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Killexams : Medical Paramedic action - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/NREMT-PTE Search results Killexams : Medical Paramedic action - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/NREMT-PTE https://killexams.com/exam_list/Medical Killexams : 20 awesome EMS saves of 2022

The year was full of disaster responses but also brought impressive extrications, off-duty saves, helpful Boy Scouts and a rampaging camel

This year was full of disaster responses. Crews responded to hurricanes and floods. Boy Scouts treated train crash victims. We saw dramatic stories of lost people being found and of entrapment responses.

And don’t forget about the off-duty saves, which were as impressive as ever.

Here are 20 of our favorite saves of the year.

HIGH-PROFILE RESCUES

With natural disasters, a bridge collapse and a train crash came paramedics, EMTs, USAR teams and even some Boy Scouts.

1. Rescue crews rappel 150 feet to assist Pittsburgh bridge collapse victims

A total of 10 people were injured in the January crash and Pittsburgh Fire Chief Darryl Jones said three were transported to a hospital. One paramedic went to the scene after he heard the news on the radio. Jon Atkinson drove into the ravine in his truck and loaded a severely injured woman into the truck bed.

A 50-year-old bridge collapsed in Pittsburgh in January, requiring rescuers to rappel nearly 150 feet and form a human chain to reach occupants of a bus that had plummeted with the span into a park ravine. (Photo/Gene J. Puskar/Associated Press)

2. 10 counties send FFs, EMS to flooded areas of Ky. to help with search, rescue

Dozens of people died in the Kentucky floods this summer. The Lexington Fire Department sent swift water crews and its mobile ambulance bus to rescue victims.

3. On the ground in Puerto Rico with Maryland’s Task Force 1

FEMA send USAR teams to aid people in the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico after Hurricane Fiona made landfall in September. Firefighters, EMTs, and paramedics were there along with others with specialized skills.

4. Off-duty battalion chief praises Boy Scouts' response to Amtrak crash

"This Boy Scout group was fantastic," said Kansas City (Mo.) Battalion Chief Todd Covington. "They probably saved 20 or 30 people's lives."

LOST AND FOUND

Hikers and hunters from their teens through their 70s were lost, found and treated.

5. Video: Stranded teen rock climbers hoisted by rescuers into helicopter

The two teenagers were rescued and treated for hypothermia after being stranded overnight in October.

6. SAR crewmembers find Ore. hunters missing for 3 days

Mercy Flights personnel transported Uintah Keever, 68, and Rick Keever, 72, to a hospital in October.

7. Maine man, 74, rescued after being lost in woods for 30 hours

A game warden’s K9 partner found a scent in November that turned out to be Joseph Nolin, who was hypothermic and dehydrated. EMS providers transported him by helicopter.

BABIES

Several babies were rescued in March – a number in Kyiv as the Russia-Ukraine War ramped up – and one in Louisiana.

8. Ambulance escorts 2 American infants out of Ukraine amid shelling

The Florida-based rescue nonprofit Project DYNAMO successfully evacuated the American twin boys plus a British baby girl to Poland.

9. 'A miracle:' La. responders find infant abandoned in field alive

The child, who was roughly eight months old, "didn't even cry" during the rescue, Baton Rouge Emergency Medical Services spokesman Mike Chustz said.

ENTRAPMENTS & EXTRICATIONS

The following providers found themselves working to free people stuck underneath vehicles in a concrete mixing truck or at a mall.

10. Worcester DA honors first responders for saving man trapped under Jeep for 24+ hours

As nearly 50 first responders participated in a day-long search for a missing man in July, Milford Firefighter/EMT Christ Alt said it seemed like the chance of stumbling upon something was slim to none. But the USAR team found the missing man’s vehicle using a satellite service.

11. More than a dozen agencies participate in 9-hour rescue in Alabama

A man was trapped in an overturned tractor-trailer carrying raw chicken in March.

12. Wis. firefighters, EMS rescue man from drum of concrete mixing truck

The Madison Fire Department's Heavy Urban Rescue Team assisted the DeForest Fire Department and Sun Prairie EMS in August.

13. Video: Fla. firefighters, medics respond to woman with foot stuck in electric massage chair

Naples Fire-Rescue Department crewmembers had to dismantle the chair in order to free the patient in October.

ANIMAL ATTACKS

People should know by now not to approach bison or in general not to bother wild or venomous creatures. Apparently they do not.

14. Medic helps save man from possible ‘worst viper bite ever survived’

The patient required 44 vials of anti-venom because of the bite from a Gaboon Viper, one of the deadliest snakes in the world. Thad Bowman, a paramedic with the Myrtle Beach Fire Department, got the antivenom to the patient. 

15. Rampaging camel kills 2 on Tenn. farm and attacks again after EMS, police arrive

Members of the Lake County Rescue Squad and other agencies were trying to get the victims into an ambulance in March when the camel started attacking again.

OFF-DUTY SAVES

These EMTs and paramedics sprang into action when disasters struck during their days off.

16. Off-duty EMT, nursing student treat shooting victims in S.C. mall

A nursing student and an off-duty EMT provided medical aid to victims of the shooting at the Columbiana Centre.

17. Off-duty Va. firefighter-EMT praised for bar fire rescues

The McLean Volunteer Fire Department's Timo Klotz helped free three people trapped under debris after an Uber driver crashed a car into building in August.

