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Exam Code: FINRA Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
FINRA Administered Qualification Examination
Financial Qualification tricks
Killexams : Financial Qualification tricks - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/FINRA Search results Killexams : Financial Qualification tricks - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/FINRA https://killexams.com/exam_list/Financial Killexams : 4 Tricks to Pay Off Your Personal Loans Early No result found, try new keyword!Following these four simple tricks can help you pay off your personal ... by brothers David and Tom Gardner, The Motley Fool is a multimedia financial-services company dedicated to building ... Tue, 08 Nov 2022 21:44:00 -0600 text/html https://www.nasdaq.com/articles/4-tricks-to-pay-off-your-personal-loans-early Killexams : How a Financial Therapist Can Help Shift Your Money Mindset

Investing your money can be an emotional affair. On one hand, you might be excited about creating financial stability and building generational wealth. On the other hand, you might feel some anxiety and fear, especially in light of the accurate volatile stock market and sky-high inflation.

Those concerns — and how you approach them — can have long-term effects, according to a 2021 study by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority. The study, Financial Anxiety and Stress Among U.S. Households

, says people who experience long-term financial anxiety and stress are less likely to plan for retirement.

For those who have fears around investing, financial therapy might be a good option to explore what’s driving those feelings.

What is financial therapy?

Financial therapy combines behavioral therapy and financial coaching to help Excellerate your thoughts, feelings, and behaviors around money.

Celia Hughes, a certified financial therapist based in Los Angeles, says financial therapy marries the two disciplines.

“There’s this real gap between emotional health and financial health and money,” she says.

If you’ve never heard of financial therapy before, that could be because it's a relatively new discipline. The Financial Therapy Association

was established in 2010.

What is a financial therapist?

A certified financial therapist is an individual who meets specific requirements in the areas of financial therapy, financial planning and financial counseling, and therapeutic competencies. The certification, from the Financial Therapy Association, is one that both financial and mental health professionals can pursue.

Financial therapists can help investors understand their worries and fears around money, guiding them to that lightbulb moment.

The difference between a financial therapist and a financial advisor is that a financial therapist explores the feelings and beliefs behind your financial habits, while financial advisors focus on helping you reach your financial goals.

For example, if you have $50,000 saved in cash and fear of going broke is keeping you from investing some of that money in the stock market, you might speak to a financial therapist. However, if you have $50,000 and want to know the best strategies for investing the money, a financial advisor would probably be a better fit.

It’s important to note that not everyone who calls themselves a financial therapist is a certified financial therapist. Some behavioral therapists focus on finance and don’t have financial qualifications. Likewise, Hughes says, some financial professionals aren’t credentialed therapists, but they help you explore the emotions behind money.

What financial therapists can help you with

Financial therapists can help with any negative feelings and limiting beliefs you have around your finances. For instance, you might be carrying some generational financial trauma, and you're terrified of starting your investing journey. Or, despite being a high earner, you might not invest much because you don't believe you'll be fortunate enough to see positive returns.

If you’re curious about what working with a financial therapist could look like, Hughes explains her approach with clients struggling to kick-start their investing journey.

“We would do some digging and see if we could get to the root cause of that fear. Is it a lack of belief in your own worth and belief that you’re worthy of having a financially stable future? Is it fear of the unknown? Or you don't understand investment and how it works so you’re afraid to provide your money to something you don’t understand? So, we would try to get into some of that root work and then work on setting small goals,” she says.

How to choose a financial therapist

Hiring a financial therapist can be a big decision, so you want to choose the right one. You should look for some of the same things you would when seeking a behavioral therapist. That means finding someone who specializes in your problem area and who you feel comfortable being vulnerable with.

If you think a financial therapist is what you need and you’re ready to get started, you can search the Financial Therapy Association to find one.

Strategies for overcoming your money fears

Limiting beliefs can stall your investing journey and keep you from reaching your financial goals, the therapists we talked to said. In some cases, fears can keep you from enjoying the fruits of your labor, too. How do you move forward despite fears? Here are a few tips the therapists shared with us.

