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Exam Code: GP-Doctor Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
General Practitioner (GP) Doctor
Medical Practitioner learner
Killexams : Medical Practitioner learner - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/GP-Doctor Search results Killexams : Medical Practitioner learner - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/GP-Doctor https://killexams.com/exam_list/Medical Killexams : Certificate in Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner

Certificate Level: Graduate
Admission Requirements: Master's degree
Certificate Type: Post-Master's
Number of Credits to Completion: 34.0
Instructional Delivery: Online, Campus
Calendar Type: Quarter
Maximum Time Frame: About 2 years
Financial Aid Eligibility: Eligible

ATTENTION NEW YORK RESIDENTS

Disclaimer:

Drexel University accepts New York residents into this program. Clinical Rotations, however, cannot be in New York State. This will not affect New York certification and licensure.

State Regulations

ATTENTION WASHINGTON RESIDENTS

Disclaimer:

Drexel University is authorized by the Washington Student Achievement Council and meets the requirements and minimum educational standards established for degree-granting institutions under the Degree-Granting Institutions Act. This authorization is subject to periodic review and authorizes Drexel University to offer field placement components for specific degree programs. The Council may be contacted for a list of currently authorized programs. Authorization by the council does not carry with it an endorsement by the council of the institution or its programs. Any person desiring information about the requirements of the act or the applicability of those requirements to the institution may contact the Council at P.O. Box 43430, Olympia, WA 98504-3430.

**Drexel University is approved by the Washington State Nursing Care Quality Assurance Commission to provide practice experiences in Washington State for MSN/Clinical Nurse Leader, MSN/Clinical Trials Research, MSN/Leadership in Health Systems Management, MSN/Nurse Educator and Faculty Role, MSN/Adult Gerontology Acute Care NP, MSN/Adult Gerontology Primary Care NP, MSN/Family Individual Across the Lifespan NP, MSN/Pediatric Acute Care NP, MSN/Pediatric Primary Care & Pediatric Acute Care NP, MSN/Pediatric Primary Care NP, MSN/Psychiatric Mental Health NP, and MSN/Women’s Health Gender Related NP programs. For more information, go to the following website.

State Regulations

State restrictions may apply to some programs

Program

The Drexel Online Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) certificate is offered to those individuals who have earned a master's degree in nursing and seek further preparation to become a Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner, or for certified nurse practitioners that would like to specify their patient population focus giving care to patients in the psychiatric setting.

This certificate program is 34 credits, and can generally be completed in about two years of part-time study. Upon completion of the program, successful graduates are eligible to sit for the ANCC's Psychiatric Mental Health Certification.

What you'll learn

This program stresses the role of the psychiatric/mental health nurse practitioner as a specialty area of practice. The Post Graduate PMHNP program of study expands on the master's level of the nursing's biopsychosocial model of care. Students are exposed to challenging didactic work and practice the application of diagnostic and treatment modalities in various psychiatric clinical settings across the program. Evidenced-based theories and approaches to practice are required throughout the program. Students also learn collaborative skills to work with other healthcare professionals to provide mental healthcare services.

Because students are being educated to diagnose and treat patients, this post-master's program was designed to combine the convenience of online learning with the necessary rigor to become a competent and confident advanced practice nurse upon graduation. Students learn in an online format that allows for active student learning in an interactive environment.

Graduates are educationally and clinically well-grounded in the psychopathology of different psychiatric disorders and can practice in a wide variety of settings. This program enables practitioners to provide direct care in assessments and various treatment and management modalities in addition to indirect care through consultation, case management and clinical supervision.

The Psychiatric NP program provides a mandatory online orientation for the requirements of the clinical courses several months prior to the start of clinical courses.

In addition, mandatory on-campus visits occur during the following times:

  • 2nd Year, Summer Term – students come to campus during the first clinical course for the On-Campus Intensives (OCI) for 2 days.
  • 3rd Year, Fall Term – students come to campus during the second clinical course for 2 days for a standardized patient lab experience (SPL) and/or human patient simulation (HPS) experiences.
  • 3rd Year, Winter Term– students come to campus during the third clinical course for the On-Campus Intensives (OCI) for 2 days.
  • NURS 592 PMHNP I Summer Simulation (3 days)
  • NURS 595 PMHNP IV Spring Simulation (3 days)

*The schedule of the OCIs is prepared well in advance of the first clinical course for the purpose of student planning.

What makes the PMHNP program unique?

  • Synchronous online lectures are offered in a highly interactive, e-learning method that challenges and engages students. Active-learning participation from graduate students.
  • Clinically active faculty with national board certification.
  • You are part of the Drexel College of Nursing and Health Professions with access to clinical practice environments, interprofessional simulated health care scenarios, and vast educational resources.

Pennsylvania RN licensure is required prior to the start of your clinical components. While this is not a requirement for admission, we recommend starting the process immediately after admission.

 *The nurse practitioner programs in the Division of Graduate Nursing at Drexel University provide students the flexibility of finding and coordinating their own clinical site and preceptor. The Division of Graduate Nursing offers students resources to assist in this process. Accessibility to clinical sites and preceptors varies from state to state. Students may be required to travel to access clinical sites/preceptors and achieve the necessary clinical hours.

COMPLIANCE

The College of Nursing and Health Professions has a compliance process that may be required for every student. Some of these steps may take significant time to complete. Please plan accordingly.

Visit the Compliance pages for more information.

Application Deadline

July 1, 2023

Admission Requirements

Technical Standards - Nursing 

Degree:
A baccalaureate degree with a major in nursing from a National League of Nursing–accredited program. Applications from RNs who hold non-nursing baccalaureate degrees are considered on an individual basis.

A GPA of 3.0 or above on all previous coursework or 3.25 or above on the last 60 credits of the BSN is required.

Standardized Tests:
N/A

Transcripts:

  • Official transcripts must be sent directly to Drexel from all the colleges/universities that you have attended. Transcripts must be submitted in a sealed envelope with the college/university seal over the flap. Please note that transcripts are required regardless of number of credits taken or if the credits were transferred to another school. An admission decision may be delayed if you do not send transcripts from all colleges/universities attended.
  • Transcripts must show course-by-course grades and degree conferrals. If your school does not notate degree conferrals on the official transcripts, you must provide copies of any graduate or degree certificates.
  • If your school issues only one transcript for life, you are required to have a course-by-course evaluation completed by an approved transcript evaluation agency
  • Use our Transcript Lookup Tool to assist you in contacting your previous institutions

Prerequisites:
N/A

References:

Two professional references required from previous or current supervisors, managers, nursing faculty members or program directors who can attest to applicant's clinical knowledge, skill, and potential aptitude for graduate study. References will not be accepted from colleagues or family members.

  • You may use our electronic letter of recommendation service
  • If a recommender prefers to submit an original, hard copy letter, please remind them that it must include an ink signature and be submitted in a sealed envelope.

Personal Statement/ Essay:

Personal statement (800 to 1,600 words) that will provide the admissions committee a better understanding of:
  1. Why you are choosing this particular program of study
  2. Your plans upon completion of the graduate degree
  3. How your current work experience will enhance your experience in this M.S.N. program.

Interview/Portfolio:
A personal interview via phone or in-person may be required.

CV/Resume:
Required.

Licenses:
A copy of your RN license or eligibility for licensure as a registered nurse. License verification from your nursing license registry Web site are acceptable.

Clinical Work/Volunteer Experience:
Minimum 1 year of psychiatric nursing experience.