18. 'I heard the horn': Off-duty FF-medic saves Ohio driver from oncoming train

Pat Paisley, with the Kent Fire Department, was driving home in a snowstorm when he saw a car stuck on a double railroad crossing.

19. 'It was go time': Off-duty Salt Lake City FF-EMT rescues driver from fiery crash

Justin Morrow was one day from returning to work full-time following an injury in July when he rushed to help a man and two children after a rollover crash.

20. Off-duty Okla. EMT helps family of 5 escape house fire

In November, Elizabeth Sauls was spending a day off from Kirk’s EMS with her mother and brother when all three jumped into action.

Leila Merrill is an assistant editor for FireRescue1 and EMS1, where she writes and edits news articles.

Merrill has worked as a writer, editor, copy editor, digital producer, journalist and communications professional for the Dallas Morning News, the Houston Chronicle and other companies. She double-majored in English and communications at Trinity University.

Send your firefighter or EMS provider news tips to Merrill at lmerrill@lexipol.com.

Mon, 12 Dec 2022 05:08:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.ems1.com/2022-year-review/articles/20-awesome-ems-saves-of-2022-J0ooH4GYMtOy7bUB/
Killexams : I’m an N.Y.C. Paramedic. I’ve Never Witnessed a Mental Health Crisis Like This One.

We need to sift through the embers and see what we can salvage. Then we need to lay a new foundation, put in some beams to support the structure and start building.

What New York, like so many cities around the United States, needs is sustained investment to fund mental health facilities and professionals offering long-term care. This effort would no doubt cost tens of millions of dollars.

I’m not opposed to taking mentally ill people in distress to the hospital; our ambulances do this all the time. But I know it’s unlikely to solve their problems. Hospitals are overwhelmed, so they sometimes try to shuffle patients to other facilities. Gov. Kathy Hochul has promised 50 extra beds for New York City’s psychiatric patients. We need far more to manage those patients who would qualify for involuntary hospitalization under Mr. Adams’s vague criteria.

Often, a patient is examined by hospital staff, given a sandwich and a place to rest for a few hours and then discharged. If the person is intoxicated, a nurse might offer a “banana bag” — an intravenous solution of vitamins and electrolytes — and time to sober up. Chances are the already overworked staff members can’t do much, if anything, about the depression that led the patient to drink or take drugs in the first place.

Let’s say a patient does receive treatment in the hospital. Mr. Adams says that under the new directive, this patient won’t be discharged until a plan is in place to connect the person with ongoing care. But the systems responsible for this care — sheltered housing, access to outpatient psychiatric care, social workers, a path to reintegration into society — are horribly inadequate. There aren’t enough shelters, there aren’t enough social workers, there aren’t enough outpatient facilities. So people who no longer know how to care for themselves, who need their hands held through a complex process, are alone on the street once again.

A few days ago, I treated a manic-depressive person in his late 30s who was shouting at people on a subway platform in Downtown Brooklyn. The man said he’d gone two years without medication because he didn’t know where to get it. He said he didn’t want to go to a shelter, and I told him I knew where he was coming from: I was homeless for two years in my early 20s, and I slept in my car to avoid shelters; one night at the Bedford-Atlantic Armory was enough for me.

I persuaded the man to come with me to Brooklyn Hospital Center and made sure he got a prescription. Whether or not he’ll remember to take it, I don’t know.

Wed, 07 Dec 2022 03:22:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.nytimes.com/2022/12/07/opinion/nyc-paramedic-mental-health-crisis.html
Killexams : New details revealed in case of EMT charged with drugging, molesting children

KENSINGTON — A former emergency medical technician facing charges he sexually assaulted three children and possessed hundreds of child sexual abuse images is looking to split the case into two trials.

Attorneys representing Todd Burnim, 54, filed a motion at Rockingham Superior Court to have one trial for the 12 aggravated felonious sexual assault counts and two felonious sexual assault charges and another one for the 15 counts of possession of child sex abuse images.

"It is not alleged that any of these images depict (the alleged victims) nor is it alleged that Mr. Burnim ever showed (the alleged victims) any of the discovered images," stated Burnim's public defender Emily Jessep in a court motion to sever the cases.

Kensington police arrested Todd Burnim, 54, on charges of aggravated sexual assault of a child and possession of child sex abuse images.

Rockingham County Attorney Pat Conway opposed severing the sexual assault charges involving the three victims into different trials in a separate court filing. However, she did agree in the same filing the possession of child sex abuse images should be tried separately.

The case is currently scheduled for trial in February.

Todd Burnim

Burnim was arrested after a two-hour standoff with Kensington police on Jan. 18 on charges that he molested three children under the age of 13 between 2012 and 2019.

Kensington Police Chief Scott Cain previously said that based on the evidence they found during the investigation, police believe Burnim drugged his victims before engaging in criminal sexual behavior. Burnim, who served as an EMT for Kensington and East Kingston fire departments, had recently worked at Action Ambulance Service, according to the Kensington police.

Previous reporting:Ex-EMT charged with drugging, sexually assaulting children: Fourth accuser comes forward

Court filings reveal new details

New details of the case were revealed in the recent court filings.

