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Exam Code: IAPP-CIPP-E Certified Information Privacy Professional/Europe (CIPP/E) helper January 2024 by Killexams.com team

IAPP-CIPP-E Certified Information Privacy Professional/Europe (CIPP/E)

Test Detail:
The Certified Information Privacy Professional/Europe (CIPP/E) certification is offered by the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP). It is designed for professionals who work with European data protection laws and regulations. The certification validates an individual's knowledge and understanding of privacy concepts and practices specific to Europe. This description provides an overview of the CIPP/E certification.

Course Outline:
The CIPP/E certification is typically supported by training courses that cover key concepts and subjects related to European privacy regulations. The course may include the following modules:

1. Introduction to European Data Protection:
- Overview of European data protection laws and regulations.
- Key concepts and principles of data protection.
- Roles and responsibilities of data protection professionals.

2. European Regulatory Framework:
- Understanding the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).
- EU-U.S. Privacy Shield.
- Key concepts and terminology of the GDPR.

3. Data Protection Principles and Obligations:
- Lawfulness, fairness, and transparency of data processing.
- Purpose limitation and data minimization.
- Data subject rights and consent.
- Accountability and privacy governance.

4. Data Subject Rights:
- Rights of individuals under the GDPR.
- Handling data subject requests.
- Privacy notices and disclosures.

5. International Data Transfers:
- Transfer mechanisms and safeguards for international data transfers.
- Standard Contractual Clauses (SCCs).
- Binding Corporate Rules (BCRs).

6. Compliance and Risk Management:
- Privacy Impact Assessments (PIAs).
- Privacy by Design and Default.
- Data breach notification and incident response.
- Data protection audits and compliance programs.

Exam Objectives:
The CIPP/E certification test evaluates the candidate's knowledge and understanding of European data protection laws and regulations. The test objectives may include:

1. Understanding European data protection laws and regulations.
2. Applying key concepts and principles of data protection.
3. Demonstrating knowledge of the GDPR and its requirements.
4. Understanding data subject rights and their implementation.
5. Knowledge of mechanisms and safeguards for international data transfers.
6. Understanding privacy compliance and risk management practices.

Exam Syllabus:
The test syllabus for the CIPP/E certification may cover the following topics:

1. European Data Protection Laws and Regulations
2. General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)
3. Data Protection Principles and Obligations
4. Data Subject Rights and Consent
5. International Data Transfers
6. Compliance and Risk Management
Certified Information Privacy Professional/Europe (CIPP/E)
IAPP Professional/Europe helper

Other IAPP exams

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IAPP-CIPM Certified Information Privacy Manager
IAPP-CIPP-E Certified Information Privacy Professional/Europe (CIPP/E)
CIPP-US Certified Information Privacy Professional/United States (CIPP/US)
IAPP-CIPP-C Certified Information Privacy Professional/ Canada (CIPP/C)