1. Identify your limiting beliefs and emotions

Some people, including those who grew up in marginalized communities, have money stories they tell themselves that are developed in childhood. These stories can either push you toward your goals or hold you back, the financial therapists say.

Perhaps you grew up watching your parents struggle to make ends meet and now you think money is scarce and shouldn't be spent. Maybe you’re afraid to invest because nobody in your family owned assets. Or maybe you invest but are afraid of losing money, so you always play it safe. According to the Wells Fargo/Gallup Investor and Retirement Optimism Index,

Black investors are less likely than white investors to feel comfortable taking on a lot of risk. They’re also more likely to provide frequent financial help to relatives.

Aja Evans, a licensed mental health counselor and financial therapist based in New York City encourages people to ask themselves hard questions about their money beliefs.

“Feel your emotions, identify them, and then make a plan with your money, and then you can move forward,” she says.

2. Envision retirement

Retirement planning might seem like a low priority for some investors, especially if retirement is decades away. And economic uncertainty in 2022 probably hasn't encouraged would-be investors. Recurring expenses may take priority, or maybe some want to use their money to live in the moment.

Hughes says sometimes people struggle to begin investing because they struggle to focus on the future.

“Some reasons are a lack of education and understanding how compound interest works and why it’s so important to start investing at a young age,” she says.

Compounding interest will help grow your money. That's a biggie because of that inflation we just mentioned — money's value erodes over time. The longer you save for retirement, the better.

If you have trouble thinking about retirement, Hughes recommends thinking about a person you know who is at retirement age and how they’re currently living. This can help create a connection to the future, so you can envision what you want for yourself and then put a plan together.

It could also be beneficial to think about future generations. What steps can you take now to help your children and grandchildren be better set up for success?

3. Start small

It might be good to take baby steps when trying to change your financial habits. This could look like doing research about whatever is creating uncomfortable feelings.

“Take the time to say, ‘Hey, where can I get some information to understand what a Roth IRA is? Or a 401(k)?’ Then decide what your goals are so you can move forward in a way that feels good,” says Evans.

4. Consider passive investing

Passive investing is a way to take pressure off yourself, especially if you’re struggling to understand the sometimes complex finance world. It’s a hands-off form of investing for those who don’t want to learn the more complicated stuff or who don’t want to take on investments with greater risk. Examples of passive investing include using robo-advisors or investment vehicles such as ETFs, index funds or mutual funds.

“You don’t need to be a finance expert, just let compound interest do its work,” Hughes says. “Even if you put a small amount of money into a mutual fund, when you start to see it grow, that feeling can be really energizing, and that can enable someone to move forward with a financial plan.”

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An earlier version of this article misattributed a quotation about a financial therapist’s approach and misstated the requirements to become a certified financial therapist. This article has been corrected.

Fri, 07 Jan 2022 11:40:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.nerdwallet.com/article/investing/how-financial-therapist-shift-your-money-mindset
Killexams : Financial Advisor

A financial advisor is a professional who provides clients with guidance around money matters, personal finances, and investments. They may work as independent agents or be employed by a financial firm. They can offer services in a variety of areas such as tax or estate planning, paying for college, and investment management.

Thu, 22 Sep 2016 08:06:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.investopedia.com/financial-advisor-4427709
Killexams : Money tight? Tricks to help you save big on holiday gifts

There’s no denying how expensive things are right now. Get as many years as possible out of the things that cost a ton to replace. Tap or click for 10 mistakes killing your appliances.

Some wallet drains are more subtle. Leaving your tech plugged in all the time can cost you a decent amount of money. Tap or click here for the most significant energy suckers.

When it comes to holiday gifting, we're all looking for a bargain. Instead of jumping from site to site and hoping you spot the best deal, let tech do the work for you.

1. An easy way to find coupons

You only have to search Google for "coupon codes" once to see how annoying and time-consuming it can be to find one that actually works. Honey is a browser extension that finds coupon codes for 30,000-plus online retailers. It works with Chrome, Safari, Firefox, Edge, and Opera.