Burnim is accused of sexually abusing one child from the age of 6 to 12 years old and another from the age of 9 to 12. A third child was sexually abused in 2017 for a period of a few weeks.

According to court documents, one child described Burnim giving her "green liquid from a syringe" that tasted like an apple as well as a small white pill that would make her sleepy before the alleged assaults.

Another child said Burnim gave her sips of green liquid that tasted like apples and "gas that came in a white package and looked like whipped cream but wasn't whipped cream."

"The defendant would make (the alleged victim) wear an oxygen mask and administer the gas into the mask while she was wearing it," stated Conway in court documents

"… After inhaling the gas and drinking the liquid, (she) would become dizzy and sometimes pass out. (She) remembers waking up undressed and having no idea how she became undressed."

Police executed a search warrant on Burnim's home on Jan. 19.

According to court documents, police found white pills in a clear plastic baggie in the kitchen as well as bottles of medicine and pills in a safe inside the closet of the master bedroom. They also recovered two syringes from the nightstand in Burnim's bedroom and multiple boxes of whipped cream aerosol-nitrous oxide canisters, commonly known as "whippets."

Police also seized sex toys, a digital camera, multiple cell phones, multiple hard drives, a laptop and a desktop computer.

800 child sex abuse images allegedly found on computer

Conway stated in court documents a forensic examination of the electronic devices seized at Burnim's home revealed 800 child sex abuse images on a hard drive on the desktop computer. Five images were also found on a mobile phone and another five on external drives.

The state, according to court documents, picked 15 images to use as the subject matter for the 15 counts of possession against Burnim.

Burnim's defense attorney argued the charges should be tried separately as the assault charges are not related to the possession charges and would be "highly and unfairly prejudicial" if presented to a jury.

Conway agreed in a court motion because the state, at this point of time, "has been unable to identify any of the found images as the (alleged victims in the case)."

A large portion of the images, according to court documents, contained sexual abuse committed against infants and toddlers. There was also a number of images of an adult engaged in sexual acts with a female child or female children.

This article originally appeared on Portsmouth Herald: New details revealed in case of EMT charged with molesting children

Tue, 06 Dec 2022 19:51:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/details-revealed-case-emt-charged-095209164.html
Killexams : Heart attack and stroke victims must be helped during paramedic strike, says Health Secretary

(AFP via Getty Images)

Unions must give a firm commitment that ambulance crews across England will respond to heart attack and stroke callouts during the first nationwide strike action by paramedics in more than three decades, the Health Secretary demanded on Wednesday.

Health services and unions have said crews will still cover emergency Category One incidents during the strikes, which include life-threatening injuries, illnesses and cardiac arrests where the patient has stopped breathing and does not have a pulse.

But minister Steve Barclay on Wednesday raised questions over whether striking ambulance services will cover all emergency Category Two conditions, which can include heart attacks, strokes, epilepsy and burns.

“There’s a question in terms of whether they will cover all the Cat Twos — those are the emergency responses to things like heart attacks and stroke — so it is hugely important that those are also covered,” he told Times Radio.

The ambulance strikes on December 21 are part of a wave of walkouts this winter which will hit the railways, NHS and other public services.

Mr Barclay said talks are due to take place tomorrow between ambulance chiefs, NHS bosses and the unions to discuss Category Two coverage. He confirmed the Army could be called on to provide emergency back up. The GMB, Unison and Unite unions are co-ordinating industrial action across England and Wales in a dispute over pay.

But the impact of the action will vary from region to region with workers from all three unions only voting to strike in the north east and north west.

In London, while Unison workers are set to go on strike, crews represented by GMB and Unite will not join the action which starts at noon on December 21 and will last until midnight.

Union sources added that only “road crew” paramedics would be involved in the first stage of the dispute in the capital, meaning other medics would continue to provide specialist advice over the phone at the London Ambulance Service’s 999 call centres. It is unclear at this stage what impact the strike will have on the London crews’ ability to respond to emergencies.

It has about 2,800 paramedics and emergency medical technicians but not all belong to a union. London Ambulance Service, the busiest in the country, normally has between 400 and 450 ambulances on duty across the capital.

A London Ambulance Service spokesperson said: “Our staff and service are already under significant pressure. Should the industrial action go ahead, we will do everything we can to maintain lifesaving services for our sickest and most seriously injured patients. We hope negotiations reach a resolution so that this strike does not take place.”

Unison head of health Sara Gorton said: “Ambulance managers will be drawing up cover plans for each service. Unions will discuss those and ensure appropriate responses to emergencies on strike days.

“But instead of speculating about the consequences of a strike, Steve Barclay should be focusing all his energies on stopping action from happening.”

Mr Barclay said he was “open to talks with the trade unions” to resolve the dispute but added that if all public sector workers were given a pay rise in line with inflation it would cost £28 billion.

Royal Mail workers, nurses, highway workers, driving examiners, Heathrow baggage handlers, bus drivers and railway staff are also set to strike.

Some 40,000 train union members will press ahead with industrial action on December 13, 14, 16, 17, between 24 and 27 and on January 3, 4, 6 and 7 after talks broke down with rail operators over pay and conditions.

Transport Secretary Mark Harper today urged rail unions to give “at least a neutral recommendation” when putting offers to their members.

