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Certified Internal Auditor - Part 3, Business Analysis and Information Technology
IIA Information approach
Killexams : IIA Information approach - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/IIA-CIA-Part3 Search results Killexams : IIA Information approach - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/IIA-CIA-Part3 https://killexams.com/exam_list/IIA Killexams : Cybersecurity and data privacy are top internal audit risks

The inability to fully leverage the potential of technology in areas such as cybersecurity or data governance due to a lack of expertise is seen as one of the key risk factors for internal auditors going forward.

In a latest report from cloud solutions provider AuditBoard, cybersecurity and data privacy were seen as especially relevant: When looking ahead to 2023, 54% of internal auditors said this was a "very high" risk area while a further 29% said it represented a "higher than average" risk. Only 17% of respondents felt it was either an average risk or less-than-average risk. When looking further to 2026, the perceived risk landscape changes little, as cybersecurity and data privacy were still seen as either a top risk or a higher-than-average risk by more than 70% of respondents.

Internal auditors do not expect these risks to dissipate — indeed, they are expecting that they will grow even stronger as the years go on. The risk presented by "advanced technologies" in particular are expected to grow from well above average in 2022 to "very high" risk by 2026. However when it comes specifically to cybersecurity and data privacy risk, while levels are expected to remain quite high through 2026, they are expected to reduce (very) slightly.

When it comes to the particular risks associated with technology, respondents said there was not enough expertise in leveraging technology for the internal audit process. At least part of this comes from concerns that there is not enough talent with the necessary skills.

"This should be a wake-up call for internal audit leaders: Investing in talent and technology is critical to bolstering internal audit efficacy and efficiency. Upskilling staff and vetting and implementing the right technology solutions for your audit function are no easy feats. But when executed properly, fine-tuning
these resources can substantially enhance internal audit's ability to perform its responsibilities and add value to the business," said the report.

Thu, 01 Dec 2022 01:25:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.accountingtoday.com/news/cybersecurity-and-data-privacy-named-as-top-risks-for-internal-auditors
Killexams : What Does An Auditor Do? A Guide To A Career In Auditing

Editorial Note: We earn a commission from partner links on Forbes Advisor. Commissions do not affect our editors' opinions or evaluations.

An auditing career requires many competencies, including keen analytical skills, strong communication skills and technical proficiencies with the subject matter under audit.

Auditors play a key role in validating the integrity of an organization’s processes, systems and information, both financial and non-financial. Professional auditors also provide advice and consultation to business leaders on how to better manage and control risks within an organization.

Auditing is a rewarding and well-regarded career, whether you are a member of an in-house auditing team or you work with a variety of clients. If you’re intrigued by a career in auditing, here’s all you need to know about stepping into the position.

What Does an Auditor Do?

An auditor conducts assessments of processes, systems and information to validate their integrity and conformance to established policies and other criteria. To understand how to prioritize auditing efforts, an auditor might perform a risk assessment before conducting an audit. Most auditors specialize in particular subject areas, such as financial statement auditing, IT auditing or process auditing.

Though some auditors are external, it’s not uncommon for companies to employ in-house auditors. Auditors are also responsible for noting where an organization can Excellerate its processes, become more efficient and decrease risk.

Advising Oversight Bodies

The results of an audit are typically provided to an oversight body, such as an audit committee, a governing board or an outside regulatory agency. For this reason, an auditor may also be known as an assurance provider. The assurance work provided by an auditor helps oversight groups fulfill their responsibilities, and the auditing profession is often seen as a pillar of good governance.

Skills for Auditors

Auditors must be detail-oriented and enjoy problem-solving. They must also be able to think strategically and relate the results of their work to the broader objectives of the organization subject to audit. It’s important for an auditor to have a high ethical standard due to the nature of their work. Many professional audit associations require their members to conform to a code of ethics.

What Is an Audit?

Auditing approaches can vary greatly, but a typical audit can be divided into three phases:

  1. Planning. During this phase, an auditor obtains an understanding of the activity under audit. They note areas of heightened risk and develop the objectives, scope and procedures that inform their audit testing. External auditors commonly perform materiality assessments during planning to identify high-risk financial accounts to include within the scope. The auditor schedules meetings with managers of the activity subject to the audit to communicate expectations and request necessary information.
  2. Fieldwork. During this phase, the auditors will execute their planned audit test procedures. This phase may require traveling to the physical location or operating site of the activity subject to audit. Some auditors travel extensively over the course of their careers, and the position may require travel to international or remote destinations.
  3. Reporting. During this phase, the auditor will draft the results of the audit, often in a written report, and may provide recommendations to address any issues noted. Once finalized, the report is often distributed to managers of the activity subject to audit and made available to the appropriate oversight body.