It's so important to let our loved ones know we care during this Christmas season and always. (iStock)

Honey connects to coupon databases and checks them against expiration dates and current promotions. When a matching coupon is found, it is automatically applied during checkout. I use it myself and have saved a ton over the years.

Download Honey here.

2. Shop smarter on Amazon

If you shop on Amazon a lot, you likely have a Prime account. Here are some of my favorite perks included with the subscription. Either way, here are three quick ways to save.

  • When you’re shopping, look for a coupon checkbox near the item’s price. If you click, a virtual coupon will be applied.
  • Select a later shipping date to get credit toward future orders or media at checkout. When you select a delivery date, you’ll see any available incentives for no-rush delivery.
  • Amazon Warehouse sells items returned or slightly used at deep discounts. You can use your Prime benefits for free shipping, and there’s a good return policy. Tap or click here to check out some wares from Amazon Warehouse.

I have more tech smarts to share. Tap or click for even more ways to save on Amazon.

3. Sign up for their app or email list

Chances are, your favorite store probably has an app of its own. You may find a few sales or promotional discounts you won’t hear about anywhere else, along with coupons or offers for loyal shoppers.

The same goes for signing up for your favorite shop’s email newsletter or following them on social media.

While you’re logging in to Facebook or Twitter, do yourself a social and check out this quick guide: 5 social media do’s and don'ts to protect your privacy and security.

4. Use a cashback app

There are lots of apps out there that will pay you for what you’re already buying. Some pay out in gift cards you can spend anywhere, and others in points or specific credit toward future purchases.

A popular option is Ibotta, which offers cashback in-store and online for purchases from retailers and travel sites like Home Depot, Best Buy, Walmart, Kohl’s, Hotels.com and Priceline.

You can shop with the Ibotta browser extension or app for online purchases. Tap or click here for direct get links. To withdraw your accrued savings, it must be greater than $20. You can also transfer money to your PayPal account or a gift card purchased through the Ibotta app.

Friends having fun celebrating Christmas, sitting at table, eating, drinking wine and having fun while spending time together during winter holidays (iStock)

Tap or click for 10 apps that pay you for doing almost nothing.

5. Set a Google alert

Google Alerts allows you to track keywords across the internet and alert you when they are mentioned. This can come in handy if you have your eye on something specific. For example, you might set one up to track "AirPods sale." You’ll get an alert in your inbox whenever that's mentioned.

  • Head to Google.com/alerts and log in.
  • Choose keywords to track, then choose Show options.
  • Select how often you want to receive alerts, sources, and more.
  • Select Create Alert to finish ups.

Alerts are a great free tool from Google. My favorite, though, is Google Voice. Tap or click here for ways a free number from Google makes life easier.

6. Track prices to see if that deal is worth it

Apps and extensions that pull coupon codes are great, but CamelCamelCamel goes a step further. It tracks prices on Amazon over time, so you can see if that advertised special is worth it.

Let’s say you’ve had your eye on expensive noise-canceling headphones. You can use the CamelCamelCamel website or browser extension to see how the price has fluctuated. That way, you’re not paying more than they might go on sale for later.

Christmas gifts  (Unsplash)

Tap or click here for direct get links and more tricks to get the most out of this handy tool.

Keep your tech-know going 

My popular podcast is called "Kim Komando Today." It’s a solid 30 minutes of tech news, tips, and callers with tech questions like you from all over the country. Search for it wherever you get your podcasts. For your convenience, hit the link below for a accurate episode.

PODCAST PICK: Facebook's slow death, Twitter competitor, free background check

In this 30-minute podcast, Meta is in steep decline. Is this the beginning of the end for Facebook? Plus, all the changes at Twitter and a look at its newest competitor Mastodon. And a trick to find the best seat on a plane, get reminders from your smart assistant, and how to do a free background check.

Check out my podcast "Kim Komando Today" on Apple, Google Podcasts, Spotify, or your favorite podcast player.

Listen to the podcast here or wherever you get your podcasts. Just search for my last name, "Komando."

