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Exam Code: II0-001 Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
Certified Information Forensics Investigator (CIFI)
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Killexams : IISFA Investigator test prep - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/II0-001 Search results Killexams : IISFA Investigator test prep - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/II0-001 https://killexams.com/exam_list/IISFA Killexams : Adventure games by Marlon’s Mystery will test your skills as an investigator No result found, try new keyword!All adventure games developed and/or published by Marlon’s Mystery will test your skills as an investigator. Thu, 01 Dec 2022 17:17:00 -0600 text/html https://adventuregamers.com/companies/view/48267 Killexams : Modifying Clinical Trial Designs to Test Treatments for Clinical Significance in Individual Patients

Methods

Methods to evaluate each individual patient's clinical course impose three conditions on investigators planning a clinical trial: a pretrial study of outcome measures to determine the reliability of measurement; setting criteria for clinical significance; and setting criteria for statistical significance. Criteria of clinical significance express the current medical norms that practitioners use to accept a treatment as clinically useful or not. These criteria of clinical significance distinguish responders and non-responders to treatment. The criteria of statistical significance set the limits of chance occurrence of a finding in the trial, usually 5% or less.

An investigator studies the test-retest reliability of outcome measures prior to the clinical trial by repeated administrations of candidate measures to a patient sample.[1] The errors of measurement in comparisons of single or of descriptive statistics summarising multiple applications of an outcome measure provide grounds to plan the trial: to select outcome measures; an assessment plan for using repeated measures of outcome in the clinical trial; a scalar summary statistic to express each patient's clinical course; and confidence intervals of measurement for the outcome measures. The aim of the pretrial reliability studies and assessment planning is to estimate the patient's true clinical course by controlling for the uncertainties introduced by measurement error. To identify individual patient responses, repeated measures must provide sufficient reliability for the scalar summary statistic to accurately express the true clinical course of each individual in the trial. To express effects from error of measurement, scalar summary statistics are bounded by a confidence interval of measurement.

These conditions describe each individual patient's clinical course with sufficient reliability to analyse the clinical trial using each individual's response, not a group's averaged responses within treatment arms, as the units of comparison. Group comparison is only an intermediary step to expressing the effects of treatment on individuals. The analysis proceeds in two phases: first, investigators choose a design-based permutation or randomisation test to determine whether the ranks or orders of clinical courses on the outcome variables differ statistically among the arms of the study. Second, in the presence of a statistically significant difference investigators test each patient's clinical course against the study criteria both for clinical significance and for the probability of the response occurring as a treatment or placebo effect. In this second step, criteria of clinical significance categorise the scalar statistic summarising each patient's clinical course as a clinically significant response or non-response to the treatment received.

The statistical probability of a patient's response occurring as an effect of treatment can be estimated in various comparisons: the probability that the actively-treated patient's course would occur under placebo conditions; whether the confidence intervals of the actively-treated patient's course overlap the mean placebo-treated patient course; as an odds ratio of the cumulative frequency of the patient's course among actively treated patients divided by the cumulative frequency among placebo-treated patients; and so forth. For example, to implement the aims of a particular study investigators can define a probable responder as an actively-treated patient whose 95% confidence interval of measurement for his or her clinical course overlaps neither the criteria for a clinically significant response nor the 90% range of clinical courses experienced by placebo group patients. Under these conditions a probable responder has only a 5% chance that the patient's clinical course does not meet the criteria of clinical significance and only a 5% chance that the course would occur under placebo treatment conditions in the trial. Using these conditions of analysis, each patient is categorised as a probable responder or non-responder -- less than 5% chance occurrence under placebo or treatment conditions, respectively -- or a possible responder or non-responder. The clinical course of possible responders or non responders would respectively meet or fail to meet the clinical significance criteria but with greater than 5% probability of chance occurrence.

To apply the model for evaluating individual patient responses in patient care a practitioner complies with the assessment conditions needed to assure adequate reliability in outcome measures. Outcomes measures may be biased indicators, lose reliability and compromise external validity of clinical trial evidence, when used outside double-blind conditions. Clinical trial investigators can study outcome measures for reliability and bias during open follow-up of patients after the double-blind phase of the clinical trial. Any outcome measures used in clinical practice require reliability comparable to the reliability of their use in a clinical trial because the outcome measures characterise the clinical course of the patient and provide a basis for applying clinical trial evidence in clinical decision making. Unfortunately, clinicians are sometimes unaware of a lack of reliability in their patient assessments and the potential effects of measurement error in medical decision making.[1]

To apply extended clinical trial evidence in patient care, a practitioner demonstrates sufficiently skilled use of outcome measures to reach test-retest reliability comparable to the reliability in the pretrial study and complies with the assessment plan of the clinical trial. The practising clinician uses or adapts to the individual patient situation the criteria of clinical and statistical significance from the trial to judge the response status of the patient and the probable level of confidence appropriate for the judgement of response status. The extended clinical trial provides confidence intervals for measurement of outcomes from treatment and a model for assessing each patient's clinical course in relation to established medical and statistical criteria of significance. With these resources in hand the clinician no longer depends on weakly supported clinical judgements or distribution-based probabilities from group comparisons to manage patients using clinical trial evidence.