Ministers are already under pressure to speed up strike busting laws, which have stalled in Parliament.

Tue, 06 Dec 2022 23:49:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/heart-attack-stroke-victims-must-113008944.html
Killexams : 'Closer to the abyss than we think': NYC paramedic blasts lack of mental healthcare  Image via Creative Commons. © provided by AlterNet Image via Creative Commons.

Anthony Almojera, author of the 2022 book “Riding the Lightning: A Year in the Life of a New York City Paramedic,” has been with the New York Fire Department’s Bureau of Emergency Medical Services for almost 20 years. Helping homeless New Yorkers who are suffering from mental illness is one of the challenges of his job. And in an op-ed/guest essay published by the New York Times on December 7, Almojera stresses that the city is presently facing a “mental health crisis” unlike anything he has witnessed before.

“There are New Yorkers who rant on street corners and slump on sidewalks beside overloaded pushcarts,” Almojera explains. “They can be friendly or angry or distrustful. To me and my colleagues, they’re patients. I’m a lieutenant paramedic with the Fire Department’s Bureau of Emergency Medical Services, and it’s rare to go a day without a call to help a mentally ill New Yorker…. In nearly 20 years as a medical responder, I’ve never witnessed a mental health crisis like the one New York is currently experiencing.”

Almojera continues, “During the last week of November, 911 dispatchers received on average 425 calls a day for ‘emotionally disturbed persons,’ or EDPs. Even in the decade before the pandemic, those calls had almost doubled. EDPs are people who have fallen through the cracks of a chronically underfunded mental health system, a house of cards built on sand that the COVID pandemic crushed.

READ MORE: Watch: NYC Mayor Eric Adams announces program to involuntarily commit mentally ill homeless people

At a late November press conference, New York City Mayor Eric Adams — a centrist Democrat and former police officer — announced plans to force mentally ill people living on the streets into treatment in hospitals if they don’t voluntarily ask for it. And Adams noted that Emergency Medical Services will provide training to police, firefighters and others as part of the program. Amojera believes this approach has some major flaws.

“Now, Mayor Eric Adams wants medical responders and police officers to force more mentally ill people in distress into care,” Almojera writes. “I get it — they desperately need professional help, and somewhere safe to sleep and to get a meal. Forceful action makes for splashy headlines…. I’m also painfully aware of the danger people with serious mental illness and without access to treatment can pose to the public. Assaults on EMS workers in the New York City Fire Department have steadily increased year over year.”

The veteran paramedic adds, “Our medical responders have been bitten, beaten and chased by unstable patients. A man who reportedly suffers from schizophrenia has been charged with fatally stabbing my colleague, Capt. Alison Russo-Elling, in Queens on September 29. But dispatching medical responders to wrangle mentally disturbed people living on the street and ferry them to overcrowded psychiatric facilities is not the answer.”

Almojera argues that Adams’ approach is “shifting more responsibility for a systemic crisis” to “an overworked medical corps” that is “burned out from years of low pay and the strain of the pandemic.”

READ MORE: Convicted 'Team America' DEA agent says the War on Drugs is 'unwinnable'

“Our ambulances are simply the entrance to a broken pipeline,” Almojera laments. “We have burned down the house of mental health in this city, and the people you see on the street are the survivors who staggered from the ashes…. I’m not opposed to taking mentally ill people in distress to the hospital — our ambulances do this all the time. But I know it’s unlikely to solve their problems. Hospitals are overwhelmed.”

In an article published by the New York Post on December 1, journalist Nolan Hicks reported that New York City’s “embattled” Department of Homeless Services (DHS) was struggling “to connect needy New Yorkers living in city shelters with desperately needed mental health services.” Those problems, Hicks reported, are outlined in a “blistering 41-page audit” from New York State Comptroller Tom DiNapoli.

According to the report, “Based on DHS records, there is limited assurance that clients were being placed in and/or transferred to a shelter that could best provide the services necessary to help the individual move forward to permanent housing, independent living, or further treatment in a more appropriate setting if necessary.”

Hicks adds that DiNapoli’s report “also determined that DHS frequently gives scarce rooms in treatment shelters to New Yorkers without mental health issues — while failing to transfer drug abusers and the mentally ill to specialized facilities when beds open up.”

Almojera notes that he was homeless himself for “two years” when he was in his early twenties and slept in his car, which he considered preferable to homeless shelters. And the paramedic stresses that a major investment in mental health care in New York and other cities is going to be needed to adequately deal with the crisis.

“Rather than looking for a superficial fix,” Almojera advises, “Mayor Adams should turn his attention to our neglected health care apparatus. We must heavily invest in social services, housing and mental health care if we want to avoid this ongoing tragedy. We need this kind of investment across the United States, where there’s a serious post-pandemic mental health crisis. My contact with New York City’s mentally ill population over the years and my own brushes with depression and homelessness have taught me we are all much closer to the abyss than we think.”

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Wed, 07 Dec 2022 07:00:01 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/other/closer-to-the-abyss-than-we-think-nyc-paramedic-blasts-lack-of-mental-healthcare/ar-AA151DrT
Killexams : N.Y. private service faces class action suit after waiting to tell patients about data breach

Social security numbers and other information belonging to at least 100,000 people was taken, according to court documents

By Leila Merrill
EMS1

NEW YORK — A private ambulance company is facing a class action lawsuit linked to allegedly waiting months to tell patients that their personal data was stolen by hackers, the New York Post reported Saturday.

