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Killexams : Admission-Tests Section action - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/GMAT-Verbal Search results Killexams : Admission-Tests Section action - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/GMAT-Verbal https://killexams.com/exam_list/Admission-Tests Killexams : ACT vs. SAT: How to Decide Which Test to Take

When it comes to the ACT and SAT, both exams are widely accepted by U.S. colleges, which often prompts students…

When it comes to the ACT and SAT, both exams are widely accepted by U.S. colleges, which often prompts students to ask: Which test should I take?

[READ: How to Tackle SAT, ACT Vocabulary Questions.]

The answer to that question lies in understanding the differences between the two tests.

Both college admissions exams remain popular even as many colleges have gone test-optional or test blind in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. In the class of 2022, 1.7 million high school students took the SAT at least once, up slightly from 1.5 million in the previous year’s class, according to College Board data. Nearly 1.35 million students in the class of 2022 took the ACT. Though still well below pre-pandemic levels, that was an increase of about 55,000 students from the year before, per ACT data.

It’s unclear how many students took both tests, but experts say it is common to do so.

“No college has a preference between the two tests,” says Ginger Fay, global director of partnerships at Georgia-based Applerouth Tutoring Services. “They’re like two children. They love them both the same. They just want them to be good.”

The idea behind both exams is similar: to demonstrate college readiness. But the tests vary in structure and timing as well as content and scoring. Both tests serve as an indicator of a student’s critical thinking and analytical skills.

“No matter what happens, taking the tests and taking them seriously and giving them their due is paramount,” says Elizabeth Levine, an independent educational consultant and founder of Signature College Counseling in New York. “Even if a school is test-optional, it is always better to submit than not submit test scores, as long as you are at a minimum within the school’s mid 50% range of test scores. It will only help support your application.”

[See: 25 Colleges With the Highest SAT Scores.]

The SAT is offered by the nonprofit College Board, which also offers Advanced Placement exams and other testing services. The nonprofit ACT organization is more limited in scope, focusing largely on its namesake test.

ACT or SAT: Choosing Which Test to Take

Students hoping to find the easier testing option are out of luck.

“Unfortunately, these are both very high-stakes and tough tests, so I’m a bit sad to say that one is not particularly easier than the other,” says Laurel Hanson, director of college prep programs at Kaplan, a New York-based company that provides test prep and other educational services.

“Most students have a preference, but they are two hard exams.”

The SAT had long been seen as more of an aptitude test whereas the ACT has been more closely associated with testing students on their understanding of their high school curriculum. Although accurate changes to the SAT have lessened that distinction, “even still, I think the ACT is a more curriculum-based assessment,” says Jaekyung Lee, professor of education at the University of Buffalo in New York.

While some students take both tests, experts say that isn’t always necessary, and preparing for both presents a challenge due to the differences in each test. Each requires different strategies, and it’s best to become well-versed in one instead of going back and forth between the two, Fay says.

To help students make their decision, experts suggest they begin by taking a full-length VCE test for each test and see which is best suited for them.

“It’s easy to say take both and see what you score better on, and that’s fair, but what I would say is take both and see what you prefer,” Hanson says. “On either of these tests, you’re going to have to put in a lot of work in order to have that strong score that demonstrates what you’re capable of.”

The two exams may appeal to different types of students, experts say, though it’s important students understand possible misconceptions.

Because the ACT includes a science section, Brand says that typically leads students who excel in science and math to favor that test. The science section, however, is a combination of memorizing comprehension and data interpretation, experts say, adding that similar questions are embedded in other sections on the SAT.

“Your memorizing still has to be pretty high for you to understand the science in that section,” says Jolyn Brand, founder of Brand College Consulting. “One test isn’t normally stronger for one set of kids versus another. If kids want to take both, I normally suggest doing the VCE test online or at home by yourself, maybe the summer before junior year. Score them both, see how you feel about both, then look up the equivalent scores.”

[Read: When to Take the SAT, ACT.]

Deciding to Take or Skip the ACT Writing Test

The College Board announced in early 2021 that it was ending the SAT optional essay and subject tests. Currently, the ACT continues to offer its optional 40-minute writing test that accompanies the exam, though it costs test takers an extra $25.

Experts have different views on whether a student should take the optional writing portion.

“The benefit of taking it is that you have it in case it’s required anywhere,” says Erika Tyler-John, senior education manager at California-based Magoosh, an online test preparation company. She notes that most colleges do not require the essay as part of an application, but “if there’s a need for it somewhere, at least you have it in your back pocket. And maybe you do really well, and that’s one more plus on your application.”

Levine previously suggested students take the writing portion for similar reasons, but she says she no longer recommends it.

Hanson says students should check with schools they plan to apply to and see if they have a preference.

“If the school doesn’t have a preference, and the student feels comfortable that their English grades reflect well on their writing abilities, that can take off 45 minutes from their test time, which can be a real benefit to students,” she says.

Recent data shows that the number of ACT-takers choosing to complete the optional essay has dwindled. In the class of 2022, a little more than 333,000 students took the writing test, down from nearly 680,000 in 2020, according to ACT data.

SAT vs. ACT Score Conversion

For students interested in comparing scores on the SAT and ACT, the College Board and the ACT organization provide conversion charts to show how composite scores stack up. The table below offers a breakdown of this data.

For the SAT, total scores range from 400 to 1600; for the ACT, the composite score runs from 1 to 36. Those ranges do not include the optional ACT writing test, which is scored separately.

