, there are 4 points at which a student can initiate a grievance: 

  1. If the student believes that the behavior cited in the original concern is unfounded; 
  2. If the student believes that the Remediation Committee's identification of a relevant competency, practice behavior, code of conduct, ethical standard is inaccurate;
  3. If the student believes that the remediation decision or Action Plan does not address the original concern; or
  4. If the student believes they are being held to a higher standard of performance than other students completing the same program of study.

The written grievance should be submitted to the Director of The School of Social Work no later than 10 working days following the decision point in question (see 1-4 above). The burden of proof during the grievance process rests with the student. If the Director determines that the student has provided adequate evidence to support his or her grievance, the Director may dismiss the issue with no further action required. Alternatively, if the Director determines that there is not adequate evidence to support the student’s grievance, he or she will redirect the student to the Remediation Team for further steps/action. The Director will provide his or her decision to the student and Remediation Team in writing within 10 working days of receipt of the student’s written grievance.

Grade appeal policy

The School of Social Work adheres to the University’s policy by which students may appeal a grade. This policy states “…a grade assigned by an instructor is only subject to the appeals procedure if:

  • There was a clerical/administrative error in the calculation and/or assignment of the grade;
  • The grade assignment was based on factors other than the student's performance in the course and/or completion of course requirements; or
  • The grade assignment meant that the student was held to more demanding standards than other students in the same section of the course.

The burden of proof of these conditions rests on the student.” The policy advises students to begin the process by consulting with the course Instructor. If the issue is not resolved at that level students may proceed with filing a Grade Appeal Form. The full policy and procedures for filing a Grade Appeal can be found at under section 3,510 of the University Administrative Manual.

Wed, 23 Dec 2020 09:15:00 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.unr.edu/social-work/degrees-and-programs/master-of-social-work/program-handbook
MSW Program Curriculum

Our Traditional Program pathway is open to all students with an undergraduate degree besides social work or students who have completed a BSW more than 5 years ago. Classes begin each fall, with rolling application and admission. Students complete a total of 57 credit hours over the course of two years (full-time) or three years (part-time). 

Field Placements

All competencies and practice behaviors are applied and practiced in the field placement. Students demonstrate mastery of the practice behaviors by working collaboratively with their course instructors, field instructor, and a Master's level social worker who acts as their field supervisor.

Students complete field placements over three semesters for a total of 900 hours.

The first field placement (spring; 300 hours) typically focuses on administrative, organizational, and policy social work practice while providing the student a foundational understanding of a client population and impacting systems.

The second and third semesters (fall and spring; 600 hours) are more intensive and students often work directly with clients or independently work on projects.

Wed, 26 Jul 2023 02:13:00 -0500 en text/html https://miamioh.edu/ehs/graduate-programs/social-work/curriculum.html
Field Practicum

For students interested in working in child welfare, particularly a career with the Alabama Department of Human Resources, you may be eligible to apply for the Title IV-E Stipend Program.

The Title IV-E Stipend Program provides stipends to university students at Alabama higher education institutions to help educate prospective child welfare workers and provide continuing educational opportunities for existing child welfare workers. Title IV-E stipends are specifically designated for students planning to pursue or continue a career in public child welfare with the Alabama Department of Human Resources. An 18-month work obligation with the Alabama Department of Human Resources is a requirement of the Title IV-E Stipend Program.

You will receive information about applying for this stipend as part of your field application.

For more information, see the Title IV-E Stipend Program website.

Fri, 01 Jul 2022 08:47:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.uab.edu/cas/socialwork/undergraduate/field-practicum
Major in Social Work

Overall employment of social workers is projected to grow 11 percent from 2018 to 2028, much faster than the average for all occupations, with the highest demand in healthcare, mental health and substance abuse areas. Majoring in social work provides students with many opportunities. Social workers provide the bulk of mental health services in the US.

BSW graduates are employed in family service agencies, child welfare organizations, nursing homes, criminal justice agencies, and schools to name just a few. Clients may consist of individuals, families, groups, organizations or communities.

