Exam Code: NAB-NHA Practice exam 2023 by Killexams.com team
NAB-NHA Nursing Home Administrator (NAB)

Required Activity Areas:
The AIT Program should be based on the five domains of practice, which are covered in the various departments found in a long term care facility. The tool presents
the departments as modules and rotations; it is through these departments/modules that the program should be designed, so that the individual AIT can meet an appropriate and tailored amount of time in each of the domains as appropriate. These modules include:
• Administration
• Human Resources
• Nursing
• Business Office/Financial Management
• Diet
• Rehabilitation
• Medical Records
• Activities
• Social Services/Admissions
• Housekeeping/Laundry
• Environmental Management/ Maintenance

A. Quality of Care/Nursing
1. Develop a rounding sheet with the administrator and director of nursing that is resident- centered; initiate implementation.
2. Observe nurse peer review on administration of medications.
3. With director of nursing, ensure medications are not expired.
4. Develop resident satisfaction surveys and make recommendations for implementation as necessary. B. Rehabilitation
1. Organize and implement a follow-up program for discharged residents to the community.
2. Develop audit for equipment inventory and complete audit; report.
C. Medical/Resident Records
1. Conduct admission audit of current in-house resident population, analyze data and report. Assist with recommendations, as needed.
2. Conduct audit of flu vaccination response variables, analyze data and report. Assist with recommendations, as needed.
3. Conduct audit of admission and annual required vaccines, analyze data and report. Assist with recommendations, as needed.
4. Conduct medical records audit with appropriate staff.
D. Activities
1. Develop and implement a volunteer program
2. Develop/enhance Life Enrichment/Person Centered Care program
a.Interview residents and families and analyze information to ensure that desired activities are planned and implemented as necessary
b.Working with Directors of Activities and other personnel as needed, help develop in-service for Life Enrichment/Person Centered Care; assist appropriate staff with delivering in-services.
E. Social Services/Admission
1. Conduct an audit of admissions documents (per regulations and organization policy), analyze and report.
2. Complete an audit of resident preferences, such as time to eat, rise and retire, bath/showers, time of therapy, etc. Make recommendations as necessary
3. Develop and implement an outreach program that communicates regularly with residents and/or families post discharge.
F. Dietary
1. Develop a questionnaire for residents related to dietary satisfaction including variables such as taste, temperature, timeliness, presentation, etc; implement, analyze and report; make recommendations.
2. Meet with the dietician and dietary manager to learn how menus are developed, followed, and implemented; conduct an audit to confirm residents are receiving correct foods, drinks and adaptive devices.
3. Understand nutritionally compromised concerns and how weights are monitored.
4. Audit purchasing and storage of dietary supplies and food; report to dietary manager and administrator.
5. Audit to ensure foods are served and maintained at proper temperatures and in accordance with the Food Code.
G. Housekeeping/Laundry
1. Conduct weekly audits, evaluating such variables as dust, floors, toilet, showers of designated public areas; track, trend and report accordingly.
2. Audit resident rooms for housekeeping variables;track, trend and report accordingly.
3. Audit residents to determine if laundry is clean and received promptly.
4. Audit infection control, safety and cross contamination procedures and make recommendations as necessary.
5. Follow the linen distribution system from soiled to clean and report accordingly.
6. Observe resident clothing management

II. Possible Activities/Assignments related to Domain 20: Human Resources
A. Conduct an employee file audit per regulations and organizational policy.
B. Collect annual turnover rates for last few years, and develop a strategic plan with activities, timeframes, etc. for identified changes.
C. Develop an employee satisfaction questionnaire, administer it and analyze data;develop a subsequent plan.
D. Develop, organize and implement several employee activities.
E. Track absentee information, such as shift, day of week, reason, frequency;
analyze and report the findings.
F. Audit external health care providers (e.g., physicians, dentists, podiatrists) to determine current licenses, liability insurance, etc.; analyze and report the findings.
G. Study and analyze recruiting plans/staffing patterns and offer ideas to improve current processes to ensure that the needs of the residents cared for are met.
H. Review and understand the facilitys employee handbook to ensure accuracy and that all federal/state guidelines are followed and make recommendations as necessary.
I. Review and evaluate payroll plans, compensation plans, and benefit packages
J. Participate in a complete employee hiring and orientation process ( interview, background check, etc.).
K. Conduct a staff meeting and an in-service training program.
L. Participate in a disciplinary/grievance procedure and an employee counseling session.
M. Understand and have knowledge of National Labor Relations Board (NRLB) as it relates to the facility.
N. Review and evaluate the unemployment compensation record of the facility and attend an unemployment compensation hearing as necessary.
O. Review and report on ways to encourage and support professional development of team members.

III.Possible Activities/Assignments related to Domain 30: Finance
A. Assist the administrator with all budget (capital, cash, operating, etc.) development and submission.
B. Understand and assist with accounts payable processing.
C. Analyze and understand how aged accounts work.
D. Understand the facilitys bad debt and write-off policy; determine avenues for improvement.
E. Understand triple-check systems for private pay and all third party payors.
F. Describe and review regularly produced financial reports to determine if fiscal issues have arisen and make recommendations as necessary
G. Review and describe the chart of accounts, bookkeeping procedures, income and expense statements and balance sheets; make recommendations as necessary.
H. Understand the financial audit process utilized by third party payors to ensure billings are in accordance with services provided.
I. Analyze and understand third party payor cost reporting systems.

IV. Possible Activities/Assignments related to Domain 40: Environment
A. Audit preventative maintenance logs per regulations and company policy;track and trend such variables as time of day, season, staff member, etc.
B. Audit resident rooms, utilizing audit tools to evaluate such items as electrical outlet plates, call bells, water temperatures and beds; track, trend and report accordingly.
C. Review emergency generator and life safety regulatory requirements according to state, local, and federal laws specific to your building(s) and prepare a compliance report.Conduct audit of past year of the log; develop/revise preventative
maintenance log with maintenance supervisor.
D. Conduct an audit of the past years log; develop and/or revise preventative maintenance logs with the maintenance supervisor.
E. Assist the administrator and maintenance supervisor with developing and implementing an emergency plan.
F. Develop a rounding sheet with the administrator and maintenance supervisor that is environmental and safety centered; initiate its implementation.
G. Audit Log Out/Tag Out procedures to ensure compliance.

V. Possible Activities/Assignments related to Domain 50: Management & Leadership
A. Review policy and procedure manuals to determine if they are appropriate and timely, per regulations and organization policy and make recommendations for change as necessary.
B. Develop and assist the administrator with an annual strategic planning meeting.
C. Review current internal and external contracts and agreements for accuracy, efficiency and timeliness; organize and make recommendations as necessary.
D. Review and become comfortable with federal regulations and state specific regulations; assist with educating department leaders, if needed.
E. Assist with writing a Plan of Correction and/or identified regulatory violations.
F. Review and update the facilitys organizational chart and job descriptions.
G. Review short-term and long-term goals of the organization for appropriateness.
H. Study the bylaws/mission statement/vision of the governing body and how decisions and policies are made within the organization. Analyze the authority throughout the facility.
I. Plan and attend internal and external meetings and prepare reports for the organization, as necessary.
J. Review the facility marketing plan and make recommendations for change as necessary based upon facility dynamics and community needs.
K. Review and understand the facilitys media publicity efforts, including (but not limited to) writing news releases, facility publications, newsletters, etc.
L. Organize and write a report to include competitive information, such as description of services and amenities, survey history, CMS 5-Star rating and community involvement.
M. Review the facilitys corporate compliance program to ensure all appropriate rules and regulations are followed.
N. Review and describe how the facilitys risk management program minimizes legal liability.
O. Review and analyze facilitys information management system, including technology, to ensure safeguards are in place to provide resident confidentiality, data security, social media, cell phones, etc.
P. Review and analyze the facilitys quality improvement programs.
Q. Review the facilitys customer satisfaction program, including resident relations initiatives, reception/concierge duties and resident/family surveys.
R. Transitional Care: understanding the various regional lines of service and how they relate, as well as initiatives to ensure continuous delivery of safe and quality care as consumers transition between the different lines of service.

Nursing Home Administrator (NAB)
Certification-Board Administrator Topics
Killexams : Certification-Board Administrator syllabus - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/NAB-NHA Search results Killexams : Certification-Board Administrator syllabus - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/NAB-NHA https://killexams.com/exam_list/Certification-Board Killexams : Best System Administrator Certifications for 2022
  • Certification programs help system administrators stand out from their peers while expanding and validating their skills. 
  • Certification training and testing help IT professionals earn professional credibility and more power to direct and control their career paths. 
  • Numerous certifications are available, but several are exceptionally valued and respected. 
  • This article is for system administrators and IT professionals who want to expand their knowledge and professional credibility through certification programs.

System administrators are the glue holding together business operations, ensuring smooth-running IT infrastructures. The role requires in-demand career skills that range from server and client configuration and maintenance to access controls, network services and application resource requirements. SysAdmins may even work with more user-facing products, like directory and name services, network addressing, database services, web and desktop applications, and email. They’re often the company “tech expert” – sometimes at several organizations simultaneously. 

System administrator certifications help IT professionals navigate their career paths, expand their knowledge and demonstrate their expertise to managers and employers. SysAdmin certs may even help you secure managerial and executive level jobs and higher pay.

TipTip: If you’re a SysAdmin specializing in database services, consider exploring the best database certifications for database administrators and developers.

Best system administrator certifications

After examining various credentials, we developed this list of our five favorite system administrator certifications for 2022. These certifications are geared toward various experience levels, product interests and skill sets. They can foster your development within system administration, encourage you to explore new areas of expertise, and help you set and achieve career goals

1. Microsoft Certified: Azure Solutions Architect Expert 

Many businesses operate within Microsoft ecosystems, making Microsoft certifications extremely valuable and sought after. However, Microsoft has overhauled its certification processes in accurate years, replacing broad certificates like Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert with a wider variety of role-based certification options divided into the following roles: 

  • Data engineer
  • Data scientist
  • Artificial intelligence engineer
  • Security engineer
  • DevOps engineer
  • Functional consultant
  • Developer
  • Administrator
  • Solutions architect 

Certifications come in beginner, intermediate, and expert levels, based on applicants’ experience. 

Various system administrators may find some Microsoft certifications more advantageous than others. However, the Azure Solutions Architect Expert is the most in-demand certification for a SysAdmin with IT operation experience.  

The Azure Solutions Architect Expert certification is ideal for someone with extensive experience using Azure to solve problems and make decisions for a business’s tech needs. Candidates must have experience with every level of IT operations as well as DevOps. Candidates will be tested on their knowledge and ability to design solutions for data storage, identity, infrastructure and more using Azure. 

This certification combines elements of system administration, Azure implementation and solutions architect experience. Candidates should have one prerequisite qualification: the Azure Administrator Associate certification.  

TipTip: If you have solutions architect experience, check out our list of the best enterprise architect certifications. Credentials at the architect level can lead to some of the highest-paid tech industry positions.

