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Exam Code: HPE0-J57 Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
Designing HPE Storage Solutions
HP Designing history
Killexams : HP Designing history - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/HPE0-J57 Search results Killexams : HP Designing history - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/HPE0-J57 https://killexams.com/exam_list/HP Killexams : Did HP Really Build a Robot?

It looks and acts like an autonomous robot, but as you watch the machine in action, you realize it’s drawing construction markings. This is HP, so of course, it’s a printer.

At Autodesk University, HP introduced and demonstrated its HP SitePrint robot. The automated robot draws complex construction site layouts in less time than the manual process. SitePrint removes a bottleneck in the construction process. HP noted that the robot can Excellerate productivity by as much as ten times. “The goal of SitePrint is productivity,” Xavi Juarez, director of construction services at HP, told Design News. “We had a team that started working on this more than four years ago. The objective was productivity gains. We did the testing at customer sites. We worked on more than 80 projects.”

SitePrint was designed for autonomous operation, including obstacle avoidance. Juarez noted it can print lines and complex objects accurately with consistent repeatability. The text-printing capabilities bring data from the digital model to the construction site. “The issue this solves is the time it takes to do this work while other construction work waits,” said Juarez. “It’s hard to find skilled people to do this work.”

The concept of SitePrint came from an internal idea competition at HP’s Barcelona research and development center. “It began as an innovation contest for employees. We set up teams that had to go through a process with milestones and validation with customers,” said Juarez. “This was the winning one. After an in-depth investigation, we funded the team for further development and testing.”

According to HP, SitePrint includes a suite of technologies designed to automate the site layout process. The technology includes:

  • A rugged and autonomous robotic device designed to operate in the conditions of the construction site. Light and compact, it is very transportable, including a hard case that fits all the solution components
  • Cloud tools to submit and prepare jobs to be printed, manage the fleet, and track usage
  • A touch screen tablet for remote control and configuration
  • A portfolio of inks for different surfaces, environmental conditions, and durability requirements

HP brought customers into the development process of SitePrint to make sure the robot was able to deliver the accuracy of a skilled worker. “The existing manual layout process can be slow and labor intensive. Despite being done by specialists, there is always the risk of human error, which can result in costly reworks,” said Albert Zulps, director of emerging technology at Skanska, a construction and development company that utilizes SitePrint on two US projects. “Layout experts are a scarce resource who add a lot of value in terms of planning and strategy, but often end up dedicating most of their time to manual execution.”

HP’s SitePrint robot is available now to customers in North America through an early access program. The final product and a wider commercial launch are planned for 2023. “The manufacturing will be done in Barcelona.,” said Juarez.

Mon, 21 Nov 2022 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.designnews.com/automation/did-hp-really-build-robot
Killexams : Inside the HP Reverb: How HP Went All-In on Enterprise VR

HP wants you to know its all-in on enterprise virtual reality.

Among the various names vying for a place in the enterprise VR market, HP has arguably been one of the most surprising. The company, traditionally known for its printer and PC products, has become a pillar in the VR hardware landscape in only a few years. In 2017 the company unveiled the HP Z VR Backpack, essentially a VR-ready PC in a backpack form factor targeted at enabling powerful VR experiences with greater freedom of movement. HP followed that up with its first VR headset as part of the Windows Mixed Reality ecosystem.

Now, HP has debuted the HP Reverb, a Windows Mixed Reality headset focused on the enterprise market. The headset offers significant upgrades from the previous model and doubles down on the company's commitment to the commercial VR market.

According to John Ludwig, Global Lead of VR Headsets at HP, “Back in 2017 what was a surprise to us at the time, but in retrospect quite obvious, is that HP has a large commercial enterprise business and those sales people start ringing our phones asking, 'How do we get our hands on that VR backpack and VR headset?' ”

That initial flood of interest led HP to create a division dedicated fully to VR for commercial and enterprise use cases. Where other companies were going strongly after the video game and entertainment markets – largely viewed as the greatest area of opportunity for VR, HP decided it was going to create products aimed at engineers and designers.

Those verticals have ranged from product design and architecture to training and healthcare applications. “Training has been huge for two reasons,” Ludwig told Design News. “One, it saves a lot of cost. You don't have to fly a person in to train by actually working a the physical engine, for example. You can do in VR for the first 30-40 hours and then do the finishing touches in the real world. The other thing is actually the retention rate has been quite impressive for VR-based training. Retention is about five to 10 percent for lectures or studying quiz afterwards. VR is about 80 percent.”

They Want Resolution and Comfort

HP's first generation of VR products garnered feedback from customers and communities that the company has used in creating its latest products, including the Reverb. “The simple feedback from the architecture, healthcare, and product design sectors was that they needed more resolution,” Ludwig said. “They need to be able see the details so they can make VR a tool they use more often.