Audit Reports

A typical audit report includes the objectives and scope of the audit, plus any issues identified, which can be referred to as audit findings. Common audit findings include:

  • Errors or inaccuracies in financial accounts or data
  • Non-compliance with policies or operating procedures
  • Deficiencies in the internal controls that would prevent or detect fraud, errors and other issues

Auditors often issue recommendations and propose action plans to address their findings. In the case of financial statement audits, an auditor might ask management to adjust certain financial accounts found to contain errors before issuing a financial statement.

Post-Audit Procedures

Auditors may also conduct post-audit follow-up procedures to confirm that their recommendations have been implemented or appropriate actions have been taken to address the identified findings. Internal audit professional standards require that monitoring and follow-up procedures be in place.

Where Do Auditors Work?

An auditor works either as part of an organization’s internal auditing team or for an outside firm.

Most audit work is performed in an office environment. Many audit test procedures involve the examination of documents and interviews or inquiries with the business managers subject to audit. However, there are times when an auditor may be expected to work outside of an office. For example, an inventory count may require an auditor to physically count inventory that is in stock and compare the quantities observed to financial records.

Other audit test steps may require an auditor to physically observe a process, such as validating that activities conducted on an assembly line conform to standard operating procedures. Environmental auditors may visit facilities to confirm that specific environmental compliance equipment is in place and is operating as intended to prevent pollution or ensure compliance with other environmental matters.

Types of Auditor Careers

Careers in auditing can be quite diverse. Take some time to explore the different specialties you can pursue within the auditing field.

Note that while the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) does not break down projection data among the various types of auditors, the BLS projects jobs for all accountants and auditors to grow by 6% from 2021 to 2031.

Internal Auditor

Education Needed: An internal auditor should have a business administration bachelor’s or a similar degree. However, internal auditors can come from a broad variety of educational backgrounds, including IT, engineering and legal fields.

Salary: An internal auditor can expect to earn around $70,000 per year.

Job Description: An internal auditor is usually employed by the organization subject to auditing. Internal audit departments play a broad role. They conduct risk assessments to understand the risks that could negatively impact the organization. They also validate that appropriate risk management and internal control practices are in place.

Due to the varying nature of potential risks faced by an organization, internal audit teams often comprise experts in a variety of subjects, including business operations, accounting/finance, IT and regulatory compliance. The collective competencies of the internal audit team should match the risk profile of the organization they work for.

In addition to audits of financial information and controls, internal auditors often evaluate the company’s processes for operational efficiency/effectiveness, proper safeguarding of assets from fraud and abuse and compliance to internal company policies, among other things. Internal auditors may also support and provide input to the organization’s enterprise risk management program and on the ethical culture of the organization.

While internal auditors are often employed by the organization, they must meet certain standards regarding independence and objectivity. According to these standards, internal auditors cannot be responsible for managing the activities they audit, and they must maintain a functional reporting relationship with the governing body of the organization.

Professional internal auditors should be proficient with the International Professional Practices Framework, which involves authoritative standards and guidance for the professional practice of internal auditing. After obtaining the Certified Internal Auditor (CIA)® qualification, internal auditors can be employed by corporations, the government and not-for-profit organizations.

External Auditor

Education Needed: An external auditor position often requires a bachelor’s degree in accounting or a related field.

Salary: An external auditor can expect to earn around $65,000 per year.

Job Description: An external auditor works at a firm external to the organization subject to auditing. This position typically focuses on accounting and financial reporting topics.

The primary objective of an external audit is to confirm that the financial statements produced by an entity are reliable and fairly presented in conformance with applicable accounting principles. External auditors may also review the adequacy of financial reporting controls, which are the controls in place at the entity to ensure financial statements are accurately produced.

It is also common for external auditors to provide assurance and consultation on other financial topics, including tax and statutory reporting.

The external audit profession is more highly regulated than other forms of auditing, and strict independence requirements prohibit external auditors from being employed by the company they are auditing.

Investors and other users of the entity’s financial statements place great reliance on the work and opinion issued by an external auditor. External auditors must be proficient in relevant accounting principles, such as US GAAP or IFRS, as well as any applicable external auditing standards.