Get more tech know-how on The Kim Komando Show, broadcast on 425+ radio stations and available as a podcast. Sign up for Kim’s 5-minute free morning roundup for the latest security breaches and tech news. Need help? Drop your question for Kim here.

Copyright 2023, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved. By clicking the shopping links, you’re supporting my research. As an Amazon Associate, I earn a small commission from qualifying purchases. I only recommend products I believe in.

Thu, 17 Nov 2022 03:35:00 -0600 Fox News en text/html https://www.foxnews.com/tech/money-tight-tricks-help-save-big-holiday-gifts
Killexams : ‘I’m using cookies to spread the joy’: These financial professionals are using tricks to cut down on their holiday spending

Consumers are keenly aware of the money pressures while they write their gift lists, and financial professionals are no exception.

“Last year was more a splurge coming out of COVID. This year, it’s more important to make sure I don’t have any financial stress coming out the holidays,” said Jacquie Carroll, an accredited financial counselor. Concerned about inflation’s toll and looming recession worries, Carroll is avoiding the stress by changing up her holiday gift strategy, and planning to spend around half as much as last year.

Various surveys and consumer sentiment gauges show people trying to figure out how they’ll handle holiday spending. For example, nearly nine in ten consumers told Michigan State University researchers that worries about high prices and their own financial conditions would influence their spending behavior.

These financial advisers, counselors and bankers usually spend their time advising people on how to strengthen their finances. But this time they are taking a leaf out of their own pocket book.

The post-lockdown “revenge travel” trend has not yet abated. More than 53 million people are traveling this Thanksgiving weekend, which is just shy of pre-pandemic levels, according to AAA. Consumers will spend up to $960.4 billion in November and December, up from $889.3 billion for the same period last year, according to National Retail Federation projections.

Of course, there are all kinds of useful conversations and unsolicited advice families can chew on over the Thanksgiving weekend. But if holiday spending strategies come up, here are tips from financial professionals who are practicing what they preach:

Stick with hard numbers

After the pandemic toppled 2020 holiday plans, Carroll felt she had to make up for lost time with her holiday celebrations and gift giving last year. She didn’t commit to capping her gift spending during 2021. This year, however, she is doing just that.

A concrete number is critical for setting goals and sticking to them. “Whenever we have vagueness in the mind we can’t accomplish anything,” said Carroll, director of program evaluation and a regional directed at AccessLex Institute, a nonprofit organization focused on aspiring lawyers and legal education.

Carroll is not new to budgeting. She devotes half of her earnings to necessities, puts 20% towards retirement and short-term savings and uses the remaining 30% for discretionary spending, which includes holiday spending. Throughout the year, she tucks away 2% of her disposable income for holiday spending.

But sticking to a precise cap on gift expenses this year is particularly important this year, she said. The gift money is dedicated for her nieces, nephews and grandkids. For everyone else, Carroll is stepping up her baking this year. “I’m using cookies to spread the joy to everybody,” she said.

Identify the ‘exuberance number’

With friends and family around — especially with the memories of COVID’s social distancing and isolation — it’s easy to get swept up in the euphoria of togetherness and a good party. It’s also easy to buy one more bottle of wine, an extra wedge of cheese or an impulse gift.

This year, Phil Blancato, CEO of Ladenburg Thalmann Asset Management in New York, is trying to resist making those additional splurges by pulling back his gift and food expenses by 10% to 15%.

“That’s the exuberance number,” he said. This isn’t a technical term and there’s no one “exuberance number” for every household. But for Blancato, it’s a handy label that keeps his spending intentional when the potential consequences of getting swept away are higher.

“You want to do a little bit extra because it’s that time of year,” Blancato said. “People like me and, in general, people are going to do less of that little bit extra. That one extra thing is no longer going to be something that you’re going to buy in a year like this.”

What a difference a year makes

As Americans geared up for 2021’s holiday shopping, the yearly inflation rate was 6.2%. One year later, the yearly rate, as of October, was 7.7%. That’s a lower-than-expected number following the 8.2% rate during September. The point is, it’s a different economic environment.