Empress Ambulance Services also is accused of telling its customers that a “small subset of files” had been stolen when the social security numbers of at least 100,000 people had been compromised, in addition to medical information, according to the latest lawsuit against the company, filed in Manhattan federal court last week.

Empress Ambulance Services did not respond to New York Post inquiries seeking comment about the data breach and delay in notifying customers. (Photo/Empress EMS Special Operations Division)

The hack occurred in late May. The company noticed it on July 14 but did not tell its customers until Sept. 9, the lawsuit states.

Empress Ambulance Services did not respond to Post inquiries seeking comment.

Tue, 06 Dec 2022 04:29:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.ems1.com/legal/articles/ny-private-service-faces-class-action-suit-after-waiting-to-tell-patients-about-data-breach-TipGHdp4nQ4i9Ww1/
Killexams : A New York City paramedic’s view of his mayor’s new policy

There are New Yorkers who rant on street corners and slump on sidewalks beside overloaded pushcarts. They can be friendly or angry or distrustful. To me and my colleagues, they’re patients.

I’m a lieutenant paramedic with the Fire Department’s Bureau of Emergency Medical Services, and it’s rare to go a day without a call to help a mentally ill New Yorker. Medical responders are often their first, or only, point of contact with the chain of health professionals who should be treating them. We know their names and their routines, their delusions, even their birthdays.

It is a sad, scattered community. And it has mushroomed. In nearly 20 years as a medical responder, I’ve never witnessed a mental health crisis like the one New York is currently experiencing. During the last week of November, 911 dispatchers received on average 425 calls a day for “emotionally disturbed persons,” or E.D.P.s. Even in the decade before the pandemic, those calls had almost doubled. E.D.P.s are people who have fallen through the cracks of a chronically underfunded mental health system, a house of cards built on sand that the Covid pandemic crushed.

Now Mayor Eric Adams wants medical responders and police officers to force more mentally ill people in distress into care. I get it — they desperately need professional help, and somewhere safe to sleep and to get a meal. Forceful action makes for splashy headlines.

People with mental health challenges can be victims of violence. I’m also painfully aware of the danger people with serious mental illness and without access to treatment can pose to the public. Assaults on E.M.S. workers in the New York City Fire Department have steadily increased year over year. Our medical responders have been bitten, beaten and chased by unstable patients. A man who reportedly suffers from schizophrenia has been charged with fatally stabbing my colleague, Capt. Alison Russo-Elling, in Queens on Sept. 29.

But dispatching medical responders to wrangle mentally disturbed people living on the street and ferry them to overcrowded psychiatric facilities is not the answer.

For one thing, the mayor is shifting more responsibility for a systemic crisis to an overworked medical corps burned out from years of low pay and the strain of the pandemic. Many E.M.S. workers are suffering depression and lack adequate professional mental health support, much like the patients we treat. Several members of the Fire Department’s Emergency Medical Services have died by suicide since the pandemic began, and hundreds have quit or retired. Many of us who are still working are stretched to the breaking point.

I’ve gone down the road of despair myself. The spring and fall of 2020 left me so empty, exhausted and sleepless that I thought about suicide, too. Our ambulances are simply the entrance to a broken pipeline. We have burned down the house of mental health in this city, and the people you see on the street are the survivors who staggered from the ashes.

Those who are supposed to respond and help them are not doing well either. Since March of 2020, the unions that represent the Fire Department’s medical responders have been so inundated with calls from members seeking help that we set up partnerships with three mental health organizations, all paid for by the E.M.S. F.D.N.Y. Help Fund, an independent charity group founded and funded by medical responders and the public through donations to help us out in times of crisis.

We need to sift through the embers and see what we can salvage. Then we need to lay a new foundation, put in some beams to support the structure and start building.

What New York, like so many cities around the United States, needs is sustained investment to fund mental health facilities and professionals offering long-term care. This effort would no doubt cost tens of millions of dollars.

I’m not opposed to taking mentally ill people in distress to the hospital — our ambulances do this all the time. But I know it’s unlikely to solve their problems. Hospitals are overwhelmed, so they sometimes try to shuffle patients to other facilities. Gov. Kathy Hochul has promised 50 extra beds for New York City’s psychiatric patients. We need far more to manage those patients who would qualify for involuntary hospitalization under Mr. Adams’s vague criteria.

Often, a patient is examined by hospital staff, given a sandwich and a place to rest for a few hours, and then discharged. If the person is intoxicated, a nurse might offer a “banana bag” — an intravenous solution of vitamins and electrolytes — and time to sober up. Chances are the already overworked staff can’t do much, if anything, about the depression that led the patient to drink or take drugs in the first place.

Let’s say a patient does receive treatment in the hospital. Mr. Adams says that under the new directive, this patient won’t be discharged until a plan is in place to connect the person with ongoing care. But the systems responsible for this care — sheltered housing, access to outpatient psychiatric care, social workers, a path to reintegration into society — are horribly inadequate. There aren’t enough shelters, there aren’t enough social workers, there aren’t enough outpatient facilities. So people who no longer know how to care for themselves, who need their hands held through a complex process, are alone on the street once again.