This section illustrates the potential contributions to patient care from methods that extend clinical trials to identify responders and nonresponders in a comparison with published studies of metrifonate efficacy in patients with AD.[1,3,4] In earlier trials of metrifonate, to increase the power for the small trial size, investigators evaluated each patient on three occasions prior to randomisation using the Mini-Mental-State Examination (MMSE).[3,4,5] Becker and Markwell[1] used these MMSE scores to estimate the reliability of MMSE measurements and to calculate 95% confidence intervals of measurement. This analysis of reliability comprises a pretrial study of reliability of measurement needed to plan outcome assessments capable of reliably characterising individual patients' clinical courses in an extended clinical trial. The studies of MMSE reliability show a ±4.16 and 4.89 MMSE points 95% confidence interval comparing two single MMSE scores, and ±2.51 and 2.81 points comparing two means of three scores.[1] This error indicates that, for the assessment plan of an extended clinical trial,in place of the single assessments at 2, 4 and 6 months in Becker et al.,[4] we need at least three weekly assessments at 2, 4 and 6 months to provide sufficient reliability for a slope to express each patient's response over time and be clinically useful in identifying patient responses. Patients with AD decline at an average rate of only four MMSE points annually and earlier re-search predicts at best no decline in the treated patient group.[3,4] We cannot reanalyse our original trials for individual outcomes because of inadequate reliability in single administrations of the MMSE. Because of these limitations in outcome measurements our original trials can only compare groups across treatment arms. As we concluded in Becker and Markwell,[1] these clinical trial group comparisons allow the clinician to reliably characterise treatment response in only 5% of patients.

In our clinical trials we set criteria of a clinically significant response as a 50% reduction in the mean rate of AD decline and chose a 5% level of significance.[1,3,4] Using these as clinical and statistical criteria of significance in an extended trial, an active treatment responder's clinical course must decline at a rate less than 2 points annually to provide clinically significant evidence of response. For the response to be probable as an effect of active treatment there must be less than a 5% chance of occurrence of the clinical course under placebo treatment conditions. Two possible examples (reasonable in relation to our clinical trial evidence), of extended clinical trial outcomes as a comparison to our existing data are provided. One should assume that a patient with AD has a mean of three outcome scores different from a baseline mean of three scores by +2 MMSE points at 6 months. To determine if they meet the criteria of clinical significance to be a responder, one should evaluate the confidence interval of measurement for a mean of three assessments, 4.81 to -0.81 (mean score of 2 ± 2.81, the confidence interval of measurement for a mean of three scores) against the criteria -- less than 50% of the placebo group 2-point mean decline at 6 months. Since the confidence interval for the patient's clinical course does not overlap the criteria of clinical significance, the clinician is assured that there is only a 5% or less chance that the patient is not responding consistent with the aims of the study. The clearly favourable response does not address whether the response occurs as a treatment effect or as a variant of the disease process. To determine if the patient has a 5% or less chance of the clinical course occurring under placebo treatment, we compared the confidence interval against the distribution of placebo-treated patient courses. If the 90% range of placebo-treated courses around their mean is 1 to -5 there is greater than 5% chance that the clinical course could occur in the absence of treatment. The clinician can weigh the risks of adverse events with continued treatment against this probability of the current course being maintained if treatment is discontinued.

The analysis can be adapted for data from a treatment period greater than the duration of the extended clinical trial. This adaptation calls on the same assumptions of external validity required to apply any clinical trial beyond the period of double-blind comparison. First, a reliable projected estimation of placebo-treated patient outcomes after the double blind is required as a comparison group to establish a probability for the treated patient's status, and second, evidence against bias influencing the open assessments of patients in follow-up. Thus, drawing on hypothetical data from an extended clinical trial, one would anticipate that to be a probable responder at 1 year a patient experiences in a mean of three assessments less than -2 MMSE points decline in a mean score at 1 year -- the clinical criteria of significant drug effect - and only 5% chance occurrence of the course under placebo conditions. The confidence interval of measurement if our 6-month patient maintains their 2-point gains at one year, 4.81 to -0.81, overlaps neither the criteria of clinical significance, -2 MMSE points, nor the projected 90% range of placebo scores, -1 to -7, at 1 year. The patient is now a probable responder to treatment. They have less than 5% chance occurrence of their clinical course in the absence of treatment and less than 5% chance that their true course does not meet the criteria of clinical significance.

