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Exam Code: LFCS Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
LFCS Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator

Overview
The Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator (LFCS) certification is ideal for candidates early in their Linux system administration or open source career. The test consists of performance-based items that simulate on-the-job tasks and scenarios faced by sysadmins in the real world. Obtaining certification allows individuals to validate their skills to prospective employers, which is particularly valuable if you have little on-the-job experience.

Domains & Competencies
The Linux Foundation worked with industry experts and the Linux kernel community to identify the core domains and the critical skills, knowledge and competencies applicable to each certification. Performance-based exams were then developed based on the competencies that were identified.

- Essential Commands – 25%
- Operation of Running Systems – 20%
- User and Group Management – 10%
- Networking – 12%
- Service Configuration – 20%
- Storage Management – 13%

Essential Commands – 25%
- Log into local & remote graphical and text mode consoles
- Search for files
- Evaluate and compare the basic file system features and options
- Compare and manipulate file content
- Use input-output redirection (e.g. >, >>, |, 2>)
- Analyze text using basic regular expressions
- Archive, backup, compress, unpack, and uncompress files
- Create, delete, copy, and move files and directories
- Create and manage hard and soft links
- List, set, and change standard file permissions
- Read, and use system documentation
- Manage access to the root account

Operation of Running Systems – 20%
- Boot, reboot, and shut down a system safely
- Boot or change system into different operating modes
- Install, configure and troubleshoot bootloaders
- Diagnose and manage processes
- Locate and analyze system log files
- Schedule tasks to run at a set date and time
- Verify completion of scheduled jobs
- Update software to provide required functionality and security
- Verify the integrity and availability of resources
- Verify the integrity and availability of key processes
- Change kernel runtime parameters, persistent and non-persistent
- Use scripting to automate system maintenance tasks
- Manage the startup process and services (In Services Configuration)
- List and identify SELinux/AppArmor file and process contexts
- Manage Software
- Identify the component of a Linux distribution that a file belongs to

User and Group Management – 10%
- Create, delete, and modify local user accounts
- Create, delete, and modify local groups and group memberships
- Manage system-wide environment profiles
- Manage template user environment
- Configure user resource limits
- Manage user privileges
- Configure PAM

Networking – 12%
- Configure networking and hostname resolution statically or dynamically
- Configure network services to start automatically at boot
- Implement packet filtering
- Start, stop, and check the status of network services
- Statically route IP traffic
- Synchronize time using other network peers

Service Configuration – 20%
- Configure a caching DNS server
- Maintain a DNS zone
- Configure email aliases
- Configure SSH servers and clients
- Restrict access to the HTTP proxy server
- Configure an IMAP and IMAPS service
- Query and modify the behavior of system services at various operating modes
- Configure an HTTP server
- Configure HTTP server log files
- Configure a database server
- Restrict access to a web page
- Manage and configure containers
- Manage and configure Virtual Machines

Storage Management – 13%
- List, create, delete, and modify physical storage partitions
- Manage and configure LVM storage
- Create and configure encrypted storage
- Configure systems to mount file systems at or during boot
- Configure and manage swap space
- Create and manage RAID devices
- Configure systems to mount file systems on demand
- Create, manage and diagnose advanced file system permissions
- Setup user and group disk quotas for filesystems
- Create and configure file systems

Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator
Linux-Foundation Administrator test
Killexams : Linux-Foundation Administrator test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/LFCS Search results Killexams : Linux-Foundation Administrator test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/LFCS https://killexams.com/exam_list/Linux-Foundation Killexams : Introducing the Linux Foundation Certified Cloud Technician (LFCT)

SAN FRANCISCO, Dec. 1, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- This week the Linux Foundation adds a new offering to our professional certifications catalog: Linux Foundation Certified Cloud Technician (LFCT).

This certification has been designed to test the practical knowledge of Linux power users, software developers, or individuals with existing cloud native certifications who wish to demonstrate their ability to work efficiently in a Linux environment and be more successful at their job. Other candidates for LFCT include cloud administrators or LFCA-certified candidates who don't wish to invest fully in becoming a Linux System Administrator (LFCS).