Microsoft Certified: Azure Solutions Architect Expert facts and figures

2. Professional Oracle Linux 8 System Administrator 

Although Oracle is known for its database products and solutions, it also distributes Linux products geared for the enterprise and designed to support cloud environments. Oracle Linux is optimized for various Oracle products and platforms, such as:

  • Oracle Exadata Database Machine
  • Oracle Exalytics In-Memory Machine
  • Oracle Exalogic Elastic Cloud
  • Oracle Database Appliance

To support Oracle Linux, the company offers several Oracle Linux System Administrator learning paths. It also provides several standalone Linux administration courses. Oracle’s Linux certifications are considered among the best Linux certifications to earn. We’ll highlight the Professional Oracle Linux 8 System Administrator certification below. 

The OCP Oracle Linux System Administrator certification, currently at version 8, covers many tools and processes. Candidates must be well-versed in:

  • Linux file systems
  • Control groups
  • Container concepts
  • Advanced storage administration techniques
  • Oracle cluster management 
  • Using Ksplice Uptrack commands 

The certification also tests for knowledge of network bonding, task automation, security configuration and more. 

SysAdmins who support Oracle Solaris might also be interested in the Oracle Solaris System Administrator certification, which Oracle offers at the Associate and Professional levels. Oracle also offers a Cloud Database Migration and Integration Professional certificate

Professional Oracle Linux 8 System Administrator certification facts and figures

Did you know?Did you know?: Oracle certifications are vendor-specific certifications to advance your networking career and are frequently sought after by SysAdmins.

3. RHCE: Red Hat Certified Engineer

In the realm of Linux system administrator certifications, Red Hat certifications stand out. Red Hat’s more senior-level certifications are especially popular among IT professionals and the firms that hire them. Those holding the Red Hat Certified Engineer (RHCE) credential qualify for highly competitive job roles, including the following:

  • Senior Linux administrator
  • Senior UNIX administrator
  • Senior systems engineer
  • Infrastructure systems engineer
  • IT analyst 

The RHCE is considered a high-level credential that’s not easy to obtain. Candidates must first obtain the Red Hat Certified System Administrator (RHCSA) credential. The RHCE credential expands the RHCSA’s understanding of automation in multisystem environments. Candidates must then pass an intense, demanding, four-hour, hands-on, performance-based exam. Those who earn the RHCE can go on to earn the Red Hat Certified Architect (RHCA) in Infrastructure credential.

Candidates can choose a path based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 or Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8. RHCE certification is valid for three years from the date the certification was achieved. To maintain the certification, a credential holder must pass any RHCA exam or pass the RHCE certification exam again before the end of the three years.

TipTip: See our Red Hat certification guide for additional Red Hat professional certifications based on software products, virtualization, storage and cloud-based solutions.

RHCE facts and figures

Certification name Red Hat Certified Engineer (RHCE)
Prerequisites and required courses

Red Hat Certified System Administrator (RHCSA) certification via one exam: EX200 Red Hat Certified System Administrator

Recommended courses: 

  • Red Hat System Administration I (RH124)
  • Red Hat System Administration II (RH134)
  • Red Hat System Administration III: Linux Automation with Ansible (RH294)

Note: Courses are not required, but Red Hat requests that candidates who opt out of the courses demonstrate equivalent experience.

Number of exams One exam: EX294 Red Hat Certified Engineer exam
Cost per exam $400 (RHCE exam fee only)
URL https://www.redhat.com/en/services/certification/rhce
Self-study materials Several online education resources, including Udemy.com, offer courses to help you prepare for the RHCE exam. In addition, some books are available with resources to help you study for the test.

4. CompTIA Server+

CompTIA certifications, such as the A+ for hardware technicians, Network+ for network admins and Security+ for security specialists, are highly regarded in the computing industry. The CompTIA Server+ certification is no exception. 

Companies such as Intel, HP, Dell, Lenovo, Xerox and Microsoft recommend or require their server technicians to earn CompTIA Server+ credentials.

The Server+ certification exam focuses on fundamental, vendor-neutral server-related topics, including:

  • Server hardware
  • Operating systems
  • Storage systems
  • Networking
  • The IT environment (documentation, diagrams and best practices)
  • Security and disaster recovery
  • Virtualization 
  • Troubleshooting

Individuals seeking positions across the system administration world, including data technician, network administrator, IT technician and data center engineer, can benefit from CompTIA Server+ certification. This certification also provides new IT professionals with an excellent foundation for more specialized certifications.

Candidates for the Server+ certification take one exam: SK0-005. CompTIA recommends that candidates have at least two years of practical experience working with servers and either CompTIA A+ certification or comparable knowledge. This certification also stands out because it does not expire – certification is good for life. 

CompTIA Server+ facts and figures

Certification name CompTIA Server+
Prerequisites and required courses Required: None Recommended: CompTIA A+ certification plus 18 to 24 months of IT experience
Number of exams One exam: SK0-005 (90 minutes, 90 multiple-choice and performance-based questions; 750 on a scale of 100 to 900 required to pass)
Cost per exam $358; purchase vouchers through CompTIA Marketplace; exam administered by Pearson VUE
URL https://certification.comptia.org/certifications/server
Self-study materials Links to practice questions, exam objectives, e-books and other training resources are available on the certification page. exam study bundles, including e-books and CertMaster practice, are available from the CompTIA Marketplace.

Did you know?Did you know?: CompTIA also offers some of the best computer hardware certifications as well as vendor-specific Dell certifications, help desk certifications and more.

5. VCAP-DCV Design 2022: VMware Certified Advanced Professional – Data Center Virtualization Design 2022

VMware certifications are must-have credentials for IT professionals interested in virtualization. With a comprehensive certification program encompassing all skill levels, VMware credentials are recognized globally as the best in their class of professional certifications.  

The latest incarnation of the VMware vSphere product is Version 8. VMware offers five credentials related to the vSphere product:

  • Certified Technical
  • Certified Professional
  • Certified Advanced Professional (Data Center Virtualization Design)
  • Certified Advanced Professional (Data Center Virtualization Deploy)
  • Certified Design Expert 

VMware also offers a wide range of badges for specific product applications. We’re highlighting the intermediate certification: Certified Advanced Professional – Data Center Virtualization Design. 

Training is required for non-credential holders seeking to obtain the VCAP-DCV credential. VMware offers various training options to meet the training prerequisite: self-paced (on demand), live online and live classroom – some of which include virtual labs. Those possessing a valid VCAP-DCV Design certificate must attend a training course or pass the VCAP-DCV Design exam. 

VCAP-DCV Design 2022 facts and figures

Certification name VMware Certified Advanced Professional – Data Center Virtualization 2022 (VCAP-DCV)
Prerequisites and required courses Path 1 (non-VCP credential holders): Earn the VCP-DCV 2022 and pass the VCAP-DCV Design exam. Additional training courses are recommended but not required. 

Path 2 (active VCAP-DCV Design or Deploy 2019 or newer credential holders): Pass the VCAP-DCV Design exam. Training is recommended but not required.

Path 3 (VCAP-CMA Design or Deploy 2019 or newer, VCAP-DTM Design or Deploy 2019 or newer, VCAP-NV Design or Deploy 2019 or newer holders): Earn the VCP-DCV 2022 and pass the VCAP-DCV Design exam. Training is recommended but not required. 

Path 4 (VCAP-DCV Design 2021 holder): Either attend the training course in 2022 or pass the VCAP-DCV Design exam.  Path 5 (VCAP6.5-DCV Design or Deploy or older): Earn the VCP-DCV 2022 and pass the VCAP-DCV Design exam. Training is recommended but not required. 

Number of exams Professional DCV exam (130 minutes, 70 single and multiple-choice questions; must score 300 out of 500 to pass)

Exam for certification: VCAP-DCV Design Exam (150 minutes, 60 single and multiple-choice questions; must score 300 out of 500 to pass)

Cost per exam Professional DCV exam: $250 VCAP-DCV Design exam: $450 
URL https://www.vmware.com/learning/certification/vcap-dcv-design.html
Self-study materials VMware offers a downloadable exam guide for each exam. VMware Customer Connect Learning offers exam prep subscriptions.

Key TakeawayKey takeaway: Earning the best IT certifications, including system admin certs, is an excellent career advancement tool for amassing and validating your skills and knowledge.

Beyond the top 5: More SysAdmin certifications

In addition to the five system administrator certifications we highlighted above, many other certification programs can help further the careers and professional development of IT professionals in system administration.

It makes sense to investigate the plethora of vendor-specific programs available for those who work with systems from companies like Brocade, Dell EMC, HPE, IBM, NetApp and Symantec. Many play into critical system specialty areas, such as storage, security and virtualization, while others offer a broad range of platforms for these and other technology areas. 

Here are some examples:

  • IBM Certified System Administrator MQ V9.1: IBM Certified System Administrator MQ V9.1 is for SysAdmins who cover admin activities such as migrating, configuration, availability, performance tuning and problem determination.
  • NetApp Certified Data Administrator (NCDA): NCDA is geared toward professionals who manage NetApp data storage controllers running the ONTAP operating system.
  • ServiceNow Certified System Administrator: ServiceNow Certified System Administrator is aimed at professionals adept at configuring, implementing and managing ServiceNow systems.

Vendor-neutral certification programs also offer a variety of interesting and potentially valuable credentials. For example, Linux Professional Institute certifications are well known and widely recognized in IT shops and operations that depend on Linux servers to handle their workloads. 

TipTip: Tech professionals may also want to consider certifications in adjacent fields, including big data certifications, starter cybersecurity certifications and project management certifications.

Job board search results (in alphabetical order by certification)

The following chart shows the results of an informal job search we conducted to give you an idea of the relative frequency with which our top five certifications appear in real job postings. While all the certifications are popular, the CompTIA Server+ stands out as the clear favorite.

Certification SimplyHired Indeed LinkedIn Jobs Linkup Total
Microsoft Certified: Azure Solutions Architect Expert (Microsoft) 1,722 4,281 554 2,711 9,268
Oracle Linux 8 System Administrator (Oracle) 1,831 2,232 166 765 4,994
RHCE (Red Hat) 417 527 1,015 1,972 3,931
Server+ (CompTIA) 6,817 5,082 1,125 4,182 17,206
VCAP-DCV Design 2022  (VMware)* 2,884 2,885 220 4,932 10,921

* When searching for VCP – Data Center credentials, we found most job descriptions didn’t indicate a specific version.

Although employers tend to pay SysAdmins less than some of their IT peers, such as network engineers and enterprise IT architects, a career in system administration is still worth pursuing. SimplyHired reports $79,283 as the national average salary for system administrators, with a range of $49,718 to $136,224. Indeed.com similarly reports that $76,942 is the average base salary for system administrators, while senior system administrators can expect an average salary of around $92,803.  

Building a dynamic IT skill set

IT systems are dynamic. They grow with companies and change with evolving technology. Therefore, it’s important for system administrators to nourish their skills. Certifications and training show you’re qualified to handle the responsibilities of your desired position while demonstrating your willingness to learn and grow. 

As you move through your career in system administration, you may want to branch into new specialties or software. Fortunately, in addition to receiving certifications, you can access many excellent courses and educational resources to help you continue to grow in your field. 

Ed Tittel and Kim Lindros contributed to the reporting and writing in this article.