SAT score ACT equivalent
1600-1570 36
1560-1530 35
1520-1490 34
1480-1450 33
1440-1420 32
1410-1390 31
1380-1360 30
1350-1330 29
1320-1300 28
1290-1260 27
1250-1230 26
1220-1200 25
1190-1160 24
1150-1130 23
1120-1100 22
1090-1060 21
1050-1030 20
1020-990 19
980-960 18
950-920 17
910-880 16
870-830 15
820-780 14
770-730 13
720-690 12
680-650 11
640-620 10
610-590 9

According to figures from both organizations, the average SAT test score for 2022 high school graduates was 1050, down from 1060 for the class of 2021. The average ACT score for the class of 2022 was 19.8, down from 20.3 for the class of 2021 and the lowest in 30 years.

“The impact of this pandemic on test score declines was bigger on the ACT as opposed to the SAT,” Lee notes. “During the pandemic period, most schools did remote learning, so there’s definitely a bigger adverse impact on some achievement in terms of the test scores.”

ACT vs. SAT Differences

The SAT takes three hours and the ACT lasts two hours and 55 minutes, though the ACT’s 40-minute optional writing test would stretch that to a little more than three and a half hours.

The SAT features 154 questions vs. 215 for the ACT. Broken down by test components, the SAT has a 65-minute memorizing test, a 35-minute writing and language test and an 80-minute math section. The ACT is comprised of a 35-minute memorizing test, 45-minute English test, 60-minute math section and 35-minute science test.

While both tests take a similar amount of time, students should be aware that they have different pacing. Because the ACT includes more questions, students have less time to spend on each of them. Hanson says on average, students typically spend over a minute on a question on the SAT and under a minute per question on the ACT.

“That’s a big difference for students in terms of what they choose,” she says. “We really recommend that students try each. That’s ultimately going to be the best way to decide which is a better fit for you.”

[Read: How Long the SAT Is and How to Manage That Time.]

Some students prefer the predictability of the ACT, in which the four sections always come in the same order, whereas the order of sections changes on the SAT, Fay says. Others might prefer the SAT because each section is a little bit shorter, which may work better for their attention span, she says.

“There are some students who like the fact that you can have your calculator the whole time you’re doing math on the ACT,” she says. “On the SAT, there’s a section where you can have it and a section where you can’t.”

ACT and SAT Costs

The costs of the exams also vary and have increased in the past year. The SAT costs $60, up for $52 last year. The ACT costs $63 for only the exam, up from $55 last year, and $88 if the optional writing test is included, compared to $70 last year.

Additional fees may apply for other options, such as late registration. Students may also be able to take the SAT or ACT for free with state support or fee waivers.

How to Be Successful on the ACT or SAT

Regardless of which test students decide to take, the goal is the same: earning a score that shows college readiness.

[READ: What to know about SAT prep classes.]

To help students be successful, experts offer strategic test-prep tips. Some are simple, such as bringing a snack on test day and taking breaks when offered. Others require much more time and deliberation on the part of the student, such as identifying and working on weak spots in testing.

One best practice recommended by experts is to study well ahead of the test date. Tyler-John recommends students complete a VCE test every other week if they can, then analyze the results.

“There’s part of the test that’s the content, and there’s part of the test that’s the test,” Tyler-John says, adding that practicing time management is also crucial. “Practice for the test. Review your mistakes.”

Searching for a college? Get our complete rankings of Best Colleges.

More from U.S. News

How to Decide if You’re Ready for College

Understand What’s a Good ACT Score for College Admissions

Questions to Ask Your High School Counselor When Applying to College

ACT vs. SAT: How to Decide Which Test to Take originally appeared on usnews.com

Update 12/01/22: The story was previously published at an earlier date and has been updated with new information.

Wed, 30 Nov 2022 05:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://wtop.com/news/2022/11/act-vs-sat-how-to-decide-which-test-to-take/
Killexams : MBBS Admission Only Via NEET, No Separate Entrance Test Will Be Conducted For AIIMS Other INI

Summary

For the MBBS seats, the separate test for AIIMS and other INIs has been abolished and a single test I.E, NEET-UG is being held

NEET-UG test caters to over 80,000 MBBS seats and has a large number of stakeholders including students and colleges

MBBS admissions to all the AIIMS and other institutes of national importance will continue to be through NEET with the proposal for a separate entrance test for such institutes being rejected at the recently held governing body meeting of the AIIMS.

The governing body of AIIMS headed by Union Health Minister Mansukh Mandaviya took the decision on December 6.

It rejected the proposal of a separate entrance examination at the undergraduate level, as distinct from NEET, for all the AIIMS and institutes of National Importance after deliberation.

"After deliberations, it was felt that the current practice of a combined entrance examination for all medical colleges is continued," the minutes of the meeting read.

The All India Institute of Medical Sciences was established as an Institution of National Importance (INI) by an Act of Parliament in 1956.

Beginning with the establishment of AIIMS, the objective of Institutes of National Importance (INI) in the field of medicine is to develop patterns of teaching in undergraduate and postgraduate medical education in all its branches to demonstrate a high standard of medical education to all medical colleges and other allied institutions in India (AIIMS Act 1956).

Subsequently, more institutions -- PGIMER- Chandigarh, JIPMER, Puducherry (2008) and 21 newly established AIIMS for undergraduate and postgraduate education -- were added.

The INIs have the mandate to continuously innovate, establish and standardise newer methods of education at all levels ie undergraduate, postgraduate and super specialty, so that these can then be implemented in all the medical colleges under Central, State, Deemed and State Private Universities, an official said.