Specific domains covered by the test include:

  • Essential Commands (20%)
  • System Configuration (15%)
  • Troubleshooting (20%)
  • Virtualization and Containers (20%)
  • GitOps Basics (25%)

The LFCT is just one of the gold-standard certifications offered by Linux Foundation Training & Certification. It was created to assist cloud administrators to demonstrate their competency working with cloud-based systems, and to help hiring managers find the quality open source, cloud-native talent they need.

Once purchased candidates have up to 12 months to schedule and take the exam. During this time they are issued one retake, if needed. Once the LFCT is passed, the certification remains valid for three years and a verifiable digital badge is issued.


According to a September 2022 report from Emergen Research, the global cloud native platforms market size was USD 3,787.9 Million in 2021 and is forecasted to register a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 23.5% in coming years. This means the tech sector is expecting even greater demand for cloud native workers in an already competitive job market.

The LFCT was developed by a globally diverse group of Linux subject matter experts in conjunction with the Linux Foundation's Training & Certification team. These industry professionals and thought-leaders are among the most reliable sources of information about cloud computing and its rapidly evolving marketplace. Certification exams are practical and rigorous, meaning they are immediately recognized as a gold standard for hiring managers.

The LFCT test is currently 50% off during our Cyber Week promotion, ending December 5, 2022. Find out more about the LFCT exam on our website.

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world's leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation's projects are critical to the world's infrastructure, including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more. The Linux Foundation's methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users, and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org. The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of the Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Contact:
Amanda Quraishi
The Linux Foundation
512-577-1800
aquraishi@linuxfoundation.org

View original content to download multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/introducing-the-linux-foundation-certified-cloud-technician-lfct-301691887.html

SOURCE The Linux Foundation

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Thu, 01 Dec 2022 04:39:00 -0600 text/html https://www.benzinga.com/pressreleases/22/12/n29929500/introducing-the-linux-foundation-certified-cloud-technician-lfct
Killexams : Rocky Linux Foundation launches
iStockphoto/Getty Images

Once upon a time, 2002 to be exact, Gregory Kurtzer started a Linux distribution called CentOS, a clone of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). It became really popular. Businesses that had Linux-savvy administrators used it to run their businesses. Then, in 2014, Red Hat acquired CentOS.

At the start, Red Hat let CentOS be, well, CentOS. But, by 2020, Red Hat put CentOS out to pasture. CentOS Stream, its Red Hat successor, is a rolling release, development distro for RHEL, not a production one. 

That left a lot of unhappy CentOS users, so Kurtzer started a new RHEL clone and CentOS replacement: Rocky Linux

Now, this Linux distribution is moving to the control of the just launched Rocky Enterprise Software Foundation (RESF).

RESF is not a non-profit foundation, though. Instead, it's a Delaware Public Benefits Corporation (PBC) or Type B Corp. What's that, you ask? A Type B, unlike a non-profit corporation, has shareholders and can seek to make a profit. However, like a conventional Type C, a Type B must spend some of its profits and resources in support of a specific public benefit. 

Also: The best Linux distros for programming

In RESF's case, the community must make certain that Rocky Linux's dependencies, sources, and build artifacts remain free, open source, and reproducible. In other words, RESF wants to make darn sure that Rocky Linux doesn't fall into the same trap CentOS did. Other Type B corps include Ben & Jerry's, Warby Parker, and Patagonia. 

This is codified in RESF's charters and bylaws. The organization's vision is to create and nurture a community of individuals and organizations that are committed to ensuring the longevity, stewardship, and innovation of enterprise-grade open source software that is always freely available.

The charter and bylaws were voted on by the initial charter member group of 30 RESF and Rocky Linux contributors. The vote was procedurally ratified by Kurtzer, who filed the original RESF PBC paperwork. 

While that means Kurtzer is the owner, legally, he doesn't control it. The RESF community calls the shots. That also means that while Kurtzer's company, CIQ, had a vital role in launching Rocky, it doesn't have any special control or access over Rocky Linux or the RESF.