Sun, 22 Jan 2023 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/10752-best-system-administrator-certifications.html
Killexams : Best Database Certifications for 2023
  • Database technology is crucial in multiple applications and computing tasks, and certifications help demonstrate job readiness and core competencies. 
  • Before pursuing a database platform certification, you should have a solid background in relational database management systems and the SQL language. 
  • Valuable certifications are typically tied to specific technology companies and their platforms, such as IBM, Microsoft, Oracle and SAP.
  • This article is for IT professionals considering database certifications to further their careers. 

While database platforms have come and gone through the decades, database technology is still critical for multiple applications and computing tasks. IT professionals often seek database certifications to demonstrate their knowledge and expertise as they navigate their career paths and pursue professional growth. 

While database certifications may not be as bleeding edge as Google cloud certifications, cybersecurity certifications, storage certifications or digital forensics certifications, database professionals at all levels possess in-demand career skills — and a plethora of database-related jobs are waiting to be filled.

We’ll look at some of the most in-demand certifications for database administrators, database developers and anyone else who works with databases.

What to know about database roles and certifications

To get a better grasp of available database certifications, it’s helpful to group these certs around job responsibilities. This reflects the maturity of database technology and its integration into most aspects of commercial, scientific and academic computing. As you read about the various database certification programs, keep these job roles in mind: 

  • Database administrator (DBA). A DBA is responsible for installing, configuring and maintaining a database management system (DBMS). The job is often tied to a specific platform, such as Oracle, MySQL, DB2 or SQL Server.
  • Database developer. A database developer works with generic and proprietary application programming interfaces (APIs) to build applications that interact with a DBMS. Like DBA roles, database developer positions are also often platform-specific.
  • Database designer or database architect. A database designer or architect researches data requirements for specific applications or users and designs database structures and application capabilities to match.
  • Data analyst or data scientist. A data analyst or scientist is responsible for analyzing data from multiple disparate sources to discover previously hidden insights, determine the meaning behind data, and make business-specific recommendations.
  • Data mining or business intelligence (BI) specialist. A data mining or BI specialist focuses on dissecting, analyzing and reporting important data streams, such as customer, supply chain and transaction data and histories.
  • Data warehousing specialist. A data warehousing specialist assembles and analyzes data from multiple operational systems (such as orders, transactions, supply chain information and customer data) to establish data history, analyze trends, generate reports and forecasts, and support general ad hoc queries. 

These database job roles highlight two critical issues to consider if you want to be a database professional:

  1. You need a solid general background. First, a background in relational database management systems, including an understanding of Structured Query Language (SQL), is a fundamental prerequisite for database professionals of all stripes. 
  2. There’s a focus on proprietary technologies. Second, although various efforts to standardize database technology exist, much of the whiz-bang capability that databases and database applications deliver comes from proprietary, vendor-specific technologies. Serious, heavy-duty database skills and knowledge are tied to specific platforms, including various Oracle products (such as the open-source MySQL environment and Oracle itself,) Microsoft SQL Server and IBM DB2. Most of these certifications relate directly to those enormously popular platforms. 

Did you know?Did you know? NoSQL databases — called “not only SQL” or “non-relational” databases — are increasingly used in big data applications associated with some of the best big data certifications for data scientists, data mining and warehousing, and business intelligence.

Best database certifications

Here are details on our five best database certification picks for 2023.

1. IBM Certified Database Administrator — DB2 12

IBM is one of the leaders in the worldwide database market by any objective measure. The company’s database portfolio includes industry-standard DB2, as well as the following:

  • IBM Compose
  • Information Management System (IMS)
  • Informix
  • Cloudant
  • IBM Open Platform with Apache Hadoop

IBM also has a long-standing and well-populated IT certification program that has been around for more than 30 years and encompasses hundreds of individual credentials. 

After redesigning its certification programs and categories, IBM now has a primary data-centric certification category called IBM Data and AI. It includes a range of database credentials: 

  • Database Associate
  • Database Administrator
  • System Administrator
  • Application Developer 

IBM’s is a big and complex certification space, but one where particular platform allegiances are likely to guide readers toward the handful of items most relevant to their interests and needs. 

Database professionals who support DB2 (or aspire to) on IBM’s z/OS should check out the IBM Associate Certified DBA — Db2 12 certification. It’s an entry-level exam that addresses routine planning, working with SQL and XML, security, operations, data concurrency, application design, and concepts around database objects.

This certification requires candidates to pass one exam. Pre-exam training and familiarity with concepts, or hands-on experience, are recommended but not required. 

IBM Certified Database Administrator — DB2 facts and figures

Certification name

IBM Certified Database Administrator — Db2 12 (z/OS)

Prerequisites and required courses

None required; recommended courses are available.

Number of exams

One: C1000-122: Db2 12 for z/OS DBA Fundamentals (63 questions, 90 minutes)

Cost per exam

$200 (or local currency equivalent) per exam. Sign up for exams at Pearson VUE.

URL

https://www.ibm.com/training/certification/C8003803

Self-study materials

The certification page includes self-study materials, including a study guide and a learning path. 

Did you know? IBM’s certification offerings are among the best system administrator certifications IT professionals can achieve.

2. Microsoft Azure

Microsoft Azure offers a broad range of tools and add-ons for business intelligence. Azure is a cloud computing platform for application management and Microsoft-managed data centers. Microsoft certifications include various Azure offerings based on job role and experience level.

Microsoft’s certification program is role-centric, centered on the skills you need to succeed in specific technology jobs. Because Azure has such a broad scope, Azure certifications span multiple job roles. However, specific certifications exist for the following positions:

  • Data Analysts
  • Data Engineers
  • Data Scientists
  • Database Administrators 

There are also certifications for learners at different experience levels. 

For those looking to take their Azure knowledge to the next level, the Microsoft Certified: Azure Data Fundamentals certification is the perfect place to start. This certification is for beginner database administrators interested in using Azure and mastering data in the cloud. It offers foundational knowledge of core concepts while reinforcing concepts for later use in other Azure role-based certifications, such as those listed below: 

  • Azure Database Administrator Associate
  • Azure Data Engineer Associate
  • Data Analyst Associate 

Azure Data Fundamentals certification facts and figures

Certification name

Microsoft Certified: Azure Data Fundamentals

Prerequisites and required courses 

This certification does not have any prerequisites. However, for absolute beginners, Microsoft offers an Azure Fundamentals certification. 

Number of exams

One exam, DP-900, which is administered via Pearson VUE or Certiport.

Cost per exam

The exam costs $99 in the United States, though the cost changes based on where it is proctored. 

URL

https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/certifications/exams/dp-900

Self-study materials

Microsoft offers one of the world’s largest and best-known IT certification programs, so the exam is well supported with books, study guides, study groups, practice exams and other materials. Microsoft also offers a free online learning path.

3. Oracle Certified Professional, MySQL 5.7 Database Administrator 

Oracle runs its certifications under the auspices of Oracle University. The Oracle Database Certifications page lists separate tracks depending on job role and product. MySQL is perhaps the leading open-source relational database management system (RDBMS). Since acquiring Sun Microsystems in 2010 (which had previously acquired MySQL AB), Oracle has rolled out a paid version of MySQL and developed certifications to support the product. 

If you’re interested in pursuing an Oracle MySQL certification, you can choose between MySQL Database Administration and MySQL Developer. 

The Oracle Certified Professional, MySQL 5.7 Database Administrator (OCP) credential recognizes professionals who can accomplish the following tasks:

  • Install, optimize and monitor MySQL Server.
  • Configure replication.
  • Apply security.
  • Schedule and validate database backups. 

The certification requires candidates to pass a single exam (the same exam can be taken to upgrade a prior certification). Oracle recommends training and on-the-job experience before taking the exam.

Oracle Certified Professional, MySQL 5.7 Database Administrator facts and figures

Did you know? According to Oracle, approximately 1.8 million Oracle Certified professionals globally hold certifications to advance their networking careers and professions to validate their IT expertise. 

4. Oracle Database SQL Certified Associate Certification

For individuals interested in working in the Oracle environment who have the necessary experience to become a database administrator, Oracle’s Database SQL Certified Associate Certification is another top Oracle certification and an excellent starting point. This exam encompasses an understanding of fundamental SQL concepts that individuals must grasp for database projects. 

By earning the certification, individuals demonstrate that they have a range of knowledge in core SQL concepts:

  • Familiarity with queries, data modeling, and normalization
  • Strong base understanding of the underlying SQL language
  • An ability to create and manipulate Oracle Database tables 

This certification also requires candidates to pass a single exam. While Oracle does not specify any prerequisites, the company does state candidates should have familiarity working with the command line. 

Oracle Database SQL Certified Associate Certification facts and figures

5. SAP HANA: SAP Certified Technology Associate — SAP HANA 2.0 SPS05

SAP SE has an extensive portfolio of business applications and analytics software, including cloud infrastructure, applications and storage. The SAP HANA platform’s foundation is an enterprise-grade relational database management system that can be run as an appliance on-premises or in the cloud. The cloud platform lets customers build and run applications and services based on SAP HANA. 

SAP offers a comprehensive certification program built to support its various platforms and products. We’re featuring the SAP Certified Technology Associate — SAP HANA cert because it aligns closely with other certifications we’ve highlighted and is in high demand among employers, according to job board surveys. 

This certification ensures database professionals can install, manage, monitor, migrate and troubleshoot SAP HANA systems. It covers the following skills:

  • Managing users and authorizations
  • Applying security
  • Ensuring high availability 
  • Effective disaster-recovery techniques 

SAP recommends that certification candidates get hands-on practice through formal training or on-the-job experience before attempting this exam. The SAP Learning Hub is a subscription service that gives certification candidates access to a library of learning materials, including e-learning courses and course handbooks. 

The annual subscription rate for individual users on the Professional certification track is $2,760. This online training program is designed for those who run, support, or implement SAP software solutions. Though this may seem like a steep price for online training, you will likely be able to pass any SAP certification exams you put your mind to by leveraging all the learning resources available to SAP Learning Hub Professional subscribers. 

Typically, SAP certifications achieved on one of the two most accurate SAP solutions are considered current and valid. SAP contacts professionals whose certifications are nearing end-of-life status and provides information on maintaining their credentials.

SAP Certified Technology Associate facts and figures

Certification name

SAP Certified Technology Associate — SAP HANA 2.0 SPS05

Prerequisites and required courses    

None required.

Recommended: Hands-on experience and the following courses: 

  • SAP HANA Installation & Operations SPS12 (HA200) 
  • High Availability and Disaster Tolerance Administration SPS05 (HA201)
  • Monitoring and Performance Tools SPS05 (HA215)
  • Database Migration using DMO SPS05 (HA250)

Number of exams

One exam: SAP Certified Technology Associate — SAP HANA 2.0 SPS05, exam code C_HANATEC_17 (80 questions, 180 minutes)

Cost per exam

$500

URL

https://training.sap.com/certification/c_hanatec_17-sap-certified-technology-associate—sap-hana-20-sps05-g/

Self-study materials

The certification web page includes a link to sample questions. SAP HANA trade books and certification guides are available on Amazon. The SAP Help Center offers product documentation and a training and certification FAQs page. The SAP Learning Hub (available on a subscription basis) provides access to online learning content.