Accordingly, section 37 of the National Medical Commission Act, 2019 specifically provides a distinct recognition of the medical degree of the INI (Schedule under 37) in relation to all other medical colleges in India under its purview.

In order to recruit the highest caliber students for its medical undergraduate degree (MBBS), AIIMS New Delhi used to conduct an All-India entrance test for admission of students to the MBBS program of all AIIMS.

"This test was conducted till 2019. With the promulgation of the NMC Act in 2019, admissions to the MBBS seats at all AIIMS were merged with the NEET- UG test conducted by the National Testing Agency and the AIIMS MBBS entrance test was stopped. As a consequence, since 2020, admissions to MBBS seats at all AIIMS are being done through the NEET-UG exam," an official explained.

For all colleges in the country, admissions are done for the three levels of medical education through entrance exams.

As of date, admissions to PG (MD/MS) and super specialty (DM/MCh)are done through two separate exams each. For all INIs, these tests are called the INICET-PG (postgraduate) and INICET-SS(super-specialty) exams, conducted by AIIMS New Delhi.

The corresponding exams for all other medical institutions are done through the NEET-PG and NEET-SS exams However, for the MBBS seats, the separate test for AIIMS and other INIs has been abolished and a single test (NEET-UG is being held).

"In pursuance of highest standards and maintain the spirit of innovation, the admission into postgraduate (INICET-PG) and super-specialty (INICET-SS) medical courses is now done through a Combined Entrance Test (CFT) administered by AIIMS, New Delhi.

"It is in this context, it is proposed that admission into undergraduate courses in the INIs should be done through a Combined Entrance Test (INICET-UG)," a note submitted to the governing body stated.

"It was suggested that the MBBS entrance test for AIIMS may be separated from the NEET-UG test and reverted to the situation that existed till 2019. Similar to the pattern prior to 2020, admission to MBBS seats at all AIIMS may be done through a separate entrance exam. This test could include MBBS seats of all INIs and be called the INICET-UG entrance exam," the official stated.

According to the note, the rationale for the re-establishment of INICET-UG was that the three levels of medical education (ie. undergraduate, MBBS, post-graduate, MD/MS) and Super specialty, SS) are implicitly and critically interlinked.

To ensure a seamless transition, it is imperative that the entrance test to all three levels has a similar approach and standards as envisaged by the Parliament.

Besides, the NEET-UG test caters to over 80,000 MBBS seats and has a large number of stakeholders including students and colleges. The mammoth organisation task requires extensive logistics and consequent delays.

Further, due to multiple stakeholders (including Central, State, Deemed and Private Universities), the conduct of NEET examination and process of counselling is often delayed due to litigations at various courts.

A separate combined entrance test for undergraduate seats in INIs will shield them from events that affect the conduct of NEET, the note stated.

Last updated on 13 Dec 2022

Mon, 12 Dec 2022 14:57:00 -0600 text/html https://www.telegraphindia.com/edugraph/news/mbbs-admission-only-via-neet-no-separate-entrance-test-will-be-conducted-for-aiims-other-ini/cid/1903585
Killexams : MBBS admissions to continue through NEET UG exam, no separate medical entrance test for AIIMS, other INI
MBBS admissions to continue through NEET UG exam, no separate medical entrance test for AIIMS, other INI
New Delhi: MBBS admissions to all the AIIMS and other institutes of national importance will continue to be through the NEET UG exam with the proposal for a separate entrance test for such institutes being rejected at the recently held governing body meeting of the AIIMS. The governing body of AIIMS headed by Union Health Minister Mansukh Mandaviya took the decision on December 6.

It rejected the proposal of a separate entrance examination at the undergraduate level, as distinct from NEET, for all the AIIMS and institutes of National Importance after deliberation.

"After deliberations, it was felt that the current practice of a combined entrance examination for all medical colleges is continued," the minutes of the meeting read.

The All India Institute of Medical Sciences was established as an Institution of National Importance (INI) by an Act of Parliament in 1956.

Beginning with the establishment of AIIMS, the objective of Institutes of National Importance (INI) in the field of medicine is to develop patterns of teaching in undergraduate and postgraduate medical education in all its branches to demonstrate a high standard of medical education to all medical colleges and other allied institutions in India (AIIMS Act 1956).

Subsequently, more institutions PGIMER- Chandigarh, JIPMER, Puducherry (2008) and 21 newly established AIIMS for undergraduate and postgraduate education were added.

The INIs have the mandate to continuously innovate, establish and standardise newer methods of education at all levels ie undergraduate, postgraduate and super speciality, so that these can then be implemented in all the medical colleges under Central, State, Deemed and State Private Universities, an official said.

Accordingly, section 37 of the National Medical Commission Act, 2019 specifically provides a distinct recognition of the medical degree of the INI (Schedule under 37) in relation to all other medical colleges in India under its purview.

In order to recruit the highest calibre students for its medical undergraduate degree (MBBS), AIIMS New Delhi used to conduct an All-India entrance test for admission of students to the MBBS program of all AIIMS.

"This test was conducted till 2019. With the promulgation of the NMC Act in 2019, MBBS admission seats at all AIIMS were merged with the NEET UG test conducted by the National Testing Agency and the AIIMS MBBS entrance test was stopped. As a consequence, since 2020, admissions to MBBS seats at all AIIMS are being done through the NEET-UG exam," an official explained.

For all colleges in the country, admissions are done for the three levels of medical education through entrance exams.