Also: Rocky Linux 9 arrives with everything you need to replicate the distro on your own

As Kurtzer said, "Open source projects should not be subject to corporate control or business agendas. What makes a successful open source project isn't having a single individual behind it or even having a massive company behind it; what makes it successful is having many individuals and many companies all supporting and managing it collectively, in line with shared interests. That has been our goal with Rocky Linux and the RESF from day one. The RESF charter and bylaws reflect our intent that neither Rocky Linux nor any RESF project will ever be controlled, purchased, or otherwise influenced by a single entity or individual."

Heather Meeker, an expert open source attorney and venture capitalist who advised on the bylaw's creation, added, "It's important for companies hosting and creating open source communities to have a choice when they consider how to best host their projects, it's not one-size-fits-all. Some companies want total control over that project. Others want a pure, decentralized community, but lacking an appropriate structure can have challenges. The RESF has taken a fresh approach to help organizations and projects build a community home for open source projects."

For now, RESF only hosts Rocky Linux. The group hopes to be the home for other open source projects eventually. It will be interesting to see how this new model for an open source organization works out. Personally, I'm hopeful. 

Sun, 13 Nov 2022 10:01:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.zdnet.com/article/rocky-linux-foundation-launches/
Killexams : The Linux Foundation unveils new RISC-V certification course

The nonprofit, open-source organization, The Linux Foundation, and RISC-V International, the global open hardware standards organization, have announced the new RISC-V Foundational Associate (RVFA) certification exam.

According to the companies, this release is designed to test functional knowledge of the RISC-V instruction set architecture.

The RVFA test is intended for anyone pursuing a career as an embedded systems engineer, RTL design engineer, design verification engineer, software developer, or documentation engineer. 

Additionally, interested candidates should already have a knowledge of git, advanced programming languages, debuggers like GDB, and system architecture (ISA).

Programming or design experience is also preferred and candidates may also find it helpful to have completed some computer science, software engineering, computer engineering, or electrical engineering coursework.  

“The increasing interest and adoption of RISC-V are driving global demand for talent, and employers value a RISC-V knowledge base,” said Calista Redmond, CEO of RISC-V International. “As RISC-V continues to proliferate everywhere, it is important that we collaborate with our members and partners such as the Linux Foundation to ensure we have programs in place to train talent around the world and meet the continuously increasing demand.”

The companies stated that the multiple choice test is timed at 90 minutes and covers several areas, including the RISC-V ISA; embedded hardware design such as IoT, medical, and automotive applications; the ability to code in RISC-V assembly language; the ability to use toolchains like GCC and LLVM; and an understanding of RISC-V calling conventions.

The RVFA test is now available for registration for $250. For more information and to register for the exam, click here.  

Wed, 30 Nov 2022 03:45:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://sdtimes.com/software-development/the-linux-foundation-unveils-new-risc-v-certification-course/
Killexams : The Linux Foundation Training & Certification Launches SkillCreds to Demonstrate Specific Technical Competencies

SAN FRANCISCO, Dec. 1, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- This week the Linux Foundation Training & Certification team announces the addition of an entirely new set of credentials focused on area-specific technical competencies: SkillCreds.

The Linux Foundation logo

Five SkillCreds are available now (with more to come):

The technology landscape is highly competitive, making it essential to find ways professionals can stand out within the field. Since the tools covered by Skillcreds are nearly ubiquitous in the tech industry, validating the ability to use them can only increase professional opportunities and earning potential.

General certifications like those offered by the Linux Foundation are well-respected across the tech sector, but it's not necessary to complete a formal course or take a rigorous test to prove competency in certain areas. This is especially true about the tools that are already being used every day. Many technologists have acquired Vim, Git, Bash, YAML and Helm skills on the job, and are simply looking for a way to validate their knowledge and experience.