A few days ago, I treated a manic-depressive person in his late 30s who was shouting at people on a subway platform in Downtown Brooklyn. The man said he’d gone two years without medication because he didn’t know where to get it. He said he didn’t want to go to a shelter, and I told him I knew where he was coming from: I was homeless for two years in my early 20s, and I slept in my car to avoid shelters — one night at the Bedford-Atlantic Armory was enough for me.

I persuaded the man to come with me to Brooklyn Hospital Center and made sure he got a prescription. Whether or not he’ll remember to take it, I don’t know.

While I don’t know how forcing people into care will help, I do see how it will hurt. Trust between a medical responder and the patient is crucial. Without it, we wouldn’t be able to get patients to talk to us, to let us touch them or stick needles filled with medications into their arms. But if we bundle people into our ambulances against their will, that trust will break.

Also, medical responders aren’t equipped to handle standoffs with psychiatric patients. In my experience, police officers are not hurry to intervene with the mentally ill. They don’t have the medical knowledge to evaluate patients. So, who is going to decide whether to transport them? What if we disagree? Protocol has been that it is the E.M.S. personnel who make the decision. Will the police now order us to take them? I can only imagine the hours that medical responders and cops will spend debating what to do with a patient.

Rather than looking for a superficial fix, Mayor Adams should turn his attention to our neglected health care apparatus. We must heavily invest in social services, housing and mental health care if we want to avoid this ongoing tragedy. We need this kind of investment across the United States, where there’s a serious post-pandemic mental health crisis. My contact with New York City’s mentally ill population over the years and my own brushes with depression and homelessness have taught me we are all much closer to the abyss than we think.

Anthony Almojera is a lieutenant paramedic with the New York City Fire Department Bureau of Emergency Medical Services, vice president of the Uniformed EMS Officers Union, Local 3621, and the author of “Riding the Lightning: A Year in the Life of a New York City Paramedic.” This article originally appeared in The New York Times.

Sat, 10 Dec 2022 10:06:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.sltrib.com/opinion/commentary/2022/12/10/anthony-almojera-im-an-nyc/
Killexams : Police have ‘grave concern’ at driving ambulances during paramedic strike

The Police Federation has expressed its grave concern that the “overstretched” thin blue line will be drafted to fill in for striking ambulance drivers.

Under national contingency plans it was understood that military personnel would be drafted in to help drive ambulances as strikes go ahead later this month.

But now it has emerged that police officers may also be called upon to help drive the emergency healthcare vehicles.

It’s important to remember every officer that would be driving an ambulance is an officer not preforming their police duties

Police Federation national chair Steve Hartshorn

The Police Federation, the body representing around 140,000 rank and file officers, said that “police are not ambulance drivers or qualified paramedics”.

National chairman Steve Hartshorn said the request is of “grave concern” as he warned that putting officers in ambulances would mean they are “not performing their police duties”.

The staff association said that the “thin blue line is already overstretched and under pressure like never before”.

Ambulance crews in England are due to walk out for two days on December 21 and 28 in support of their pay claim.

Mr Hartshorn said: “Later this month we will witness the biggest ambulance strike action in 30 years.

“Ambulance workers from all three unions are due to walk out on 21 December – this means that ambulance drivers, paramedics, call handlers and emergency care assistants will refuse to work across 10 of the 11 trusts in England and Wales.

“A further strike is due to take place on the 28 December by members of the GMB union.”

Steve Hartshorn (Met Federation) © Provided by Evening Standard Steve Hartshorn (Met Federation)

He said police officers are “unable to express our own frustrations through strike action, even though we step in as a last resort to ensure public safety when others strike,” adding: “It is no different with the ambulance workers’ strike as our members are being asked to step in and drive ambulances; it shouldn’t need saying, but police are not ambulance drivers or qualified paramedics.

“At a time when the thin blue line is overstretched and under pressure like never before, this request gives me grave concern for the welfare of our members.”

Mr Hartshorn continued: “Police officers driving ambulances may make sense to some; many officers are uniquely qualified to drive both emergency service vehicles, but this is where any similarity ends.

“It’s important to remember every officer that would be driving an ambulance is an officer not performing their police duties.

“I have genuine concern for any officer who may be exposed to medical emergencies they are not qualified to act on.

“The human consequences are awful to imagine, but we must consider the legal responsibilities and practicalities too. Should a patient die in the presence of a police officer, or within a period of time of being with a police officer, that officer is referred to the Independent Office for Police Conduct for investigation.”

It comes after it emerged that the armed forces have just 40 paramedics who would be qualified to work in the NHS,

Defence minister Andrew Murrison said that of the 107 paramedics serving in the military, 40 have the qualification requirements set out by the Health and Care Professions Council.

The details, set out in a written answer to Liberal Democrat health spokeswoman Daisy Cooper, were disclosed as ministers prepare to deploy troops to cover for striking ambulance staff.

It is understood that troops are unlikely to be used to drive ambulances to respond to urgent calls although they could be used for non-urgent cases to free up paramedics.

The Department of Health and Social Care has been contacted for comment.