As of date, admissions to PG (MD/MS) and super speciality (DM/MCh)are done through two separate exams each. For all INIs, these tests are called the INICET-PG (postgraduate) and INICET-SS(super-speciality) exams, conducted by AIIMS New Delhi.

The corresponding exams for all other medical institutions are done through the NEET-PG and NEET-SS exams However, for the MBBS seats, the separate test for AIIMS and other INIs has been abolished and a single test (NEET-UG is being held).

"In pursuance of highest standards and maintain the spirit of innovation, the admission into postgraduate (INICET-PG) and super-speciality (INICET-SS) medical courses are now done through a Combined Entrance Test (CFT) administered by AIIMS, New Delhi.

"It is in this context, it is proposed that admission into undergraduate courses in the INIs should be done through a Combined Entrance Test (INICET-UG)," a note submitted to the governing body stated.

"It was suggested that the MBBS entrance test for AIIMS may be separated from the NEET-UG test and reverted to the situation that existed till 2019. Similar to the pattern prior to 2020, admission to MBBS seats at all AIIMS may be done through a separate entrance exam. This test could include MBBS seats of all INIs and be called the INICET-UG entrance exam," the official stated.

According to the note, the rationale for the re-establishment of INICET-UG was that the three levels of medical education (ie. undergraduate, MBBS, post-graduate, MD/MS) and Super speciality, SS) are implicitly and critically interlinked.

To ensure a seamless transition, it is imperative that the entrance test to all three levels has a similar approach and standards as envisaged by the Parliament.

Besides, the NEET-UG test caters to over 80,000 MBBS seats and has a large number of stakeholders including students and colleges. The mammoth organisation task requires extensive logistics and consequent delays.

Further, due to multiple stakeholders (including Central, State, Deemed and Private Universities), the conduct of NEET examination and process of counselling is often delayed due to litigations at various courts.

A separate combined entrance test for undergraduate seats in INIs will shield them from events that affect the conduct of NEET, the note stated.

Mon, 12 Dec 2022 18:10:00 -0600 en text/html https://health.economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/education/mbbs-admissions-to-continue-through-neet-ug-exam-no-separate-medical-entrance-test-for-aiims-other-ini/96193733
Killexams : No Separate Medical Entrance Test For AIIMS, Other INI No result found, try new keyword!Accordingly, section 37 of the National Medical Commission Act, 2019 specifically provides a distinct recognition of the medical degree of the INI (Schedule under 37) in relation to all other medical ... Mon, 12 Dec 2022 00:14:00 -0600 https://www.india.com/education/no-separate-medical-entrance-test-for-aiims-other-ini-5798500/ Killexams : VICTOR JOECKS: How higher education is setting itself up for a slow decline

Colleges and universities are planting the seeds of their own decay.

Last month, the accrediting branch of the American Bar Association voted to end the requirement that law schools use the LSAT or other standardized tests for admission decisions. A final vote from the ABA’s House of Delegates is scheduled for February. The ABA accredits most law schools in the country, so this is a massive shift. The change will go into effect in 2025.

The LSAT is a difficult test, but passing the bar test is hard, too. The LSAT measures memorizing comprehension, the ability to analyze arguments and analytical reasoning. Every lawyer needs those skills. An LSAT score is a clear signal to the student and law schools about future potential. That’s good information for students to learn before taking on six figures in student loans. The ABA should have an interest in ensuring law schools churn out competent lawyers.

But ditching standardized tests is a widespread trend in higher education. Hundreds of colleges have dropped requirements for the SAT or ACT. That includes many top schools. The University of California system no longer even looks at test scores in the admissions process. Harvard made tests optional through 2026.

Colleges are doing this in pursuit of “diversity.” As a group, African-American and Hispanic students score lower than white and Asian students. In 2020, the average score on the SAT math section was 454 out of 800 for Black students. Hispanic students had an average of 478. For white students, the average was 547. It was 632 for Asians.

Dropping tests from the equation is an attempt to institute affirmative action by another name. When colleges don’t consider SAT or ACT scores, they generally admit more Black and Hispanic students. The likely corollary is that they will exclude more Asian students. For some bizarre reason, the left is selective about when they deem Asian Americans to be a hallmark of racial diversity.

Set aside how this change affects individual graduates. It’s not great for students to be accepted to a college for which they are academically unprepared. That’s a recipe for student loan debt but no degree.

Consider how this change will undermine universities as institutions. Higher education offers two main economic benefits to students. One, is the prestige of having graduated from a particular school. Next, the education itself is supposed to provide students an economically valuable skill set.

But what makes certain schools prestigious is that they don’t accept students of limited academic ability. A degree from Harvard sends an unmistakable message about your intelligence. Or at least it once did.

The other problem is that many schools are prioritizing woke virtue signaling over academics. Intellectual diversity is long gone in most places. A survey of seven universities by the College Fix found that half of their departments didn’t contain a single Republican. So much for teaching students how to think and debate. But even many professors aren’t being selected on their academic merits. Even MIT now demands that prospective faculty submit a diversity statement.

If colleges aren’t offering better instruction, online options will continue to gain ground. Some smaller colleges are already facing financial pressures, as America’s long-declining birth rate has reduced the number of high school graduates. Elite institutions are well-positioned, but don’t be surprised to find many smaller colleges closing their doors over the next decade. Some already have.

Helped by government subsidies, higher education is in a dominant position now. But, if you step back, you can see how it’s setting itself up for a slow decline.

Victor Joecks’ column appears in the Opinion section each Sunday, Wednesday and Friday. Contact him at vjoecks@reviewjournal.com or 702-383-4698. Follow @victorjoecks on Twitter.