"Skillcreds are an entirely new initiative from the Linux Foundation Training & Certification team. We're pleased to be able to offer professional learners the credentials they need, when they need them, and on the courses that are immediately relevant to their careers." - Clyde Seepersad, SVP, and general manager of training & certification at the Linux Foundation

SkillCreds can be acquired and added to other professional credentials quickly - each test takes approximately 30-60 minutes. These can be mixed and matched depending on specific job title and needs. The cost for each single-attempt SkillCred test is $79 USD. The exams are remote-AI proctored, and never expire once the test has been passed.

The launch of SkillCreds marks an exciting new initiative to fill a unique credentialing space for technology professionals served by the Linux Foundation. As an added bonus, when the SkillCred exams are passed, a digital badge is issued for display in online profiles.

Unlike many vanity credentials, Linux Foundation SkillCreds come from an internationally recognized source for practical training and certification. We offer these to help fulfill the Linux Foundation's nonprofit mission of building a qualified global workforce to develop and maintain open source projects and products.

SkillCreds are currently 30% off during our Cyber Week promotion, ending December 5, 2022. Visit the SkillCreds catalog on our training website to learn more and register for SkillCred exams today.

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world's leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation's projects are critical to the world's infrastructure, including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more. The Linux Foundation's methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users, and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org. The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of the Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Contact:
Amanda Quraishi
The Linux Foundation
512-577-1800
aquraishi@linuxfoundation.org

Cision

View original content to download multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/the-linux-foundation-training--certification-launches-skillcreds-to-demonstrate-specific-technical-competencies-301691945.html

SOURCE The Linux Foundation

Thu, 01 Dec 2022 23:39:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/linux-foundation-training-certification-launches-193000251.html
Killexams : Linux Foundation Certifications Included in Guide for National and Foreign Workers Seeking Employment in Beijing

CKA, CKAD and CKS certifications are included in the Catalogue of Recognized Overseas Professional Qualifications in Beijing Municipality (Edition 2.0)

SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 30, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- With the construction of an international scientific and technological innovation center and at least two business innovation zones (the Integrated National Demonstration Zone for Opening up the Services Sector and China (Beijing) Pilot Free Trade Zone) there is an urgent need for technology professionals both from within China and Internationally to work in Beijing.

The Linux Foundation logo

As such, Beijing's government has added additional acceptable credentials for employment candidates to their Catalogue of Recognized Overseas Professional Qualifications in Beijing Municipality inviting individuals who hold these qualifications to live and work in Beijing. Included in Edition 2.0 of the catalogue are three Linux Foundation Certifications: Certified Kubernetes Association (CKA); Certified Kubernetes Application Developer (CKAD); and Certified Kubernetes Security Specialist (CKS).

"Understanding Kubernetes is a necessity for developers working with cloud native architectures, which is quickly becoming the norm. Having the CKA, CKAD, and CKS certifications included in Beijing's Catalogue of Recognized Overseas Professional Qualifications is a huge win for our community of technologists in China, and for organizations looking to innovate and stay competitive," said Chris Aniszczyk, CTO, Cloud Native Computing Foundation. 

Individuals who hold such qualifications and are accepted to work under this provision will enjoy several benefits:

  • The personnel with Chinese nationality can be included into the eligible group for the application for Beijing's work-type residence permits.
  • Personnel with foreign nationalities can apply for multiple-entry visas or residence permits with a valid period of no more than five years. Those who meet relevant conditions can be included in the eligible group for enjoying a green channel in their application for permanent residence and can apply for port visas in port visa departments of public security organs after the port visa policy is resumed for implementation.
  • The personnel with foreign nationalities can apply for work permits without being restricted by education backgrounds, academic degrees, or working experiences. The age limit can be extended to 65 years old (or even to 70 years old for high-end, precision, and sophisticated industries). Those who meet the conditions for the recognition of high-end foreign talent (Category A) can apply for work permits valid for no more than five years.
  • The overseas working experience of professional personnel can be deemed as their working experience in China.
  • The industrial departments, enterprises and public institutions in Beijing are encouraged to provide professional personnel with support and guarantee in aspects such as innovation and entrepreneurship, talent training, children's education, social security, as well as talent evaluation and rewards.