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Question: 121
Under which of the following conditions does the General Data Protection Regulation NOT apply to the processing of personal data?
A. When the personal data is processed only in non-electronic form
B. When the personal data is collected and then pseudonymised by the controller
C. When the personal data is held by the controller but not processed for further purposes
D. When the personal data is processed by an individual only for their household activities
Answer: D
Explanation:
Reference: https://gdpr-info.eu/art-6-gdpr/
Question: 122
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next Question:
You have just been hired by a toy manufacturer based in Hong Kong. The company sells a broad range of dolls, action figures and plush toys that can be found internationally in
a wide variety of retail stores. Although the manufacturer has no offices outside Hong Kong and in fact does not employ any staff outside Hong Kong, it has entered into a
number of local distribution contracts. The toys produced by the company can be found in all popular toy stores throughout Europe, the United States and Asia. A large portion
of the company’s revenue is due to international sales.
The company now wishes to launch a new range of connected toys, ones that can talk and interact with children. The CEO of the company is touting these toys as the next big
thing, due to the increased possibilities offered: The figures can answer children’s questions on various subjects, such as mathematical calculations or the weather. Each figure is
equipped with a microphone and speaker and can connect to any smartphone or tablet via Bluetooth. Any mobile device within a 10-meter radius can connect to the toys via
Bluetooth as well. The figures can also be associated with other figures (from the same manufacturer) and interact with each other for an enhanced play experience.
When a child asks the toy a question, the request is sent to the cloud for analysis, and the answer is generated on cloud servers and sent back to the figure. The answer is given
through the figure’s integrated speakers, making it appear as though that the toy is actually responding to the child’s question. The packaging of the toy does not provide
technical details on how this works, nor does it mention that this feature requires an internet connection. The necessary data processing for this has been outsourced to a data
center located in South Africa.
However, your company has not yet revised its consumer-facing privacy policy to indicate this.
In parallel, the company is planning to introduce a new range of game systems through which consumers can play the characters they acquire in the course of playing the game.
The system will come bundled with a portal that includes a Near-Field Communications (NFC) reader. This device will read an RFID tag in the action figure, making the figure
come to life onscreen. Each character has its own stock features and abilities, but it is also possible to earn additional ones by accomplishing game goals. The only information
stored in the tag relates to the figures’ abilities. It is easy to switch characters during the game, and it is possible to bring the figure to locations outside of the home and have the
character’s abilities remain intact.
What presents the BIGGEST potential privacy issue with the company’s practices?
A. The NFC portal can read any data stored in the action figures
B. The information about the data processing involved has not been specified
C. The cloud service provider is in a country that has not been deemed adequate
D. The RFID tag in the action figures has the potential for misuse because of the toy’s evolving capabilities
Answer: B
Question: 123
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next Question:
Anna and Frank both work at Granchester University. Anna is a lawyer responsible for data protection, while Frank is a lecturer in the engineering department.
The University maintains a number of types of records:
– Student records, including names, student numbers, home addresses, pre-university information,
university attendance and performance records, details of special educational needs and financial
information.
– Staff records, including autobiographical materials (such as curricula, professional contact files, student evaluations and other relevant teaching files).
– Alumni records, including birthplaces, years of birth, dates of matriculation and conferrals of degrees. These records are available to former students after registering through
Granchester’s Alumni portal.
– Department for Education records, showing how certain demographic groups (such as first-generation students) could be expected, on average, to progress. These records do
not contain names or identification numbers.
– Under their security policy, the University encrypts all of its personal data records in transit and at rest.
In order to Improve his teaching, Frank wants to investigate how his engineering students perform in relational to Department for Education expectations. He has attended one of
Anna’s data protection training courses and knows that he should use no more personal data than necessary to accomplish his goal. He creates a program that will only export
some student data: previous schools attended, grades originally obtained, grades currently obtained and first time university attended. He wants to keep the records at the
individual student level. Mindful of Anna’s training, Frank runs the student numbers through an algorithm to transform them into different reference numbers. He uses the same
algorithm on each occasion so that he can update each record over time.
One of Anna’s tasks is to complete the record of processing activities, as required by the GDPR. After receiving her email reminder, as required by the GDPR. After receiving
her email reminder, Frank informs Anna about his performance database.
Ann explains to Frank that, as well as minimizing personal data, the University has to check that this new use of existing data is permissible. She also suspects that, under the
GDPR, a risk analysis may have to be carried out before the data processing can take place. Anna arranges to discuss this further with Frank after she has done some additional
research.
Frank wants to be able to work on his analysis in his spare time, so he transfers it to his home laptop (which is not encrypted). Unfortunately, when Frank takes the laptop into
the University he loses it on the train. Frank has to see Anna that day to discuss compatible processing. He knows that he needs to report security incidents, so he decides to tell
Anna about his lost laptop at the same time.
Before Anna determines whether Frank’s performance database is permissible, what additional information does she need?
A. More information about Frank’s data protection training.
B. More information about the extent of the information loss.