©2022 Las Vegas Review-Journal. Visit reviewjournal.com.. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Sat, 03 Dec 2022 15:00:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/careersandeducation/victor-joecks-how-higher-education-is-setting-itself-up-for-a-slow-decline/ar-AA14Y278
Killexams : No separate medical entrance for AIIMS, similar bodies Killexams : No separate medical entrance for AIIMS, similar bodies Mon, 12 Dec 2022 10:54:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.thehansindia.com/hans/young-hans/no-separate-medical-entrance-for-aiims-similar-bodies-773119 Killexams : Only NEET for MBBS admissions at AIIMS, PGIMER, JIPMER, other INIs, No separate entrance test

New Delhi: Only the National Eligibility cum Entrance Test, NEET will be the gateway to the MBBS admissions at All India Institute of Medical Sciences, AIIMS and other Institutes of National Importance (INI) including JIPMER and PGIMER. No separate medical entrance test will be held for MBBS admissions at INI institutions.

According to a accurate report by the Press Trust of India, MBBS admissions to all the AIIMS and other institutes of national importance will continue to be through NEET with the proposal for a separate entrance test for such institutes being rejected at the recently held governing body meeting of the AIIMS.

The governing body of AIIMS headed by Union Health Minister Mansukh Mandaviya took the decision on December 6 and rejected the proposal of a separate entrance examination at the undergraduate level, as distinct from NEET, for all the AIIMS and institutes of National Importance after deliberation.

"After deliberations, it was felt that the current practice of a combined entrance examination for all medical colleges be continued," the minutes of the meeting read.

In order to recruit the highest calibre students for its medical undergraduate degree (MBBS), AIIMS New Delhi used to conduct an All-India entrance test for admission of students to the MBBS program of all AIIMS.

"This test was conducted till 2019. With the promulgation of the NMC Act in 2019, admissions to the MBBS seats at all AIIMS were merged with the NEET- UG test conducted by the National Testing Agency and the AIIMS MBBS entrance test was stopped. As a consequence, since 2020, admissions to MBBS seats at all AIIMS are being done through the NEET-UG exam," an official explained.

For all colleges in the country, admissions are done for the three levels of medical education through entrance exams.

As of date, admissions to PG (MD/MS) and super speciality (DM/MCh)are done through two separate exams each. For all INIs, these tests are called the INICET-PG (postgraduate) and INICET-SS (super-speciality) exams, conducted by AIIMS New Delhi.

The corresponding exams for all other medical institutions are done through the NEET-PG and NEET-SS exams However, for the MBBS seats, the separate test for AIIMS and other INIs has been abolished and a single test (NEET-UG is being held).

"In pursuance of highest standards and maintain the spirit of innovation, the admission into postgraduate (INICET-PG) and super-speciality (INICET-SS) medical courses is now done through a Combined Entrance Test (CFT) administered by AIIMS, New Delhi.

"It is in this context, it is proposed that admission into undergraduate courses in the INIs should be done through a Combined Entrance Test (INICET-UG)," a note submitted to the governing body had stated, quotes PTI.

"It was suggested that the MBBS entrance test for AIIMS may be separated from the NEET-UG test and reverted to the situation that existed till 2019. Similar to the pattern prior to 2020, admission to MBBS seats at all AIIMS may be done through a separate entrance exam. This test could include MBBS seats of all INIs and be called the INICET-UG entrance exam," the official stated.

According to the note, the rationale for the re-establishment of INICET-UG was that the three levels of medical education (ie. undergraduate, MBBS, post-graduate, MD/MS) and Super speciality, SS) are implicitly and critically interlinked.

To ensure a seamless transition, it is imperative that the entrance test to all three levels has a similar approach and standards as envisaged by the Parliament.

Besides, the NEET-UG test caters to over 80,000 MBBS seats and has a large number of stakeholders including students and colleges. The mammoth organisation task requires extensive logistics and consequent delays.

Further, due to multiple stakeholders (including Central, State, Deemed and Private Universities), the conduct of NEET examination and process of counselling is often delayed due to litigations at various courts.

A separate combined entrance test for undergraduate seats in INIs will shield them from events that affect the conduct of NEET, the note stated.

The All India Institute of Medical Sciences was established as an Institution of National Importance (INI) by an Act of Parliament in 1956. Beginning with the establishment of AIIMS, the objective of Institutes of National Importance (INI) in the field of medicine is to develop patterns of teaching in undergraduate and postgraduate medical education in all its branches to demonstrate a high standard of medical education to all medical colleges and other allied institutions in India (AIIMS Act 1956).

Subsequently, more institutions — PGIMER Chandigarh (Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research), JIPMER, Puducherry (2008) (Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research) and 21 newly established AIIMS for undergraduate and postgraduate education — were added.

The INIs have the mandate to continuously innovate, establish and standardise newer methods of education at all levels ie undergraduate, postgraduate and super specialty, so that these can then be implemented in all the medical colleges under Central, State, Deemed and State Private Universities, an official said.

Accordingly, section 37 of the National Medical Commission Act, 2019 specifically provides a distinct recognition of the medical degree of the INI (Schedule under 37) in relation to all other medical colleges in India under its purview.

Mon, 12 Dec 2022 18:21:00 -0600 en text/html https://medicaldialogues.in/news/education/only-neet-for-mbbs-admissions-at-aiims-pgimer-jipmer-other-inis-no-separate-entrance-test-103925
Killexams : AIIMS: No separate entrance exams for MBBS admissions other than NEET

The suggestion for a separate entrance test for institutes was rejected at the recently convened governing body meeting of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS).On December 6, the AIIMS governing committee, which is chaired by Union Health Minister Mansukh Mandaviya, made the decision. 