“You really shouldn’t go into the holidays with the same mentality that it’s same holiday as it always been. Going into it with that mentality, you’ll blow right through that budget,” said JR George, senior vice president, marketing at Trustco Bank TRST, +0.26%.

This year, George is shopping early. Last year, he started shopping on Cyber Monday — the Monday after Thanksgiving. This year he has already completed roughly 80% of his holiday gift buying.

It’s not a worry about supply chains and product availability. Spreading out the purchases avoids a truncated spending spree that might make George more likely to rely on credit cards and potentially face credit=card debt, he explained.

Like Carroll and Blancato, George isn’t new to budgeting. He has made peace with the fact that he may be giving less to some friends, family and colleagues — and in some cases, nothing. “I’ve thought a lot harder about who I’m giving gifts to,” he said.

Mon, 28 Nov 2022 22:34:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.marketwatch.com/story/im-using-cookies-to-spread-the-joy-these-financial-professionals-are-using-tricks-to-cut-down-on-their-holiday-spending-11669231826
Killexams : Tips and Tricks No result found, try new keyword!Welcome to IGN's Tips and Tricks guide for Evil West. Evil West is a fairly linear third person shooter / beat em' up, but that doesn't mean there aren't a couple things to know before you dive in. Wed, 23 Nov 2022 12:45:00 -0600 https://www.ign.com/wikis/evil-west/Tips_and_Tricks Killexams : Canna Campbell: SugarMamma’s ‘financial foreplay’ court battle with Rhondalynn Korolak </head> <body id="readabilityBody" readability="27.959183673469"> <h3>Newscorp Australia are trialling new security software on our mastheads. If you receive "Potential automated action detected!" please try these steps first:</h3> <ol type="1"> <li>Temporarily disable any AdBlockers / pop-up blockers / script blockers you have enabled</li> <li>Add this site in to the allowed list for any AdBlockers / pop-up blockers / script blockers you have enabled</li> <li>Ensure your browser supports JavaScript (this can be done via accessing <a href="https://www.whatismybrowser.com/detect/is-javascript-enabled" target="_blank">https://www.whatismybrowser.com/detect/is-javascript-enabled</a> in your browser)</li> <li>Ensure you are using the latest version of your web browser</li> </ol> <p>If you need to be unblocked please e-mail us at accessissues@news.com.au and provide the IP address and reference number shown here along with why you require access. News Corp Australia.</p><p>Your IP address is: 108.167.164.204 | Your reference number is: 0.79c84d17.1670949715.26ba3cac</p> </body> </description> <pubDate>Fri, 04 Nov 2022 01:12:00 -0500</pubDate> <dc:format>text/html</dc:format> <dc:identifier>https://www.weeklytimesnow.com.au/agribusiness/breaking-news/canna-campbell-sugarmammas-financial-foreplay-court-battle-with-rhondalynn-korolak/news-story/b0f476664aff756a21c46c5cee6324a9</dc:identifier> </item> <item> <title>Killexams : 'I'm using cookies to spread the joy': These financial professionals are using tricks to cut down on their holiday spending

By Andrew Keshner

'It's more important to make sure I don't have any financial stress coming out of the holidays'

This holiday shopping season coincides with four-decade high inflation, declining personal savings rates, ballooning credit-card debt, a growing list of layoffs in the tech sector, and storm clouds signaling a recession.

Consumers are keenly aware of the money pressures while they write their gift lists, and financial professionals are no exception.

"Last year was more a splurge coming out of COVID. This year, it's more important to make sure I don't have any financial stress coming out the holidays," said Jacquie Carroll, an accredited financial counselor. Concerned about inflation's toll and looming recession worries, Carroll is avoiding the stress by changing up her holiday gift strategy, and planning to spend around half as much as last year.

Various surveys and consumer sentiment gauges show people trying to figure out how they'll handle holiday spending. For example, nearly nine in ten consumers told Michigan State University researchers that worries about high prices and their own financial conditions would influence their spending behavior.

