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Exam Code: EPPP Examination for Professional Practice of Psychology Dumps January 2024 by Killexams.com team

EPPP Examination for Professional Practice of Psychology

The Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology
(EPPP) is developed and owned by the Association of
State and Provincial Psychology Boards (ASPPB). The EPPP
is provided to state and provincial boards of psychology to
assist them in their evaluation of the qualifications of
applicants for licensure and certification. This
standardized knowledge-based examination is
constructed by ASPPB with the assistance of its test
vendor, Pearson VUE. The EPPP is continuously
administered in a computerized delivery format through
the Pearson VUE network of computer testing centers.
State and provincial psychology boards acting collectively
through ASPPB provide support for the testing format.
Pearson VUE maintains a network of more than 275
Pearson Professional Centers (PPCs) in the United States
and Canada in order to provide access to computer-based
testing (CBT) for candidates.

The resources of individual psychologists, ASPPB and its
test vendor are used in the ongoing development of and
improvements to the EPPP. These combined resources are
greater than those available to any individual psychology
licensing. The EPPP is only one part of the evaluation
procedures used by state and provincial boards to
determine candidates readiness to practice the
profession of psychology. Most boards supplement the
EPPP with other requirements and/or assessment
procedures. The EPPP is intended to evaluate the
knowledge that the most accurate practice analysis has
determined as foundational to the competent practice of
psychology. Most candidates taking the EPPP have
obtained a doctoral degree in psychology, a year of predoctoral supervised experience and appropriate
postdoctoral experience. Candidates are expected to have
acquired a broad basic knowledge of psychology,
regardless of individual areas of concentration. This
knowledge, and the candidates ability to apply it, are
assessed through the candidates responses to objective,
multiple-choice questions that are representative of the
field at large. The average pass-rate for doctoral level
candidates who are taking the test for the first time
exceeds 80% in the most accurate trial years.



Regardless of the jurisdiction, in order to sit for the
EPPP, individuals seeking licensure must first apply for
licensure to the licensing authority in the state,
province or territory in which they wish to be licensed.
The licensing authority reviews applicants credentials
and determines if they meet the requirements
established in the laws of the state, province or
territory.



Candidates who meet their licensing authorities
requirements will be pre-approved by the board to take
the EPPP. The board will enter the candidates
identifying information into an online EPPP registration
system that will enable the candidate to logon and
verify her/his account, and that gives access to the
application materials. Candidates will be sent two
consecutive emails, the 1st advising them that their
licensing authority has uploaded their information into
the system, and the 2nd with information for them to
verify their account and begin the registration process.
 Candidates will not be able to log into the
registration system until their licensing authority has
uploaded their information. Candidates must contact
their board to advise that they are ready to test and
need to be uploaded to the EPPP registration system.



Candidates may test at any authorized Pearson VUE
center that administers the EPPP, regardless of the
jurisdiction where they are applying for licensure.
Candidates must arrive 30 minutes prior to their
scheduled appointment. Please Note: Candidates must
have a currently valid, government-issued photo ID
(e.g., passport, drivers license, etc.), as well as another
piece of identification imprinted with their name and
containing a signature or accurate photo (e.g., credit card,
CPR card, etc.). The first and last name on both forms
of ID must match the name on the Authorization to
Test email.



Prior to taking the EPPP, candidates will be asked to
read and acknowledge their review of the Candidate
Acknowledgment Statement. Please note that the
Candidate Acknowledgement Statement contains
important rules for taking the EPPP and should be read
in its entirety before acknowledging that it has been
read.

The EPPP is administered under standardized conditions
in accordance with procedures established by Pearson
VUE for all their testing centers.
• Candidates taking the EPPP are allowed:
o 5 minutes to agree to the terms of the
Candidate Acknowledgement Statement (If
you do not agree to the terms within the 5-
minute timeframe, the test will be
canceled and cannot be reset),
o 5 minutes for completion of the tutorial,
o 4 hours and 15 minutes for completion of
the EPPP and 5 minutes at the end of the test allotted
to complete a brief survey.
• Candidates with documented disabilities or
impairments, who wish to be tested under
nonstandard conditions, please see the section
regarding “Special Accommodations” on page 7.
There are no scheduled breaks during the Exam.
Candidates may take breaks whenever they wish;
however, the clock on the time allotted for the Exam
will continue to run.