“In training a big issue is actually text illegibility. A lot of training is still on documents, using multiple choice questions and things like that. And so the ability to read text very well or comfortably in current generation VR hurts their ability go from documentation to VR training.”

The other big piece of feedback HP got was in relation to comfort. Even casual VR users are familiar with issues of headset weight and overall comfort, particularly in applications like product design and training that can involve a lot of head movement. The equation is pretty simple, if you make a headset more comfortable, you provide users the ability (and desire) to wear them for longer.

HP's first VR headset wasn't designed solely by the company. The base unit work was provided by Microsoft as part of its larger strategy to maintain a certain standard among the first Windows Mixed Reality headsets to roll out.

But Ludwig said HP knew if it was going to implement the feedback it had been receiving and meet expectations, the Reverb would have to be designed from the ground up.

Indeed the most notable specs for the Reverb come in the way of resolution and comfort. The headset boasts a 114-degree field-of-view with a 2160 x 2160-pixel resolution and a 90Hz refresh rate. Mathematically, that's nearly double the resolution of leading headsets such as the HTC Vive Pro, Oculus Rift, and Samsung Odyssey.

The headset itself weighs about 1.1 pounds. And while it is not a wireless headset (it uses DisplayPort 1.3 and USB 3.0), it does offer inside-out tracking, meaning it doesn't need external sensors (or “lighthouses”) to track the wearer's movement in space.

“We're utilizing the fact that you have two eyes to increase field of view and also boost clarity."

The Reverb comes packaged with wireless controllers (the standard Windows Mixed Reality controllers). However, because Bluetooth connectivity can sometimes be unreliable, HP's engineers have opted to implement a Bluetooth radio directly into the headset to avoid having to rely on the PC's Bluetooth and avoiding possible interference from other Bluetooth devices.

In our hands-on tests with the Reverb this Bluetooth implementation did cause some initial confusion with the Windows 10 setup, but after pairing the controllers directly through the OS rather than through the provided app, we found the controllers response to be very accurate and very low latency – even in gaming applications.

The high resolution is also immediately noticeable, provided you have a PC with the horsepower to handle the Reverb (HP recommends a setup with an Intel Core i7, Nvidia GTX 1080 graphics card, and 16GB of RAM at minimum). Even the Windows Mixed Reality Portal – essentially a virtual house that you can walk through to launch apps – takes on a whole new level of detail and clarity in the Reverb.

The comfort level will also be immediately noticeable to anyone who has tried other Mixed Reality headsets on the market. Thanks to some improved weight balancing and some other design decisions related to the optics, the Reverb offers a level of comfort rivaled only by the HTC Vive Pro, but at roughly half the weight.

In our own tests we logged a record amount of time using the Reverb both in enterprise demos and playing games (we ran the headset through its paces with enterprise demos provided by HP as well as by playing Robo Recall). It's a nice feeling to have to remove a VR headset simply because you're done with a task or actually want to take a break, as opposed to having neck strain or needing to stave off a headache.

The HP Reverb comes in two flavors: a consumer and professional edition. “We're commercially focused, but we also notice when the Venn diagram of consumer wants and commercial wants overlap enough,” Ludwig said. The base specs between the two versions are the same, but with slight differences. For example, the consumer variant comes with a machine washable cloth face mask, whereas the Pro version has a wipeable leather face mask for easier sanitation and use in multiuser environments. The Pro version also has a cord so that it can be connected to the HP Backpack, the latest version of which – the HP VR Backpack G2 – HP released to closely coincide with the release of the Reverb.

Coming to an Optical Conclusion

Ludwig said for HP's team of engineers the key to really delivering the resolution and visual quality that enterprise users demand is in the optics. “[With the Reverb] we're using LCD panels instead of OLED. HTC, Oculus, and Samsung, for example, all use OLED,” Ludwig explained. “The advantage there is we actually have an RGB subpixel stripe, so for each pixel we have a red, green, and blue subpixel – meaning each pixel can make any color. The result is we have two times the resolution, but we are actually more than twice as sharp.”

The other advantage the Reverb's LCDs offer is greater pixel density. “You can't really have a good panel with bad lenses, otherwise you get a bad experience,” Ludwig said. “Quite frankly the lenses aren't the best in the first generation mixed reality devices. The sweet spot is pretty small, which leads to a lot of moving your face around until the image looks clear. And it gets a little blurry near the edges, which isn't great.”

“The other advantage of our LCD panels is they are are much more pixel dense,” Ludwig added. “We use 2.89-inch panels versus the three-and-a-half-inch panels we find for OLED in the Vive, Samsung, and Oculus. So as we basically the headset ends up being a lot smaller and a lot lighter, which also leads directly to comfort.”

Adding only four degrees to the field of view over competing headsets (114-degrees versus 110) may not seem significant, but the difference is very noticeable in use. Aside from the larger view meaning less neck movement (another plus for comfort) it also lends to an overall improvement in clarity in virtual environments.