Tip: To broaden your skill set, consider pursuing the best sales certifications to better sell and implement various IT solutions, including databases.

Beyond the top 5 database certifications

Additional database certification programs can further the careers of IT professionals who work with database management systems. 

While most colleges with computer science programs offer database tracks at the undergraduate, master and Ph.D. levels, well-known vendor-neutral database certifications exist, including the following: 

  • ICCP certifications. The Institute for the Certification of Computing Professionals (ICCP) offers its unique Certified Data Professional and Certified Data Scientist credentials. Learn more about ICCP certifications from the ICCP website.
  • Enterprise DB certifications. EnterpriseDB administers a small but effective certification program with two primary certs: the EDB Certified Associate and the EDB Certified Professional

These are some additional certifications: 

These credentials represent opportunities for database professionals to expand their skill sets — and salaries. However, such niches in the database certification arena are generally only worth pursuing if you already work with these platforms or plan to work for an organization that uses them.

Key takeaway: Pursuing additional database certifications can be helpful for professional development if you already work with these platforms or plan to work with them in the future. 

Job board search results

Before pursuing certifications, consider their popularity with employers to gain a helpful perspective on current database certification demand. Here’s a job board snapshot to give you an idea of what’s trending.

Certification

SimplyHired

Indeed

LinkedIn Jobs

LinkUp

Total

IBM Certified Database Administrator — DB2

867

1,337

1,911

753

4,868

Azure Data Fundamentals

2,052

4,154

283

2,322

8,811

Oracle Certified Professional, MySQL Database Administrator

339

473

143

23

978

Oracle Database SQL Certified Associate Certification

138

177

10

273

598

SAP HANA

32

37

57

466

592

If the sheer number of available database-related positions isn’t enough motivation to pursue a certification, consider average salaries for database administrators. SimplyHired reports $91,949 as the national average in the U.S., ranging from $64,171 to over $131,753. Glassdoor’s reported average is somewhat lower at $84,161, with a top rung for experienced senior DBAs right around $134,000.

Choosing the right certification

Choosing the best IT certifications to enhance your skills and boost your career can be overwhelming, especially as many available certifications are for proprietary technologies. While picking a database certification can feel like locking yourself into a single technology family, it is worth remembering that many database skills are transferable. Additionally, pursuing any certification shows your willingness to learn and demonstrates competence to current and future employers. 

Ultimately, choosing which certification to pursue depends on the technologies you use at work or would like to use at a future employer.

Jeremy Bender contributed to the reporting and writing in this article. 

Sun, 22 Jan 2023 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/10734-database-certifications.html
Killexams : Near Misses Raise Fresh Questions For US Air Regulator

The Federal Aviation Administration has faced questions after accurate near misses at US airports

SAUL LOEB

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The Barron's news department was not involved in the creation of the content above. This story was produced by AFP. For more information go to AFP.com.
© Agence France-Presse
Sat, 18 Feb 2023 16:06:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.barrons.com/news/near-misses-raise-fresh-questions-for-us-air-regulator-bb2bdf52
Killexams : FALA leadership: Flagstaff school sees impacts as administrator positions shift

Flagstaff Arts and Leadership Academy's (FALA) leadership situation has continued to unfold over the past two months, with administrator positions changing, and students and staff experiencing impacts to their education and work. 

In the second of two meetings hosted the week before winter break, the school's board of directors moved to administratively reassign executive director Eli Cohen to remote work after a discussion that took place in public session.

Board treasurer Ron Borkan spoke against the reassignment, noting accurate resignations and saying he had concerns about “the unintended consequences,” but other board members disagreed.

“We have lost 30 out of 40 faculty in the last three years, 26 of them in the last two years,” said board member Debra Edgerton. “What became alarming was to have more, the largest number of faculty that left in the past year.”

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A chart depicting staff attrition at FALA over the last three school years that Cohen presented to the board at its Sept. 27 meeting.

She continued: “What was happening after this past year is what started, at least for me, thinking what is going on and to talk about students when we had the report of how many students were leaving and not connecting it to the reason faculty were leaving. That is the question we have in front of us. Yes, we will probably lose more faculty, but you can’t blame the entire incident on us when most of this has happened in the prior three years.”

The motion passed 3-2, with Borkan and James Yih, the board president,  voting against.

During discussion of appointing an interim executive director later in the meeting, Borkan resigned, citing his disapproval with the way the board was handling the situation.

He later said this “was not some rash decision,” noting dissenting votes he’d made throughout the fall.

“When you’re on the board, sometimes you lose a vote, but you’re expected to then support the majority decision," he said. "For the most part, I could, but as we got into reassigning Eli to work from home or reassigning Christina [Wolfe] to work from home, those decisions I thought were very ill-advised, very short-sighted and downright wrong. I figured I can’t support these decisions [and] I can’t be on the board if they’re going to be making decisions I can’t support, so I resigned.”

ESS director position eliminated

The latter of those two reassignments had happened at the board’s meeting on Nov. 28.

Borkan was absent, but the rest of the board voted unanimously, due to a reduction in force, not to renew Extended School Services (ESS) director Wolfe’s contract after it is set to end on June 30. It also appointed board Vice President Kyle Winfree to lead a committee — including staff, parents, FALA leaders and outside experts — to explore how to restructure the department.

“We’ve been deliberating with thoughtfulness and care,” board secretary Andy Bessler is summarized as saying in the minutes. “We can move forward in positivity and growth. This has been tough for everyone, and it involves confidential information we cannot disclose. Please trust that we are working in the benefit of the school, legally and for the care of the students.”

Although Borkan believed Wolfe had performance issues that needed to be addressed, he moved during the meeting to rescind the decision to eliminate the position until the new structure had been finalized.

He had been on the finance committee for about a year at time and said neither reduction in force nor changes to the ESS director position had ever been discussed.

“If the issues were how Christina was performing at her job, that she wasn't what the school needed in a SPED director, the process the board was going through was wrong,” he said. “You do a performance evaluation, you collect your data, you talk to the employees and you work on a performance improvement plan. You’re not just having performance issues and eliminating the position; that's not how it's done.”

Other members noted that without this motion the position would still exist at FALA, with Wolfe in the role, until the end of her contract at the close of the academic year.

“I am feeling extraordinarily challenged and concerned that this is not objectively being considered,” Wolfe said when recognized at the meeting.

In response, Bessler said he was “considering all the stuff objectively as best as I can,” but that he was not comfortable discussing certain items in public “to protect people.”

“I’ll say that finances were not the only thing that we considered,” Yih said. “We had a long discussion of this.”

The motion did not continue.

ESS restructuring

According to Winfree, the reduction in force was the first step in addressing a need to restructure the ESS department. While he said he thinks everyone in the department has a "big heart" and is “in it for the right reasons,” his belief is that the structure is not serving them well.

“As it was earlier this year, we have one person at the top with certification and then multiple others who have these conditional certifications that are dependent on a mentor in the school to retain their certification and complete their education,” he said. “I think it’s great to have a mentor supporting your education, but if it is your direct supervisor and there is no other [supervisor], how are you going to speak up if there’s an issue? This person controls your job [and] they control your education."

Having multiple people at the top of the hierarchy does not necessarily require hiring new staff, he said. Instead, he offered, “it should be interpreted as an opportunity for advancement.”

Wolfe, however, was skeptical that the department could function without any sort of director, saying one is needed for tasks such as reporting to the state, providing oversight and SPED-specific crisis management.

“I just don’t see how a full-time teacher has the level of flexibility that's needed sometimes to support the department running as smoothly as it needs to,” she said. “I would never recommend that a SPED department completely eliminate the director or the leader of that entirely because there are too many moving pieces at all times for that to all be distributed out. But my hope was to actually move to more distribution and building more autonomy within all of the professionals.”

Cohen and Borkan had similar concerns about removing the position, both saying it was a necessary role for the school to have filled.

“[This position is] the one that keeps you from getting sued,” Cohen explained. “Which is frankly what schools get into trouble for -- they get SPED lawsuits or a lawsuit from the office of civil rights or the ADA or IDEA. That's when you get into trouble.”

During the Dec. 12 meeting, the board discussed interim solutions for determining the structure of the ESS department going forward with the director position eliminated.

Winfree said he met with four Flagstaff SPED experts to discuss ways FALA could better support its ESS students (only naming one, to the disapproval of meeting attendees).

The committee, which will eventually provide a recommendation to the board, has not yet met and is expected to take “several months” to come to a decision -- Winfree estimated next fall.

In the meantime, the board has hired two experts to help guide the ESS department -- interim director Michele Lucci and consultant Russ Randall, both of whom have decades of experience in special education.

In an email to the Daily Sun, Yih specifically noted their knowledge of IEPs, 504 plans and transition plans, saying they along with school improvement specialist Kara Kelty "have been instrumental in bringing the highest quality of services to our students."

Wolfe’s resignation

“I want people to understand that the story the board is trying to tell is a lie,” Wolfe said about a month after these meetings. “I, for sure, understand and appreciate that reality is based on perception and that perception is subjective. But this whole 'we’re going to fix the school after we broke it, but we're not going to say that we broke it.' ... It's wrong, it’s gaslighting.”

Like almost everyone cited in these articles, Wolfe described her initial experience at FALA as one of the best work environments she’d experienced in education, and, similar to former dean Jed Hayes, she believed some of the issues came from a lack of support as she entered an administrative position for the first time.

While the 21-22 school year was especially difficult, she said she’d started this year with new staff and a plan to “pivot and grow.” She had hired three educators who were in the process of completing a master’s degree and was building extra support for them. Eventually, she said, the hope was to grow a strong team in-house and move to a more distributed leadership model that matched FALA overall.

Wolfe expressed several concerns with the board’s decision. Among them were Borkan’s absence, that her position was the only one affected by the reduction in force, that the next school year’s budget had not yet been reviewed (she was also a member of the finance committee) and that a continuance clause in her contract meant that reduction in force was one of the only nonperformance (specifically a PIP) reasons the board could decide not to renew it.

Her primary reason for resigning, she said, was the Dec. 13 meeting and the board’s treatment of staff during the open forum that night.

She had also found the situation personally stressful.

“I have plenty of documentation about how the board’s been pretty crappy to me, but it was painful on a different level last night, watching everyone be treated that way,” she said the day after the Jan. 12 meeting.

Students walk between classes Monday morning at Flagstaff Arts and Leadership Academy.

Student, staff letters

The school began its winter break on Dec. 16, with students and staff set to return Jan. 2 (snow later delayed the return from break to Jan. 3).

Issues again surfaced after the break, with a total of 10 staff now having resigned, including the student services director. By the end of January, the board had hired three education professionals to help provide guidance for the school -- two specifically for its ESS department.

Two group letters were sent to the board -- one from 14 staff members, one from 47 students -- expressing disapproval with the board’s handling of the situation and asking for changes, as were several individual emails on the same themes.

The staff email, sent Dec. 14, included seven demands they asked to be recognized by 2 p.m. Dec. 16 (the last day of school before winter break), after which they would “have no choice but to coordinate escalating actions until our demands are met.”