Pearson Professional Centers are built to standard
specifications and vary primarily on the basis of size.
Private modular workstations provide ample workspace,
comfortable seating, and proper lighting. Proctors
monitor the testing process through an observation
window and from within the testing room. Parabolic
mirrors mounted on the walls assist proctors in
observing the testing process. All testing sessions are
videotaped and audio-monitored, and a digitized image
of all candidates taking the EPPP will be retained.
Computer knowledge is not required to take a
computerized examination. Before the examination
begins, a basic introductory lesson (tutorial) is
presented that explains the process of selecting answers
and moving from question to question. Candidates have
5 minutes to complete the tutorial, and are strongly
encouraged to review it carefully.



Candidates may select their answers using either the
keyboard or the mouse. During the tutorial, candidates
will learn how they can skip forward or backward
through the EPPP to review questions. Candidates
should be sure they understand how to review
questions when they take the tutorial.
The testing software contains a feature that allows
candidates to flag questions they might wish to review
later, if time permits. Any question can be flagged,
regardless of whether it has been left blank or
answered, and will be scored even if it is still marked
upon completion of the Exam.

Candidates are encouraged to take notes during the
tutorial on whiteboards that can be supplied by the
testing center upon request. They are not automatically
supplied. Testing center staff will collect whiteboards at
the completion of the Examination. Candidates are not
allowed to bring their own scratch paper or writing
instruments into the testing room.
Please Note: There might be some distractions in the
testing situation because:
• Other candidates may be taking exams that require
narrative responses, and there may be keyboard
noise.

• Proctors will be entering the testing room on a
regular basis to observe activity and to seat other
candidates or answer inquiries.
• Other minor distractions might include ambient
noise from outside the testing room.
If a candidate is concerned that these kinds of
distractions will affect test performance, he or she
may request earplugs and/or noise cancelling
headphones after arriving at the testing center. This
does not require pre-approval. Candidates are not
allowed to bring their own earplugs into the testing
room.

The total number of correct responses determines a
candidates score. Therefore, it is to the candidates
advantage to answer every item, even when uncertain
of the correct response. The candidate should choose
the single best answer to each item.
Examination for Professional Practice of Psychology
Medical Professional Questions and Answers

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Medical
EPPP
Examination for Professional Practice of Psychology
https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/EPPP
Question: 8
_____ proposed a social learning theory of career development in which career path is influence
by four major factors: genetic endowment; environmental conditions and events; learning
experiences; and task approach skills (which include performance expectations, work habits, and
emotional responses).
A. Zimbardo
B. Roe
C. Tiedeman
D. Krumboltz
Answer: D
Question: 9
_____ created a theory of cognitive development based on the idea that people increase their
cognitive skill based on information taken from both the environment and biological maturation.
A. Krumboltz
B. Skinner
C. Piaget
D. Tiedeman
Answer: C
Question: 10
The _______ will have predominant symptoms including at least two of the following: motoric
immobility; excessive motor activity; extreme negativism or mutism; peculiarities in voluntary
movement; and echolalia or echopraxia.
A. Catatonic Type schizophrenic
B. Paranoid Type schizophrenic
C. Disorganized Type schizophrenic
D. Undifferentiated Type schizophrenic
Answer: A
3
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Medical Professional Dumps - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/EPPP Search results Medical Professional Dumps - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/EPPP https://killexams.com/exam_list/Medical ChatGPT struggles to answer medical questions, new research finds

CNN  — 

ChatGPT might not be a cure-all for answers to medical questions, a new study suggests.

Researchers at Long Island University posed 39 medication-related queries to the free version of the artificial intelligence chatbot, all of which were practice questions from the university’s College of Pharmacy drug information service. The software’s answers were then compared with responses written and reviewed by trained pharmacists.

The study found that ChatGPT provided accurate responses to only about 10 of the questions, or about a quarter of the total. For the other 29 prompts, the answers were incomplete or inaccurate, or they did not address the questions.

The findings were presented Tuesday at the annual meeting of the American Society for Health-Systems Pharmacists in Anaheim, California.