C. More information about the algorithm Frank used to mask student numbers.
D. More information about what students have been told and how the research will be used.
Answer: D
Question: 124
Which aspect of the GDPR will likely have the most impact on the consistent implementation of data protection laws throughout the European Union?
A. That it essentially functions as a one-stop shop mechanism
B. That it takes the form of a Regulation as opposed to a Directive
C. That it makes notification of large-scale data breaches mandatory
D. That it makes appointment of a data protection officer mandatory
Answer: A
Explanation:
Reference: https://ec.europa.eu/info/law/law-topic/data-protection/data-protection-eu_en
Question: 125
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next Question:
You have just been hired by a toy manufacturer based in Hong Kong. The company sells a broad range of dolls, action figures and plush toys that can be found internationally in
a wide variety of retail stores. Although the manufacturer has no offices outside Hong Kong and in fact does not employ any staff outside Hong Kong, it has entered into a
number of local distribution contracts. The toys produced by the company can be found in all popular toy stores throughout Europe, the United States and Asia. A large portion
of the company’s revenue is due to international sales.
The company now wishes to launch a new range of connected toys, ones that can talk and interact with children. The CEO of the company is touting these toys as the next big
thing, due to the increased possibilities offered: The figures can answer children’s questions on various subjects, such as mathematical calculations or the weather. Each figure is
equipped with a microphone and speaker and can connect to any smartphone or tablet via Bluetooth. Any mobile device within a 10-meter radius can connect to the toys via
Bluetooth as well. The figures can also be associated with other figures (from the same manufacturer) and interact with each other for an enhanced play experience.
When a child asks the toy a question, the request is sent to the cloud for analysis, and the answer is generated on cloud servers and sent back to the figure. The answer is given
through the figure’s integrated speakers, making it appear as though that the toy is actually responding to the child’s question. The packaging of the toy does not provide
technical details on how this works, nor does it mention that this feature requires an internet connection. The necessary data processing for this has been outsourced to a data
center located in South Africa.
However, your company has not yet revised its consumer-facing privacy policy to indicate this.
In parallel, the company is planning to introduce a new range of game systems through which consumers can play the characters they acquire in the course of playing the game.
The system will come bundled with a portal that includes a Near-Field Communications (NFC) reader. This device will read an RFID tag in the action figure, making the figure
come to life onscreen. Each character has its own stock features and abilities, but it is also possible to earn additional ones by accomplishing game goals. The only information
stored in the tag relates to the figures’ abilities. It is easy to switch characters during the game, and it is possible to bring the figure to locations outside of the home and have the
character’s abilities remain intact.
In light of the requirements of Article 32 of the GDPR (related to the Security of Processing), which practice should the company institute?
A. Encrypt the data in transit over the wireless Bluetooth connection.
B. Include dual-factor authentication before each use by a child in order to ensure a minimum amount of security.
C. Include three-factor authentication before each use by a child in order to ensure the best level of security possible.
D. Insert contractual clauses into the contract between the toy manufacturer and the cloud service provider, since South Africa is outside the European Union.
Answer: A
Question: 126
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next Question:
You have just been hired by a toy manufacturer based in Hong Kong. The company sells a broad range of dolls, action figures and plush toys that can be found internationally in
a wide variety of retail stores. Although the manufacturer has no offices outside Hong Kong and in fact does not employ any staff outside Hong Kong, it has entered into a
number of local distribution contracts. The toys produced by the company can be found in all popular toy stores throughout Europe, the United States and Asia. A large portion
of the company’s revenue is due to international sales.
The company now wishes to launch a new range of connected toys, ones that can talk and interact with children. The CEO of the company is touting these toys as the next big
thing, due to the increased possibilities offered: The figures can answer children’s questions on various subjects, such as mathematical calculations or the weather. Each figure is
equipped with a microphone and speaker and can connect to any smartphone or tablet via Bluetooth. Any mobile device within a 10-meter radius can connect to the toys via
Bluetooth as well. The figures can also be associated with other figures (from the same manufacturer) and interact with each other for an enhanced play experience.
When a child asks the toy a question, the request is sent to the cloud for analysis, and the answer is generated on cloud servers and sent back to the figure. The answer is given
through the figure’s integrated speakers, making it appear as though that the toy is actually responding to the child’s question. The packaging of the toy does not provide
technical details on how this works, nor does it mention that this feature requires an internet connection. The necessary data processing for this has been outsourced to a data
center located in South Africa.
However, your company has not yet revised its consumer-facing privacy policy to indicate this.
In parallel, the company is planning to introduce a new range of game systems through which consumers can play the characters they acquire in the course of playing the game.
The system will come bundled with a portal that includes a Near-Field Communications (NFC) reader. This device will read an RFID tag in the action figure, making the figure
come to life onscreen. Each character has its own stock features and abilities, but it is also possible to earn additional ones by accomplishing game goals. The only information
stored in the tag relates to the figures’ abilities. It is easy to switch characters during the game, and it is possible to bring the figure to locations outside of the home and have the
character’s abilities remain intact.
Why is this company obligated to comply with the GDPR?
A. The company has offices in the E