The student letter, sent Jan. 11, expressed concerns with Cohen and Wolfe’s removal and the lack of explanation for those actions in particular.

“In the immediate aftermath of your actions, we are left without administrators on our campus and without answers to our questions,” they wrote. “Rather than promote our well-being, you have chosen to take actions that place stress on students and staff, disrupting our education and damaging our school.”

Both emails asked that three board members -- Yih, Winfree and Edgerton -- resign and that some form of staff and student voice replace them, and on the board more generally. This had also been expressed in meeting comments throughout the process.

A clip from the public comment section of FALA's Dec. 12 board meeting, in which the school's executive director asks the entire board to resign.

The board has so far had two community discussion sessions on different syllabus related to the situation in its meetings and, in a letter to the community published Feb. 12, said FALA would hold a public town hall "in the near future."

The Jan. 23 meeting included reports from student representatives and staff advocates -- which Yih said would be the first of many.

In this meeting, he addressed the request to resign, saying it was "a fair request," and that he was past his three-year term, but that it was difficult to find suitable candidates. Winfree gave a similar answer, with both noting that the board cannot legally function with fewer than five members, so to fulfill the request would have risked FALA's charter school status.

Board members also acknowledged the impact the situation was having on students and staff in their comments.

"We will get through this, and I think part of this healing process does start with us being called out and us owning up to the situation that we are in," Yih said. "I'm hopeful, based on your participation today, that we can go down this road together to Improve our communications with you, to meet you, to learn from you and to hear your voice."

Student impacts

Borkan said this situation has also caused at least a “handful” of students to leave FALA -- on Jan. 5, Cohen mentioned about 10 leaving over the previous two weeks. Other educators described the effects they’d seen in their students.

“Students on campus are afraid, some of them to the point of tears daily, that the school’s going to shut down and that this is the only place they’ve felt safe at school,” said Chad Fields, FALA’s mental health counselor. “At every other school, they felt ostracized, marginalized and unseen. [They] felt safe here and they’re afraid that’s going to go away.”

One student shared an email they wrote to a board member as part of an exchange in response to the group letter. At the end, they explained why they decided to join the other students in signing.

“Personally, my hope for the letter from students wasn't that it would immediately prompt everything it calls for, because I'd seen nothing that made me expect any quick action," they wrote. "Rather, I hoped that it could demonstrate the cost of the direction the Board is moving in, as well as the stress and frustration it creates for students when we're not given a way to affect that direction."

It went on to read: “At worst, I expected it to be taken as a demonstration of conviction and capability from FALA's students. I did hope and do still hope that it will encourage the Board to give students the seat at the table we're entitled to, and that the Board will give us more reasons to believe that our voices actually have an impact on their decisions.”

Staff impacts

Fields’ job means he works closely with the school’s ESS team -- Wolfe was his direct supervisor for the roughly 80% of his work that had to do with special education, he said.

Fields has attended every meeting since October and said the board’s actions in that time have seemed “at best, illogical.”

“It feels like a hostage situation, where our care for the children and the services we provide for them are leveraged against our moral sense of integrity to not want to be a part of this system anymore,” he said. “But we know what will happen if we all choose to be a part of this immoral disaster. ... So many staff feel like we have to sacrifice our sense of integrity to be what is just because of our commitment to holding this community together for the students that we love.”

The reassignments and resignations have impacted Fields’ work “massively,” he said in early January. The ESS department went from having a director, counselor, three teachers and an administrative assistant to just himself and one teacher.

Fields said he has been helping out in other areas to try to fill those gaps, and while he’s continued to be able to meet the required number of counseling minutes, ”it’s becoming harder and harder.”

“It’s huge,” he said. “There are compliance issues -- IEPs are tied to legal documents and our funding is tied to the ability to satisfy the stipulations in those contracts with students and their families. We’re getting close to not being able to do that legally and, I would say, definitely ethically.”

Such concerns are echoed by many current staff’s communication with the board and some of the resignation letters.

One current employee, who asked to remain anonymous due to fear of retaliation, said they would like to resign from the school as well, but needed to stay to support their family’s livelihood. They’d seen other staff making similar decisions.

In an email to a board member in late December, another employee (who asked for anonymity for the same reason) gave the example of the student services team needing to cover multiple positions due to the absences created by the reassignments and resignations.

“I just want to do my job. I want to come to work and be amazing,” they wrote. “I miss where the hardest problem I had was telling kids to get out of the bathroom. I understand we all have the same mission, ‘to do what is best for kids.’ That is hard to do when we ended up in a place of distrust and endless discomfort towards the people around us.”

Police reports

That email was part of a thread about the third FALA-related police report filed in December.

The first two, filed by Winfree and another staff member, both focused on the same incident, which had happened in May of 2021.

One report summarizes Winfree as saying he’d heard from a school employee that Wolfe had taken a student with disabilities to music class, which was auditorily overstimulating for them and caused significant distress. Wolfe, however, said the student had asked to be taken to the class, the reporting educator had misread the situation and that the student's parents agreed this was not a concern.

Both reports ended with the case being closed unfounded, with the stated reasons that there was no criminal conduct and the allegations don’t rise to the level of child abuse.

The timing and reason behind these reports has been in contention, however.

Cohen and Wolfe both say the board knew about and dismissed this employee’s claim; an email from Yih on Sept. 18 asks the board not to respond to the same source cited in the report, as “at this point, I do not believe [their] claims need to rise to the attention of the board.”

Winfree, however, said he was taking the first step in reporting allegations to the state by calling law enforcement. Hearing that Wolfe had threatened to sue a different staff member if they spoke up about the situation was what “solidified” his understanding that it needed to be reported.

The third report is about a different incident: an alleged kidnapping attempt on Winfree’s child.

On Dec. 15, someone called the school claiming to be Winfree’s wife, according to what Winfree and Cohen said was the understanding at the time. The caller said to send Winfree’s child to meet them outside, and that they were not to interact with any school staff.

Winfree said he was concerned enough after putting the pieces together to call the police about this on Dec. 22. The police report closed the case on Dec. 28, noting that this was likely a misunderstanding, as the parent of another child at the school who had the same first name had called their child out of school at the same time as the phone call in question.

Cohen charges

The board brought charges against Cohen at a meeting Jan. 12, delivering them with an intent to terminate on Jan. 26.

Board members went into more detail of their concerns at the meeting as they brainstormed what to include in the charges. (Cohen has admitted to some of these, including breaking reassignment and having a relationship with a subordinate. He said the first was necessary out of a need for safety and that there were no policies against the second at the time.)

Yih summarized the charges in a Jan. 23 meeting as falling into groups of allegations around “inappropriate disclosure of confidential information, violation of administrative reassignments, failure to conduct duties, mishandling of contracts…poor relationship with the board of directors and some unprofessionalism.”

As seen in the comments around the original discussion, particularly an apology Yih made at the beginning, current employees disagreed with the choice to outline these in detail in a public session. To Wolfe and other employees, this discussion wasn’t an act of transparency, because it was both false and unnecessary.

Clip from the Jan. 12 meeting, where Yih introduces the item on making charges against Cohen.

Stating that Cohen broke the terms of his reassignment would have been enough, Wolfe said.

“He has areas to work on in his profile as a leader; we all do, frankly. We don’t all have to suffer through 45 minutes of public criticism,” she said. “Those weren’t discussions. It’s such a gross display of dehumanizing.”

“To learn in the board meeting that James apologized for not taking action in 2020 over things, feels very wrong to take it now. It's 2023. It's punishing us,” another employee wrote to the Daily Sun. “Clearly there have been improvements as all of Eli's staff working near him have stuck our necks out, spoken up, sent emails and said how wrong this is from the beginning. Ron's resignation and letter summed it up that it is wrong and they need to listen to us.”

Board members noted here and in later meetings, however, that Cohen had requested the discussion be done in public, so that is what they did.

When the board turned the floor to Cohen after discussing the potential charges at the meeting, he said he didn’t need to speak, out of concern for legal jeopardy.

“I am not going to deal with lies and whatever. I have legal counsel, we’re done,” he said. “You can continue as you wish.”

The motion passed with four members voting for it, and the two new members abstaining.

This was followed by an explanation of the hearing process from the board's legal counsel, which can be seen about 45 minutes into the recording

On Jan. 26, the board took the next step, moving to approve and deliver the charges against Cohen as well as an intent to terminate his employment. It also amended the terms of his reassignment, instructing him not to report to work or act on FALA's behalf until further notice.

He is currently still employed at the school. 

"I hope we can in due time give more information when we feel it is legally appropriate, good timing, that sort of thing," Yih said in discussion of the motion. "We're trying to be careful here -- in large part, legally. We have heard your concerns about transparency and we're working through that."

Bessler added: "We need to have that due process run through and I just ask for everyone's patience while we let that happen."

A hearing, which will not be open to the public, is set for today. Afterwards, the hearing officer will have 10 days to deliver a report with recommendations to the board, which it will then review in a public meeting.

Minutes of all the meetings, including summaries of public and board comments on the matter, are available on FALA’s website at flagarts.com/governance. Recorded versions and transcripts are available for meetings beginning Dec. 12.

Wed, 15 Feb 2023 22:59:00 -0600 Abigail Kessler en text/html https://azdailysun.com/news/local/education/fala-leadership-flagstaff-school-sees-impacts-as-administrator-positions-shift/article_13edf404-acb0-11ed-87e1-6ff445e48ff4.html
Killexams : Looking for help with space regulations?

Creating the technology to get to space is hard enough, something that may be just as or even more difficult, navigating your way through the bureaucratic regulations that you need to comply with. As with most industries, those just getting into it are going to have the hardest time learning about the rules in place. Enter the Association of Commercial Space Professionals, who at the end of February 2023 are hosting a Space Regulatory Bootcamp. It’s designed specifically for startups and is being done in partnership with the Air Force Research Lab. To learn more about it, the  Federal Drive with Tom Temin spoke with Bailey Reichelt, partner at Aegis Space Law, and Bryce Kennedy who is the firm’s Business Development Director.

Bailey Reichelt
So I’m one of the founding partners, I have one other partner, Jack Shelton. It’s actually a bit of an interesting story, we met both as international trade attorneys. I was working in house for a big U.S. defense contractor. I did a lot of helping subcontractors figure out how to comply with regulations, so we could work with them. Seem there is a real need there, for smaller businesses needing regulatory help, before they can actually afford the attorneys that could help them with the regulatory help. Jack and I had been working on designing export training for a big contractor and then decided to go out on our own. And, actually, just found a law firm that does just that. Let’s provide regulatory assistance to small companies. My background was in space law from Ole Miss law. And we decided, this industry was really where our passion was. It’s a very, highly regulated, industry.