International Students:
International applicants, as well as immigrants to the United States and U.S. permanent residents whose native language is not English and who have not received a bachelor's degree or higher in the United States, Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, or the United Kingdom, must show proficiency in English speaking as well as listening, writing and reading. American citizens born on U.S. military bases abroad may be waived from the TOEFL requirement after providing documentation of this status. Otherwise, applicants must meet one of the following requirements: 

If you take the TOEFLiBT exam, you must have: 

  • a minimum combined score for listening, writing, and practicing sections of 79 plus a speaking section score of 26 or higher.
  • a minimum score of 550 or higher and a Test of Spoken English score (TSE) of 55 or higher.

Tuition and Fee Rates:
Please visit the Drexel Online Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Post-Masters Certificate tuition page

Application Link (if outside organization):
N/A

Students are accepted once a year by May 1st.

Accreditation

The baccalaureate degree program in nursing, master's degree program in nursing, Doctor of Nursing Practice program and post-graduate APRN certificate program at Drexel University are accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, 655 K Street, NW, Suite 750, Washington DC 20001, 202.887.6791.

Wed, 14 Jan 2015 03:12:00 -0600 en text/html https://drexel.edu/cnhp/academics/certificates/Certificate-Nurse-Practitioner-Psychiatric-Mental-Health/
Killexams : Master of Science in Nursing: Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Concentration

ATTENTION WASHINGTON RESIDENTS

Disclaimer:

Drexel University is authorized by the Washington Student Achievement Council and meets the requirements and minimum educational standards established for degree-granting institutions under the Degree-Granting Institutions Act. This authorization is subject to periodic review and authorizes Drexel University to offer field placement components for specific degree programs. The Council may be contacted for a list of currently authorized programs. Authorization by the council does not carry with it an endorsement by the council of the institution or its programs. Any person desiring information about the requirements of the act or the applicability of those requirements to the institution may contact the Council at P.O. Box 43430, Olympia, WA 98504-3430.

**Drexel University is approved by the Washington State Nursing Care Quality Assurance Commission to provide practice experiences in Washington State for MSN/Clinical Nurse Leader, MSN/Clinical Trials Research, MSN/Leadership in Health Systems Management, MSN/Nurse Educator and Faculty Role, MSN/Adult Gerontology Acute Care NP, MSN/Adult Gerontology Primary Care NP, MSN/Family Individual Across the Lifespan NP, MSN/Pediatric Acute Care NP, MSN/Pediatric Primary Care & Pediatric Acute Care NP, MSN/Pediatric Primary Care NP, MSN/Psychiatric Mental Health NP, and MSN/Women’s Health Gender Related NP programs. For more information, go to the following website.

State Regulations

ATTENTION NEW YORK RESIDENTS

Disclaimer:

Drexel University accepts New York residents into this program. Clinical Rotations, however, cannot be in New York State. This will not affect New York certification and licensure.

State Regulations

State restrictions may apply to some programs.

Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Recorded Virtual Open House

Program

The Drexel online Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) program prepares practitioners to provide a wide range of services to patients in need of mental health services across the lifespan with their families. Graduate students are educated to practice and refine higher-level competencies in the Advanced Practice Psychiatric/Mental Health role with multiple and complex patients.

Graduates are educationally and clinically well grounded in the psychopathology of different psychiatric disorders and can practice in a wide variety of settings. This program enables practitioners to provide direct care in assessments and various treatment and management modalities in addition to indirect care through consultation, case management and clinical supervision. Graduates are eligible to sit for the ANCC's Psychiatric Mental Health Certification Examination.

What you'll learn

The PMHNP program of study expands on the baccalaureate level of the nursing’s biopsychosocial model of care. Graduate students are exposed to challenging didactic work and practice the application of diagnostic and treatment modalities in various psychiatric clinical settings across the program. Evidenced-based theories and approaches to practice are required throughout the program. Students also learn collaborative skills to work with other healthcare professionals to provide mental healthcare services.

Because students are being educated to diagnose and treat patients, this master’s program was designed to combine the convenience of online learning with the necessary rigor to become a competent and confident advanced practice nurse upon graduation. Students learn in an online format that allows for active student learning in an interactive environment.

The Psychiatric NP program provides a mandatory online orientation for the requirements of the clinical courses several months prior to the start of clinical courses.

During your time in the program, you will participate in a mandatory on-campus and/or virtual intensive. The required intensive/s will be held during clinical courses. Exact dates and times will be confirmed with students prior to the term.

What makes the PMHNP program unique?

  • Synchronous online lectures are offered in a highly interactive, e-learning method that challenges and engages students. Active-learning participation from graduate students.
  • Clinically active faculty with national board certification.
  • You are part of the Drexel University College of Nursing and Health Professions with access to clinical practice environments interprofessional simulated health care scenarios, and a library for educational resources.

Pennsylvania RN licensure is required prior to the start of your course with a clinical component. While this is not a requirement for admission, we recommend starting the process immediately after admission.

*The nurse practitioner programs in the Division of Graduate Nursing at Drexel University provide students the flexibility of finding and coordinating their own clinical site and preceptor. The Division of Graduate Nursing offers students resources to assist in this process. Accessibility to clinical sites and preceptors varies from state to state. Students may be required to travel to access clinical sites/preceptors and achieve the necessary clinical hours.

COMPLIANCE

The College of Nursing and Health Professions has a compliance process that may be required for every student. Some of these steps may take significant time to complete. Please plan accordingly.

Visit the Compliance pages for more information.

Admission Requirements

Technical Standards - Nursing 

Ronin-S Essentials Kit

Application Deadline

Spring 2023 Application Deadline: March 6, 2023
Fall 2023 Application Deadline: July 1, 2023

Degree:
Baccalaureate degree with a major in nursing from a National League of Nursing (NLN)-accredited program. Cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above from your BSN.

Standardized Tests:
N/A

Transcripts:

  • Official transcripts must be sent directly to Drexel from all the colleges/universities that you have attended. Transcripts must be submitted in a sealed envelope with the college/university seal over the flap. Please note that transcripts are required regardless of number of credits taken or if the credits were transferred to another school. An admission decision may be delayed if you do not send transcripts from all colleges/universities attended.
  • Transcripts must show course-by-course grades and degree conferrals. If your school does not notate degree conferrals on the official transcripts, you must provide copies of any graduate or degree certificates.
  • If your school issues only one transcript for life, you are required to have a course-by-course evaluation completed by an approved transcript evaluation agency
  • Use our Transcript Lookup Tool to assist you in contacting your previous institutions

Prerequisites:
Minimum one year of psychiatric nursing experience

References:
Two professional references required from previous or current supervisors, managers, nursing faculty members or program directors who can attest to applicant's clinical knowledge, skill, and potential aptitude for graduate study. References will not be accepted from colleagues, family members or friends.

Personal Statement/ Essay:
Personal statement (under 1,000 words) that will provide the admissions committee a better understanding of...
  • Why you are choosing this particular program of study
  • Your plans upon completion of the graduate degree
  • How your current work experience will enhance your experience in this MSN program. 

Interview/Portfolio:
Admissions interview may be required

CV/Resume:
Required. (Note: Resume should be detailed regarding work experience including specific job experiences/responsibilities/departments)

Licenses:
A copy of your current, unrestricted United States RN license or eligibility for licensure as a registered nurse. License verification from your nursing license registry website are acceptable.

Clinical/Work/Volunteer Experience:
Minimum one year of psychiatric nursing experience

International Students:
Requirements can be found here

Tuition and Fee Rates
Please visit the Drexel Online MSN in Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner tuition page

Application Link (if outside organization):
N/A

This program is organized into four 10-week quarters per year (as opposed to the traditional two semester system) which means you can take more courses in a shorter time period. One semester credit is equivalent to 1.5 quarter credits.

Graduate students who utilize student loans (FAFSA) must maintain a minimum enrollment of 4.5 credits per term.

For Full List of courses, please visit Drexel Online.