Clyde Seepersad, SVP, and general manager of training & certification at the Linux Foundation had this to say about the inclusion: "The Linux Foundation Training & Certification is proud to offer the gold standard for Cloud Native certifications including the CKA, CKAD and CKS. We're honored to have our credentials included in the Beijing Government's Catalogue of Recognized Overseas Professional Qualifications."

About Cloud Native Computing Foundation

Cloud native computing empowers organizations to build and run scalable applications with an open source software stack in public, private, and hybrid clouds. The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) hosts critical components of the global technology infrastructure, including Kubernetes, Prometheus, and Envoy. CNCF brings together the industry's top developers, end users, and vendors, and runs the largest open source developer conferences in the world. Supported by more than 800 members, including the world's largest cloud computing and software companies, as well as over 200 innovative startups, CNCF is part of the nonprofit Linux Foundation. For more information, please visit www.cncf.io.

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world's leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation's projects are critical to the world's infrastructure, including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more. The Linux Foundation's methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users, and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org. The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Contact:
Amanda Quraishi
The Linux Foundation
512-577-1800
aquraishi@linuxfoundation.org

Cision View original content to download multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/linux-foundation-certifications-included-in-guide-for-national-and-foreign-workers-seeking-employment-in-beijing-301690893.html

SOURCE The Linux Foundation

Wed, 30 Nov 2022 12:12:00 -0600 en text/html https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/linux-foundation-certifications-included-in-guide-for-national-and-foreign-workers-seeking-employment-in-beijing-1031946498
Killexams : RHEL and its Linux relatives and rivals: How to choose
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Lately, I've noticed a lot of confusion about Red Hat's Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and related distros, such as AlmaLinux OS, Oracle Linux, and Rocky Linux. In addition, there are Red Hat's own RHEL variants, CentOS Stream and Fedora. Mea culpa. It is confusing. Let me help straighten things out.

To start with the basics, these are all open-source Linux distributions. That means anyone -- yes, even you -- can take RHEL's source code and make your own RHEL-based distro. Mind you, that's much easier said than done. 

You see, you can't simply pull the code from a Git repository and compile it. That would be way too easy. Instead, starting in 2011, Red Hat incorporated its own patches directly into its kernel tree. All the code's still in there, but, as one person put it at the time, "It's sort of like asking someone for a recipe for the family's chocolate chip cookies, and getting cookie batter instead." 

Exactly. 

Also: This 1980s programming language sparked a revolution. Now you can see the source code

For years afterward, that didn't stop those capable of recipe archaeology from teasing out the code. Oracle, for example, has been copycatting RHEL in its Oracle Linux since 2006.

However, many people used a community RHEL distro called Community Enterprise Operating system (CentOS) instead of Oracle Linux. Founded by Gregory Kurtzer, this was the most successful of the early RHEL clones. Indeed, CentOS proved to be far more popular than RHEL in such critical markets as web servers. 

Why? Simple. CentOS doesn't cost you one thin dime. If you use RHEL commercially, you must pay a licensing fee. That's the difference anyone can see. The hidden difference, and why Red Hat became the first billion-dollar Linux company and then IBM ponied up $34 billion for the company, is that many companies need the first-rate support Red Hat provides to its RHEL customers. 

Many, but not all. Indeed, RHEL doesn't even have a majority of the RHEL operating system family customer base. That's because if you just need an RHEL-style operating system for something simple such as web or office servers, you can easily find web and system administrators that can keep CentOS running without any outside help. The same is true for anyone not doing any fancy programming. There are lots of developers who know how to build software around the RHEL family. 

Red Hat knows this. So, first, the company adopted CentOS in 2014. CentOS continued on its free license way, while Red Hat hoped it could persuade CentOS users to become RHEL customers. It didn't work out.

Also: Twitter turns its back on open source development

So, in late 2020, Red Hat changed CentOS from being a stable RHEL clone to being a rolling Linux release distro, CentOS Stream. In addition, the plan was that while Red Hat would continue to support the older CentOS 7 release until at least June 30, 2024, the newer CentOS 8 version, instead of being supported until 2029, would run out of support at the end of 2021. 

That went over like a lead balloon with the hundreds of thousands of CentOS users. 