I have a list of 12 agencies, just right off the bat, that most commercial space startups have to deal with, they don’t even know half these agencies exist when they start. So one of the things we wanted space law to do, was to really help them get a handle on the regulatory obligations, really help all those innovative tech startups out there. And we really like the companies where the founders are still involved, because there is so much passion. They’re out to change the world. And we want to help them actually do that. And I joke with Jack all the time, like, we don’t get the luxury of being the scientists or the inventors who make the innovative and world changing technologies. But we can help them get those technologies and that company to market. We can help them navigate the regs, we can help them actually be successful. And then we all benefit. And one of the beautiful things about working in commercial space, is that pretty much everyone is aligned in this passion goal, that if we can send something to space, not only does that fulfill some sort of greater need and like communal feeling for us, like we’re changing the world, we’re exploring space. But all the technology, that we develop that can keep someone alive to Mars, it also redefines life as we know it on Earth. So it helps everyone. And everyone in this industry really does want to change the world and see everyone grow. And it’s a big enough industry that there’s lots of room for all of us. So we founded the law firm, with the idea that we’re going to help small companies, actually, succeed with their tech by navigating the regulatory hurdles. And so far, there’s been lots and lots of demand. And that kind of led us to establishing the association of commercial space professionals. And the regulatory bootcamp that we’re hosting in Albuquerque in February.

Eric White
We will certainly get to that. So I was going to just talk to Bryce a little bit, about the how he found himself in this particular arena. And you’re right about all the massive amount of regulations there. And so Bryce, I wonder if you could, maybe, just give us a few pillars of space law itself, since it is something relatively new to most people.

Bryce Kennedy
Sure. One of the things that really drew me to space law, so I had my own executive coaching company before this. I was an attorney before that. And then I had an executive coaching company in New York. And I remember when I pivoted, as most people did a lot of during COVID, it was just something simple, where I was kind of looking up at the stars and starting to ask questions about, who’s protecting space? And so that’s when I decided to go full bore into it. And that’s when I met Jack and Bailey. And I was like, I want to dust off my law degree and really use it for something meaningful. And every good space attorney or someone in the industry starts off with a very high level, the Outer Space Treaty. And that’s at a UN level. It governs most nations. It has a set of principles that people follow. One of the big things is that, you can’t claim any territory as your own for a country. There’s provisions in there for war and avoiding nuclear proliferation in space and that type of stuff. But what’s really cool is, it governs a lot of the way spaceflight is shaped. And so, as Bailey said, we have the regulatory field with [Federal Communications Commission (FCC)], [Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)], [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)], in terms of licensing. And then on top of that, any type of commercial activity boils down to, essentially, if you’re a traditional company. And the thing that, as lawyers, we have to be careful with, because as Bailey said, there’s 12 different agencies that we’re looking at. So everything counts. And if say you violate something, in one agency, there can be this cross pollination where you violate something else in another one. And so, they’re, traditionally, these big firms that worked for the Lockheeds, the Raytheon’s, [National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)], [Department of Defense (DoD)], over the years. And they were used to having those massive contracts, and huge staffs in whatever. But as the commercial space industry becomes much more nimble, much more agile, those firms aren’t necessarily what we need anymore. And so what we’re trying to do, at different levels, is streamlining a lot of it. We’re trying to make it more accessible. And we’re also trying to, kind of, bring the information forward that was kind of kept behind these barriers of large law firms or in governmental agencies that wasn’t necessarily appropriate for commercial industry. And now it is.

Bailey Reichelt
He brings up a really good point, bringing it back to the government side of things. I don’t know if you saw, Eric. A couple of weeks ago, it was in the news, that the Biden administration might publish an executive order the end of Q1 in 2023. Asking the Commerce Department, to try to streamline space regs, because they’re starting to realize how, prohibitively, hard it is for some of these companies to get their technology to space. Or more importantly, to get it to the government who has real world problems to solve right now. Like, one of the most notorious ones being like, orbital debris. We’re trying to source all the solutions we can, we need lots of solutions. And they’re seeing how hard it is for those companies, actually, make it. It’s part of why the Air Force has put funding towards our bootcamp to teach companies how to deal with this stuff. They want them to make it and get across these hurdles, that they keep seeing them fail on. We’re hoping that what we’re teaching, at our boot camp and what information we’re unlocking through the association of commercial space professionals, is going to really illustrate to government, as well as teach the companies. But illustrate to government, how exactly hard it is to do this. And we can, maybe, guide them. Like, here are places we could streamline and here are places that are, prohibitively, difficult that we really need to focus on. Because luckily, with the startups we’ve been working with, I think we’ve aggregated a lot of industry information, on where the regs are completely unworkable, or where they’re going to create the, as DoD says, like the valley of death for startups. I think we have a lot of information there. And hopefully, we’re going to be able to continue using [Association for Commercial Space Professionals (ACSP)] to, even educate regulators and like government contracting officers and such on the commercial side of why this is important.

Eric White
So why don’t we get into how one of the vehicles have changed that you all are using. And that’s these regulatory boot camps that you’re working with ACSP with and in partnership with the Air Force Research Lab. What can you tell me about what those boot camps entail? And some of the responses that you’ve gotten from participants?

Bryce Kennedy
So ACSP, Association for Commercial Space Professionals, is a certifying body for commercial space professionals. And we’re creating and, essentially that is a completely separate organization from me to space law. And we’re intentionally doing that with this amazing advisory board, that we’ve hand chosen and asked to be a part of this. Because what we want to do is, let me just backtrack real quick. One of the things that we have all agreed on, that we kind of got sick and tired of, is going to these symposiums or going to these these discussions or conferences, where everyone talks about the same thing. We need to streamline the regs, orbital debris, China, we get it, it’s all bad. There’s no doubt about it and it needs to change.

However, in the meantime, we got to work with what we have. And right now we have the regulations that exist. And that’s where the bootcamp really developed from. And with the boot camp, we have 14 or 15 subjects, it’s kind of like space regulation in a box. That people are going to be able to come to the boot camp, they’re going to learn from experts that have been in this field for decades. And they’re not only going to learn exactly what the regs are. How much sometimes, say licensing costs, the timeframe for these things. They’ll also be able to take an action item and apply it to their business or their field of practice, immediately. And so that’s what we’re really trying to focus on. This isn’t just a conference, this is something, this is an education, this is a training, again, from these high level people. And then at the end of it, we’re offering a certification. And that’s the, like I said, for the commercial space professionals. And that’s where the ACSP comes in and the advisory board. And we’re going to have this first level certification offered after the boot camp, where people can take this. We’re going to have our advisory board, because we didn’t want just us looking at this from one angle, just from our own angle. There’s blind spots everywhere. And so we have such an incredible team from, NOAA to Saquib for Blue Origin, when he worked at Blue Origin. like just incredible group of people. And they’re going to take it apart and put it back together. And so when that certification and that exam comes out, it’s gonna be difficult. And people, when they pass it, they’ll have this opportunity and the feeling like, oh, we really challenged ourselves. And it says it on our website, ACSP. It’s a chance to democratize space and the information behind it. And eventually, ACSP is going to start offering different levels of certifications. We’re going to have different modules of different trainings there. And everyone we talked to, it’s so funny, everyone we talked to is like, this is exactly what is needed. Not everyone has time to go get an engineering degree or go staff on the Hill, to learn these regs. And if we can break this down through our network, through the contributions of other people, through ACSP, we really feel like we’re gonna move the needle in a way that’s never been done before.

Bailey Reichelt
Yeah, I think reiterating, kind of, where this just really meets practicality. When I was in house. I know in law school, I learned the word ITAR, International Traffic in Arms Regulations. No one taught me how to apply for an export license. And when I started, you’re like, well, you’re a lawyer, get an export license. I’m like, I have no idea where to begin. So one of the things we’ll be teaching is, how do I even start to know if I need an export license? How do I apply for one? What are the triggering factors? If I’m a government contractor, or want to be a government contractor, there is a litany of questions in [System for Award Management (SAM)], which is the registration platform, that issues the cage. How do I answer those? Well, these are all things that we’re going to be teaching skills for. And I know that when I was in house, I wish someone had told me how these things had implicated one another. So when you get into government contracting, you’re going to be asked to comply with export controls. Or if you’re dealing with foreign investors or foreign employees. Maybe you’re going to be dealing with [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CIFIUS)]. Maybe you’re going to be dealing with [Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC)], which is a part of the Department of the Treasury. They deal with sanctions and things like that. How am I doing due diligence? All of these things intersect each other. And if you don’t know how, or where they intersect, or how much they cost or how long they take, it can ruin your whole contract cost you penalties. Especially, if you have contracts that are sensitive to dates, like launch agreements, or ride share agreements. You could be breaking or in breach of the whole contract, just because you weren’t educated on what the realistic timelines were, for all the different moving parts of your business and your particular mission.

So I wish this had existed before. We’re creating it now because there’s definitely a need, but there’s been a need for a while. And we’re seeing a lot of interest among like people, kind of, in the situation I was, which is general counsel’s at space companies or just founders who want to be educated so they can avoid these pitfalls. And they can preserve all of their their resources, both, monetary resources and their time. So that they don’t have to go hire an expensive lawyer, put things back together after they took an investment that they learned after the fact they shouldn’t have We can teach them how to avoid these things on the front end and give them our experience working with lots of companies across commercial space. And we’re just going to, hopefully, speed up the process, save them money and put their resources where they really need to go, which is indicating their technology to customers. What we hope, as many people will come to the bootcamp as possible. We’re offering a hybrid model, as well. A lot of students have been interested in attending that. Follow us on ACSP.space, we have a newsletter that you can sign up for or you can follow us on LinkedIn, either Aegis Space Law, or you can follow ACSP. You can see what we’re up to and see all the things we’re adding to that website, either website and the newsletter all the time. The newsletter comes out monthly. And we try to keep it as practical as possible by saying, here’s why you should care about this thing. And then giving you a quick snippet on what’s going on in industry policy and everything else commercial space.

Bryce Kennedy
And the other thing is the bootcamp is hybrid. So for those who can’t come Feb. 21 to 23, in Albuquerque. You can attend online on Zoom and still have the offering for the certification.

Eric White
And is there a concern there on you that if you do too many, teach too many, regulators and commercial space professionals about this knowledge and how to navigate the waves of this regulation. You may work yourself out of a job there?

Bailey Reichelt
What’s really funny is, I get asked that a lot. And we have only had more and more work, the more that we’ve taught people how to deal with the regs. I’m not panic at all about that, as I said, like space is huge. There’s only more and more companies in space. This benefits mankind the more innovative technologies, we can get fully commercialized. So no, I don’t think we’re going out of business. And when we see other law firms wanting to work in this space, we want to network with them. Because there’s room enough for all of us, there’s plenty of work. And, frankly, most of these companies end up saying, yeah, I’m not touching securities with a 10 foot pole anyway. Do you want to work for us?

Bryce Kennedy
And the truth is, if we don’t open up this information and make it accessible at a high level, or even a more intricate level. Then we, as a country, will lose our position as a space power. That’s the overarching theme. Before we could, especially as attorneys, in large law firms, we could bury it deep and hoard the information and put it behind all these different paywalls and all these other things. And that was fine, because we were leaders in the industry. Now we don’t have that benefit. And, some of the major barriers to entry, for commercial space are the regulations. And while it is there is that fear kind of instilled in a lot of legal minds, as Bailey said, we’re finding quite the opposite. And we are really pushing the envelope in terms of making the U.S. a commercial space behemoth in to, traditionally, just continuing to make it open for everyone. So that’s why we started.