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Tue, 13 Dec 2022 08:20:20 -0600 en-GB text/html https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/newslondon/police-have-grave-concern-at-driving-ambulances-during-paramedic-strike/ar-AA15enFB
Killexams : Lynchburg fire captain honored for EMS work

Capt. Jennifer Collins, health and safety officer for the Lynchburg Fire Department, believed there was no way she would win an EMS Health and Safety honor when she attended the Virginia EMS Symposium a few weeks ago.

Lynchburg Fire Capt. Jennifer Collins poses with her recent EMS award.

Collins said she thought there were many other people more deserving.

“When they called my name, I was genuinely shocked,” Collins said.

The EMS awards given, which are endorsed by the governor’s office, recognize emergency medical service providers and organizations from across the commonwealth for their “outstanding level of excellence and dedication to the EMS system,” according to the Virginia Department of Health.

Last month, Collins was honored with The Governor’s EMS Award for Outstanding Contribution to EMS Health and Safety.

Deputy Chief Robert Lipscomb, who wrote the recommendation for Collins, said the captain “clearly” deserved it.

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“I think what she does defines the role of health and safety officer for an agency,” Lipscomb said.

Lipscomb said the work Collins does with programs at the department, along with all of the responsibilities she has, are all the reasons why he recommended her for the award.

In a news release from the Lynchburg Fire Department, Lynchburg Fire Chief Greg Wormser said, “Captain Collins is incredibly passionate about the health and wellness of our team.”

In her time as captain, Collins worked closely to develop many programs to help firefighters.

She helped develop the Firefighter Occupational Risk Management and Athletic Training program, or FORMAT, which focuses on the fitness of the firefighters in the department.

In January, Lynchburg firefighters participated in a fitness assessment with the department’s athletic trainer, John Wise. Firefighters were tested on their overall movement and cardiorespiratory output. The athletic trainer highlighted some of their weaknesses and made suggestions on how to improve.

Collins also added a physical fitness policy allowing firefighters to work out once a day per shift.

She hopes FORMAT reduces emergency response times and improves the overall fitness of the firefighters.

“What we’re trying to do is decrease the chance of a firefighter having a cardiac event on the fire ground,” Collins said. “If they know they have a poor score, they can do what they need to get better and to get more fit.”

Heart attacks are one of the leading causes of deaths for firefighters, they are caused not just by fitness but also high-stress situations.

Peer counseling and chaplain programs, both projects Collins has worked closely with, help firefighters navigate through stressful events.

The department has two chaplains who socialize with the firefighters and are available for counseling and spiritual support.

Members of a peer support team, made up of firefighters in the department, serve as peer counselors with one another.

For example, Collins said if there’s a call that’s “pretty rough,” the group will have a meeting and discuss it, which gives them an opportunity to express their thoughts and feelings.

Coupled with the program is the Impact First Responders, which offers different forms of counseling such as grief counseling and stress management.

Collins said firefighters are offered up to six free counseling sessions per year, and there’s an option for additional help if needed.

A big aspect of concern is mental health.

“We struggle with having to deal with people’s worst day, and we see things that a lot of people don’t ever see,” Collins said.

Collins first got hired as a firefighter in 2001.

The captain said when she was growing up, however, she never thought about being a firefighter.

Collins went to Central Virginia Community College and got an associate’s degree in information systems technology. Her original plan was to do something with computer support and consider a business degree down the road.

She said her interest in that career path is obsolete now.

“Honestly, it did not occur to me that it was something that I could do until I actually saw a female firefighter working on one of the medic units and came through the hospital while I was working there. When I saw her, I was like, ‘Wait a minute,’” Collins said.

At the time, Collins was working in an outpatient department at Virginia Baptist Hospital as a health unit coordinator, an administrative assistant position.

Occasionally she would see fire crews bring in patients, but one particular day she saw the female firefighter.

“When I saw her and started talking to her, that’s when it clicked that it was something that a woman could do,” Collins said. “I think that the hard part is for females just in general to realize that this is a type of job that they can do,” Collins said.

Soon after, she did her first ride-along with Lipscomb’s crew and never looked back.

“I mean, the camaraderie at the station, the action on the calls, getting to be in the middle of all the stuff going on. To me, it was the only thing I can imagine doing. The rest is history,” Collins said.

On Thursday, Dec. 8, 2022, the Lynchburg Fire Department welcomed two new trucks into its fleet with a traditional "wet down" ceremony at Station 7. The new Tower 2 and Medic 8 trucks cost nearly $2 million combined. At the end of the ceremony, officials pushed Tower 2 back into the bay, in keeping with a long-standing tradition.

Mon, 12 Dec 2022 00:25:00 -0600 Rodney Robinson en text/html https://newsadvance.com/news/local/lynchburg-fire-captain-honored-for-ems-work/article_b8bedd28-77d5-11ed-a6c2-1f700ccdc79c.html
Killexams : Orange Village Council approves increase in EMS fees

ORANGE, Ohio -- Village Council has authorized an increase in the fees to be charged to both residents and non-residents for emergency medical services.

On Wednesday (Dec. 7), council passed an ordinance amending the section to revise the fees, effective immediately. Council suspended the rules so it could vote on the legislation on first reading.

Treasurer Dana Kavander said the village’s billing collection agency recommended that it increase the fees “to be more consistent with other municipalities and in light of the prices that are authorized through Medicare and various agencies.”