Becoming a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) can demonstrate proficiency in these principles. External auditors are commonly employed by public accounting firms.

Information Technology (IT) Auditor

Education Needed: An IT auditor must hold a bachelor’s degree in accounting, computer science or a similar field.

Salary: An information technology auditor can expect to earn around $75,000 per year.

Job Description: IT auditing is a specialized form of auditing that focuses on assessing an organization’s IT infrastructure and business applications. In modern times, it can be said that all forms of auditing require competency in IT syllabus due to the ever-increasing reliance on technology to manage business operations and information.

IT auditors typically receive more extensive training on IT syllabus and often focus their audits on IT systems and applications. IT auditors may work alongside other internal or external auditors who are reviewing other aspects of an activity subject to auditing.

IT audits may entail assessments of financial reporting applications, cybersecurity, information security, systems development processes and broader assessments of overall IT governance. Prospective IT auditors may pursue the Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA)® qualification, which demonstrates proficiency in IT auditing.

IT auditors can be employed by public accounting firms, consulting firms, corporations, government bodies or not-for-profit organizations.

Forensic Auditor

Education Needed: A forensic auditor must hold a bachelor’s degree in accounting or a related field.

Salary: A forensic auditor can expect to earn around $65,000 per year.

Job Description: A forensic auditor is a specialized auditor who focuses on fraud and financial crimes. Forensic auditors commonly work with syllabus such as financial statement fraud, embezzlement, bribery, money laundering, insider trading and other forms of fraud.

A forensic auditor may assist with investigations conducted in response to an allegation of fraud or red flags or concerns reported by employees in a company. Since the work of forensic auditors may be used in a trial, these professionals must have a strong knowledge of relevant laws, legal procedures and the rules of evidence.

Forensic auditors commonly testify in court and work alongside law enforcement. In addition to serving in an investigative capacity, forensic auditors may provide assurance and consultation regarding fraud risk management strategies, including assessments of the internal controls that prevent or detect fraud.

Individuals interested in careers in forensic auditing can pursue the Certified Fraud Examiner (CFE) qualification, which demonstrates proficiency in conducting fraud examinations. Forensic auditors can work for large organizations, government entities or insurance companies.

Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) Auditor

Education Needed: An EHS auditor typically has a bachelor’s degree in health and safety or environmental sciences.

Salary: EHS auditors earn around $98,000 per year on average.

Job Description: EHS auditors review matters that are key to protecting, managing and enhancing the health and safety of people and the environment. Unlike other forms of auditing where most work is spent in an office environment, EHS auditing involves spending extensive time on-site at physical locations to conduct inspections of EHS-related matters.

Individuals interested in EHS auditing careers can consider pursuing a certification from the Board for Global EHS Credentialing.

Other Forms of Auditing

The careers listed above describe some of the most common types of auditors, but the auditing field is quite large. Wherever there is a need for assurance, there can be a need for auditing.

Tax examiners are employed by the IRS to validate the proper filing and payment of taxes by individuals and entities. Quality auditors may inspect processes, goods and services to confirm conformance to defined quality standards.

Compliance departments, which are responsible for regulatory compliance, may incorporate auditing procedures as part of their monitoring responsibilities. Many other professions also employ techniques that can be seen as forms of auditing.

Auditor Certifications and Licenses

An auditor certification is a great way to set yourself apart as an expert in the field. Earning certification or licensure can increase earning potential as well.

Check out a few common auditor certifications below.

CIA Certification

If your goal is to become a Chief Audit Executive, consider adding a CIA certification to your repertoire. This certification is administered by the Institute of Internal Auditors to demonstrate that recipients are proficient in mandatory internal audit professional standards. CIAs have the technical competencies necessary to successfully conduct or lead internal audit engagements.

To earn the CIA credential, you must have a bachelor’s degree or higher, or five years of internal auditing experience. Each year your certification is active, you are responsible for accumulating 40 continuing education credits.

CISA Certification

Before becoming a CISA, you need at least five years of experience working as an information technology auditor or in a related field. CISAs must have extensive knowledge in computer systems, security and, of course, auditing.

Individuals can become CISAs through the Information Systems Audit and Control Association (ISACA) To maintain certification, ISACA requires members to complete 120 continuing education credits every three years.