Accreditation

The baccalaureate degree program in nursing, master's degree program in nursing, Doctor of Nursing Practice program and post-graduate APRN certificate program at Drexel University are accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, 655 K Street, NW, Suite 750, Washington DC 20001, 202.887.6791.

These programs and the Post Graduate APRN certificates are also approved by the Pennsylvania State Board of Nursing.

Sun, 30 Oct 2022 11:37:00 -0500 en text/html https://drexel.edu/cnhp/academics/graduate/MSN-Nurse-Practitioner-Psychiatric-Mental-Health/
Killexams : Justification and optimization

» Who decides which medical procedure is appropriate and whether it is justified?

The process of justification allows determining whether the medical exposure will take place or not. The goal of justification is to avoid unnecessary radiological procedure, which would result in patient being unnecessary exposed to ionizing radiation and its potential risks. 

First, a given radiological procedure shall be justified. This applies to the justification of new technologies and techniques as they evolve. This generic justification shall be carried out by the health authority in conjunction with appropriate professional bodies. 

The justification of medical exposure for an individual patient shall be carried out by means of consultation between the referring medical practitioner (who initiates the request for a radiological procedure) and the radiological medical practitioner (who is responsible for performing a procedure). A referral should be regarded as a request for a professional consultation or opinion rather than an instruction or order to perform. The referring medical practitioner brings the knowledge of the medical context and the patient’s history to the decision process, while the radiological medical practitioner has the specialist expertise on the radiological procedure. Therefore, the joint approach is required to justification and shared decision at the level of an individual patient considering:

  • The appropriateness of the request; 
  • The urgency of the procedure; 
  • The characteristics of the exposure and of the individual patient; 
  • The relevant information from any previous procedures; 
  • The relevant referral guidelines. 

» Are there requirements to justify exposures for health screening of population or exposures of humans for research?

Justification for radiological procedures to be performed as part of a health screening programme for asymptomatic populations shall be carried out by the health authority in conjunction with appropriate professional bodies. 

Any radiological procedure on an asymptomatic individual that is intended to be performed for the early detection of disease, but not as part of an approved health screening programme, shall require specific justification for that individual by the radiological medical practitioner and the referring medical practitioner, in accordance with the guidelines of relevant professional bodies or the health authority. As part of this process, the individual shall be informed in advance of the expected benefits, risks and limitations of the radiological procedure. 

The medical exposure of volunteers as part of a programme of biomedical research is deemed to be not justified unless: 

(a) It is in accordance with the provisions of the Helsinki Declaration  and takes into account the guidelines published by the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences  , together with the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP); (b) It is subject to approval by an ethics committee (or other institutional body that has been assigned functions similar to those of an ethics committee by the relevant authority), subject to any dose constraints that may be specified, and subject to applicable national regulations and local regulations.

» How optimization of medical exposure is ensured and who is responsible?

Once justified, the radiological procedure should be optimized and performed such that the exposure of the patient is managed in order to achieve the medical objective. 
Too low radiation dose could be as bad as too high radiation dose. As a  consequence, cancer is not cured or the images taken are not of a suitable diagnostic quality. The medical exposure should always lead to the required clinical outcome. 
Optimization is a prospective and iterative process that requires judgements to be made using both qualitative and quantitative information. The following aspects and tools have to be used to ensure optimization of protection and safety: 

  • Appropriate design of medical radiological equipment and software; 
  • Operational considerations specific to the modality and application; 
  • Calibration of sources and dosimeters; 
  • Quality assurance program implemented and independent audits made of this program; 
  • Dosimetry of patients to determine typical doses to patients for common diagnostic and image guided interventional procedures, and absorbed doses to the planning target volume and relevant organs for each patient in radiotherapy; 
  • Diagnostic reference levels established and used for most common diagnostic procedures (see more here); 
  • Dose constraints used in the optimization of protection and safety for persons acting as carers or comforters, or subject to exposure as part of a programme of biomedical research. 

Special considerations should be made for the optimization of protection and safety of patients who are: 

» What is required for prevention and investigation of accidental medical exposure?

Unintended and accidental medical exposures can occur from flaws in design and operational failures of medical radiological equipment, from failures of and errors in software, or as a result of human error. The hospital management has responsibility to ensure that all practicable measures are taken to prevent such exposures, and, if such an exposure does occur, that it is properly investigated and corrective actions are taken. Any of the following unintended or accidental medical exposures shall be promptly investigated and corrective actions implemented:

  • Any medical treatment delivered to the wrong individual or to the wrong tissue or organ of the patient, or using the wrong radiopharmaceutical, or with an activity, a dose or dose fractionation differing substantially from (over or under) the values prescribed by the radiological medical practitioner, or that could lead to unduly severe secondary effects; 
  • Any diagnostic radiological procedure or image guided interventional procedure in which the wrong individual or the wrong tissue or organ of the patient is subject to exposure; 
  • Any exposure for diagnostic purposes that is substantially greater than was intended; 
  • Any exposure arising from an image guided interventional procedure that is substantially greater than was intended; 
  • Any inadvertent exposure of the embryo or fetus in the course of performing a radiological procedure; 
  • Any failure of medical radiological equipment, failure of software or system failure, or accident, error, mishap or other unusual occurrence with the potential for subjecting the patient to a medical exposure that is substantially different from what was intended. 

Written records shall be kept of all unintended and accidental medical exposures. The more significant events are required to be reported to the regulatory body, according to the national requirements. In addition to mandatory reporting for regulatory purposes, anonymous and voluntary safety reporting and learning systems like the IAEA SAFRON and SAFRAD can significantly contribute to enhanced radiation safety and quality in health care.

Read more for: 

  • Accidents prevention in radiotherapy here 
  • Skin injuries from image guided interventional procedures here 
Wed, 13 Dec 2017 05:19:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.iaea.org/resources/rpop/resources/international-safety-standards/justification-and-optimization
Killexams : Fentanyl, seniors and pills among Topics planned in 2023 learning series

The Partnership for a Drug-Free New Jersey (PDFNJ) has wrapped up a successful 2022 Knock Out Opioid Abuse Day Learning Series and will renew its partnership with the Office of the New Jersey Coordinator of Addiction Responses and Enforcement Strategies (NJ CARES) to host the webinar series in 2023 along with the Opioid Education Foundation of America.

“The Opioid Education Foundation of America is dedicated to providing learning opportunities for our medical practitioners,” said Elaine Pozycki, CEO of the Opioid Education Foundation of America. “It is only together and with education that we can best address the opioid crisis.”

The Learning Series will kick off on Jan. 26 with the webinar “From Pills to Fentanyl: Understanding the Opioid Crisis” featuring Dr. Lewis S. Nelson, Chair of Emergency Medicine at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School. Nelson will provide a greater understanding of the opioid crisis in New Jersey and what challenges lie ahead, according to a press release.

PDFNJ, the Opioid Foundation of America and NJ CARES, which is responsible for overseeing addiction-fighting efforts across the New Jersey Office of the Attorney General, have planned to address wide-ranging Topics concerning the opioid epidemic in the 2023 Learning Series, including educating families about opioids and opioid alternatives for youths through seniors, the rising fentanyl crisis, evidence-based programs for addiction prevention, treatment and recovery, and other trends impacting New Jersey, according to the press release.

“The Knock Out Opioid Abuse Day Learning Series is a trusted resource for New Jersey residents to learn more about the opioid crisis and educate themselves on how to make a difference in the fight against the epidemic,” PDFNJ Executive Director Angelo Valente said. “We are grateful for our continued collaboration with the New Jersey Office of the Attorney General, which has been an invaluable partner in planning the series.”