In our published clinical trials in patients with AD, we concluded that clinicians could not identify patient responses for the majority of individuals. If in an extended clinical trial we follow the assessment plan developed out of our study of MMSE error of measurement, our hypothetical examples suggest we would have developed a model of clinical and statistical significance that clinicians could use to identify responders and non-responders to treatment. The advantages of extending clinical trial methods are the ability of investigators and practitioners to identify responders and non-responders to a treatment in relation to medical and scientific criteria of clinical and statistical significance, as illustrated in this adaptation of our published studies.[1,3,4]

Fri, 02 Dec 2022 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/406244_2
Killexams : Groundbreaking PGT-A Genetic Test Research Receives Prestigious Investigator Achievement Award Groundbreaking PGT-A Genetic Test Research Receives Prestigious Investigator Achievement Award

PR Newswire

BASKING RIDGE, N.J., Nov. 3, 2022

Fertility and Sterility Journal Recognizes Outstanding Scientific Paper Authored by RMA Fellow in Collaboration with Juno Genetics

BASKING RIDGE, N.J., Nov. 3, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- The top journal in the field of reproductive medicine, Fertility and Sterility, has named Julia Kim, MD, winner of its 2022 Investigator Achievement Award. Dr. Kim is first author of a landmark study on preimplantation genetic testing for aneuploidy (PGT-A). The research was conducted in collaboration with Juno Genetics during her fellowship at Reproductive Medicine Associates (RMA), part of the IVIRMA fertility network. The prestigious award recognizes an exceptional paper in which the first author is less than five years out of fellowship training or less than 35 years old. The award was recently presented to Dr. Kim at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) Scientific Congress in Anaheim, California.

Reproductive Medicine Associates

The study, "The concordance rates of an initial trophectoderm biopsy with the rest of the embryo using PGTSeq, a targeted next-generation sequencing platform for preimplantation genetic testing-aneuploidy," was Dr. Kim's thesis project and utilized Juno Genetics' PGTSeq assay. The results of 300 initial clinical-grade biopsies from blastocyst embryos were compared with those from subsequent rebiopsies of those embryos. The study assessed the reproducibility of the clinical result as an indicator of test accuracy. For both normal (euploid) and abnormal (aneuploid) results, nearly 100% concordance was demonstrated. Conversely, when initial biopsy results were predicted to be mosaic – in which the number of copies of a chromosome is between normal and abnormal, a result that causes uncertainty for clinicians and patients - rebiopsies showed poor reproducibility, with only 2% of embryos showing full mosaicism. This data illustrates the low predictive value of an initial mosaic diagnosis and questions the clinical utility of mosaicism reporting, an important consideration for patient care. 

"It is an honor to receive this award from Fertility and Sterility," said Dr. Kim. "The research for which I am receiving the award would not have been possible without the combined efforts of an incredible team at IVIRMA and Juno Genetics. Our findings further endorse PGTSeq as one of the most validated PGT-A platforms in embryo genetic testing."

Dr. Marie Werner, a former RMA fellow who was recently appointed the new director of its fellowship program, added, "We are proud to celebrate and share in Fertility and Sterility's recognition of Dr. Kim's ground-breaking work in collaboration with Chaim Jalas and the Juno Genetics team during her time as a fellow at RMA."

PGT-A is performed on thousands of IVF cycles in the U.S. each year and the process tests DNA from just a few cells from the developing embryo. Because the results are used to make clinical decisions regarding which embryos are transferred and which are discarded, utilizing a test that accurately predicts the clinical outcome is key to realizing the benefits of PGT-A. However, nearly every PGT laboratory uses a custom test assay and each lab is independently responsible for demonstrating that their assay has been properly validated. Juno's PGTSeq is the only PGT-A test currently in use with published prospective, non-selection validation data supporting it. Juno's groundbreaking 2020 study "A multi-center, prospective, blinded, non-selection study evaluating the predictive value of an aneuploid diagnosis with PGT-A and the impact of biopsy," demonstrated a nearly 100% positive predictive value of the PGTSeq platform in diagnosing embryos that are not expected to lead to a successful pregnancy, and was a finalist for the ASRM 2020 Prize Paper Award.

"Juno Genetics is honored to be recognized by Fertility & Sterility for our scientific contributions. We are setting rigorous standards for PGT quality and validation and are committed to ongoing research in embryo diagnostics," stated Antonio Capalbo, PhD, Juno's new Chief Genomics Officer. "Dr. Kim's paper perfectly complements and builds upon Juno's other industry-leading publications on PGT-A, providing further compelling evidence about PGT-A accuracy when properly handled and validated in preclinical and clinical studies."

Chaim Jalas, the COO and Director of Technology Development at Juno and senior author on the study, added, "Completing proper analytical and clinical validations of individualized laboratory PGT-A assays prior to clinical use is one of the most critical and underrecognized components of responsible use of testing in IVF programs. Without diligent attention paid to this step, the positive and negative predictive values of the PGT-A results cannot be accurately assessed. This information is critical for evidence-based counseling and patient care."