C. The company employs staff in the E
E. The company’s data center is located in a country outside the E
G. The company’s products are marketed directly to EU customers.
Answer: D
Question: 127
What is the consequence if a processor makes an independent decision regarding the purposes and means of processing it carries out on behalf of a controller?
A. The controller will be liable to pay an administrative fine
B. The processor will be liable to pay compensation to affected data subjects
C. The processor will be considered to be a controller in respect of the processing concerned
D. The controller will be required to demonstrate that the unauthorized processing negatively affected one or more of the parties involved
Answer: C
Explanation:
Reference: https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-data-protection/guide-to-the-general-dataprotection-regulation-gdpr/key-definitions/controllers-and-processors/
Question: 128
How is the retention of communications traffic data for law enforcement purposes addressed by European data protection law?
A. The ePrivacy Directive allows individual EU member states to engage in such data retention.
B. The ePrivacy Directive harmonizes EU member states’ rules concerning such data retention.
C. The Data Retention Directive’s annulment makes such data retention now permissible.
D. The GDPR allows the retention of such data for the prevention, investigation, detection or prosecution of criminal offences only.
Answer: D
Explanation:
Reference: https://www.law.kuleuven.be/citip/en/archive/copy_of_publications/440retention-of-traffic-datadumortier-goemans2f90.pdf (9)
Question: 129
According to the GDPR, how is pseudonymous personal data defined?
A. Data that can no longer be attributed to a specific data subject without the use of additional information kept separately.
B. Data that can no longer be attributed to a specific data subject, with no possibility of re-identifying the data.
C. Data that has been rendered anonymous in such a manner that the data subject is no longer identifiable.
D. Data that has been encrypted or is subject to other technical safeguards.
Answer: A
Explanation:
Reference: https://www.chino.io/blog/what-is-pseudonymous-data-according-to-the-gdpr/
Question: 130
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next Question:
Jason, a long-time customer of ABC insurance, was involved in a minor car accident a few months ago. Although no one was hurt, Jason has been plagued by texts and calls
from a company called Erbium Insurance offering to help him recover compensation for personal injury. Jason has heard about insurance companies selling customers’ data to
third parties, and he’s convinced that Erbium must have gotten his information from ABC.
Jason has also been receiving an increased amount of marketing information from ABC, trying to sell him their full range of their insurance policies.
Perturbed by this, Jason has started looking at price comparison sites on the Internet and has been shocked to find that other insurers offer much cheaper rates than ABC, even
though he has been a loyal customer for many years. When his ABC policy comes up for renewal, he decides to switch to Xentron Insurance.
In order to activate his new insurance policy, Jason needs to supply Xentron with information about his No Claims bonus, his vehicle and his driving history. After researching
his rights under the GDPR, he writes to ask ABC to transfer his information directly to Xentron. He also takes this opportunity to ask ABC to stop using his personal data for
marketing purposes.
ABC supplies Jason with a PDF and XML (Extensible Markup Language) versions of his No Claims Certificate, but tells Jason it cannot transfer his data directly to Xentron at
this is not technically feasible. ABC also explains that Jason’s contract included a provision whereby Jason agreed that his data could be used for marketing purposes; according
to ABC, it is too late for Jason to change his mind about this. It angers Jason when he recalls the wording of the contract, which was filled with legal jargon and very confusing.
In the meantime, Jason is still receiving unwanted calls from Erbium Insurance. He writes to Erbium to ask for the name of the organization that supplied his details to them. He
warns Erbium that he plans to complain to the data protection authority because he thinks their company has been using his data unlawfully. His letter states that he does not
want his data being used by them in any way.
Erbium’s response letter confirms Jason’s suspicions. Erbium is ABC’s wholly owned subsidiary, and they received information about Jason’s accident from ABC shortly after
Jason submitted his accident claim. Erbium assures Jason that there has been no breach of the GDPR, as Jason’s contract included a provision in which he agreed to share his
information with ABC’s affiliates for business purposes.
Jason is disgusted by the way in which he has been treated by ABC, and writes to them insisting that all his information be erased from their computer system.
Which statement accurately summarizes ABC’s obligation in regard to Jason’s data portability request?
A. ABC does not have a duty to transfer Jason’s data to Xentron if doing so is legitimately not technically feasible.
B. ABC does not have to transfer Jason’s data to Xentron because the right to data portability does not apply where personal data are processed in order to carry out tasks in the
public interest.
C. ABC has failed to comply with the duty to transfer Jason’s data to Xentron because the duty applies wherever personal data are processed by automated means and necessary
for the performance of a contract with the customer.
D. ABC has failed to comply with the duty to transfer Jason’s data to Xentron because it has an obligation to develop commonly used, machine-readable and interoperable
formats so that all customer data can be ported to other insurers on request.
Answer: C
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Job loss and breakups stand as formidable challenges, triggering an emotional maelstrom that disrupts the very fabric of our lives. The aftershocks reverberate across multiple dimensions, leaving mental health, self-assurance, and general wellness in disarray. Coping with the upheaval of these events can be an overwhelming task, often plunging individuals into uncharted emotional territory. Yet, within this chaos lies an anchor of hope: the profound impact of seeking professional help. In these tumultuous times, the invaluable support and guidance provided by trained professionals can serve as a beacon of resilience, guiding individuals through the labyrinth of emotions and uncertainties. Through tailored strategies and compassionate understanding, seeking professional assistance becomes not just a lifeline but a pathway to reclaiming stability, fostering healing, and ultimately, rediscovering a renewed sense of self.