The Knock Out Opioid Abuse Day Learning Series began in 2020 in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic to educate New Jersey residents about various aspects of the opioid epidemic and its impact on New Jersey and the nation, according to the press release.

The series is a branch of PDFNJ’s Knock Out Opioid Abuse Day statewide initiative, which has been held annually on Oct. 6 since 2016 to educate residents and prescribers about the risks of prescription opioids and to raise awareness of the opioid crisis throughout the state.

The 2022 Learning Series included 12 webinars that drew a total audience of more than 8,000 participants and featured speakers discussing all aspects of the opioid epidemic, including Sam Quinones, Author of “Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic,” Dr. Andrew Kolodny, Medical Director of Opioid Policy Research, Heller School for Social Policy and Management, and former New Jersey Gov. James McGreevey.

In 2021, more than 3,000 people in New Jersey died from suspected drug overdoses, a vast majority of which involved some form of opioid including prescription painkillers, heroin and synthetic opioids, such as fentanyl, according to the press release.

To learn more about the Knock Out Opioid Abuse Day and for a schedule of next year’s webinars, visit knockoutday.drugfreenj.org.

Tue, 13 Dec 2022 04:00:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://centraljersey.com/2022/12/13/fentanyl-seniors-and-pills-among-topics-planned-for-2023-knock-out-opioid-abuse-day-learning-series/
Killexams : What Does a Good Health-Care System Look Like? © Getty; The Atlantic

This is an edition of Up for Debate, a newsletter by Conor Friedersdorf. On Wednesdays, he rounds up timely conversations and solicits reader responses to one thought-provoking question. Later, he publishes some thoughtful replies. Sign up for the newsletter here.

Last week I asked, “What’s been your experience with the health-care system and what lessons have you drawn?”

Dennis kicks us off with a near-death experience:

I was young and foolish. I drove a motorcycle into the side of a car in 1980. After four-plus operations, [losing] 80-plus pints of blood, the removal of my gall bladder and most of my liver, two and a half months in the hospital, lots of infections and complications, and several more months of care, I recovered. It was intense and amazing, and since my union-member parents’ insurance paid for it, possible. I turned 23 in the hospital. I have never lost a scar contest.

The American health-care system saved my life. But my experience shows that it is not the best system in North America. I moved to Canada at 40. Now I can see my doctor at will and at no cost. Thankfully I have not needed the level of care in Canada that I required 42 years ago, but I know several cancer survivors who have had serious needs, and all have been well served, no worries about the cost. It’s better, it’s fair, it’s less stressful, and overall, it’s cheaper.

Since I’m now over 65, I’d be covered in the U.S. under a roughly equivalent system, Medicare. There is no good reason for Americans to wait 65 years each to get publicly funded health care.

Jaleelah gives harsher reviews to Canada’s health-care system:

Last fall, I struggled with disordered eating. After moving cities, I ate less than one meal a day. I experienced overwhelming nausea at the thought of cooking breakfast or going to dinner with friends. As a result, it became hard to live my life. I barely had enough energy to get out of bed, let alone attend my classes or see my friends. I entered a feedback loop where my lack of energy for grocery shopping and cooking made me eat less. My mental state worsened. When I told my family, they urged me to see my doctor.

I tried scheduling an appointment. “Due to COVID,” they were only scheduling phone consults. I booked one anyway. The office instructed me to wait for the doctor to call me at the scheduled time. When the appointment came around, I waited for three hours but I received no call. I phoned the office. They told me they would remind the doctor to call. I waited the whole afternoon and evening with no luck. I finally got a call the next day.

I talked about my symptoms. I described the toll they were taking on my academic career and my mental health. When I asked about my options, the doctor ordered blood work and told me to come back if the issue was still around in a few months. I didn’t actually get examined for another six months. Meanwhile, I tried to schedule appointments multiple times only to be met with voicemail and instructed to try again later. I failed a class. I lost nearly 20 pounds. The people around me were bewildered by my decision not to see a doctor. I kept having to explain that it was the doctor who refused to see me.

Canada’s health-care system is severely understaffed. There is an extreme shortage of family doctors in almost every region. This is more the fault of the government (which, until recently, made no effort to attract foreign professionals) than my ghosting-prone doctor.

But there are other issues at play. The medical system has been incredibly slow to bounce back from pandemic-era limitations. Only when I finally got a hold of the doctor and gave them a number value on how much weight I’d lost was I able to schedule an in-person appointment—set for two months later. The reason was listed as “weight loss,” even though I’d spent far more time describing the debilitating effects on my energy and my life. I worked hard to gradually eat more and turned to my social support system for help. That was my only real option. Under a veil of ignorance, I’d still prefer Canada’s health-care system to America’s. Doctors are dismissive everywhere and long wait times are preferable to the possibility of dying due to lack of insurance.

[Read: Will an influential conservative brain trust stand up to Trump?]

Rachel has spent her teens, her 20s, and now her early 30s “navigating and bumbling my way through the byzantine U.S. health-care system as a chronic-illness patient” since being diagnosed at 17 with chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia, “a complex chronic condition for which modern Western academic medicine gives little to no explanation.” She has advice:

I now see hordes of long COVID patients wading through the same long, confusing slog as they try to manage care for something that exceeds the limits of our current medical capacity. And I see it as a health coach, as I work with clients who are largely plagued by the typical Western cardio and metabolic diseases (diabetes, high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, etc.) or lead reasonably normal, healthy-ish lives and yet fall prey to poor care, misdiagnoses, and a general lack of guidance around lifestyle medicine.

We have a weird paradox in the U.S. where many patients like their doctors but hate the overall health-care system. I’d imagine most doctors and providers feel the same way. And so while there is a lot of antagonism between chronic-illness patients and the medical establishment, I’m not sure this is a fair take as we have a system that has a number of really weird and perverse incentives. Every patient gets reduced to a set of CPT billing codes. And for conditions that are marked by nonspecific symptoms and nebulous origins, the problems get exacerbated. In the absence of biomarkers and clear disease etiology, the common denominator is the patient, who either gets outright blamed for her symptoms or patronizingly referred to psych (therapy is great, obviously, but not sufficient).

Like many patients, I have sought answers outside the norm. I’ve spent almost a decade and a half going everywhere from major medical centers to borderline witchcraft. My favorite doctors have been those who are honest and treat me with respect; they know their limits and value my experience as a patient. I had a PCP tell me in my initial appointment, “You’ve been through a lot. How can I support you in this?” I still tear up thinking of that moment, and how rare that kind of exchange is. I’ve since established a good care team with my primary-care doctor, some specialists, and a Chinese medicine doctor who is an absolute godsend. My out-of-pocket costs could probably fund a trophy wife’s Hermès obsession, but who really needs that many Birkins when you can spend your days having acupuncture needles jammed in your body?

Lessons learned are numerous:

1. Learn how to advocate for yourself. Know what your lab tests mean, understand your medications, keep track of your symptoms and health questions, and use this information to help you prepare for your doctor appointments. Ask for explanations and take notes.

2. Building on that, know your body and take reasonable measures to track your health. This doesn’t have to be an obsessive pursuit but merely enough to help you understand if things are helping or not. Unfortunately, data in this area is quite messy.

3. Health habits, like most habits, are heavily influenced by your surroundings. Cultivating a community of people with shared values around well-being is a worthwhile investment of your time and energy.

4. You have a surprising amount of agency with respect to your health. But you don’t have control over everything. Knowing the difference gives you freedom from beating yourself up over health outcomes that aren’t your fault.

5. Western medicine does a really great job at managing acute care. It’s less equipped to handle chronic conditions.

6. Chinese medicine is amazing and highly underrated. Unfortunately it’s heavily practitioner-dependent, which means there is lots of mediocrity happening.