ChatGPT, OpenAI’s experimental AI chatbot, was released in November 2022 and became the fastest-growing consumer application in history, with nearly 100 million people registering within two months.

Given that popularity, the researchers’ interest was sparked by concern that their students, other pharmacists and ordinary consumers would turn to resources like ChatGPT to explore questions about their health and medication plans, said Sara Grossman, an associate professor of pharmacy practice at Long Island University and one of the study’s authors.

Those queries, they found, often yielded inaccurate – or even dangerous – responses.

In one question, for example, researchers asked ChatGPT whether the Covid-19 antiviral medication Paxlovid and the blood-pressure lowering medication verapamil would react with each other in the body. ChatGPT responded that taking the two medications together would yield no adverse effects.

In reality, people who take both medications might have a large drop in blood pressure, which can cause dizziness and fainting. For patients taking both, clinicians often create patient-specific plans, including lowering the dose of verapamil or cautioning the person to get up slowly from a sitting position, Grossman said.

ChatGPT’s guidance, she added, would have put people in harm’s way.

“Using ChatGPT to address this question would put a patient at risk for an unwanted and preventable drug interaction,” Grossman wrote in an email to CNN.

When the researchers asked the chatbot for scientific references to support each of its responses, they found that the software could provide them for only eight of the questions they asked. And in each case, they were surprised to find that ChatGPT was fabricating references.

At first glance, the citations looked legitimate: They were often formatted appropriately, provided URLs and were listed under legitimate scientific journals. But when the team attempted to find the referenced articles, they realized that ChatGPT had given them fictional citations.

In one case, the researchers asked ChatGPT how to convert spinal injection doses of the muscle spasm medication baclofen to corresponding oral doses. Grossman’s team could not find a scientifically established dose conversion ratio, but ChatGPT put forth a single conversion rate and cited two medical organizations’ guidance, she said.

However, neither organization provides any official guidance on the dose conversion rate. In fact, the conversion factor that ChatGPT suggested had never been scientifically established. The software also provided an example calculation for the dose conversion but with a critical mistake: It mixed up units when calculating the oral dose, throwing off the dose recommendation by a factor of 1,000.

If that guidance was followed by a health care professional, Grossman said, they might deliver a patient an oral baclofen dose 1,000 times lower than required, which could cause withdrawal symptoms like hallucinations and seizures.

“There were numerous errors and “problems’ with this response and ultimately, it could have a profound impact on patient care,” she wrote.

The Long Island University study is not the first to raise concerns about ChatGPT’s fictional citations. Previous research has also documented that, when asked medical questions, ChatGPT can create deceptive forgeries of scientific references, even listing the names of real authors with previous publications in scientific journals.

Grossman, who had worked little with the software before the study, was surprised by how confidently ChatGPT was able to synthesize information nearly instantaneously, answers that would take trained professionals hours to compile.

“The responses were phrased in a very professional and sophisticated manner, and it just seemed it can contribute to a sense of confidence in the accuracy of the tool,” she said. “A user, a consumer, or others that may not be able to discern can be swayed by the appearance of authority.”

A spokesperson for OpenAI, the organization that develops ChatGPT, said it advises users not to rely on responses as a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment.

The spokesperson pointed to ChatGPT’s usage policies, which indicate that “OpenAI’s models are not fine-tuned to provide medical information.” The policy also states that the models should never be used to provide “diagnostic or treatment services for serious medical conditions.”

Although Grossman was unsure of how many people use ChatGPT to address medication questions, she raised concerns that they could use the chatbot like they would search for medical advice on search engines like Google.

“People are always looking for instantaneous responses when they have this at their fingertips,” Grossman said. “I think that this is just another approach of using ‘Dr. Google’ and other seemingly easy methods of obtaining information.”

For online medical information, she recommended that consumers use governmental websites that provide reputable information, like the National Institutes of Health’s MedlinePlus page.

Still, Grossman doesn’t believe that online answers can replace the advice of a health care professional.

“[Websites are] maybe one starting point, but they can take their providers out of the picture when looking for information about medications that are directly applicable to them,” she said. “But it may not be applicable to the patients themselves because of their personal case, and every patient is different. So the authority here should not be removed from the picture: the healthcare professional, the prescriber, the patient’s physicians.”