As one user pointed out, "the use case for CentOS is completely different than CentOS Stream. Many, many people use CentOS for production enterprise workloads, not for dev. CentOS Stream may be ok for dev/test, but it is unlikely people are going to adopt CentOS Stream for prod." 

Nevertheless, Chris Wright, Red Hat's CTO, has said, "CentOS Stream is stable enough for production." Still, Wright added, "CentOS Stream now sits between the Fedora Project's operating system innovation and RHEL's production stability."

I take this to mean, CentOS Stream is stable enough for adventurous companies that value getting the latest features over a guarantee of rock-hard stability. Fedora, of course, remains Red Hat's community Linux for developers and users who want to be on the RHEL's family leading edge.

But, where does that leave the old CentOS users? For them, there are two major choices: AlmaLinux and Rocky Linux. 

Remember when I said people were ticked off by Red Hat's CentOS Stream move? Two leading Linux developers, CloudLinux founder and CEO Igor Seletskiy, and CentOS founder and CIQ CEO Gregory Kurtzer, decided to respond by creating new RHEL clones. Both decided that the old CentOS needed to come back.

As Seletskiy said then, "The demise of the CentOS stable release left a very large gap in the Linux community, which prompted CloudLinux to step in and launch a CentOS alternative." CloudLinux, for those that don't know it, is a commercial RHEL clone, but it's designed especially for Linux web hosting. 

AlmaLinux, however, is a free community Linux. Calling AlmaLinux's shots is the AlmaLinux OS Foundation. This is a 501C6 non-profit foundation.

Rocky Linux is also a free community Linux. It's governed by the Rocky Enterprise Software Foundation (RESF), a Type B Corp. The idea here, Kurtzer said, is that "Open-source projects should not be subject to corporate control or business agendas. What makes a successful open source project isn't having a single individual behind it or even having a massive company behind it; what makes it successful is having many individuals and many companies all supporting and managing it collectively, in line with shared interests. That has been our goal with Rocky Linux and the RESF from day one. The RESF charter and bylaws reflect our intent that neither Rocky Linux nor any RESF project will ever be controlled, purchased, or otherwise influenced by a single entity or individual."

Now both groups offer support for their RHEL clones, but you don't need to pay a penny to use them. As Kurtzer observed, "Support is the first offering in our open-source product lineup. We can do multiple support models, but the one that is most interesting and valued is 'by the person' rather than by the core, node, socket, or entitlement. In this model, we support the people by providing a level of escalation over and above what they might have access to now."

Both organizations also work hard at keeping their releases in sync with Red Hat's own. So, for example, Red Hat released RHEL 8.7 and RHEL 9.1 in November. AlmaLinux 8.7 and AlmaLinux 9.1 and Rocky Linux 8.7 and Rocky Linux 9.1 followed close on its heels.

So, what's the right one for you? It depends on your needs.

Also: How to choose the right Linux desktop distribution

If you need serious corporate support, RHEL has a lot to offer. If your company is all about Oracle, you might as well use Oracle Linux. 

Next, I'm not crazy about using CentOS Stream for production, but if you need the latest and greatest Linux features and you have in-house expertise, go for it. If you're a developer and you're happy with living with the bleeding edge, say hello to Fedora. Just please don't use it on production servers. 

Finally, if you and your crew cut your teeth on the old CentOS, either AlmaLinux or Rocky Linux are excellent choices. Personally, I'm moving my servers from CentOS 7 to Rocky Linux 8.7, but you won't go far wrong with either one. 

Related stories:

Mon, 05 Dec 2022 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.zdnet.com/article/rhel-and-its-linux-relatives-and-rivals-how-to-choose/
Killexams : Introducing the Linux Foundation Certified Cloud Technician (LFCT) No result found, try new keyword!This week the Linux Foundation adds a new offering to our professional certifications catalog: Linux Foundation Certified Cloud Technician (LFCT). This certification has been designed to test the ... Thu, 01 Dec 2022 04:48:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://technews.tmcnet.com/news/2022/12/01/9723271.htm
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