These financial advisers, counselors and bankers usually spend their time advising people on how to strengthen their finances. But this time they are taking a leaf out of their own pocket book.

The post-lockdown "revenge travel" trend has not yet abated. More than 53 million people are traveling this Thanksgiving weekend, which is just shy of pre-pandemic levels, according to AAA. Consumers will spend up to $960.4 billion in November and December, up from $889.3 billion for the same period last year, according to National Retail Federation projections.

Of course, there are all kinds of useful conversations and unsolicited advice families can chew on over the Thanksgiving weekend. But if holiday spending strategies come up, here are tips from financial professionals who are practicing what they preach:

Stick with hard numbers

After the pandemic toppled 2020 holiday plans, Carroll felt she had to make up for lost time with her holiday celebrations and gift giving last year. She didn't commit to capping her gift spending during 2021. This year, however, she is doing just that.

A concrete number is critical for setting goals and sticking to them. "Whenever we have vagueness in the mind we can't accomplish anything," said Carroll, director of program evaluation and a regional directed at AccessLex Institute, a nonprofit organization focused on aspiring lawyers and legal education.

Carroll is not new to budgeting. She devotes half of her earnings to necessities, puts 20% towards retirement and short-term savings and uses the remaining 30% for discretionary spending, which includes holiday spending. Throughout the year, she tucks away 2% of her disposable income for holiday spending.

But sticking to a precise cap on gift expenses this year is particularly important this year, she said. The gift money is dedicated for her nieces, nephews and grandkids. For everyone else, Carroll is stepping up her baking this year. "I'm using cookies to spread the joy to everybody," she said.

Identify the 'exuberance number'

With friends and family around -- especially with the memories of COVID's social distancing and isolation -- it's easy to get swept up in the euphoria of togetherness and a good party. It's also easy to buy one more bottle of wine, an extra wedge of cheese or an impulse gift.

This year, Phil Blancato, CEO of Ladenburg Thalmann Asset Management in New York, is trying to resist making those additional splurges by pulling back his gift and food expenses by 10% to 15%.

"That's the exuberance number," he said. This isn't a technical term and there's no one "exuberance number" for every household. But for Blancato, it's a handy label that keeps his spending intentional when the potential consequences of getting swept away are higher.

"You want to do a little bit extra because it's that time of year," Blancato said. "People like me and, in general, people are going to do less of that little bit extra. That one extra thing is no longer going to be something that you're going to buy in a year like this."

What a difference a year makes

As Americans geared up for 2021's holiday shopping, the yearly inflation rate was 6.2% One year later, the yearly rate, as of October, was 7.7%. That's a lower-than-expected number following the 8.2% rate during September. The point is, it's a different economic environment.

"You really shouldn't go into the holidays with the same mentality that it's same holiday as it always been. Going into it with that mentality, you'll blow right through that budget," said JR George, senior vice president, marketing at Trustco Bank (TRST).

This year, George is shopping early. Last year, he started shopping on Cyber Monday -- the Monday after Thanksgiving. This year he has already completed roughly 80% of his holiday gift buying.

It's not a worry about supply chains and product availability. Spreading out the purchases avoids a truncated spending spree that might make George more likely to rely on credit cards and potentially face credit=card debt, he explained.

Like Carroll and Blancato, George isn't new to budgeting. He has made peace with the fact that he may be giving less to some friends, family and colleagues -- and in some cases, nothing. "I've thought a lot harder about who I'm giving gifts to," he said.

-Andrew Keshner

 

(END) Dow Jones Newswires

11-29-22 1234ET

Copyright (c) 2022 Dow Jones &amp; Company, Inc.
Tue, 29 Nov 2022 03:44:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.morningstar.com/news/marketwatch/20221129253/im-using-cookies-to-spread-the-joy-these-financial-professionals-are-using-tricks-to-cut-down-on-their-holiday-spending
Killexams : 'I'm using cookies to spread the joy': These financial professionals are using tricks to cut down on their holiday spending

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