CFE Certification

If you are interested in forensic auditing or would like to pursue a career in fraud examinations, then the CFE may be a good fit for you. To be eligible for the CFE certification, you must be a member of the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, have two years of fraud-related work experience and meet other eligibility requirements based on a point system.

CPA License

CPA licensure is the accounting profession’s highest standard of competence, denoting achievement and assurance of quality. Each state sets separate requirements for CPAs, including stipulations around residency, citizenship, education and work experience. After meeting the state eligibility requirements and passing the Uniform CPA Exam®, a candidate can apply to become a CPA.

For more information, check out our guide on how to become a CPA.

Wed, 30 Nov 2022 18:21:00 -0600 Meghan Gallagher en-US text/html https://www.forbes.com/advisor/education/career-in-auditing/
Killexams : IIA makes changes to CPE policy

The Institute of Internal Auditors is planning changes next year to its continuing professional education reporting policy to make sure internal audit professionals are regularly enhancing their skills and keeping up to date with emerging trends and risks.

The changes to CPE policy, which were approved by the IIA's Professional Certification's Board, allow any surplus of CPE credits acquired during a calendar year to be used for the following calendar year reporting cycle, with a maximum of 20 hours for Certified Internal Auditors and 10 hours for other IIA designations, that can be rolled over. The grace period has increased from one year to two years.

While those changes may ease the CPE process, some of the policy changes signal a tougher stance. A certification will be "revoked" if the holder goes three consecutive years without reporting CPE. In addition, a certification in "revoked" status cannot be reinstated; an individual with "revoked" certifications will need to retake the exams.

"After a thorough review, the PCB decided to update our CPE reporting policy to align with credentialing best practices and maintain the credibility of the IIA's certifications," said Dr. Lily Bi, executive vice president of global standards and certification at the IIA, in a statement Wednesday. "Continuing professional education is an opportunity for internal auditors to demonstrate their commitment to lifelong learning, which serves to benefit all certification holders, their employers, and stakeholders alike."

As part of the changes, the "CPE Reporting Policy" will become known as the "Annual Certification Renewal Policy" on Sept. 1, 2023, when the changes above take effect for all IIA certification holders and current candidates.

Individual certification holders who are currently in either grace period or expired status can't claim the certifications. They should instead follow the current CPE policy to report CPE or reinstate their certifications before the new policy takes effect. Detailed information on the CPE changes, including the full current CPE reporting policy and the newly approved ACRP, is available on the IIA's website.

Last week, the IIA held its Ignite conference in Las Vegas where internal audit leaders spoke about the challenges their organizations face. 

"As internal auditors, we need information for people to share with us," said Rachel Tressy, chief auditor and senior vice president at Voya Financial. "We need people to say to us that this is what's going on. Ideally we can be the trusted advisor, and for some of the team it's a little bit uncomfortable. If we've got someone who's new to the team, we're not going to send them off into a scary conversation. We're going to pair them up with a peer and they're going to own the relationship together, but it's to try and evolve it. With COVID, it's been really interesting. We used to be able to just walk down the hall, and if you saw somebody was on the phone, you could just pop your head in and say, 'Hey, what's going on.' Our team right now is mostly home and our business partners and our auditors are still mostly remote, so we've needed to take this management matrix and be very deliberate. You need to schedule time. You don't want it to be purely an audit conversation."

Wed, 09 Nov 2022 07:15:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.accountingtoday.com/news/iia-adds-makes-changes-to-cpe-policy
Killexams : The Association of Certified Fraud Examiners and The Institute of Internal Auditors Announce Education Partnership

The partnership will elevate competency for fraud investigators and auditors.

AUSTIN, Texas, Nov. 30, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- The Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE) – the world's largest organization of anti-fraud professionals – today announced a new partnership with The Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA) that will see both organizations collaborate on education initiatives that will serve the interests of both global memberships in fraud investigation and auditing.

Anti-fraud professionals and internal auditors both strive to protect the organizations they serve and, though the primary focus is different, the opportunities to collaborate are vast. ACFE and IIA members often have similar interests and perspectives on fraud investigation and auditing – in fact, some practitioners are members of both organizations – and this partnership is a natural evolution that will allow both organizations to formalize and recognize this shared interest.

"This partnership brings the power of fraud auditing, detection, and fraud investigation together in order to help businesses and organizations deal head-on with the risks and challenges of fraud," said Brad Monterio, Executive Vice President of Member Competency & Learning at The IIA. "With increasingly complex technologies comes potential for fraud – this partnership will help both professions learn how to audit and investigate for fraud within these complex technology environments, including cryptocurrency, blockchain, non-fungible tokens (NFTs), robotic process automation (RPA), and others."