Mosaic Research Presented at ASRM

At the 2022 ASRM conference, the RMA and Juno teams also presented the largest blinded non-selection outcome data set on the transfer of putative mosaic embryos. Dr. Pavan Gill, current RMA fellow, presented clinical outcome data from almost 5000 embryos transferred with mosaic PGT-A findings masked. Embryos testing negative for whole chromosome aneuploidy on the PGTSeq assay, including those with mosaic findings, were classified as being suitable for transfer; therefore, embryos were selected for use without knowledge of their potential mosaic status. Sustained pregnancy rates were not statistically different between embryos with and without putative mosaic findings, supporting the notion that mosaicism predicted by PGT testing may be a benign finding without known clinical utility. The study results suggest that by clinically reporting mosaic findings and thereby limiting the transfer of such embryos, embryos with good reproductive potential are being unnecessarily deprioritized or even excluded from patient use, a practice that may limit patients' chances for success through IVF.

"Juno Genetics is the only lab that has thoroughly and prospectively evaluated the clinical significance of all types of mosaic PGT-A findings. We are proud to be an international leader in embryo diagnostics and reproductive genetics," said Jalas. Capalbo added, "we are also proud that our research and efforts will contribute to significant advancements in scientific guidelines and recommendations from relevant societies in the field of reproductive medicine, ultimately improving treatment outcomes of infertile couples undergoing IVF."

Reproductive Medicine Associates (RMA) has been helping build families through the most advanced treatment options and patient-centered fertility care for over 20 years. RMA is a leader in IVF research, pioneering the Single Embryo Transfer (SET), increasing safety for mom and baby and Pre-Implantation Genetic Testing (PGT-A), dramatically increasing successful outcomes. With access to practices nationwide, RMA has helped welcome over 50,000 babies into loving families. Learn more at rmanetwork.com.

Our mission is to provide evidence based, clinically useful information of the highest quality for patients who are undergoing fertility treatments. Juno genetics is dedicated to advancing knowledge and enhancing outcomes in embryonic research, diagnosis, and education. Learn more at www.junogenetics.com.

Cision View original content to obtain multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/groundbreaking-pgt-a-genetic-test-research-receives-prestigious-investigator-achievement-award-301667839.html

SOURCE Reproductive Medicine Associates

Thu, 03 Nov 2022 03:13:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.morningstar.com/news/pr-newswire/20221103ny24032/groundbreaking-pgt-a-genetic-test-research-receives-prestigious-investigator-achievement-award
Killexams : Private investigators share five major signs you’re dating a cheater

A team of private investigators have sparked a conversation about dating, after revealing some key ways to tell if your partner is cheating on you.

In the bio of their TikTok, @downunderinvestigations describes themselves as “Licensed and Experienced Private Investigators” based in Australia. On the app, they frequently post videos about the kind of work they do as a private detectives and some of things they’ve learned on the job.

In a accurate clip, one of the investigators posted a video of the road in front of him, while driving, and listed the “top five signs that you’ve got a cheater on your hands”.

He then quickly described all of the traits that a cheater could exhibit, explaining: “They lie about big things and small things, they get excessively defensive, they gaslight, they accuse you of cheating, and they have a history of cheating.”

The investigator then asked viewers to share “any other signs of a potential cheater” in the comments of the video, which has more than 20,300, prompting a wide range of responses from TikTok users.

“Sudden interest in their own appearance and weight,” one person wrote, to which @downunderinvestigations responded: “Totally agree! New clothes, obsession with perfume/aftershave, more time showering and washing [their] own clothes.”

In the comments, the private investigator also noted that if you notice certain changes to your partner’s phone and how they act around it, that could be a potential sign of cheating.

Viewers also shared specific examples of that change in behaviour, including how significant others’ “phones are suddenly flat, or on silent all the time” and “they guard their phone like the FBI”.

Even more viewers went on to share tips for spotting a cheater.

“Their phone rings in front of you all the time and they don’t take the call,” one wrote. There are always messages coming up on it. The story keeps changing.”

“They are paranoid,” another added. “They want to know who is calling us, trying to investigate to see if WE are cheating and look through [Facebook] friends list to see guys.”

In 2020, private investigator Tom Martin spoke to The Independent and detailed the top 20 clues that your partner is cheating, some of which include a change in their habits, leaving the house early and returning late, and unexplained spending.

The Independent has contacted @downunderinvestigations for comment.

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 22:21:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/signs-dating-cheater-relationship-investigation-b2236080.html
Killexams : Polygraph test: Aaftab Poonawala seems to have anticipated queries, says investigator NEW DELHI: Aaftab Poonawala appeared to have anticipated and rehearsed how he would respond to questions posed to him by experts conducting the polygraph test at the Forensic Science Laboratory in Rohini, an investigator said on Friday.
The investigator said Aaftab lied confidently while replying to some questions, reminding investigators of the Bollywood movie Drishyam. During a break, a cop jokingly asked the alleged murdered if he had watched the movie, to which he simply smiled. Officials are likely to have another test session, but will now bank mostly on his narco analysis examination.