At the onset of such a crisis, individuals often find themselves overwhelmed by a myriad of emotions. Whether it’s the sudden loss of a job or the dissolution of a relationship, the feelings of shock, sadness, anger, and anxiety can be all-consuming. This emotional rollercoaster can impede decision-making, cloud judgment, and hinder the ability to move forward. Seeking professional help at this stage provides a safe space to navigate these emotions, offering a compassionate ear and strategies to cope.

Therapists, counselors, and life coaches play pivotal roles in aiding recovery from job loss or breakup by offering tailored approaches to address specific challenges. For those experiencing job loss, career counselors assist in rediscovering professional strengths, exploring new opportunities, and devising effective job search strategies. Their expertise helps individuals reframe their perspectives, identifying possibilities where they might only see setbacks.

Similarly, in the realm of relationship breakups, therapists specializing in relationship counseling guide individuals through the grieving process, fostering self-reflection, and aiding in understanding the dynamics that led to the breakup. They equip individuals with tools to heal emotional wounds, rebuild self-worth, and navigate future relationships more consciously.

One of the most significant advantages of seeking professional help lies in the unbiased perspective it offers. Friends and family, while well-intentioned, may not always provide the neutral guidance needed during such sensitive times. Professionals, on the other hand, bring objectivity and expertise, offering insights and strategies that are tailored to individual needs.

Moreover, professional help doesn’t just revolve around emotional support. It extends to practical guidance as well. Financial advisors can assist those facing job loss in managing their finances during the transition period, providing a sense of stability amidst uncertainty. Legal advisors specializing in divorce or separation proceedings can offer crucial advice to individuals navigating the legal aspects of a breakup, ensuring a smoother process.

The stigma surrounding seeking professional help for emotional or psychological support is gradually diminishing as more people recognize its efficacy in aiding recovery. It’s essential to view seeking professional guidance during these challenging times as an act of self-care and strength rather than a sign of weakness.

In the labyrinth of recovering from job loss or a breakup, the path to healing is intricate and often strewn with emotional obstacles. However, amidst this complexity lies a guiding light: the invaluable assistance of professional support. Offering a tapestry of emotional solace, personalized guidance, and pragmatic strategies, seeking professional help becomes a linchpin in the journey toward restoration. It’s the beacon that illuminates the route through emotional tumult and the compass that navigates towards a redefined sense of purpose.

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This story was created using AI technology.

Sun, 31 Dec 2023 10:00:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://rollingout.com/2024/01/01/professional-job-loss-breakup-recovery/
Why Europe's 'lonely' tech entrepreneurs need help
Image caption,

Leo Apotheker during his short reign at Hewlett-Packard in 2011

Why can't Europe replicate the dazzling achievements of Silicon Valley?

"We're not just a bunch of incompetent Europeans who are only good for going to the beach," says Leo Apotheker.

Mr Apotheker ran SAP, a German business software company that rose to dominate its field. He also had a short period as chief executive of US giant Hewlett-Packard.

He believes Europe has got a lot to offer.

Partially retired, the 69-year old divides his time between Paris and London and has spent the last decade advising small software companies.

Today he has a new role, as one of a team of tech veterans determined to end Europe's underwhelming record of producing giant technology firms.

Mr Apotheker is part of Boardwave, the brainchild of Phill Robinson. Mr Robinson is a British former software boss who has lived in Silicon Valley and retired after a diagnosis of Parkinson's Disease.

Boardwave grew out of Mr Robinson ruminating on what he could do to lift Europe's tech scene to Californian levels.

Mr Apotheker joined Boardwave the day after its website went live. As Mr Robinson puts it, "we're grateful for the careers we've had and the opportunity to share what we know."