After consideration, the committee decided against the idea of holding a unique undergraduate entrance exam, different from NEET, for all AIIMS and other institutions of national importance. The minutes of the meeting read, "After deliberations, it was felt that the current practice of a combined entrance examination for all medical colleges be continued,” stated a report by PTI.

In 1956, a Parliamentary Act designated the All India Institute of Medical Sciences as an Institution of National Importance (INI). The goal of Institutes of National Importance (INI) in the area of medicine, starting with the construction of AIIMS, is to design teaching patterns for undergraduate and postgraduate medical education in all of its branches to show that a high standard of medical education is possible in India (AIIMS Act 1956).

Later, more institutions were added, including 21 newly built AIIMS for undergraduate and graduate medical education, PGIMER- Chandigarh, JIPMER, Puducherry (2008), as reported by PTI. 

An official stated that the INIs have the responsibility to continuously establish, innovate, and standardise newer educational approaches at all levels, including undergraduate, postgraduate, and super specialty, so that they can be used in all medical colleges affiliated with central, state, deemed, and state private universities. As a result, the INI's medical degree (Schedule under 37) is distinctly recognised in Section 37 of the National Medical Commission Act, 2019 in comparison to all other medical colleges in India that fall within its scope. 

AIIMS New Delhi used to have an All-India entrance test for admission of students to the MBBS programme of all AIIMS in order to enroll the top calibre candidates. "This test was conducted till 2019. With the promulgation of the NMC Act in 2019, admissions to the MBBS seats at all AIIMS were merged with the NEET- UG test conducted by the National Testing Agency and the AIIMS MBBS entrance test was stopped. As a consequence, from 2020, admissions to MBBS seats at all AIIMS are being done through the NEET-UG exam," an official explained, as reported by PTI.

Entrance tests are used to determine admission to the three levels of medical schools. Currently, there are two exams required for each super specialty (DM/MCh) and PG (MD/MS) admission. The INICET-PG (postgraduate) and INICET-SS (super-speciality) exams are given to all INIs and are administered by AIIMS New Delhi. The NEET-PG and NEET-SS tests serve as comparable exams for all other medical colleges. The separate test for AIIMS and other INIs for MBBS seats, however, has been eliminated in favour of a single exam: National Eligibility cum Entrance Test (NEET-UG is being held).

"In pursuance of highest standards and to maintain the spirit of innovation, the admission into postgraduate (INICET-PG) and super-speciality (INICET-SS) medical courses is now done through a Combined Entrance Test (CFT) administered by AIIMS, New Delhi. It is in this context, it is proposed that admission into undergraduate courses in the INIs should be done through a Combined Entrance Test (INICET-UG)," a note submitted to the governing body had stated. 

"It was suggested that the MBBS entrance test for AIIMS may be separated from the NEET-UG test and reverted to the situation that existed till 2019. Similar to the pattern prior to 2020, admission to MBBS seats at all AIIMS may be done through a separate entrance exam. This test could include MBBS seats of all INIs and be called the INICET-UG entrance exam," stated the official.

The letter states the reinstatement of INICET-UG was justified by the fact that the three stages of medical education—undergraduate, MBBS, post-graduate, MD/MS, and super specialty, SS—are implicitly and critically interlinked.

The entrance exams for all three levels must adhere to the same standards and approaches in order to guarantee a smooth transition. In addition, the NEET-UG test has a significant number of candidates, including students and colleges, and it fills about 80,000 MBBS seats in the country. The mammoth organisation task requires extensive logistics and consequent delays. The NEET exam's administration and the counselling procedure are frequently postponed due to numerous stakeholders (including central, state, deemed, and private universities) because of legal disputes in various courts. A separate combined entrance test for undergraduate seats in INIs will shield them from events that affect the conduct of NEET, the note stated, as reported by PTI.

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Killexams : ACT vs. SAT: How to Decide Which Test to Take 221201_StudentsTakingTest © (Getty Images) 221201_StudentsTakingTest

When it comes to the ACT and SAT, both exams are widely accepted by U.S. colleges, which often prompts students to ask: Which test should I take?

The answer to that question lies in understanding the differences between the two tests.

Both college admissions exams remain popular even as many colleges have gone test-optional or test blind in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. In the class of 2022, 1.7 million high school students took the SAT at least once, up slightly from 1.5 million in the previous year's class, according to College Board data. Nearly 1.35 million students in the class of 2022 took the ACT. Though still well below pre-pandemic levels, that was an increase of about 55,000 students from the year before, per ACT data.

It's unclear how many students took both tests, but experts say it is common to do so.

“No college has a preference between the two tests,” says Ginger Fay, global director of partnerships at Georgia-based Applerouth Tutoring Services. “They’re like two children. They love them both the same. They just want them to be good."

The idea behind both exams is similar: to demonstrate college readiness. But the tests vary in structure and timing as well as content and scoring. Both tests serve as an indicator of a student's critical thinking and analytical skills.

"No matter what happens, taking the tests and taking them seriously and giving them their due is paramount," says Elizabeth Levine, an independent educational consultant and founder of Signature College Counseling in New York. "Even if a school is test-optional, it is always better to submit than not submit test scores, as long as you are at a minimum within the school’s mid 50% range of test scores. It will only help support your application."