Latest in Shraddha Walkar murder case: From multiple weapons being recovered to new CCTV footage


FSL assistant director Sanjeev Gupta said, "As on Thursday, Aaftab complained of fever today too, so the process couldn't be completed. We may call him again another day."
Another official said Aaftab started coughing shortly after electrodes were attached to his body and the readings couldn't be recorded properly. "Due to his coughing, the readings went haywire and we couldn't decide whether he was telling the truth or manipulating the test," the official said.
According to sources, Aaftab showed signs of stress when answering questions about Shraddha Walkar, his live-in partner whom he allegedly killed. The readings remained normal whenever he was asked questions unconnected to the case, such as the name of India's president or movie characters.

Shraddha murder case: Delhi-Mumbai police search Bhayandar creek


Prior to the test, the experts asked Aaftab about his family to record his responses to innocuous queries. Experts then started asking tricky questions and recorded the heart and pulse rates when he answered these. Experts will analyse the report of all sessions and submit a final report in a few days.
Meanwhile, police are probing a character named Badri who had met Aaftab and Shraddha in Himachal Pradesh during their vacation. He had accompanied the couple to Delhi and they lived at his flat in Chhatarpur Pahadi's D block before moving into a rented flat.
Police find it interesting that Badri also vacated his flat in May. Badri's landlord, Shekhar Panchadhye, told TOI on Friday that he lived in the house for around nine months. Asked why his tenant had vacated the house, Panchadhye said, "Badri had a car and he told me he was having parking problems." The cops have collected CCTV footage from cameras installed in the lane where Badri lived because Aaftab often visited him.

How Shraddha Walkar and Aaftab Poonawala's social media accounts showed two different personalities


Fri, 25 Nov 2022 23:35:00 -0600 en text/html https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/delhi/polygraph-test-aaftab-poonawala-seems-to-have-anticipated-queries-says-investigator/articleshow/95774875.cms
Killexams : Probe launched into alleged bid rigging of Tokyo 2020 test events

Prosecutors have begun investigating widespread bid rigging allegations for the rights to organize test events at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics, according to sources.

Investigators suspect that bidders conspired to decide in advance which companies would win bids for planning the test events, which are preparatory competitions held well ahead of the Games to review event conditions and ensure that security is sufficient.

The Tokyo District Public Prosecutors Office’s special investigation division launched an investigation in cooperation with the Japan Fair Trade Commission into whether the companies violated the antimonopoly law, which bans unfair restrictions on trade.

The Tokyo 2020 organizing committee solicited bids for work related to the test events, including the event planning, and major companies, including advertising firms such as public relations giant Dentsu Inc., ultimately won the bidding.

Between May 2018 and August 2018, the organizing committee conducted 26 auctions for the test events where it evaluated the bidders’ qualifications and prices.

Nine companies, including advertising firms such as Dentsu, and one joint venture company won bids.

The total price tag for the 26 contracts landed around 540 million yen ($3.84 million), with the contracts costing anywhere from around 4 million yen to 60 million yen.

But authorities suspect the companies involved colluded to decide in advance who would win each bid, according to sources.

Between 2018 and 2021, 56 test events were held.

The companies that won bids for planning the test events also took charge of running the test events, as well as competitions in the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics.

The companies won these rights through “negotiated contracts” without going through the bidding process. 

One of the negotiated contracts fell in the range of 1 billion to 2 billion yen.

The Tokyo District Public Prosecutors Office’s special investigation division has indicted Haruyuki Takahashi, 78, a former organizing committee executive, for accepting bribes over the selection of Games sponsors.

Suspicions about the test-event bid rigging surfaced during the investigation into whether Takahashi was bribed, according to sources.

The major advertising firms ADK Holdings Inc. and Daiko Advertising Inc. were among the bid winners for the test events, in addition to Dentsu, which played a leading role in coordinating Tokyo 2020.

Officials from ADK and Daiko have been arrested in connection with charges of bribing Takahashi.

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/14773666
Killexams : Mehrauli Murder: Investigators Gets Vital Clues During Aaftab's Narco Test
(MENAFN- IANS)

New Delhi, Dec 1 (IANS) Aaftab Amin Poonawalla, accused in the ghastly murder of his live-in partner Shraddha Walkar in Delhi's Mehrauli area, shared crucial information about the victim's mobile phone and the weapons he had used to chop her body, during his narco test on Thursday.

As per sources, he even admitted to killing Shraddha in a 'fit of rage'.

'The narco test was successful and provided several clues to the investigators. A detailed report will be shared with the Delhi Police soon,' the sources said.

Aaftab was taken to Ambedkar Hospital at 8.30 a.m. for his narco test, which started around 10 a.m. and ended at 12.30 p.m., they said.