For basic life support, the fee increases from $550 to $850. For advanced life support, it goes from either $650 to $1,000 or $750 to $1,200, depending on the level.

The classification of service will be determined by the Fire Department.

“This is what gets billed to your insurance company, if you’re a resident or employee (of the village), not the out-of-pocket cost,” Mayor Kathy U. Mulcahy said. “It’s been a number of years since we last increased it.”

In addition, a charge of $16 per mile traveled outside of the municipal corporation limits will be levied for transportation of a patient to a medical facility. The previous charge was $12 per mile.

More body cameras approved

In other action, council approved the purchase of 25 body cameras for the police department -- along with installation and software -- from Chagrin Valley Dispatch, in an amount not to exceed $46,000.

In July, council had approved the purchase of 21 body cameras for the department, with installation and software, from Chagrin Valley Dispatch, at a cost not to exceed $37,425.

But Police Chief Chris Kostura said with the department hiring three additional part-time officers this year, more body cameras were needed.

With council’s approval of a total of 25 body cameras, every officer will have his or her own and there will be no need to share them, he said.

Kostura said the department, which has never worn body cameras before, has received the 25 cameras.

“We’ve got one or two extras in case of damage,” he said.

In July, Kostura said the village had applied for a grant from the State of Ohio that may cover the entire cost of the cameras. He said Wednesday that the village still has not heard if the grant has been awarded, but it should learn in January.

“There’s a good chance the entire cost (of the cameras) will be covered by the grant,” he said.

Retire-rehire deal for Byron

Also on Wednesday, council approved a retire-rehire deal for village Law Director Stephen Byron.

A public hearing was held, to comply with state law, regarding the retirement and proposed rehiring of Byron, who is appointed by council. There were no comments during the hearing.

The ordinance was introduced to council in October.

It authorizes Mulcahy to enter into an agreement with Byron and his Beachwood-based law firm, Singerman, Mills, Desberg and Kauntz Co., for legal services from Jan. 1 through Dec. 31, 2023, and confirms the appointment of Byron as law director.

Byron will retire this Dec. 31. Council and the village will then retain his services and his law firm for another year, effective Jan. 1.

The terms and conditions of Byron’s contract with the village remain the same.

The village will pay Byron’s law firm a retainer of $4,043 per month. Byron will be employed as village law director at a salary of $3,262 per month.

Byron, a Beachwood resident who serves as a principal with his law firm, has served as the village’s law director since 2000. He began his employment with the village as its prosecutor in 1993.

The agreement includes attending all regular and special council meetings, as well as other board and commission meetings; drafting ordinances and resolutions; providing legal advice to village officials; and reviewing and approving contracts and other written documents.

Byron said the Ohio Public Employees Retirement System (OPERS) permits him to retire and be rehired and to start collecting his retirement benefits in March, if his retirement is effective Dec. 31.

He said a two-month period during which he does not collect benefits is required by OPERS after his retirement date.

Village engineer reappointed

Council also confirmed the mayor’s reappointment of Stephen Hovancsek and Associates Inc. as village engineer for another year, effective Jan. 1.

Mulcahy said the engineer’s rates will remain the same as this year.

Operating budget for 2023 approved

Council also approved the village’s management operating budget for 2023 on first reading, at the request of the administration.

General fund appropriations for the year are $9.99 million. The total of all funds to be appropriated is $18.4 million.

William Gross

Orange Mayor Kathy U. Mulcahy, left, administers the oath of office to William Gross, who was appointed by Village Council Wednesday (Dec. 7) as a part-time firefighter/emergency medical technician for the village. (Ed Wittenberg, special to cleveland.com)

Two firefighters appointed

Also on Wednesday, Mulcahy administered the oath of office to two part-time firefighters whose appointments were confirmed by council.

They are Eric Jones, who will serve as part-time firefighter/paramedic, and William Gross, part-time firefighter/emergency medical technician.

Fire Chief Bob Wilson said Jones has worked as a firefighter for the Parma Fire Department for 15 years and “comes to us with a vast amount of experience.”

Gross is currently in paramedic school but is expected to graduate soon, Wilson said. He has worked at the Lafayette Township Fire Department in Medina County for two years and has served as a combat medic in the U.S. Army Reserve.

Both new firefighters introduced their family members in attendance before being sworn in.

Orange for the Holidays

Mulcahy also reminded residents to frequent village businesses and use the coupons that can be found in the Orange for the Holidays coupon book, which all village households should have received in the mail.

The coupons will expire Dec. 31.

Mulcahy noted that Pinecrest is offering weekly opportunities to win shopping sprees there, ranging from $250 to $1,000. Only village residents are eligible to participate.

Entry coupons can be dropped off at 4th and Park at Pinecrest, the mixed-use development off the Harvard Road exit of Interstate 271.

The village’s third annual Orange for the Holidays campaign is being coordinated by Councilman Brent Silver and Councilwoman Staci Adelman Vincent, with assistance from Clerk of Council Anna Girardi, who serves as executive assistant to the mayor.

The goal is to encourage residents to shop at and support local businesses during the holiday season.

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Thu, 08 Dec 2022 01:28:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.cleveland.com/community/2022/12/orange-council-approves-increase-in-fees-to-be-charged-for-emergency-medical-services.html
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