Both are driven by a pressing sense of passing time and a desire to spare future generations of tech pioneers the pains they endured.

Mr Apotheker points out that Europe does have some leaders. He highlights specialist fields such as industrial design programs and the UK's lead in financial software. London's financial technology (fintech) scene wins his approval.

But why aren't there more?

Image source, Getty Images
Image caption,

Silicon Valley is the home to Apple, Alphabet, Facebook, eBay and many others

He rejects the traditional argument that finding money is much easier in the US.

"I don't think this is about raising capital, Europe is awash with venture capital companies."

Investors will sink $50bn into European tech businesses in 2023, according to venture capital firm Atomico.

One problem for European tech entrepreneurs is a lack of peers.

"I lived in Silicon Valley and there's always a group of people around who can provide you advice. When I ran SAP and needed advice I talked to the wall!, " says Mr Apotheker.

"Boardwave is trying to mentor other company bosses to help them grow. Being in charge can be a very lonely job. You worry about something in the middle of the night and it keeps on chewing at you. The value of picking up the phone and talking to someone is huge."

He sees Boardwave's team saving his youthful successors from those sleepless nights and guiding the big ideas to fruition.

Mr Apotheker still wishes he could have had a sympathetic guide to share concerns with when he ran SAP. "There were a lot of decisions I struggled with at SAP and I wish I could have talked with someone who'd been there before me, someone I could bounce ideas off."

Boardwave was also born out of a sense that time is not on the side of wise older guys. "Of the few hairs I have left lots of them are grey. So I'm willing to spend the time I have left on this."

That includes talking about decisions that did not work out.

"We talk about mistakes we've made. We've made a lot of mistakes, and got a few things right!"

European scepticism is often cited as a poor contrast to the overwhelming optimism of Silicon Valley.

Image source, Getty Images
Image caption,

Former Silicon Valley star Elizabeth Holmes is serving a 11 years in prison for fraud

Yet Mr Apotheker values the ability to ask penetrating questions in an industry with its fair share of fraudulent ventures such as Theranos, the Silicon Valley start-up whose founder Elizabeth Holmes has just begun an eleven-year prison sentence for defrauding investors.

"I am of mixed German/French heritage and I can be cynical and sceptical but I turn that to an advantage."

His colleague, 58-year old Mr Robinson, is candid about how Parkinson's Disease motivates him. "I've accumulated a lot of knowledge of the software sector and I want to share it with others before my brain gets mushy."

He took one of the first computer science degrees in the UK and worked in Silicon Valley at the age of 23, beginning an impressive career in business software.

"I believe Europeans have a great talent pool but it's fragmented. We're 1,000 miles across while Silicon Valley is 40 miles long." He founded Boardwave on his kitchen table in 2022 and it now has 800 members, chief executives and founders across Europe.

Image caption,

Europe's tech scene is fragmented says Phill Robinson

Start-ups registered with Boardwave can connect with these mentors. Boardwave aims to shepherd them towards the critical stage of ÂŁ100m turnover when they can spread their wings on the international stage.

Other established initiatives echo Boardwave's drive to expand Europe's top tier of tech. Finland hosts a huge annual gathering, Slush, where tech start-ups can meet potential investors.

The boss of Finnish success story WithSecure, a cybersecurity business that confronts the global threat of malware, hacking and ransom demands, is Juhani Hintikka.

He too does pro bono coaching for local start-ups and agrees with the concept behind Boardwave. "People do ask for advice and I try to do my bit."

But he admits innovators are curbed by Europe's fragmentation, with multiple business cultures as opposed to the vast home market US companies can tap into.

Ever ambitious, Mr Apotheker cites planemaker Airbus as a great European guiding light. "European airline makers came together to take on Boeing and Airbus is now the largest in the world."

Sun, 02 Jul 2023 23:21:00 -0500 en-GB text/html https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-65889259
Pro-Palestine demonstrations face restrictions in Europe No result found, try new keyword!Pro-Palestine demonstrations in Europe have encountered various restrictions and bans, raising concerns about freedom of expression and assembly. In contrast, there have been no restrictions or ... Sat, 09 Dec 2023 10:00:00 -0600 text/html https://www.aa.com.tr/en/europe/pro-palestine-demonstrations-face-restrictions-in-europe/3017412 Engaging with Europe: Professional Skills

This information is for the 2020/21 session.