Sat, 10 Jun 2023 05:49:00 -0500 en text/html https://miamioh.edu/ehs/departments/family-science-social-work/academics/social-work-major.html
Social work licensing requirements
Alabama Meets None LMSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Alabama State Board of Social Work Examiners
Alaska Meets None LMSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Alaska Board of Social Work Examiners
Arizona Meets None LMSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Arizona Board of Behavioral Health Examiners
Arkansas Meets None LMSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Arkansas Social Work Licensing Board
California Meets California does not require licensure to practice social work outside of clinical practice. ASW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) California Board of Behavioral Sciences
Colorado Meets None LSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Colorado State Board of Social Work Examiners
Connecticut Meets None LMSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Connecticut State Department of Public Health
District of Columbia Meets None LGSW LISW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) LICSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) DC Health
Delaware Meets None LMSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Delaware Board of Social Work Examiners
Florida Meets Florida does not require licensure for social work practice outside of clinical practice. The University of Nevada, Reno MSW program does not meet the requirements for LCSW licensure in Florida. CMSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) RCSWI* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Florida Board of Clinical Social Work, Marriage & Family Therapy and Mental Health Counseling
Georgia Meets None LMSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Georgia Board of Professional Counselors, Social Workers, and Marriage & Family Therapists
Guam Meets None LMSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Guam Board of Social Work
Hawaii Meets None LSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Hawaii Professional & Vocational Licensing Division Social Worker Program
Idaho Meets None LMSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Idaho Board of Social Work Examiners
Illinois Meets None LSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) State of Illinois - Social Work
Indiana Meets None LSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Indiana Behavioral Health and Human Services
Iowa Meets None LMSW LISW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Iowa Board of Social Work
Kansas Meets None LMSW LSCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Kansas Behavioral Sciences Regulatory Board
Kentucky Meets None CSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Kentucky Board of Social Work
Louisiana Meets None CSW/LMSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Louisiana State Board of Social Work Examiners
Maine Meets None LMSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Maine State Board of Social Worker Licensure
Maryland Meets None LMSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply check with state board) LCSW-C* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Maryland Board of Social Work Examiners
Massachusetts Meets None LCSW LICSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Massachusetts Board of Registration of Social Workers
Michigan Meets None LMSW - limited LMSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Michigan Board of Social Workers
Minnesota Meets None LGSW LISW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Minnesota Board of Social Work
Mississippi Meets None LMSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Mississippi Board of Examiners for Social Workers and Marriage and Family Therapists
Missouri Meets None LMSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Missouri Committee for Social Workers
Montana Meets None LMSW candidate LMSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) LCSW candidate* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Montana Board of Behavioral Health
Nebraska Meets None CSW CMSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) PCMSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) LIMHP* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Nebraska Mental Health and Social Work Practice
Nevada Meets None LMSW LISW* (Additional course work/training req.- check with state board) LCSW* (Additional coursework/training req. - check with state board) State of Nevada Board of Examiners for Social Workers
New Hampshire Meets New Hampshire does not require licensure for social work practice outside of clinical practice. LICSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) New Hampshire Board of Mental Health Practice
New Jersey Meets None LSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) New Jersey State Board of Social Work Examiners
New Mexico Meets None LMSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) LISW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) New Mexico Social Work Examiners
New York Meets None LMSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) New York Social Work
North Carolina Meets None CMSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) CSWM* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) North Carolina Social Work Certification and Licensure Board
North Dakota Meets None LMSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) North Dakota Board of Social Work Examined
Northern Mariana Islands Has not been determined
Ohio Meets None LSW LISW* (additional coursework/training req. - check with state board) Ohio Counselor, Social Worker and Marriage and Family Therapist Board
Oklahoma Meets None LMSW LSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) LSW-Adm* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Oklahoma State Board of Licensed Social Workers
Oregon Meets None LMSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Oregon Board of Licensed Social Workers
Pennsylvania Meets None LMSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Pennsylvania Social Workers, Marriage and Family Therapists and Professional Counselors
Rhode Island Meets None LCSW LISW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) State of Rhode Island Department of Health: Social Work Licensing
Puerto Rico Meets None LSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Puerto Rico Professional Social Workers
South Carolina Meets None LMSW LISW-CP* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) LISW-AP* (additional requirements apply- check with state board) South Carolina Board of Social Work Examiners
South Dakota Meets None CSW CSW-PIP* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) South Dakota Department of Social Services
Tennessee Meets None LMSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) LAPSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Tennessee Department of Health Board of Social Workers
Texas Meets None LMSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Texas State Board of Social Worker Examiners
US Virgin Islands Meets None CSW CISW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Government of the U.S. Virgin Islands Board Certification Social Workers
Utah Meets None CSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply- check with state board) Utah Department of Commerce Division of Occupational and Professional Licensing
Vermont Meets None LMSW LICSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Vermont Office of Professional Regulation: Social Workers
Virginia Meets None LMSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Virginia Department of Health Professions Board of Social Work
Washington Meets None AAICSW LASW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) LICSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Washington State Department of Health Social Worker and Social Worker Associate
West Virginia Meets None LGSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) LICSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) West Virginia Board of Social Work
Wisconsin Meets None APSW ISW* (additional requirements apply - check with stateboard) State of Wisconsin Department of Safety and Professional Services - Social Worker
Wyoming Meets None PCSW LCSW* (additional requirements apply - check with state board) Wyoming Mental Health Professions Licensing Board




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