7.  Having a chronic illness is basically a full-time job with abysmal pay and few benefits. Learning to monetize your existential crisis (writing, coaching, mentoring, hell—even tweeting) will go a long way toward bringing a sense of purpose to an otherwise lonely existence.

Sharon agrees that patients must advocate for themselves to thrive in the American system:

I find you have to be very persistent; do your homework on many fronts. I was denied a drug with many qualifications stated for rationale. I dug up all the records to show that blood tests validated the chemistry they required—and they approved the drug. But I didn’t depend on my physician’s office to do this. It would have never gotten done. The few hospitalizations I’ve had went pretty well. I wasn’t strong enough physically or mentally to have an endoscopy until a few days after it was recommended. I got it, but later, so knowing your own strength and sticking to what you know of your own body is very important.

VH has impressions of health care in Australia:

Aside from long waiting lists in the public sector, care is good. In theory, regardless of whether you are private or public, the care should be the same, right? The only differences should be the “perks” of private care. Granted, long waiting lists are problematic, but if something is acute you are seen immediately, and the public, tertiary hospitals are where you’d want to be. They are the best equipped and most experienced.

Last month I learned I had a heart issue. I went private—it was expensive, about $2,500 for all the tests needed—so that I could find out quickly what was wrong. If I’d gone public, I probably wouldn’t have even had one test yet. This was the first time I really thought about the broadening inequity in Australia. I’m lucky, in that while it’s expensive, if I need to spend that much on health care, I can. What about others who can’t? Why are public systems not better funded? One issue is that people who can afford private care and have private health insurance choose to instead take up a public bed. In my opinion, if you can afford to go private and therefore let someone who can’t afford the same to have better access, you should. It’s about being a good person and doing the right thing. But when I mention that to people, they get really defensive about it.

I see it as one small way I can positively contribute to society. I just wish people would focus on the fact that we all deserve good health care, regardless of what we can afford, and make it a genuine not-for-profit industry. The drug companies in the U.S. sound horrific. Profiteering off people’s poor health is incomprehensible. The larger lesson I’ve drawn? You only deserve the best care if you can pay for it. Your life is only worth how much money you can spend. And that is NOT a lesson I want my daughter to learn. The life of someone who’s rich is not more important than that of someone who is poor.

Christopher describes the American health-care system as “confusing, costly, and unchanging.” He writes:  

I’ve never been to a doctor, since I was a teenager, with whom I felt a connection and the impression of care. I feel like I’m at the deli counter being served as the next customer. I usually have no idea what medical care is going to cost (to me) until I’m sitting in the office. I don’t know of anything else I buy where that occurs.  For significant procedures planned in advance, the providers won’t provide the cost to me in advance, even though they know what the price will be, because they’ve done it 500 times. Then, when it’s over, a confusing set of bills is sent, along with separate insurance [explanations of benefits], all seemingly for the singular purpose of inflating a price to arrive at a final number.  

It’s broken; everyone knows it’s broken, and they know most of the solutions too, but health care is like a mountain of stone. Everyone I know says it sucks (except for those covered by Cadillac plans, and for them it’s only a matter of time before they become Medicare’s problem). Even people I know who criticized the Affordable Care Act still think the system is broken yet seem opposed to the obvious fixes. The incentives given to providers are all backwards and wrong. They should be incentivized to keep you healthy, not find expensive ways to try to fix a problem that could have been avoided.

[Read: 10 readers on opposing anti-Semitism]

M. describes the unnerving way that health-care outlays can affect even the financial well-being of the relatively affluent––so much so that he plans on leaving the United States entirely:

I make a good living. I should have a larger retirement portfolio than I do, as my husband and I keep our living expenses within bounds, and I am a moderately successful self-employed professional. However, every few years, or sometimes a few years in a row, I find our household being bankrupted by the medical-industrial complex.  

This year has been uniquely devastating. My husband is a 75-year-old bone-cancer survivor. Two years of radical chemotherapy left him with a suppressed immune system, which means for most of the pandemic we’ve been hiding from people the way Gremlins hide from sunlight.

A few years ago he had a two-year bout of C. diff, for which the drugs cost thousands. He finally beat it.

A long-term result of the C. diff left him with bacteria in his teeth and gums, which resulted in him needing $25,000 worth of dental work. He lost his upper teeth, now has upper dentures, and had serious gum work done on all his bottom teeth. Medicare covered a tiny bit of this. Dental work is not considered worthy of proper insurance in this country. And without the dental care he would have developed sepsis and died.

This cost was on top of his Medicare deduction from his Social Security and his $471-per-month drug-plan copay.

We’ve had some truly INCOMPETENT primary-care physicians over the years.  We found a great doctor in 2006. He was an independent. Didn’t take insurance. Fee for service. Had studied at Loma Linda hospital. Great credentials. Finally a great primary-care physician. His wife, a Harvard-trained attorney who had retired from the law, ran his practice. Well, with the COVID pandemic, his wife burned out on medical administration, partly from all of the death they had to deal with. And she had a few COVID deaths in her own family. With his wife retiring from medical administration, he joined a boutique primary-care practice starting January 1, 2022. He’s no longer fee-for-service.  He went concierge. He takes insurance now. But the annual “concierge fee” for 2022 was $3,000 per patient per year. It is going up to $4,000 per patient for 2023.

Then there are MY medical costs. My insurance is $1,189 per month for second-from-top-level insurance. It goes up 14 percent next year. I have arthritic knees from being a 10-to-15-mile-a-week runner from my late teens to early 30s. At 6 foot 1, I am a knee-replacement candidate. Prednisone made me put on weight, and I was already heavy, so I had to get off of it. Humira had all the effects of a sugar pill. I am immune to the benefit. So my arthritis doctor prescribed a biologic drug infusion.

Those treatments, of which I had three, had a copay of $1,468 each. And to boot, they did absolutely nothing! I was fired by my arthritis doctor when I told him that it was professionally irresponsible of him and his staff to prescribe such an expensive treatment without first notifying me of the cost. They felt that it wasn’t their job.

Next year I will have the knee replacement. I am living on pain meds and toradol (an injectable anti-inflammatory) and can’t wait until 65 when Medicare picks up the full tab. The out-of-pocket cap on my health insurance is $8,800. I’ll hit that. And I have a tooth that’s going and needs to be replaced with an implant. That’s another $4,000 next year.  

There is a silver lining in all of this. My husband is a French citizen. He has family all over that country. Lovely people. In 2024 we are selling our home and moving to the southwest of France. As it turns out, with the world having gone virtual during the pandemic, I can service my clients from anywhere. And as it is, over a third of my practice is out of the region where I live. With the equity in our home, we can buy a lovely home in the Dordogne with cash left over. Our taxes will go up only slightly. Our medical costs will plummet by more than two-thirds, and that‘s if we opt for top-tier health care. I really do love this country. I just can’t afford the medical care here anymore.

Paul prefers his home country’s system to the American system:

Having lived in both the United States and the United Kingdom, I do not understand why Americans tolerate their expensive, divisive, and dangerously inefficient system. While in the U.S., my family had (at great expense to me and my employer) insurance through the University of Texas system, among the best available. We were subjected to repeated unnecessary testing, but the fragmented nature of the system meant that crucial indicators were missed. When we returned to the U.K., my wife was rapidly diagnosed through our taxpayer-funded system with angina and coronary artery constriction, which, if we had stayed in the U.S., would have killed her, and which was promptly and expertly treated by bypass surgery. And that’s top end, for an articulate, educated, health-conscious individual.