"Audit and anti-fraud professionals must intentionally seek out new information and best practices to ensure they stay one step ahead of bad actors," said Andi McNeal, Vice President of Education for the ACFE. "This partnership brings the necessary resources and conversations to the forefront so that everyone charged with protecting organizations against fraud—whether in audit or in another anti-fraud role—is able to effectively carry out those responsibilities."

The partnership launches today with a series of webcasts, called "Fraud Perspectives," which will cover important fraud-related topics. Each webcast in the series will feature a CIA-credentialed fraud auditor and a CFE-credentialed fraud investigator, who will offer their unique perspectives on timely, relevant topics.

The first webcast in the series will be offered today from 12:00 p.m.–1:15 p.m. ET and is free for ACFE and IIA members. Six paid webcasts will follow in 2023.

  • January 11, 2023 – "Fraud Perspectives: Blockchain, Crypto, and KYC"

  • March 15, 2023 – "Fraud Perspectives: Virtual Remote Work Forever"

  • May 10, 2023 – "Fraud Perspectives: Nonfungible Tokens"

  • July 19, 2023 – "Fraud Perspectives: Deepfake Technologies"

  • September 13, 2023 – "Fraud Perspectives: ESG and Regulatory Reporting"

  • November 15, 2023 – "Fraud Perspectives: The Metaverse"

Although the partnership will start with collaboratively developed education, the ACFE and IIA will be exploring additional opportunities to work together, including joint research projects, impactful thought leadership, and working together on conference and event programs.

About The Association of Certified Fraud Examiners

Founded in 1988 by Dr. Joseph T. Wells, CFE, CPA, the ACFE is the world's largest anti-fraud organization. Together with more than 90,000 members, the ACFE works to reduce business fraud worldwide and inspire public confidence in the integrity and objectivity within the profession. For more information, visit ACFE.com.

About The Institute of Internal Auditors

The Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA) is a nonprofit international professional association that serves more than 218,000 global members and has awarded 180,000 Certified Internal Auditor (CIA) certifications worldwide. Established in 1941, The IIA is recognized throughout the world as the internal audit profession's leader in standards, certification, education, research, and technical guidance. For more information, visit theiia.org.

Media Contacts:

Stefanie Hallgren
The Association of Certified Fraud Examiners 
SHallgren@ACFE.com 
+1-512-276-8167

Chris Almonte
The Institute of Internal Auditors 
Chris.Almonte@theiia.org 
+1-407-937-1349

Cision

View original content:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/the-association-of-certified-fraud-examiners-and-the-institute-of-internal-auditors-announce-education-partnership-301689669.html

SOURCE Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 23:46:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/association-certified-fraud-examiners-institute-123000058.html
Killexams : Internal Auditors Task Nigerians on Efforts against Corruption

Goddy Egene

The Society for West African Internal Audit Practitioners (SWAIAP) has called on Nigerians to refrain from aiding and abetting corruption by refusing to provide and receive bribes or participate in every manner of corrupt practices.

The internal auditors made the call as one their resolutions at the inaugural induction, investiture and fellowship award dialogue of the society in Lagos at the weekend.

President of SWAIAP, Mr. Patrick Nzechukwu, said that the dialogue, with the theme “Internal auditing: Effective tool for anti-corruption, risk management controls and corporate governance”, was apt as corruption continues to ravage many nations of the world including Nigeria.

According to him, SWAIAP was established in June 2018 with the objective of institutionalising internal auditing in West Africa as a major tool for anti-corruption campaign as well as mitigation of inefficiency, ineffectiveness, wastes and other forms of financial and non-financial risk.
It was also conceived to “improve business processes and performance” in both private and public sectors, he said.

Nzechukwu said: “We are committed to educating internal auditors on global best practices with emphasis on effective corporate governance, risk management system and adequate internal control and compliance and virile reporting systems, and informing stakeholders on the imperatives of effective internal auditing in West Africa.”

However, the SWAIA president queried Nigeria employers’ preference for international certifications while Nigerians were doing better than their counterparts globally.

Chairman of the occasion, Gbolahan Oyegoke, commended SWAIAP for the focus of the national dialogue, adding that internal auditors hardly have friends within an organisation due to professional discipline and anti-corruption stance.