Dr Mareike Kleine CBG 6.07

This course is compulsory on the MSc in Culture and Conflict in a Global Europe, MSc in Culture and Conflict in a Global Europe (LSE & Sciences Po), MSc in European Studies (Research), MSc in European and International Public Policy, MSc in European and International Public Policy (LSE and Bocconi), MSc in European and International Public Policy (LSE and Sciences Po), MSc in Political Economy of Europe and MSc in Political Economy of Europe (LSE and Sciences Po). This course is available on the MSc in International Migration and Public Policy and MSc in The Global Political Economy of China and Europe (LSE and Fudan). This course is not available as an outside option.

This innovative programme introduces European Institute students to professional skills for a successful career that engages with Europe. The course consists of a number of workshops, seminar series and interactive simulations from which students can choose. The aim of the course is that European Institute students leave LSE with a competitive CV and connections with alumni and professionals.

EU450 sessions are offered in both the Michaelmas and Lent Terms and will typically be held online. The teaching format and hours for each session will vary across the different workshops and seminars on offer.  Details about how to sign up for a place on sessions of interest will be sent to students’ LSE email accounts on a rolling basis throughout the Michaelmas and Lent Terms.

Students are not required to attend all workshops and seminars on offer.  Students only need to attend those sessions for which they have signed up to attend and for which they have received a confirmed place.

Formative work will vary based on the workshops attended.  

There is no examination for this course.  Students will qualify for a certificate of participation for some workshops upon completion of formative work.

Thu, 17 Sep 2020 16:11:00 -0500 text/html https://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/calendar2020-2021/courseGuides/EU/2020_EU450.htm
Will the hard right really sweep Europe in 2024? If it does, here’s what could happen

There has been much talk of late about a renewed far right surge in Europe, especially as the continent looks ahead to the European parliament elections next June. Is this tilt to the right likely to happen – and what could it mean for us?

This fear has ebbed and flowed. It took off when Georgia Meloni’s far-right Brothers of Italy surged in elections last year, as did the hard-right Sweden Democrats, which became part of the rightwing governing bloc and shapes its policies for the first time. The following months saw rightwing wins in Finland and Greece too. The firm conviction that there was an inexorable rise of the right then crumbled in July this year, when in Spain the hard-right Vox and the conservative Popular party failed to win a joint majority in elections, leading to the eventual return of a progressive coalition led by Pedro Sánchez. Three months later, Poles voted to oust the populist right Law and Justice party, opening the way to a liberal government led by a former president of the European Council, Donald Tusk.

The anxiety about a hard-right wave is back with a vengeance, however, after Geert Wilders’ Freedom party (PVV) unexpectedly triumphed in Dutch elections to become the Netherlands’ biggest party in parliament, with over 23% of the vote.

These results point to two political and three policy implications for Europe in the months ahead. We should be wary of sweeping political conclusions, which is in some ways reassuring. All elections, including the European parliament ones next year, reflect national stories. While people across different European countries are subject to comparable forces and dynamics, rarely do these trigger the same political outcomes.

The elections over the past year tell us this. While it’s impossible to anticipate the outcome of next year’s European elections, it is likely that the next European Commission will reflect the same pro-European centre-right, social-democrat, liberal and green majority that supports the current set of EU leaders. The largest grouping in the European parliament puts forward its lead candidate for the presidency of the EU’s executive arm, the commission.

Furthermore, the 27 heads of government sitting around the European Council table who will next summer have the last word on those appointments come from different political backgrounds. Of the five largest countries – Germany, France, Italy, Spain and Poland – two (Germany and Spain) are led by socialists, two (France and Poland) by liberals and only one (Italy) by the hard right. Even if Meloni is joined by Wilders next summer, this still points to a rather mixed political constellation in Europe.

Less reassuringly, political winds are clearly blowing to the hard right, and in countries such as Germany and France, especially, this is a major source of concern. This seems to be the consequence of several factors, among them the politically suicidal tendency of moderate parties to cooperate with the extremes, believing this will take the wind out of the latter’s political sails.

Every time they do so, they either fail to increase their support (as in the case of the People’s party in Spain) or they end up losing votes to the hard right (as in Italy and the Netherlands). This is not surprising. When moderate parties rule out cooperation with the radical right, citizens know that a vote for the latter is wasted, as these parties will not enter government. When instead moderates wink at the hard right, that disincentive evaporates.