Errol emphasizes the role of individuals in their health outcomes:

I do agree that there needs to be coverage for everyone so that people don’t face crippling debts after accidents, but part of me feels as if this is a “banning assault weapons will stop mass shootings” argument. The leading causes of death in our country related to health are mostly preventable with exercise, diet, and [avoiding harmful] choices such as alcohol and smoking; cancer screenings and preventive treatments, such as yearly checkups, are not expensive in the system we have now. Individual responsibility for your own health needs to be priority No. 1. Let’s focus on getting Americans to be more active and more conscientious of what they put in their bodies and then see where we’re at. It’s great that we finally have a law that lowers the costs of life-saving prescription medicines, but we need to focus on getting Americans off of pill popping and injections. The best medicine is prevention, and we don’t focus on that in this country.

Also, it’s relatively easy for other countries such as Canada and the U.K. to implement cheaper forms of universal health care when they replicate the life-saving technologies and medicines made in America. I worry that if we adopt their methods then we’ll see a large dip in medicinal advancement due to a lack of incentive for private companies to push the envelope.

Ted writes from the West Coast, where he finds that health care is a mess:

We retired and moved to a relatively prosperous, well-educated locale—the central coast of California, where the insurance companies do not compensate local providers at a level that attracts physicians, dentists, optometrists, and others. Thus a one-year wait to see a dermatologist, a four-month wait to see my regular doc. For optometry we didn’t even try––we drive two and a half hours to our old providers. This was the same condition in the Central Valley until the largest employers rebelled and demanded more options for their employees. When the insurance companies raised their compensation to match Los Angeles’s, the clinician shortage went away.

My spouse has Federal retiree insurance; I am on her policy and on Medicare. The options, permutations, preferred-provider lists, and gotchas are endlessly staggering. My dear wife carefully researches all the different plans every year to see what might be most beneficial for us. Our medical needs are very ordinary—probably dull. Yet every year, the choices look more and more like a minefield than a straightforward set of choices.

MR urges a “laboratory of democracies” approach to reforming health care:

As with pretty much anything, society must make choices. But there is no consensus on what the big-picture future state should look like. When those on one side push a one-size-fits-all, state-owned-and-run, no profit-motive solution (which does not work anywhere in the world) and the other [endorses] zero government involvement with constraints that are aligned to social views, not medical solutions, you can’t move to a rational framework.

Drugs take time and money to develop and test, doctors take time and money to educate and train, and anything free will be valued as such and overused, but overcharging for preventive medicine increases long-run costs and results in poor outcomes. Both Europe and the U.S. could do with more flexibility and experimentation as to potential solutions. Although it is made fun of in today’s climate, the idea that the U.S. has 50 different experiments going on is a plus, not a flaw, in its system. We should try and use it [for health care].

Mon, 12 Dec 2022 06:38:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/other/what-does-a-good-health-care-system-look-like/ar-AA15ckCO Killexams : HMP Global's Psych Congress launches NP Institute In-Person event, new educational offering specifically for psychiatric nurse practitioners

Program takes a deep dive into psychopharmacology, including basic principles and terminology on treatment, disease states, and medication classes.

MALVERN, Pa. (PRWEB) December 13, 2022

Nurse practitioners in the psychiatric field have a robust new opportunity to grow their knowledge of psychopharmacology through the Psych Congress NP Institute In-Person event, featuring an interactive educational program which takes a deep dive into foundational principles and terminology on treatment, disease states, and medication classes.

The inaugural Psych Congress NP Institute In-Person event will take place April 28 – May 1 in Boston. This essential educational experience is crafted by the world-class experts of Psych Congress, the United States' largest independent mental health educational conference and a forum for the entire mental health team.

"With the increased need for mental health and psychiatric services, we are working to ensure that psychiatric nurse practitioners receive the tailored education they want to provide the best possible care for all their patients," said Steering Committee member Andrew Penn, RN, MS, NP, CNS, APRN-BC, clinical professor, University of California, San Francisco. "NPs leave school still hungry for knowledge and wanting to learn. This event will feed that hunger and connect NPs with colleagues and experts in the field."

The four-day event is designed and accredited specifically for psychiatric nurse practitioners (including general, primary care, and family practice NPs), and intended for clinicians in their early years of practice or for experienced NPs seeking updates and continuing psychopharmacology education. The educational program will focus on:

  •     Traditional medications and what's new on the market, filling any educational gaps NPs may have experienced since graduation;
  •     Classes of medications including antidepressants, antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, and stimulants; how to choose between different medications and when to prescribe them;
  •     Psychiatric disorders such as ADHD, anxiety, bipolar, depression, and schizophrenia;
  •     And important practice management Topics including common billing errors, documentation best practices, and more, along with implementation in your own practice.

"In our field there is always more to learn," said Steering Committee member Julie Carbray, PhD, FPMHNP-BC, PMHCNS-BC, APRN, clinical professor of psychiatry and nursing, University of Illinois Chicago, and director, Pediatric Mood Disorder Clinic. "New nurse practitioners are eager to jump into their practice while still wanting more confidence and clarity on how their learning translates to their professional environments. The Psych Congress NP Institute In-Person event will help grow that confidence and a solid footing for building their psychopharmacological practice and provide resources for ongoing education for years to come."

The event website will be a year-round resource to supplement the learnings from the meeting. For more information or to register, visit in-person.psychnpinstitute.com.

ABOUT PSYCH CONGRESS
For 36 years, Psych Congress has delivered practical, case-based education to an exceptional community of mental healthcare providers across the U.S. The annual national meeting serves as a unique, integrated forum to connect members of the entire mental health team — bringing together psychiatrists, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, psychologists, primary care physicians, and other mental health professionals for practical education to Strengthen patient care. For more information, visit national.psychcongress.com.

ABOUT HMP GLOBAL 
HMP Global is the force behind Healthcare Made Practical — and is an omnichannel leader in healthcare content, events, and education, with a mission to Strengthen patient care. The company produces accredited medical education events — in person and online via its proprietary VRTX virtual platform — and clinically relevant, evidence-based content for the global healthcare community across a range of therapeutic areas. Its brands include the HMP Global Learning Network, healthcare's most comprehensive source for news and information; Psych Congress, the largest independent mental health meeting in the U.S.; the Evolution of Psychotherapy, the world's largest independent educational event for mental health professionals; the Leipzig Interventional Course (LINC), the leading, global gathering for interdisciplinary cardiovascular specialists; EMS World Expo, North America's largest EMT and paramedic event; and the Symposium on Advanced Wound Care (SAWC), the largest wound care meeting in the world. For more information, visit hmpglobal.com.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: https://www.prweb.com/releases/hmp_globals_psych_congress_launches_np_institute_in_person_event_new_educational_offering_specifically_for_psychiatric_nurse_practitioners/prweb19073560.htm

© 2022 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

Tue, 13 Dec 2022 04:30:00 -0600 text/html https://www.benzinga.com/pressreleases/22/12/p30064983/hmp-globals-psych-congress-launches-np-institute-in-person-event-new-educational-offering-specific
Killexams : Redesigning Health Equity Philanthropy No result found, try new keyword!Most philanthropic dollars still seem to go toward short-term, deficit-based, and scope-limited projects—charitable donations rather than sustainable investments. Of particular concern is that funding ... Mon, 12 Dec 2022 01:01:00 -0600 text/html https://www.benzinga.com/pressreleases/22/12/p30064983/hmp-globals-psych-congress-launches-np-institute-in-person-event-new-educational-offering-specific Killexams : As student mental health needs soar, schools turn to telehealth

Comment

In the southeastern suburbs of Denver, the Cherry Creek school system has been tackling the mental health crisis gripping students here, as in the rest of the country. Social workers and psychologists are based in schools to help. But this month, the district debuted a new option: telehealth therapy for children.