Bailey Reichelt
Really good point. Again, let me bring it full circle with an example here. The FCC, it’s expensive to work with the FCC. But if you want to talk to your satellite, when it’s in space, you need to work with the FCC as a U.S. company. I say that there’s caveat to that. You can work with other countries, we’ve had several companies, especially ones that have more of an international presence. They say the FCC is too hard. It’s too expensive. It’s too slow. There’s too many hurdles that I have to jump over. I’m going to work with Germany, their regs are straightforward, they’re easy to comply with, it’s cheaper, it’s faster. So there’s a real, real potential that the U.S. loses their cutting edge, because our regulators are more difficult to comply with. And more opaque, than all the other regulators they could choose to deal with, say, in Europe.

Eric White
Got it. And it speaks to the uniqueness of this industry. And in speaking to a lot of the commercial space professionals that we do for the show. You do really touch on something there about, they’re competitive, but they’re also excited for each other. It’s not quite as cutthroat as other industries that I’m sure that you both have worked in, as far as being a regulatory law professional. Is that the case that you’re finding?

Bailey Reichelt
I would agree with that. That’s part of why so many people are passionate about this industry. It’s why it excites people. I mean, rockets are innately exciting. But when you work with people, who everyone has at least some part of a common goal that we’re going to change the world and better humanity. It’s something to be excited about every day. And frankly, I don’t need to make the salary of a lawyer in D.C. And I don’t need that, if I can go to work every day thinking, I’ve changed something, I’ve done something better. I did something that benefits my daughter’s generation. And as a lawyer, there just so few opportunities to do some of that stuff. So again, working on streamlining regs, I think that is, kind of, every lawyers dream, on how you can actually impact change. And I guess it, I don’t know exactly where I’m going with this. Yes, it’s less cutthroat, it’s much more rewarding to work with commercial space companies.

Bryce Kennedy
One of the jokes that I always bring up is in my previous life, when I was an attorney in New York on Wall Street. I worked for the bad guys, the quote unquote, bad guys. I made a ton of money. I could buy whatever I wanted. And it was one of those things. However, I had a bleeding ulcer, I thought I had a tumor. I was probably just a hard sneeze away from divorcing my wife. Life was awful. But it was like I was following the pattern of the big time attorneys, of that cutthroat world, of the New York Wall Street. And it was just like, it was completely debilitating from just a overall mental health standpoint. And fighting and something like this, when you’re passionate and you’re able to bridge passion, optimism, altruism and the law together. It’s like, it’s the most perfect combination to live life by.

Eric White
Yeah, I can hear it from both of your voices. So why don’t we get into how one of the vehicles of change, that you all are using. And that’s these regulatory boot camps that you’re working with ACSP with and in partnership with the Air Force Research Lab. What can you tell me about what those boot camps entail? And some of the responses that you’ve gotten from participants?

Bryce Kennedy
So ACSP, Association for Commercial Space Professionals, is a certifying body for commercial space professionals. And we’re creating and, essentially that is a completely separate organization from me to space law. And we’re intentionally doing that with this amazing advisory board, that we’ve hand chosen and asked to be a part of this. Because what we want to do is, let me just backtrack real quick. One of the things that we have all agreed on, that we kind of got sick and tired of, is going to these symposiums or going to these these discussions or conferences, where everyone talks about the same thing. We need to streamline the regs, orbital debris, China, we get it, it’s all bad. There’s no doubt about it and it needs to change.

However, in the meantime, we got to work with what we have. And right now we have the regulations that exist. And that’s where the bootcamp really developed from. And with the boot camp, we have 14 or 15 subjects, it’s kind of like space regulation in a box. That people are going to be able to come to the boot camp, they’re going to learn from experts that have been in this field for decades. And they’re not only going to learn exactly what the regs are. How much sometimes, say licensing costs, the timeframe for these things. They’ll also be able to take an action item and apply it to their business or their field of practice, immediately. And so that’s what we’re really trying to focus on. This isn’t just a conference, this is something, this is an education, this is a training, again, from these high level people. And then at the end of it, we’re offering a certification. And that’s the, like I said, for the commercial space professionals. And that’s where the ACSP comes in and the advisory board. And we’re going to have this first level certification offered after the boot camp, where people can take this. We’re going to have our advisory board, because we didn’t want just us looking at this from one angle, just from our own angle. There’s blind spots everywhere. And so we have such an incredible team from, NOAA to Segi for Blue Origin, when he worked at Blue Origin. like just incredible group of people. And they’re going to take it apart and put it back together. And so when that certification and that exam comes out, it’s gonna be difficult. And people, when they pass it, they’ll have this opportunity and the feeling like, oh, we really challenged ourselves. And it says it on our website, ACSP. It’s a chance to democratize space and the information behind it. And eventually, ACSP is going to start offering different levels of certifications. We’re going to have different modules of different trainings there. And everyone we talked to, it’s so funny, everyone we talked to is like, this is exactly what is needed. Not everyone has time to go get an engineering degree or go staff on the Hill, to learn these regs. And if we can break this down through our network, through the contributions of other people, through ACSP, we really feel like we’re gonna move the needle in a way that’s never been done before.

Bailey Reichelt
Yeah, I think reiterating, kind of, where this just really meets practicality. When I was in house. I know in law school, I learned the word ITAR, International Traffic in Arms Regulations. No one taught me how to apply for an export license. And when I started, you’re like, well, you’re a lawyer, get an export license. I’m like, I have no idea where to begin. So one of the things we’ll be teaching is, how do I even start to know if I need an export license? How do I apply for one? What are the triggering factors? If I’m a government contractor, or want to be a government contractor, there is a litany of questions in [System for Award Management (SAM)], which is the registration platform, that issues the cage. How do I answer those? Well, these are all things that we’re going to be teaching skills for. And I know that when I was in house, I wish someone had told me how these things had implicated one another. So when you get into government contracting, you’re going to be asked to comply with export controls. Or if you’re dealing with foreign investors or foreign employees. Maybe you’re going to be dealing with [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CIFIUS)]. Maybe you’re going to be dealing with [Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC)], which is a part of the Department of the Treasury. They deal with sanctions and things like that. How am I doing due diligence? All of these things intersect each other. And if you don’t know how, or where they intersect, or how much they cost or how long they take, it can ruin your whole contract cost you penalties. Especially, if you have contracts that are sensitive to dates, like launch agreements, or ride share agreements. You could be breaking or in breach of the whole contract, just because you weren’t educated on what the realistic timelines were, for all the different moving parts of your business and your particular mission.

Bryce Kennedy
And the other thing is the bootcamp is hybrid. So for those who can’t come Feb. 21 to 23 in Albuquerque. You can attend online on Zoom and still have the offering for the certification.

Fri, 10 Feb 2023 09:58:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://federalnewsnetwork.com/space-hour/2023/02/looking-for-help-with-space-regulations/
Killexams : Business retention and expansion survey underway by 4CED

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2023 3:22 PM Updated Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2023 3:22 PM

SBDC and 4CED seek business input – offers free assistance

Four Corners Economic Development announced it is renewing efforts to survey community businesses and offer assistance as part of its business retention and expansion efforts.

With a short, open-ended series of seven questions, 4CED and the Small Business Development Center aim to help existing businesses thrive and grow.

Two years ago, during COVID, 4CED interviewed 100 local businesses over a two-month period, collaborating with the University of Minnesota and one of the extension services.

“It was pretty intense … it was a questionnaire with 48 questions,” said Nancy Shepherd, a contractor for Four Corners Economic Development.

Shepherd, along with about five others, took the business retention and expansion training and became certified about 2½ years ago.

Shepherd, previously a financial consultant and a longtime college administrator, will be accompanied by Carmen Martinez as they visit businesses at their convenience. She said they hope to interview 50 businesses before the end of June, when the assessment will take place.

The survey seeks to understand what challenges businesses are facing, then to offer appropriate, effective solutions. Issues that could force a company to fail or close will be addressed in an effort to prevent companies from relocating to a new community.

First they will ask, “generally how their business is doing. What stage they’re at?” Shepherd said. “We ask them about employees. Are they currently finding the employees they need?”

They also want to determine where businesses look for employees and what types they are seeking. Is it frontline workers? Frontliner, or frontline worker, generally refers to anyone who provides an essential service and cannot perform their job from home.

If businesses are looking for skilled craftsmen, such as those in the trades or engineers, the survey determines what online platforms they may be using, such as the number one job site Indeed, and what other avenues they may use to fill positions. Shepherd said their previous survey determined that many employers rely heavily on tried-and-true methods such as word-of-mouth. They found that a personal referral often means a higher success rate of employee reliability and performance.

The third question asks what suppliers a business uses. “It helps us know what types of suppliers could set up to fill a need.” Buying local is highly encouraged. Shepherd said many people will pay a little more for locally sourced products.

Question four is, “What is your biggest point of pain?” What nagging problems are businesses facing that keep owners awake at night, worrying about how to keep the doors open another day.

The next question asks what training business owners would like local entities to provide. Both 4CED and SBDC, headquartered in the Quality Center for Business at San Juan College, work closely with the college to tailor training programs based on needs revealed by the survey.

Question six asks, “What do you want us to take back to the 4CED board for their consideration?” Specific problems facing local businesses will determine where they should focus. “We have our fingers in lots of different pies,” Shepherd said.

The final question asks businesses how familiar are they with resources like the SBDC, training offered by the college, NM Workforce Solutions and 4CED’s offerings.

A lot of 4CED and San Juan College materials are left with the businesses to increase their awareness of available programs. Some businesses are in need of training in Microsoft Office, in customer service, in how to be a supervisor or in how to create a business plan.

Eighty percent of all jobs and capital investment and expansion come from existing businesses. Shepherd said getting new businesses into the area can be “like knocking your head against the wall. It’s better to take care of the businesses you have.”

As part of the push by local cooperating agencies, SBDC and 4CED are doing what they can to help the economy in the region. By July, the SBDC plans to hire a full-time business retention and expansion person to work in San Juan County.

Shepherd created a job description and said the structure and database is ready. She said the right person can take the BRE program and “make it even better than what it is.” “When you actually get in there and talk to businesses, it’s real exciting and … they’re so appreciative,” Shepherd said.

The economy “seems to be strengthening to me. I see a segment that has the ability to grow. There are a lot of entrepreneurs in this county,” Shepherd said.

When working with and advising businesses, Shepherd recommends the Stephen Covey principle of “first listen to understand, and then be understood.” She said the Covey approach or philosophy works well in both business and life.

“We’re learning and striving to take the big rocks and put them in our bucket first. The small pebbles, analogous to distractions or less important things, must follow to allow everything to fit into the bucket, or structure of our lives,” Shepherd said.

She advises to businesses to “pay attention to the things that are most important and don’t get lost in the little, bitty details.” The big rocks are customer service, quality products, communication and reliability. “Customer service is huge … you can carry a business a lot further. It’s definitely one of the keys,” she said.

505 Cycles, along with Animas Valley Mall, are the first two businesses to be surveyed in 2023. Shepherd and Carmen Martinez, director of SBDC, plan to visit two businesses per week throughout the Spring.

Martinez said Jack’s Plastic Welding in Aztec, who makes rafts and rafting equipment, was one of the first SBDC clients. Since October of 2000 they have received help with financing, employee issues and other business consulting services.