He said that the best approach to fighting corruption was to prevent it from happening, urging practioners to be proactive at all times.
“An internal auditor is caught between management who wants you to catch thieves and the staff whom the internal auditors want all processes to be followed.

“The destiny of organisations rests on your capacity and capabilities, because when everything moves on fine nobody cares about you but when there is an error you will be held liable,” he added.

Executive Secretary, Nigeria Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative, NEITI, Dr. Orji Ogbonnaya Orji, said that Nigeria was struggling to curb corruption in all sectors of the nation’s economy.

Represented by Alhaji Abdulraheem Usman, the NEITI boss called on staff of internal control departments in organisations to build capacity in the use of modern auditing softwares in order to effectively block leakages and proactively build defence systems against fraud.

He said that there was need for organisations to embrace and deploy technology and modern audit softwares to aid its internal control mechanisms.
Orji said: “For every organisation which intends to achieve its set objectives, the five components of a good internal control as set by Committee for Sponsoring Organisation (COSO) framework must be adhered to. The framework, which includes control environment, risk management, control activities, information and communication and monitoring must be taken into consideration to curb malfeasance in any typical organisation.

Sat, 03 Dec 2022 10:01:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.thisdaylive.com/index.php/2021/09/27/internal-auditors-task-nigerians-on-efforts-against-corruption/
Killexams : The Association of Certified Fraud Examiners and The Institute of Internal Auditors Announce Education Partnership

The partnership will elevate competency for fraud investigators and auditors.

AUSTIN, Texas, Nov. 30, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- The Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE) – the world's largest organization of anti-fraud professionals – today announced a new partnership with The Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA) that will see both organizations collaborate on education initiatives that will serve the interests of both global memberships in fraud investigation and auditing. 

Anti-fraud professionals and internal auditors both strive to protect the organizations they serve and, though the primary focus is different, the opportunities to collaborate are vast. ACFE and IIA members often have similar interests and perspectives on fraud investigation and auditing – in fact, some practitioners are members of both organizations – and this partnership is a natural evolution that will allow both organizations to formalize and recognize this shared interest.

"This partnership brings the power of fraud auditing, detection, and fraud investigation together in order to help businesses and organizations deal head-on with the risks and challenges of fraud," said Brad Monterio, Executive Vice President of Member Competency & Learning at The IIA. "With increasingly complex technologies comes potential for fraud – this partnership will help both professions learn how to audit and investigate for fraud within these complex technology environments, including cryptocurrency, blockchain, non-fungible tokens (NFTs), robotic process automation (RPA), and others." 

"Audit and anti-fraud professionals must intentionally seek out new information and best practices to ensure they stay one step ahead of bad actors," said Andi McNeal, Vice President of Education for the ACFE. "This partnership brings the necessary resources and conversations to the forefront so that everyone charged with protecting organizations against fraud—whether in audit or in another anti-fraud role—is able to effectively carry out those responsibilities."

The partnership launches today with a series of webcasts, called "Fraud Perspectives," which will cover important fraud-related topics. Each webcast in the series will feature a CIA-credentialed fraud auditor and a CFE-credentialed fraud investigator, who will offer their unique perspectives on timely, relevant topics.

The first webcast in the series will be offered today from 12:00 p.m.–1:15 p.m. ET and is free for ACFE and IIA members. Six paid webcasts will follow in 2023.

  • January 11, 2023 – "Fraud Perspectives: Blockchain, Crypto, and KYC"
  • March 15, 2023 – "Fraud Perspectives: Virtual Remote Work Forever"
  • May 10, 2023 – "Fraud Perspectives: Nonfungible Tokens"
  • July 19, 2023 – "Fraud Perspectives: Deepfake Technologies"
  • September 13, 2023 – "Fraud Perspectives: ESG and Regulatory Reporting"
  • November 15, 2023 – "Fraud Perspectives: The Metaverse"

Although the partnership will start with collaboratively developed education, the ACFE and IIA will be exploring additional opportunities to work together, including joint research projects, impactful thought leadership, and working together on conference and event programs.

About The Association of Certified Fraud Examiners

Founded in 1988 by Dr. Joseph T. Wells, CFE, CPA, the ACFE is the world's largest anti-fraud organization. Together with more than 90,000 members, the ACFE works to reduce business fraud worldwide and inspire public confidence in the integrity and objectivity within the profession. For more information, visit ACFE.com.