A growing number of public schools across the country are following the same path — turning to remote health care when the demand for aid has spiked and the supply of practitioners has not. To pay for it, some school districts are using federal covid relief money, as studies show rising depression, anxiety and suspected suicide attempts among adolescents.

Some of the contracts are going to private companies. Other districts are working with local health-care providers, nonprofits or state programs. In Texas, state officials recruited help from providers at medical schools, a collaboration that served more than 13,300 Texan students last school year. “It’s provided a lot of kids the support they needed,” said David Lakey, administrator and presiding officer of the Texas Child Mental Health Care Consortium.

Telehealth services more generally soared during the pandemic, as people sought to minimize in-person contact and embraced the convenience. Over almost three years of pandemic life, families and providers have grown comfortable with remote medical visits.

Federal data shows that 17 percent of public schools reported having telehealth services in the spring, with a greater concentration in rural areas and middle and high schools. Seventy percent of schools said the percentage of students seeking mental health services had increased during the pandemic.

“I don’t know one kid who wasn’t affected by this,” said Michelle Weinraub, chief health officer for 55,000-student Cherry Creek district, recalling that students lost relatives or homes during the pandemic, and many were isolated at home learning remotely.

In many schools, students may see a telehealth therapist by using an iPad or other device in a quiet office away from classmates. In Cherry Creek, they will do so from home, before or after school. Some school systems offer both options.

For schools that host the digital therapy sessions, it is not enough to simply outfit a room for appointments and send students in, said Sharon Hoover, a professor of child and adolescent psychiatry at the University of Maryland’s School of Medicine and co-director of the National Center for School Mental Health. “Most schools will need to provide staffing to support safety and privacy issues,” she said. Services are free to families in many cases, covered through school systems, government grants or insurance reimbursements.

Hoover said the trend in virtual mental health care owes partly to more providers offering remote sessions and a loosening of strict regulations that prohibit delivery and billing across state lines.

In Colorado’s Aurora Public Schools, which began to focus on mental health efforts after the 2018 school shooting in Parkland, Fla., Superintendent Rico Munn said several hundred of his students have benefited from a contract for telehealth services, including a number of children in crisis. More than 1,800 therapy sessions were held remotely last spring, thanks to federal covid relief funds. “The need was there, obviously, and it was important to be there to serve that need,” Munn said.

Virginia Garcia’s daughter was among those struggling in Aurora schools. The 17-year-old was at first distressed by family issues but while she was in treatment, a close friend was killed, her mother said. “The therapy helped a lot at that time, because the situation was terrible,” Garcia said. Her daughter began to learn strategies to help her cope with her sadness and anger and be more forthcoming with her feelings, her mother said. “I saw the change.”

Garcia said her daughter continues to work with a private therapist. Still, she was grateful when the school checked back in to see if her daughter needed more help.

According research published by the American Psychological Association, no-show rates for therapy visits for underserved families and children were significantly lower with telehealth programs than with in-person care before the pandemic. But the paper also noted some challenges unique to this format, including patients who don’t have the right tech to log in or enough privacy at home. Other research also has broadly pointed to telehealth benefits for children.

While some schools used virtual mental health services before covid-19, particularly in rural areas, researchers at the nonprofit Child Trends said the pandemic showed “proof of concept” to many more people.

The Colorado school districts in Aurora and Cherry Creek hired Hazel Health, a San Francisco-based company that started with virtual health services in schools in 2015 and expanded to mental health in May 2021.

It now has telehealth in 80 school districts, including in Florida, California, Georgia, Maryland and Hawaii; 20 other districts have signed contracts. The company said students are seen in relatively short order, and sessions are held in the familiar settings of school or home. Parent permission is required, and referrals are made by school staff or families.

Hazel Health CEO Josh Golomb said children often receive to six to 10 sessions, meeting the clinical needs of most students. For longer-term cases, Hazel connects patients to community clinicians. Some advocates have raised concerns that telehealth could mean a different practitioner from one session to the next. Hazel said children primarily keep to the same therapist.

Hazel therapists, who combined speak 10 languages, work from their homes, Golomb said. All are clinical mental health professionals who are licensed to practice in the state where their patients receive therapy.

The company plans to work with school districts to study whether Hazel’s mental health services also help reduce absenteeism, Golomb said.

Reducing absenteeism was one major incentive for Maryland’s second-largest school system, in Prince George’s County. If appointments are at school, many students will be able to return to class and miss less instruction, said Doreen Hogans, supervisor of school counseling.

Schools are already using Hazel for physical health services and will launch mental health services for high schools, middle schools and k-8 schools before winter break. Elementary schools will come sometime during or after January. Students across k-12 may request home-based telehealth.

Students will be able to go to the nurse’s office, where the nurse will find a quiet place to set the student up on an iPad with a practitioner, Hogans said. “The benefit is that the student is not going home and we can retain the student right there in school,” she said. The school system, like others around the country, has a number of vacancies in mental health-related positions, she said.

It is paid for through a $4 million federal grant, according to a spokesman for the Prince George’s County Health Department.

The big question for some districts is what to do when their federal relief money runs out in the next couple of years — whether they will find other dollars for telehealth.

correction

A previous version of this article said the Cherry Creek school system is in Denver's southwestern suburbs. It is southeast of the city. This version has been corrected.

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Thu, 08 Dec 2022 20:59:00 -0600 Donna St. George en text/html https://www.washingtonpost.com/education/2022/12/09/telehealth-remote-student-mental-health/
Killexams : More learners at risk of mental health issues

The world is grappling with the Covid-19 pandemic, which has nearly crippled the education and employment sectors, among others. The two sectors – education and employment – directly and indirectly affect learning and learning outcomes. Without finances, parents are unable to provide their children with basic educational needs like books, uniforms, meals, and transport costs.

Likewise, lack of or inadequate finances at the school level hinder delivery or provision of quality education since schools become unable to provide a quality learning environment, including appropriate infrastructure for both teachers and learners, better salaries to non-permanent teachers, and other learning resources such as books.

While the linkages between work, finances and the lack thereof are certain for adults, the impact of the same on children remains unclear.

According to World Health Organisation, it is estimated that up to 20 per cent of children and adolescents globally are affected by mental health challenges, with nearly half of all mental health incidences beginning at the age of 14. The leading mental health problems affecting students, especially adolescents and young adults, are anxiety, depression, suicide, attention-deficit, addiction and eating disorders.

Basic needs

Caregivers’ inability to provide educational materials and support can immensely contribute to or worsen this group’s mental health. Other than parental/guardian inability to provide learners with basic needs, issues to do with teenage pregnancies in developing countries contribute to increased mental anguish. As it stands, with the Covid-19 situation, parents stare at more challenges that would trigger or worsen mental health problems among children and adolescent learners.

The school closures that have been imposed in many countries across the world as part of social distancing measures mean that many children have been forced into isolated learning. Consequently, negative learning outcomes are a likely occurrence that parents should expect as a result of lack of face-to-face interaction between pupils and their teachers.

The pandemic has also increased paranoia and suspicion - everybody is potentially Covid-19 positive - and imposed a stigma against those who do test positive. Children and adolescents have learnt this ‘prejudice’ through association or learning. For this reason, when physical classes resume, as planned by the Ministry of Education, it will not be surprising to see or hear learners subjecting their classmates to this mistrust.

Self-esteem

The practice, widespread or in isolated cases, would not only result in isolated learning among learners but would also lower learners’ self-esteem. The latter would be worse for learners who even under normal circumstances suffer from this condition.

Thirdly, learners from advantaged families are likely to come to school with more and varied personal protective equipment like masks, sanitisers, and clothing among other materials. Learners from poor households – urban and rural – attending the same school or class with those from advantaged families may have limited or lack altogether such protective gears.