Ludwig said HP accomplished this by actually taking advantage of a bit of opticl trickery. “We found something interesting, which is that there tends to be an inverse relationship between your field of view and the clarity of the lens in a lot of cases with this kind of technology. So as you increase field of view the lens gets a little murky.

“So what we did is we moved from a symmetrical lens – where these are just circles with your eye in the very middle – to an asymmetrical lens, where your eyes are actually more inboard on the lenses,” Ludwig said. “They're not the same shape. What this lets us do is we've actually lowered the per eye field of view – so your monocular field of view has been lowered, which boosts the clarity of the lens up a bunch and increases the sweet spot of the optics by about 33 percent.”

The magic here is that the Reverb's lenses take advantage of the fact that humans have two eyes. Having a lower than average field of view in each eye results in a larger field of view with both eyes open. “We're utilizing the fact that you have two eyes to increase field of view and also boost clarity,” Ludwig said.

“We don't want to just throw hardware at companies and tell them to figure it. That would be a classic mistake.” 

Not Just Throwing Hardware

Moving forward, Ludwig said HP wants to maintain a relationship with its customers and not just become a high-end VR hardware vendor. “What we find in the enterprise space is a lot companies are saying, 'Okay let's have our technologist make something [with VR] and see if it's actually reasonable.'In general they all find yes it is. But they're having difficulty going from that to implementing it company wide because that's a much different problem.”

To address this HP is making a support system available to its customers to help bridge the gap from making VR a nice-to-have into a regular, crucial part of workflows. “We've ramped up this support system alongside our products so that say a company comes to us in future and says, 'We have CAD or architecture files, but we don't know how to make the solution to take those into VR we can work with them to find a solution...We don't want to just throw hardware at companies and tell them to figure it. That would be a classic mistake.”

Chris Wiltz is a Senior Editor at  Design News covering emerging technologies including AI, VR/AR, blockchain, and robotics.

Drive World with ESC Launches in Silicon Valley

This summer (August 27-29), Drive World Conference & Expo launches in Silicon Valley with North America's largest embedded systems event, Embedded Systems Conference (ESC). The inaugural three-day showcase brings together the brightest minds across the automotive electronics and embedded systems industries who are looking to shape the technology of tomorrow.
Will you be there to help engineer this shift? Register today!

Wed, 09 Nov 2022 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.designnews.com/design-hardware-software/inside-hp-reverb-how-hp-went-all-enterprise-vr
Killexams : Moving Brands overhauls HP identity

Moving Brands has overhauled the HP brand to position the computing giant as a company founded on the belief that technology improves people’s lives.

Progress marque
The progress marque (which has not been adopted by HP)

HP made Moving Brands its lead consultancy in 2008 and charged it with brand strategy and experience design development – case study elements of which are pictured here.

According to Moving Brands chief creative officer Mat Heinl, who led the project, HP wants to be transformed into ‘the world’s most powerful brand’ and tasked the consultancy with creating a ten year plan which could chart digital firsts and be multi-sensorial.

User Interface screen case study
User Interface screen case study

According to Moving Brands the project was initiated by HP as it had a growing portfolio – having made 50 acquisitions in the last five years – but was seen as ‘dull and lifeless’ by customers and business customers.

Billboard
Billboard case study

The strategy is based on the idea that the company looks to ‘lean into the future with innovation’ according to Heinl, who says that ‘Human Progress’ has been appropriated as a brand story, rather then an external communication to express this.

As a design system, the use of a 13° angle has been brought in. ‘It is the angle of founders Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard’s original logo – which can still be found on the wall of the HP Labs building in Palo Alto, [California],’ says Heinl.

case study advert
Case study advert

As part of its work, Moving Brands developed a new ‘progress marque’ (pictured), which also has the proportions of the original logo and can be easily animated or simplified and references a forward slash, adds Heini.

However there are currently no plans to implement this logo. A spokesman for HP says, ‘The design system created with Moving Brands was the only aspect of this work that was approved. The logo was a working draft that did not get adopted by HP.’

A roll out will now be controlled by HP which has taken charge of the new design elements. Moving Brands says execiutions for the HP Summit 2011 and the launch of the HP TouchPad were informed by the new vision.

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 10:00:00 -0600 Tom Banks en-UK text/html https://www.designweek.co.uk/moving-brands-overhauls-hp-identity/
Killexams : Remoticon 2021 // Rob Weinstein Builds An HP-35 From The Patent Up

Fifty years ago, Hewlett-Packard introduced the first handheld scientific calculator, the HP-35. It was quite the engineering feat, since equivalent machines of the day were bulky desktop affairs, if not rack-mounted. [Rob Weinstein] has long been a fan of HP calculators, and used an HP-41C for many years until it wore out. Since then he gradually developed a curiosity about these old calculators and what made them tick. The more he read, the more engrossed he became. [Rob] eventually decided to embark on a three year long reverse-engineer journey that culminated a recreation of the original design on a protoboard that operates exactly like the original from 1972 (although not quite pocket-sized). In this presentation he walks us through the history of the calculator design and his efforts in understanding and eventually replicating it using modern FPGAs.