The SAT is offered by the nonprofit College Board, which also offers Advanced Placement exams and other testing services. The nonprofit ACT organization is more limited in scope, focusing largely on its namesake test.

ACT or SAT: Choosing Which Test to Take

Students hoping to find the easier testing option are out of luck.

"Unfortunately, these are both very high-stakes and tough tests, so I'm a bit sad to say that one is not particularly easier than the other," says Laurel Hanson, director of college prep programs at Kaplan, a New York-based company that provides test prep and other educational services.

"Most students have a preference, but they are two hard exams."

The SAT had long been seen as more of an aptitude test whereas the ACT has been more closely associated with testing students on their understanding of their high school curriculum. Although accurate changes to the SAT have lessened that distinction, “even still, I think the ACT is a more curriculum-based assessment,” says Jaekyung Lee, professor of education at the University of Buffalo in New York.

While some students take both tests, experts say that isn't always necessary, and preparing for both presents a challenge due to the differences in each test. Each requires different strategies, and it's best to become well-versed in one instead of going back and forth between the two, Fay says.

To help students make their decision, experts suggest they begin by taking a full-length VCE test for each test and see which is best suited for them.

"It's easy to say take both and see what you score better on, and that's fair, but what I would say is take both and see what you prefer," Hanson says. "On either of these tests, you're going to have to put in a lot of work in order to have that strong score that demonstrates what you're capable of."

The two exams may appeal to different types of students, experts say, though it's important students understand possible misconceptions.

Because the ACT includes a science section, Brand says that typically leads students who excel in science and math to favor that test. The science section, however, is a combination of memorizing comprehension and data interpretation, experts say, adding that similar questions are embedded in other sections on the SAT.

“Your memorizing still has to be pretty high for you to understand the science in that section," says Jolyn Brand, founder of Brand College Consulting. "One test isn’t normally stronger for one set of kids versus another. If kids want to take both, I normally suggest doing the VCE test online or at home by yourself, maybe the summer before junior year. Score them both, see how you feel about both, then look up the equivalent scores.”

Deciding to Take or Skip the ACT Writing Test

The College Board announced in early 2021 that it was ending the SAT optional essay and subject tests. Currently, the ACT continues to offer its optional 40-minute writing test that accompanies the exam, though it costs test takers an extra $25.

Experts have different views on whether a student should take the optional writing portion.

"The benefit of taking it is that you have it in case it's required anywhere," says Erika Tyler-John, senior education manager at California-based Magoosh, an online test preparation company. She notes that most colleges do not require the essay as part of an application, but "if there's a need for it somewhere, at least you have it in your back pocket. And maybe you do really well, and that's one more plus on your application."

Levine previously suggested students take the writing portion for similar reasons, but she says she no longer recommends it.

Hanson says students should check with schools they plan to apply to and see if they have a preference.

"If the school doesn't have a preference, and the student feels comfortable that their English grades reflect well on their writing abilities, that can take off 45 minutes from their test time, which can be a real benefit to students," she says.

Recent data shows that the number of ACT-takers choosing to complete the optional essay has dwindled. In the class of 2022, a little more than 333,000 students took the writing test, down from nearly 680,000 in 2020, according to ACT data.

SAT vs. ACT Score Conversion

For students interested in comparing scores on the SAT and ACT, the College Board and the ACT organization provide conversion charts to show how composite scores stack up. The table below offers a breakdown of this data.

For the SAT, total scores range from 400 to 1600; for the ACT, the composite score runs from 1 to 36. Those ranges do not include the optional ACT writing test, which is scored separately.

SAT score ACT equivalent
1600-1570 36
1560-1530 35
1520-1490 34
1480-1450 33
1440-1420 32
1410-1390 31
1380-1360 30
1350-1330 29
1320-1300 28
1290-1260 27
1250-1230 26
1220-1200 25
1190-1160 24
1150-1130 23
1120-1100 22
1090-1060 21
1050-1030 20
1020-990 19
980-960 18
950-920 17
910-880 16
870-830 15
820-780 14
770-730 13
720-690 12
680-650 11
640-620 10
610-590 9

According to figures from both organizations, the average SAT test score for 2022 high school graduates was 1050, down from 1060 for the class of 2021. The average ACT score for the class of 2022 was 19.8, down from 20.3 for the class of 2021 and the lowest in 30 years.

“The impact of this pandemic on test score declines was bigger on the ACT as opposed to the SAT," Lee notes. "During the pandemic period, most schools did remote learning, so there’s definitely a bigger adverse impact on some achievement in terms of the test scores.”

ACT vs. SAT Differences

The SAT takes three hours and the ACT lasts two hours and 55 minutes, though the ACT's 40-minute optional writing test would stretch that to a little more than three and a half hours.

The SAT features 154 questions vs. 215 for the ACT. Broken down by test components, the SAT has a 65-minute memorizing test, a 35-minute writing and language test and an 80-minute math section. The ACT is comprised of a 35-minute memorizing test, 45-minute English test, 60-minute math section and 35-minute science test.

While both tests take a similar amount of time, students should be aware that they have different pacing. Because the ACT includes more questions, students have less time to spend on each of them. Hanson says on average, students typically spend over a minute on a question on the SAT and under a minute per question on the ACT.

"That's a big difference for students in terms of what they choose," she says. "We really recommend that students try each. That's ultimately going to be the best way to decide which is a better fit for you."

Some students prefer the predictability of the ACT, in which the four sections always come in the same order, whereas the order of sections changes on the SAT, Fay says. Others might prefer the SAT because each section is a little bit shorter, which may work better for their attention span, she says.