About The Institute of Internal Auditors

The Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA) is a nonprofit international professional association that serves more than 218,000 global members and has awarded 180,000 Certified Internal Auditor (CIA) certifications worldwide. Established in 1941, The IIA is recognized throughout the world as the internal audit profession's leader in standards, certification, education, research, and technical guidance. For more information, visit theiia.org.

Media Contacts:

Stefanie Hallgren
The Association of Certified Fraud Examiners 
SHallgren@ACFE.com 
+1-512-276-8167

Chris Almonte
The Institute of Internal Auditors 
Chris.Almonte@theiia.org 
+1-407-937-1349

View original content:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/the-association-of-certified-fraud-examiners-and-the-institute-of-internal-auditors-announce-education-partnership-301689669.html

SOURCE Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.

© 2022 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 22:41:00 -0600 text/html https://www.benzinga.com/pressreleases/22/11/n29903258/the-association-of-certified-fraud-examiners-and-the-institute-of-internal-auditors-announce-educa
Killexams : Solving for Fraud: Institute of Internal Auditors Announces Education Partnership with Association of Certified Fraud Examiners

The partnership will elevate competency for fraud auditors and investigators.

LAKE MARY, Fla., Nov. 30, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- The Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA) – the internal audit profession's leader in standards, certification, education, research, and technical guidance worldwide – today announced a new partnership with the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE) that will see both organizations collaborate on education initiatives that will raise the competency of each organizations' members with regard to fraud auditing and investigation.

Internal auditors and anti-fraud professionals both strive to protect the organizations they serve and, though the primary focus is different, the opportunities to collaborate are vast. IIA and ACFE members often have similar interests and perspectives on fraud auditing and investigation – in fact, some practitioners are members of both organizations – and this partnership is a natural evolution that will allow both organizations to formalize and recognize this shared interest.

"This partnership brings the power of fraud auditing, detection, and fraud investigation together in order to help businesses and organizations deal head-on with the risks and challenges of fraud," said Brad Monterio, Executive Vice President of Member Competency & Learning at The IIA. "With increasingly complex technologies comes potential for fraud – this partnership will help both professions learn how to audit and investigate for fraud within these complex technology environments, including cryptocurrency, blockchain, non-fungible tokens (NFTs), robotic process automation (RPA), and others." 

"Audit and anti-fraud professionals must intentionally seek out new information and best practices to ensure they stay one step ahead of bad actors," said Andi McNeal, Vice President of Education for the ACFE. "This partnership brings the necessary resources and conversations to the forefront so that everyone charged with protecting organizations against fraud—whether in audit or in another anti-fraud role—is able to effectively carry out those responsibilities."

The partnership launches today with a webcast series called "Fraud Perspectives," which will cover important fraud-related topics. Each webcast will feature a CIA-credentialed fraud auditor and a CFE-credentialed fraud investigator, who will offer their unique perspectives on timely, relevant topics.

The first webcast will be offered today from 12:00pm-1:15pm ET and is free for IIA and ACFE members. Six paid webcasts will follow in 2023.

  • January 11, 2023 – "Fraud Perspectives: Blockchain, Crypto, and KYC"
  • March 15, 2023 – "Fraud Perspectives: Virtual Remote Work Forever"
  • May 10, 2023 – "Fraud Perspectives: Nonfungible Tokens"
  • July 19, 2023 – "Fraud Perspectives: Deepfake Technologies"
  • September 13, 2023 – "Fraud Perspectives: ESG and Regulatory Reporting"
  • November 15, 2023 – "Fraud Perspectives: The Metaverse"

Although the partnership will start with collaboratively developed education, the IIA and ACFE will be exploring additional opportunities to work together, including joint research projects, impactful thought leadership, and working together on conference and event programs.

About The Institute of Internal Auditors
The Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA) is a nonprofit international professional association that serves more than 218,000 global members and has awarded 180,000 Certified Internal Auditor (CIA) certifications worldwide. Established in 1941, The IIA is recognized throughout the world as the internal audit profession's leader in standards, certification, education, research, and technical guidance. For more information, visit theiia.org.

About The Association of Certified Fraud Examiners
Founded in 1988 by Dr. Joseph T. Wells, CFE, CPA, the ACFE is the world's largest anti-fraud organization. Together with more than 90,000 members, the ACFE works to reduce business fraud worldwide and inspire public confidence in the integrity and objectivity within the profession. For more information, visit ACFE.com.

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SOURCE The Institute of Internal Auditors

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