The HP patent ( US Patent 4,001,569 ) contains an extremely detailed explanation of the calculator in nearly every aspect. There are many novel concepts in the design, and [Rob] delves into two of them in his presentation. Early LED devices were a drain on batteries, and HP engineers came up with a clever solution. In a complex orchestra of multiplexed switches, they steered current through inductors and LED segments, storing energy temporarily and eliminating the need for inefficient dropping resistors. But even more complicated is the serial processor architecture of the calculator. The first microprocessors were not available when HP started this design, so the entire processor was done at the gate level. Everything operates on 56-bit registers which are constantly circulating around in circular shift registers. [Rob] has really done his homework here, carefully studying each section of the design in great depth, drawing upon old documents and books when available, and making his own material when not. For example, in the course of figuring everything out, [Rob] prepared 338 pages of timing charts in addition to those in the patent.

LED Driver Timing Chart

One section called the “Micro-Programmed Controller” is presented as just a black-box in the patent. This is the heart of the systems, and is essential to the calculator’s operation. However, all the other parts that talk to the controller were so well-described in the patent that [Rob] was able to back out the details. The controller, and all sections of the calculator, was implemented in Verilog, and tested on an instrumented workbench he built to test each module.

Once everything was working in the simulations, [Rob] set out to build a working model. TInyFPGA models were used, one for each custom chip. A few understandable departures were made from the original design. An 18650 lithium ion cell powers the board, kept topped off by a modern battery charging controller. The board is larger than the original, and yes, he’s using the Hackaday-obligatory 555 chip in the power-on circuit. In this short demonstration video, you can see the final prototype being put through its paces side by side with an original HP-35, working through examples from the owner’s manual.

This is an incredibly researched and thoroughly documented project. [Rob] has made the design open source and is sharing it on the project’s GitLab repository. [Rob]’s slides for Remoticon are not only a great overview of the project, but have some good references included. Its clear he has a real passion for these old calculators and has done a fantastic job exploring the HP-35. But even after three years, there’s more to come. He’s thinking about making a PCB version, and a discrete implementation using individual logic gates may be in the works.

We wrote about the history of the HP-35 before. And if you like hacking into these old calculators, check out our writeup of a similar dive into the Sinclair scientific calculator.

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 10:00:00 -0600 Chris Lott en-US text/html https://hackaday.com/2022/04/07/remoticon-2021-rob-weinstein-builds-an-hp-35-from-the-patent-up/
Killexams : HP Laptop 17 (2022) Review Mon, 28 Nov 2022 04:24:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.pcmag.com/reviews/hp-laptop-17-2022 Killexams : HP decimates staff


Decimation of company

The maker of expensive printer ink HP has decimated its staff claiming that is justified due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

While HP must have made a killing as businesses rushed to buy hardware so their staff could work from home, during the pandemic, it appears that Covid is now being used as the reason for PC sale's slumping.

The computing giant has revealed its 2022 fiscal year results, showing fourth quarter revenues down 14.8 per cent compared to the same period last year so the answer is getting rid of ten per cent of staff.

The mass layoffs come after HP expanded the workforce by around 10,000 workers compared to this time last year. 

In what it calls its “Fiscal year 2023 Future Ready transformation” and anyone else might call “a slew of cost-cutting measures”, HP claimed it would make savings across around “digital transformation, portfolio optimisation and operational efficiency.”  At some point, history will say that workers killed managers who used this sort of language, particularly when they come to announce job cuts, and humanity generally benefited. 

Wed, 23 Nov 2022 20:09:00 -0600 Nick Farrell en-gb text/html https://www.fudzilla.com/news/55883-hp-decimates-staff
Killexams : Dividend History

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Sun, 27 Nov 2022 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://seekingalpha.com/symbol/HP/dividends/history
Killexams : Best HP printers of 2022: Portable, laser, all-in-one, inkjet and more

OCTOBER 2022 - EDITOR'S NOTE

This month, we've compared the following list of HP printers across multiple aspects including their printing speed and quality to design and build. We've assessed how easy it's to set them up, their running costs, and connectivity options, among other things.

The best HP printers have been around since the company built its first desktop laser printer in 1984, known as the LaserJet. As one of the biggest names for printers, the company produces some of the best printers on the market.

No one model is necessarily the best for HP printers because they come in such a broad range. So, all sorts of users, from photographers, business owners, and home users, can find the most suitable printer for them.