Aaftab was administered sodium pentothal after which he became less inhibited and then answered the investigators' questions.

Though his confessions in the narco test cannot be used in the court, yet it proved that the investigators are proceeding in the right direction.

Pertinent to mention here that the findings of both polygraph and narco test are not admissible in the court. These tests will only help the Delhi Police gather evidence, and thereby increase the possibility of prosecution of the guilty.

Aaftab will undergo a second narco test, most likely on December 5.

'The second narco test will be without administering any drug. He will remain fully conscious and his answers will be analysed,' the sources said.

His polygraph test at the Forensic Science Laboratory (FSL) in Rohini ended on Tuesday.

According to a senior FSL official, Aaftab's polygraph test is now complete and a detailed report will be shared in a day or two with the Delhi Police.

Shraddha and Aaftab had met through the dating app 'Bumble' in 2018. They had come to Delhi on May 8 and shifted to the Chattarpur area on May 15. On May 18, Aaftab allegedly killed Shraddha, chopped her body into 35 pieces and dumped them across various places over a period of 18 days.

--IANS

ssh/arm

MENAFN01122022000231011071ID1105256071


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Thu, 01 Dec 2022 05:38:00 -0600 Date text/html https://menafn.com/1105256072/Mehrauli-Murder-Investigators-Gets-Vital-Clues-During-Aaftabs-Narco-Test
Killexams : Groundbreaking PGT-A Genetic Test Research Receives Prestigious Investigator Achievement Award

Fertility and Sterility Journal Recognizes Outstanding Scientific Paper Authored by RMA Fellow in Collaboration with Juno Genetics

BASKING RIDGE, N.J., Nov. 3, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- The top journal in the field of reproductive medicine, Fertility and Sterility, has named Julia Kim, MD, winner of its 2022 Investigator Achievement Award. Dr. Kim is first author of a landmark study on preimplantation genetic testing for aneuploidy (PGT-A). The research was conducted in collaboration with Juno Genetics during her fellowship at Reproductive Medicine Associates (RMA), part of the IVIRMA fertility network. The prestigious award recognizes an exceptional paper in which the first author is less than five years out of fellowship training or less than 35 years old. The award was recently presented to Dr. Kim at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) Scientific Congress in Anaheim, California.

Reproductive Medicine Associates

The study, "The concordance rates of an initial trophectoderm biopsy with the rest of the embryo using PGTSeq, a targeted next-generation sequencing platform for preimplantation genetic testing-aneuploidy," was Dr. Kim's thesis project and utilized Juno Genetics' PGTSeq assay. The results of 300 initial clinical-grade biopsies from blastocyst embryos were compared with those from subsequent rebiopsies of those embryos. The study assessed the reproducibility of the clinical result as an indicator of test accuracy. For both normal (euploid) and abnormal (aneuploid) results, nearly 100% concordance was demonstrated. Conversely, when initial biopsy results were predicted to be mosaic – in which the number of copies of a chromosome is between normal and abnormal, a result that causes uncertainty for clinicians and patients - rebiopsies showed poor reproducibility, with only 2% of embryos showing full mosaicism. This data illustrates the low predictive value of an initial mosaic diagnosis and questions the clinical utility of mosaicism reporting, an important consideration for patient care.

"It is an honor to receive this award from Fertility and Sterility," said Dr. Kim. "The research for which I am receiving the award would not have been possible without the combined efforts of an incredible team at IVIRMA and Juno Genetics. Our findings further endorse PGTSeq as one of the most validated PGT-A platforms in embryo genetic testing."

Dr. Marie Werner, a former RMA fellow who was recently appointed the new director of its fellowship program, added, "We are proud to celebrate and share in Fertility and Sterility's recognition of Dr. Kim's ground-breaking work in collaboration with Chaim Jalas and the Juno Genetics team during her time as a fellow at RMA."

PGT-A is performed on thousands of IVF cycles in the U.S. each year and the process tests DNA from just a few cells from the developing embryo. Because the results are used to make clinical decisions regarding which embryos are transferred and which are discarded, utilizing a test that accurately predicts the clinical outcome is key to realizing the benefits of PGT-A. However, nearly every PGT laboratory uses a custom test assay and each lab is independently responsible for demonstrating that their assay has been properly validated. Juno's PGTSeq is the only PGT-A test currently in use with published prospective, non-selection validation data supporting it. Juno's groundbreaking 2020 study "A multi-center, prospective, blinded, non-selection study evaluating the predictive value of an aneuploid diagnosis with PGT-A and the impact of biopsy," demonstrated a nearly 100% positive predictive value of the PGTSeq platform in diagnosing embryos that are not expected to lead to a successful pregnancy, and was a finalist for the ASRM 2020 Prize Paper Award.