If in addition, centre-right parties buy into a rightwing populist agenda, for instance by overblowing immigration as a policy priority, voters are more inclined to opt for the hard-right original, rather than the blander moderate copy. The famous definition of madness (doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results) seems to be playing out in Europe, however. The centre-right European parliament grouping, the European People’s party, led by the German MEP Manfred Weber, has, I understand, warmed to the idea of cooperation with the hard-right European Conservatives and Reformists, a grouping that includes the Brothers of Italy and Poland’s Law and Justice.

If we imagine a more rightwing political landscape in Europe, what are the policy implications? First is the risk of dwindling European support for Ukraine. We are already witnessing how right populist leaders such as Viktor Orbán are raising their voices, threatening to block the opening of accession talks with Kyiv and a €50bn package of economic assistance to Ukraine, as well as €20bn in military aid.

Orbán’s pro-Russian sympathies are nothing new, but the fact that he feels emboldened to vent them so openly now is no coincidence. He is probably calculating that political winds are changing in his favour. So far, rightwing leaders such as Meloni are toeing the pro-Ukraine line. Yet worrying signals have emerged. A few weeks ago, when she was pranked by two Russian comedians pretending to be the president of the African Union, Meloni spilled the beans. The concerning bit of that call was not the prank itself (other European leaders have fallen into the same trap), but what Meloni said while thinking that she was talking to an African leader with pro-Russian sympathies. The Italian prime minister spoke of western fatigue and the hope that a compromise with Russia could stem from this: hardly evidence of steadfast support for Ukraine.

Second is the climate crisis. Here too, rightwing pushback is getting stronger and has already watered down the European green deal, especially on such broader sustainability agenda concerns as deforestation and agriculture. Those headwinds are likely to pick up in the months ahead. They probably won’t block the move to decarbonisation altogether, but support for any measures is likely to be articulated more in terms of technological innovation and industrial policy than climate as such.

Having said that, it is hard to see a stronger right wing supporting a European industrial policy that requires fresh funds. For the same reason, while a more rightwing Europe might in principle back greater emphasis on defence, it would be less likely to approve a significant uptick of European funds dedicated to this purpose.

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Third is migration. The paradox here is that the more Europeans, spurred on by the populist right, get hyped up about immigration, the less likely they are to find policy solutions to address the phenomenon. Rightwing parties across Europe all agree they don’t want irregular migrants or asylum seekers, but they profoundly disagree on sharing out the responsibility between them. They therefore concur to offload the problem on to countries of transit and origin. Yet with the exception of the EU-Turkey deal struck in 2016, in no case has this approach really worked, with the European memorandum of understanding with Tunisia being the latest case of failure.

None of this bodes well. That said, a tilt to the right in Europe is unlikely to spark the end of liberal democracy on the continent, or a new wave of radical Euroscepticism with countries queuing up to leave the EU, as feared back in 2016 after the Brexit referendum. That political season is over for now. Until and unless there is a Donald Trump comeback to the White House. In that catastrophic scenario, all bets are off, as many masks would come off and the hard right would probably show an uglier face in Europe than we have hitherto seen.

This article was amended on 14 December 2023 to clarify the role in Sweden’s government of the Sweden Democrats.

Thu, 14 Dec 2023 01:20:00 -0600 Nathalie Tocci en text/html https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2023/dec/14/hard-right-europe-2024-ukraine-climate-election-us
Moldova's pro-European president Sandu says she will seek second term

CHISINAU (Reuters) - Moldova's pro-European President Maia Sandu said on Sunday she intends to run for a second presidential term in late 2024 to bring the issue of the country's European integration to its logical conclusion.

"We still have important steps to take and I pledge to continue, if you will provide me your trust for a new term," Sandu said in a statement published on the presidential website.

Sandu, a former World Bank economist who favours closer ties with the European Union, defeated the pro-Moscow incumbent Igor Dodon in a run-off vote in December 2020.

The presidential elections are due to be held in November-December 2024, with the exact date to be determined by parliament.

Integration with the EU is one of Sandu's goals, with Brussels announcing earlier this month the start of accession talks with Chisinau.

"Our future is in the European family and we need to say clearly - the whole country - which path we choose for Moldova. I call on parliament to initiate a referendum next autumn, in which the voice of the citizens will be decisive," she said.

Sandu has denounced Russia's invasion of Ukraine and accused Moscow of plotting a coup to oust her.

(Reporting by Alexander Tanas, Writing by Pavel Polityuk; Editing by Kirsten Donovan)

Sat, 23 Dec 2023 16:04:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.aol.com/moldovas-pro-european-president-sandu-110408778.html




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