Such wealth dynamics ordinarily affect the mental health of learners from disadvantaged families. Covid-19 is likely to worsen the situation, and could eventually result in poor learning outcomes, interactions and mental health.

It is, therefore, important to be aware that even as we plan for schools’ re-opening, we should prepare to deal we some mental health and related challenges.

Specifically, parents should take due diligence in observing their children to note if they exhibit some or all of the symptoms of mental health challenges, including whether their children react apathetically and negatively to most things than before, do not like the things or activities they once enjoyed, exhibit extreme sadness or anger, often talk about suicide or death, and don't attend social events or classes.

In doing so, they should focus/pay attention to their children’s mental health well-being, including the emotional, physical well-being (changes in sleep and sleep habits) and thinking symptoms. When parents observe changes in their children in light of any of the above behaviours, they should seek immediate and appropriate help.

-Mr Ochieng' is a research officer at the African Population and Health Research Center 

Thu, 10 Sep 2020 09:24:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.standardmedia.co.ke/ureport/article/2001386026/more-learners-at-risk-of-mental-health-issues
Killexams : A teaching style that encourages learners to solve sticky problems
 Several research findings provide evidence to support claims about the positive effects of PBL on cognitive skill development and knowledge retention. [iStockphoto]

Problem-based learning (PBL) is a student-centred instructional approach in which students learn about a subject by working in groups to solve an open-ended problem. It provides learners with opportunities to identify solutions to ill-structured, real-world problems. Several research findings provide evidence to support claims about the positive effects of PBL on cognitive skill development and knowledge retention. This problem is what drives the motivation and the learning in a classroom. To encourage students to develop flexible knowledge and effective problem-solving skills, we must embed learning in contexts that require the use of these skills.

Studies suggest PBL improves long-term knowledge retention, problem-solving skills, analytical and reasoning skills, interpersonal skills, self-directed learning skills, and attitudes towards the course subject. There is also considerable evidence in the literature supporting claims that PBL helps students develop flexible knowledge, effective problem-solving skills, and self-directed learning skills.

Problem-based learning is seen as a set of approaches under the broader category of Enquiry-based Learning. One of the main defining characteristics of Problem-based Learning, which distinguishes it from some other forms of Enquiry-based Learning, is that the problem is presented to the students first at the start of the learning process, before other curriculum inputs. Another defining characteristic of PBL is that in PBL tutorials, students define their own learning issues, what they need to research and learn to work on the problem and are responsible themselves for searching appropriate sources of information.

Why is PBL important?

The positive impacts of PBL range widely. First, PBL allows the learner to take an active role in his/her education, encourages concept application, and provides intellectual growth through strategic decision making. Specifically, PBL holds students accountable for their own learning and the learning of the classmates, allows students to explore more than one right answer, and encourages students to use learned knowledge to arrive at a solution. Second, PBL can enrich students’ learning outcomes, which will better prepare them for the work environment. When knowledge is deficient, PBL encourages students to identify the missing information that must be utilised to complete their task. As such, PBL requires active engagement of material rather than regurgitation of lectured concepts. Third, PBL provides tools necessary to handle future challenges. In contrast to traditional lecture-based learning, which requires students to demonstrate understanding by replicating materials provided by the faculty member on exams, PBL has been found to be a better instructional pedagogy to “bridge the gap between theory and practice”. Due to its well-known benefits, PBL has been successfully employed in a wide variety of disciplines including business education, medical education, social work education, health education, and engineering education.

 Research on PBL

Let’s take a look at a study done here in Kenya on the effects of PBL on secondary students’ agriculture achievement in Ndhiwa Sub County, Homa Bay County. Scholars Peter Oyier Ogweno of Egerton University, Prof Nephat J. Kathuri of Kenya Methodist University, and D  Agnes O. Nkurumwa of Egerton University, sought to compare the effects of PBL method and Demonstration Teaching Method (DTM) on achievement of students in agriculture subject.

The target population were 7, 124 students taking agriculture and 52 teachers of agriculture. Accessible population were Form Two Students and 12 schools. Both stratified random sampling and purposive sampling methods were used to obtain a sample size of 575 students and 12 teachers of agriculture. Six schools used Problem Based Learning as treatment, while the other six schools were taught through Demonstration teaching method. Pre-test was administered to PBL and DTM groups before teaching the students and a post-test was also administered to both groups at the end of six weeks of study

Students who were exposed to PBL achieved better results with a mean of 57.475 as compared to the mean score achieved under demonstration teaching method (48.4). The calculated mean difference between PBL and DTM was 9.075. However, the difference between pre-test and post-test mean scores under PBL was 27.475, while, the difference in mean scores between pre-test and post-test under demonstration teaching method was 18.4. This implies that PBL had the highest effect on students’ academic achievement compared to demonstration method.

Therefore, teaching through PBL produced better mean score when compared to teaching using demonstration method. This implies that PBL is superior teaching method because it has produced higher students’ learning outcomes as compared to demonstration teaching method. The success of PBL use is mainly linked to very close and useful interactions of students in PBL classrooms. Learning through interactions in sharing and discussing learning issues in small groups motivates most of the students, especially after gathering information through independent study.

The researchers reiterated that students taught through PBL acquire skills that are useful in real life situations. Other studies testing the effectiveness of PBL method across the globe also confirmed that PBL has far reaching benefits to students, therefore, this has made students in PBL classes to consistently perform better than students taught through other teaching methods.

 Getting started with PBL

When starting to design a PBL initiative, it is very important to be aware of the research evidence about success factors in PBL implementation and to plan with this awareness in mind. In addition to gathering information about PBL generally and about PBL in a specific discipline, there is a range of effective strategies for starting a PBL initiative. These include attending PBL staff development workshops in your own institution or a major PBL university.

Visiting a university that is implementing PBL and listening to the perspectives of academics and students can be very helpful. Working with an internal/external PBL consultant to design, implement and continuously evaluate a PBL initiative is another effective strategy. Framing the PBL initiative as a major action –research project or having a research project linked to the PBL initiative are ways of combining teaching and research.

What approach should teachers employ? A 2001 research study titled ‘The Power of Problem-Based Learning’ conducted by Deborah Allen and B. J. Duch, scholars at the University of Delaware, provided written guidelines for a class centred approach around the method.

Choose a central idea, concept, or principle that is always taught in a given course, and then think of a typical end-of-chapter problem, assignment, or homework that is usually assigned to students to help them learn that concept. List the learning objectives that students should meet when they work through the problem.

Think of a real-world context for the concept under consideration. Develop a storytelling aspect to an end-of-chapter problem, or research an real case that can be adapted, adding some motivation for students to solve the problem. More complex problems will challenge students to go beyond simple plug-and-chug to solve it. Look at magazines, newspapers, and articles for ideas on the story line. Some PBL practitioners talk to professionals in the field, searching for ideas of realistic applications of the concept being taught.

The problem needs to be introduced in stages so that students will be able to identify learning issues that will lead them to research the targeted concepts.

Write a teacher’s guide detailing the instructional plans on using the problem in the course. If the course is a medium- to large-size class, a combination of mini-lectures, whole-class discussions, and small group work with regular reporting may be necessary. The teacher’s guide can indicate plans or options for cycling through the pages of the problem interspersing the various modes of learning.

The final step is to identify key resources for students. Students need to learn to identify and utilise learning resources on their own, but it can be helpful if the instructor indicates a few good sources to get them started. Many students will want to limit their research to the Internet, so it will be important to guide them toward the library as well.

PBL is a pedagogical technique that situates learning in complex problem-solving contexts. It provides students with opportunities to consider how the facts they acquire relate to a specific problem at hand. It obliges them to ask what they need to know. PBL offers the potential to help students become reflective and flexible thinkers who can use knowledge to take action.

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