The Chili Pod, on downtown Main Street in Farmington, is another “success story” that has taken advantage of SBDC programs, Martinez said. After six years in business, they soon plan an expansion to include the space next door.

Carmen Martinez joins Nancy Shepherd to survey and help businesses in the region. (David Edward Albright/Durango Herald)

“Most companies are doing OK … they’re not doing great … there are some that are doing stellar, depending on the industry and their workforce,” Martinez said.

Employee retention is a major issue, according to Martinez. She said legislative policies statewide are not business-friendly. HB-25 and HB-28, both minimum wage bills currently in the NM State Legislature, have met with derision from local businesses. Hiring is more cumbersome, considering some existing employees are making less than the new minimum wage.

Martinez does workshops on tax law, how to market, how to raise money and how to acquire grant money, Shepherd said. She also works closely with New Mexico SBDC on many topics, including contract administration, workers’ compensation, minority certification and government-to-business outreach, as outlined on their NMSBDC website.

“The beauty of SBDC is that most all their workshops and consultations are free,” Shepherd said. Martinez said businesses “appreciate all the resources we can bring to them and their challenges can often be handled with one or more of our programs.”

Most businesses responded to their survey in a positive, receptive manner. “Hey, you’re paying attention to me … you’re trying to see what it is that I need to help my business,” Shepherd said. “We haven’t been turned down by many people.”

“They’re kind enough to know that even if it doesn’t help them that much, it helps businesses in the community, in general,” Shepherd said. “The survey definitely has potential for helping the economy of San Juan County, and it might even be fun.”

Wed, 15 Feb 2023 07:22:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.durangoherald.com/articles/business-retention-and-expansion-survey-underway-by-4ced/
Killexams : What to Know About the Adderall Shortage Artisteer/Getty Images © Provided by CNET Artisteer/Getty Images

People are still having a hard time filling their Adderall prescriptions, months after the US Food and Drug Administration reported a shortage of amphetamine mixed salts, the active ingredient in many ADHD medications, including Adderall.

Adderall and its cousins are most commonly used to treat ADHD, but they may also be used to treat narcolepsy, leaving an even more significant gap for patients with problems getting their prescriptions.

While it's easier than ever to get a medical diagnosis of ADHD, or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, supply issues are complicating the post-pandemic demand for ADHD prescriptions. Adding to the problems is the fact that Adderall and similar medications are controlled substances in the US, which may make switching pharmacies more difficult.

If you're having difficulty finding ADHD medication, here's what to know. 

Can I switch medications?

Before changing any medication, it's essential to talk to your doctor. And this isn't just a standard statement to cover the bases of what's legal or medically safest. Different families of stimulants are prescribed to treat ADHD and different chemical combinations. This is especially important to consider if you have another mental health condition. 

Dr. Sanam Hafeez, a neuropsychologist in New York, previously told CNET that stimulants like Adderall might exacerbate symptoms of certain mood disorders. If you believe your ADHD symptoms overlap with other mental health conditions, it's critical to ensure you're on an appropriate treatment course safe for you.

While your doctor may say it's fine to transfer to a generic version of Adderall because it contains the same active ingredients, it may not be a good idea to switch families of medications, such as from Adderall to Ritalin. However, if your doctor determines that it's OK for you to change medications and ingredients, you may consider a new drug, like Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine) or Dexedrine, for example.

ADHD medications also come in extended-release and immediate-release formulations, so depending on your needs, you may switch from one type to the other. There are also nonstimulant ADHD medications. But again, talk to your doctor before you make any changes. 

Tips for coping if you can't fill your prescription 

Some patients have found success by calling different pharmacies to see if their medication is in stock. If your insurance offers it, you may be able to get 90-day refills through your mail-order pharmacy, meaning you can go longer before needing to go back out in search of your prescription.

While it could work fine for some, skipping doses of Adderall can cause withdrawal symptoms or other adverse effects. Ultimately, the best decision on what to do in the face of an Adderall shortage depends on your symptoms or reasons for taking the drug, as well as your health history -- all of which can be discussed with your doctor or whoever prescribed the medication to you.

If your doctor suggests you skip doses, or you need to space them out, taking a multivitamin at the same time of day you'd normally take your ADHD medication can help you stick to a routine, according to ADDitutde magazine, an online publication for people with ADHD. That way, you can maintain your medication habit, at least without any disruption between prescriptions. 

More natural remedies could offer some relief from ADHD symptoms, though they may not work for everyone. These lifestyle tweaks include drinking more caffeine or changing the time of day you drink it (caffeine is a stimulant) or reorganizing your daily routine to optimize the times you feel most focused, readers of ADDitude suggest.

Now might also be a time to experiment with attentiveness "brain hacks," such as finding music that helps you focus while you work, which some people report has helped their attention. Music without words and simple, consistent melodies have benefited some people, such as this binaural beats playlist on YouTube or the various "focus" or "study" music playlists available online. 

Sun, 19 Feb 2023 04:55:35 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/other/what-to-know-about-the-adderall-shortage/ar-AA13bBJX
Killexams : How anxiety came to dominate the big business of medical marijuana cards in Pennsylvania

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Killexams : African American class drops syllabus DeSantis hated, but creator denies ‘political pressure’

A revised framework for a controversial Advanced Placement African American studies course released Wednesday no longer contains syllabus such as “Black queer studies” and suggested readings about critical race theory that Gov. Ron DeSantis’ administration blasted last month.

The new outline for what will be taught also does not include references to the Black Lives Matter movement, reparations or authors whose writings about communism and incarceration, among other subjects, upset Florida leaders.

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But the College Board, which runs the 38-course AP program, said only college professors with expertise in the subject were consulted to develop the final framework for the new class.

Robert Patterson, a professor of African American studies at Georgetown University, was a co-chair for the committee that helped develop the course. In a statement released by the College Board, he praised the class and said revisions are part of all AP courses and were made “independently from political pressure.”

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The revised framework was completed in December, the agency said in its statement.

“No states or districts have seen the official framework that is released, much less provided feedback on it,” the statement said. “This course has been shaped only by the input of experts and long-standing AP principles and practices.”

The College Board said the new course, to debut nationwide in the 2024-25 school year, gives a complete picture of African American history.

“This course is an unflinching encounter with the facts and evidence of African American history and culture,” said David Coleman, CEO of the College Board, in the statement. “No one is excluded from this course: the Black artists and inventors whose achievements have come to light; the Black women and men, including gay Americans, who played pivotal roles in the Civil Rights movements; and people of faith from all backgrounds who contributed to the antislavery and Civil Rights causes. Everyone is seen.”

Florida leaders in mid-January told the College Board that the initial framework violated Florida law by teaching critical race theory, a legal theory that views racism as embedded in American institutions. Eliminating CRT has become a conservative cause across the nation and a priority of DeSantis, who got it banned from Florida’s public schools two years ago and reinforced that with the passage of the “Stop woke” act last year.

Critics viewed it as an effort to whitewash history and ignore the stories of non-white Americans and the decision to reject the AP course as proof of their worries.

Sen. Shevrin Jones, D-Miami Gardens, previously criticized the state’s move and Wednesday said DeSantis’ agenda is “part of a larger war on our very ability to think, question and engage in our democracy.”

He noted that Wednesday was the start of Black History month and said in a statement that “it is imperative that “we all continue to learn of the innumerable triumphs, innovation, beauty and diversity of Black American life.”

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State education leaders said the AP course, as first proposed, was without “educational value” because its suggested studying list included works by authors such as Angela Davis who were communists or favored abolishing prisons and it delved into syllabus like “Black queer studies.”

That latter, in particular, upset DeSantis who said, “When you try to use Black history to shoehorn in queer theory, you are clearly trying to use that for political purposes.”

Florida leaders said the class would not be offered in Florida next year unless it was revamped. A spokesman for the governor said the Florida Department of Education was reviewing the new framework and would comment when it had gone through the document.

Florida’s decision to reject the course prompted protests, threats of a lawsuit and criticism, including some from professors who helped devise it. Those professors said the course put a lens on subjects often absent in the high school curriculum and would offer valuable lessons to Florida students.

On Wednesday, the National Black Justice Coalition, a Black LGBTQ civil rights group, accused the College Board of capitulating to Florida’s governor.

“The College Board’s decision to capitulate to Governor Ron DeSantis’ extremist anti-Black censorship demands, stripping the AP African American studies course of key content about contemporary Black history, is an insult to the lived experiences of millions of Black Americans throughout our country today,” said the group’s director, David Johns, in an emailed statement.

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The College Board, in another statement released later Wednesday, said the course still includes “several explicit references to gay Black Americans.”

The section on “The Long Civil Rights movement,” for example, notes that Bayard Rustin helped organize the March on Washington in 1963. He “faced discrimination for being openly gay, but nonetheless was a significant advisor to Martin Luther King Jr. and leader of the civil rights movement,” it says.

And a section on Black women’s movements notes that many “Black lesbians, in particular, did not see or feel a space for them in the civil rights movement (mostly led by Black men) or the women’s movement (mostly led by White women).”

The sections the College Board referenced are in the final and fourth unit of the course titled “movements and debates.” That is where DeSantis and his staff at the Florida Department of Education found most of the syllabus they trashed.

The syllabus of “Black queer studies,” “intersectionality and activism” and reparations — all of which raised state leaders’ ire — were absent from that unit in the final framework, though syllabus on “diversity within the Black community” and “identity, culture and connection” were added.

The revised framework also deleted all suggested readings, some of which upset Florida leaders, allowing teachers to decide what textbooks and secondary sources to assign as they devise daily lesson plans. That was done, the College Board said, so that the only required items would be primary sources, from maps to artwork to essays, poems and speeches. That is consistent with how other AP courses operate, it said.

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The new framework also includes a student research project to be done at the end of the course. Some of the suggested research syllabus are ones Florida objected to, such as reparation debates, “queer life” in Black communities and “intersectionality and the dimensions of the Black experiences,” though dozens of other syllabus are suggested, too, and students do not have to pick from the list.

A spokesperson for the College Board did not respond to questions asking for additional information on why some syllabus were altered.

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Though suggested readings about critical race theory included in the initial framework are absent from the revised framework, some think Florida could argue that the course’s overall focus on racism, with syllabus on housing discrimination, for example, would still violate its laws.

The state is selecting new social studies textbooks this year and reminded publishers in a memo that instructional materials may not include critical race theory, or any of its “applied principles,” such as the concept of “social justice,” which it defined in part as “equality of treatment under the law is not a sufficient condition to achieve justice.”

The ban against CRT said also students should not feel “discomfort” because of their own race or sex.

AP courses are meant to mimic introductory college classes and students who take and pass the corresponding AP exam can earn college credit. Florida has been a longtime supporter of the program and led the nation in AP participation in 2021. Last year, Florida students took more than 363,000 AP exams.

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But upset with the initial framework for AP African American studies, state leaders made the Florida State University Schools’ high school stop teaching the course mid-year. The FSU school was one of 60 high schools nationwide piloting the course this school year.

The same happened at a Miami-Dade County high school, the Miami Herald reported.

lpostal@orlandosentinel.com

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