"Juno Genetics is honored to be recognized by Fertility & Sterility for our scientific contributions. We are setting rigorous standards for PGT quality and validation and are committed to ongoing research in embryo diagnostics," stated Antonio Capalbo, PhD, Juno's new Chief Genomics Officer. "Dr. Kim's paper perfectly complements and builds upon Juno's other industry-leading publications on PGT-A, providing further compelling evidence about PGT-A accuracy when properly handled and validated in preclinical and clinical studies."

Chaim Jalas, the COO and Director of Technology Development at Juno and senior author on the study, added, "Completing proper analytical and clinical validations of individualized laboratory PGT-A assays prior to clinical use is one of the most critical and underrecognized components of responsible use of testing in IVF programs. Without diligent attention paid to this step, the positive and negative predictive values of the PGT-A results cannot be accurately assessed. This information is critical for evidence-based counseling and patient care."

Mosaic Research Presented at ASRM

At the 2022 ASRM conference, the RMA and Juno teams also presented the largest blinded non-selection outcome data set on the transfer of putative mosaic embryos. Dr. Pavan Gill, current RMA fellow, presented clinical outcome data from almost 5000 embryos transferred with mosaic PGT-A findings masked. Embryos testing negative for whole chromosome aneuploidy on the PGTSeq assay, including those with mosaic findings, were classified as being suitable for transfer; therefore, embryos were selected for use without knowledge of their potential mosaic status. Sustained pregnancy rates were not statistically different between embryos with and without putative mosaic findings, supporting the notion that mosaicism predicted by PGT testing may be a benign finding without known clinical utility. The study results suggest that by clinically reporting mosaic findings and thereby limiting the transfer of such embryos, embryos with good reproductive potential are being unnecessarily deprioritized or even excluded from patient use, a practice that may limit patients' chances for success through IVF.

"Juno Genetics is the only lab that has thoroughly and prospectively evaluated the clinical significance of all types of mosaic PGT-A findings. We are proud to be an international leader in embryo diagnostics and reproductive genetics," said Jalas. Capalbo added, "we are also proud that our research and efforts will contribute to significant advancements in scientific guidelines and recommendations from relevant societies in the field of reproductive medicine, ultimately improving treatment outcomes of infertile couples undergoing IVF."

About RMA

Reproductive Medicine Associates (RMA) has been helping build families through the most advanced treatment options and patient-centered fertility care for over 20 years. RMA is a leader in IVF research, pioneering the Single Embryo Transfer (SET), increasing safety for mom and baby and Pre-Implantation Genetic Testing (PGT-A), dramatically increasing successful outcomes. With access to practices nationwide, RMA has helped welcome over 50,000 babies into loving families. Learn more at rmanetwork.com.

About Juno Genetics

Our mission is to provide evidence based, clinically useful information of the highest quality for patients who are undergoing fertility treatments. Juno genetics is dedicated to advancing knowledge and enhancing outcomes in embryonic research, diagnosis, and education. Learn more at www.junogenetics.com.

Cision

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SOURCE Reproductive Medicine Associates

Thu, 03 Nov 2022 03:10:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/now/groundbreaking-pgt-genetic-test-research-150700667.html
Killexams : Groundbreaking PGT-A Genetic Test Research Receives Prestigious Investigator Achievement Award

Fertility and Sterility Journal Recognizes Outstanding Scientific Paper Authored by RMA Fellow in Collaboration with Juno Genetics

BASKING RIDGE, N.J., Nov. 3, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- The top journal in the field of reproductive medicine, Fertility and Sterility, has named Julia Kim, MD, winner of its 2022 Investigator Achievement Award. Dr. Kim is first author of a landmark study on preimplantation genetic testing for aneuploidy (PGT-A). The research was conducted in collaboration with Juno Genetics during her fellowship at Reproductive Medicine Associates (RMA), part of the IVIRMA fertility network. The prestigious award recognizes an exceptional paper in which the first author is less than five years out of fellowship training or less than 35 years old. The award was recently presented to Dr. Kim at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) Scientific Congress in Anaheim, California.

Reproductive Medicine Associates

The study, "The concordance rates of an initial trophectoderm biopsy with the rest of the embryo using PGTSeq, a targeted next-generation sequencing platform for preimplantation genetic testing-aneuploidy," was Dr. Kim's thesis project and utilized Juno Genetics' PGTSeq assay. The results of 300 initial clinical-grade biopsies from blastocyst embryos were compared with those from subsequent rebiopsies of those embryos. The study assessed the reproducibility of the clinical result as an indicator of test accuracy. For both normal (euploid) and abnormal (aneuploid) results, nearly 100% concordance was demonstrated. Conversely, when initial biopsy results were predicted to be mosaic – in which the number of copies of a chromosome is between normal and abnormal, a result that causes uncertainty for clinicians and patients - rebiopsies showed poor reproducibility, with only 2% of embryos showing full mosaicism. This data illustrates the low predictive value of an initial mosaic diagnosis and questions the clinical utility of mosaicism reporting, an important consideration for patient care. 