"There are some students who like the fact that you can have your calculator the whole time you’re doing math on the ACT," she says. "On the SAT, there’s a section where you can have it and a section where you can’t.”

ACT and SAT Costs

The costs of the exams also vary and have increased in the past year. The SAT costs $60, up for $52 last year. The ACT costs $63 for only the exam, up from $55 last year, and $88 if the optional writing test is included, compared to $70 last year.

Additional fees may apply for other options, such as late registration. Students may also be able to take the SAT or ACT for free with state support or fee waivers.

How to Be Successful on the ACT or SAT

Regardless of which test students decide to take, the goal is the same: earning a score that shows college readiness.

To help students be successful, experts offer strategic test-prep tips. Some are simple, such as bringing a snack on test day and taking breaks when offered. Others require much more time and deliberation on the part of the student, such as identifying and working on weak spots in testing.

One best practice recommended by experts is to study well ahead of the test date. Tyler-John recommends students complete a VCE test every other week if they can, then analyze the results.

"There's part of the test that's the content, and there's part of the test that's the test," Tyler-John says, adding that practicing time management is also crucial. "Practice for the test. Review your mistakes."

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Copyright 2022 U.S. News & World Report

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Killexams : No separate medical entrance test for AIIMS, other INI; says governing body AIIMS was established as an Institution of National Importance by an Act of Parliament in 1956. © Provided by The Financial Express AIIMS was established as an Institution of National Importance by an Act of Parliament in 1956.

All India Institute Of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) governing body has rejected the proposal for a separate entrance test for admission to AIIMS and other Institutes of National Importance (INI). In a meeting headed by Union Health Minister Mansukh Mandaviya, the governing body said MBBS admissions to AIIMS and INI will continue to be through National Eligibility cum Entrance Test (NEET).

“After deliberations, it was felt that the current practice of a combined entrance examination for all medical colleges be continued,” the minutes of the meeting read.

AIIMS was established as an Institution of National Importance by an Act of Parliament in 1956. Beginning with the establishment of AIIMS, the objective of Institutes of National Importance in the field of medicine is to develop patterns of teaching in undergraduate and postgraduate medical education in all its branches to demonstrate a high standard of medical education to all medical colleges and other allied institutions in India (AIIMS Act 1956).

Subsequently, more institutions — PGIMER- Chandigarh, JIPMER, Puducherry (2008) and 21 newly established AIIMS for undergraduate and postgraduate education — were added.

The INIs have the mandate to continuously innovate, establish and standardise newer methods of education at all levels-

undergraduate, postgraduate and super specialty, so that these can then be implemented in all the medical colleges under Central, State, Deemed and State Private Universities, an official said.

Accordingly, section 37 of the National Medical Commission Act, 2019 specifically provides a distinct recognition of the medical degree of the INI (Schedule under 37) in relation to all other medical colleges in India under its purview.

In order to recruit the highest calibre students for its medical undergraduate degree (MBBS), AIIMS New Delhi used to conduct an All-India entrance test for admission of students to the MBBS program of all AIIMS.

“This test was conducted till 2019. With the promulgation of the NMC Act in 2019, admissions to the MBBS seats at all AIIMS were merged with the NEET- UG test conducted by the National Testing Agency and the AIIMS MBBS entrance test was stopped. As a consequence, since 2020, admissions to MBBS seats at all AIIMS are being done through the NEET-UG exam,” an official explained.

For all colleges in the country, admissions are done for the three levels of medical education through entrance exams. As of date, admissions to PG (MD/MS) and super specialty (DM/MCh) are done through two separate exams each. For all INIs, these tests are called the INICET-PG (postgraduate) and INICET-SS(super-specialty) exams, conducted by AIIMS New Delhi.

The corresponding exams for all other medical institutions are done through the NEET-PG and NEET-SS exams However, for the MBBS seats, the separate test for AIIMS and other INIs has been abolished and a single test (NEET-UG is being held).

“In pursuance of highest standards and maintain the spirit of innovation, the admission into postgraduate (INICET-PG) and super-specialty (INICET-SS) medical courses is now done through a Combined Entrance Test (CFT) administered by AIIMS, New Delhi.

“It is in this context, it is proposed that admission into undergraduate courses in the INIs should be done through a Combined Entrance Test (INICET-UG),” a note submitted to the governing body had stated.

“It was suggested that the MBBS entrance test for AIIMS may be separated from the NEET-UG test and reverted to the situation that existed till 2019. Similar to the pattern prior to 2020, admission to MBBS seats at all AIIMS may be done through a separate entrance exam. This test could include MBBS seats of all INIs and be called the INICET-UG entrance exam,” the official stated.

According to the note, the rationale for the re-establishment of INICET-UG was that the three levels of medical education ( undergraduate, MBBS, post-graduate, MD/MS) and Super specialty, SS) are implicitly and critically interlinked. To ensure a seamless transition, it is imperative that the entrance test to all three levels has a similar approach and standards as envisaged by the Parliament.

Besides, the NEET-UG test caters to over 80,000 MBBS seats and has a large number of stakeholders including students and colleges. The mammoth organisation task requires extensive logistics and consequent delays.

Further, due to multiple stakeholders (including Central, State, Deemed and Private Universities), the conduct of NEET examination and process of counselling is often delayed due to litigations at various courts. A separate combined entrance test for undergraduate seats in INIs will shield them from events that affect the conduct of NEET, the note stated.

With inputs from PTI

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