"It is an honor to receive this award from Fertility and Sterility," said Dr. Kim. "The research for which I am receiving the award would not have been possible without the combined efforts of an incredible team at IVIRMA and Juno Genetics. Our findings further endorse PGTSeq as one of the most validated PGT-A platforms in embryo genetic testing."

Dr. Marie Werner, a former RMA fellow who was recently appointed the new director of its fellowship program, added, "We are proud to celebrate and share in Fertility and Sterility's recognition of Dr. Kim's ground-breaking work in collaboration with Chaim Jalas and the Juno Genetics team during her time as a fellow at RMA."

PGT-A is performed on thousands of IVF cycles in the U.S. each year and the process tests DNA from just a few cells from the developing embryo. Because the results are used to make clinical decisions regarding which embryos are transferred and which are discarded, utilizing a test that accurately predicts the clinical outcome is key to realizing the benefits of PGT-A. However, nearly every PGT laboratory uses a custom test assay and each lab is independently responsible for demonstrating that their assay has been properly validated. Juno's PGTSeq is the only PGT-A test currently in use with published prospective, non-selection validation data supporting it. Juno's groundbreaking 2020 study "A multi-center, prospective, blinded, non-selection study evaluating the predictive value of an aneuploid diagnosis with PGT-A and the impact of biopsy," demonstrated a nearly 100% positive predictive value of the PGTSeq platform in diagnosing embryos that are not expected to lead to a successful pregnancy, and was a finalist for the ASRM 2020 Prize Paper Award.

"Juno Genetics is honored to be recognized by Fertility & Sterility for our scientific contributions. We are setting rigorous standards for PGT quality and validation and are committed to ongoing research in embryo diagnostics," stated Antonio Capalbo, PhD, Juno's new Chief Genomics Officer. "Dr. Kim's paper perfectly complements and builds upon Juno's other industry-leading publications on PGT-A, providing further compelling evidence about PGT-A accuracy when properly handled and validated in preclinical and clinical studies."

Chaim Jalas, the COO and Director of Technology Development at Juno and senior author on the study, added, "Completing proper analytical and clinical validations of individualized laboratory PGT-A assays prior to clinical use is one of the most critical and underrecognized components of responsible use of testing in IVF programs. Without diligent attention paid to this step, the positive and negative predictive values of the PGT-A results cannot be accurately assessed. This information is critical for evidence-based counseling and patient care."

Mosaic Research Presented at ASRM

At the 2022 ASRM conference, the RMA and Juno teams also presented the largest blinded non-selection outcome data set on the transfer of putative mosaic embryos. Dr. Pavan Gill, current RMA fellow, presented clinical outcome data from almost 5000 embryos transferred with mosaic PGT-A findings masked. Embryos testing negative for whole chromosome aneuploidy on the PGTSeq assay, including those with mosaic findings, were classified as being suitable for transfer; therefore, embryos were selected for use without knowledge of their potential mosaic status. Sustained pregnancy rates were not statistically different between embryos with and without putative mosaic findings, supporting the notion that mosaicism predicted by PGT testing may be a benign finding without known clinical utility. The study results suggest that by clinically reporting mosaic findings and thereby limiting the transfer of such embryos, embryos with good reproductive potential are being unnecessarily deprioritized or even excluded from patient use, a practice that may limit patients' chances for success through IVF.

"Juno Genetics is the only lab that has thoroughly and prospectively evaluated the clinical significance of all types of mosaic PGT-A findings. We are proud to be an international leader in embryo diagnostics and reproductive genetics," said Jalas. Capalbo added, "we are also proud that our research and efforts will contribute to significant advancements in scientific guidelines and recommendations from relevant societies in the field of reproductive medicine, ultimately improving treatment outcomes of infertile couples undergoing IVF."

About RMA

Reproductive Medicine Associates (RMA) has been helping build families through the most advanced treatment options and patient-centered fertility care for over 20 years. RMA is a leader in IVF research, pioneering the Single Embryo Transfer (SET), increasing safety for mom and baby and Pre-Implantation Genetic Testing (PGT-A), dramatically increasing successful outcomes. With access to practices nationwide, RMA has helped welcome over 50,000 babies into loving families. Learn more at rmanetwork.com.

About Juno Genetics

Our mission is to provide evidence based, clinically useful information of the highest quality for patients who are undergoing fertility treatments. Juno genetics is dedicated to advancing knowledge and enhancing outcomes in embryonic research, diagnosis, and education. Learn more at www.junogenetics.com.

Cision View original content to obtain multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/groundbreaking-pgt-a-genetic-test-research-receives-prestigious-investigator-achievement-award-301667839.html

SOURCE Reproductive Medicine Associates

Thu, 03 Nov 2022 03:31:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://fox2now.com/business/press-releases/cision/20221103NY24032/groundbreaking-pgt-a-genetic-test-research-receives-prestigious-investigator-achievement-award/
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