Sat, 09 Dec 2023 18:49:00 -0600 en text/html https://edition.cnn.com/2023/12/10/health/chatgpt-medical-questions/index.html?trk=public_post_comment-text
ChatGPT struggles to accurately answer medical questions, study says

(CNN) – Doctors and medical personnel will probably want to stay away from using artificial intelligence for medical advice.

Researchers at Long Island University posed 39 real-life medication-related queries to the free version of ChatGPT. The study found that ChatGPT provided accurate responses to only about 10 of the questions.

For the other 29 prompts, the answers were incomplete or inaccurate, or they didn’t even address the questions.

Interestingly, when researchers asked for scientific sourcing for answers, the platform fabricated references and citations in some cases.

A spokesperson for OpenAI, the organization that develops ChatGPT, said it advises users not to rely on responses as a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment.

Sun, 10 Dec 2023 04:50:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.wctv.tv/2023/12/10/chatgpt-struggles-accurately-answer-medical-questions-study-says/?outputType=apps
ChatGPT struggles to answer medical questions, new research finds

ChatGPT might not be a cure-all for answers to medical questions, a new study suggests.

Researchers at Long Island University posed 39 medication-related queries to the free version of the artificial intelligence chatbot, all of which were practice questions from the university’s College of Pharmacy drug information service. The software’s answers were then compared with responses written and reviewed by trained pharmacists.

The study found that ChatGPT provided accurate responses to only about 10 of the questions, or about a quarter of the total. For the other 29 prompts, the answers were incomplete or inaccurate, or they did not address the questions.

The findings were presented Tuesday at the annual meeting of the American Society for Health-Systems Pharmacists in Anaheim, California.

ChatGPT, OpenAI’s experimental AI chatbot, was released in November 2022 and became the fastest-growing consumer application in history, with nearly 100 million people registering within two months.

Given that popularity, the researchers’ interest was sparked by concern that their students, other pharmacists and ordinary consumers would turn to resources like ChatGPT to explore questions about their health and medication plans, said Sara Grossman, an associate professor of pharmacy practice at Long Island University and one of the study’s authors.

Those queries, they found, often yielded inaccurate – or even dangerous – responses.

In one question, for example, researchers asked ChatGPT whether the Covid-19 antiviral medication Paxlovid and the blood-pressure lowering medication verapamil would react with each other in the body. ChatGPT responded that taking the two medications together would yield no adverse effects.

In reality, people who take both medications might have a large drop in blood pressure, which can cause dizziness and fainting. For patients taking both, clinicians often create patient-specific plans, including lowering the dose of verapamil or cautioning the person to get up slowly from a sitting position, Grossman said.

ChatGPT’s guidance, she added, would have put people in harm’s way.

“Using ChatGPT to address this question would put a patient at risk for an unwanted and preventable drug interaction,” Grossman wrote in an email to CNN.

When the researchers asked the chatbot for scientific references to support each of its responses, they found that the software could provide them for only eight of the questions they asked. And in each case, they were surprised to find that ChatGPT was fabricating references.

At first glance, the citations looked legitimate: They were often formatted appropriately, provided URLs and were listed under legitimate scientific journals. But when the team attempted to find the referenced articles, they realized that ChatGPT had given them fictional citations.

In one case, the researchers asked ChatGPT how to convert spinal injection doses of the muscle spasm medication baclofen to corresponding oral doses. Grossman’s team could not find a scientifically established dose conversion ratio, but ChatGPT put forth a single conversion rate and cited two medical organizations’ guidance, she said.

However, neither organization provides any official guidance on the dose conversion rate. In fact, the conversion factor that ChatGPT suggested had never been scientifically established. The software also provided an example calculation for the dose conversion but with a critical mistake: It mixed up units when calculating the oral dose, throwing off the dose recommendation by a factor of 1,000.

If that guidance was followed by a health care professional, Grossman said, they might deliver a patient an oral baclofen dose 1,000 times lower than required, which could cause withdrawal symptoms like hallucinations and seizures.

“There were numerous errors and “problems’ with this response and ultimately, it could have a profound impact on patient care,” she wrote.

The Long Island University study is not the first to raise concerns about ChatGPT’s fictional citations. Previous research has also documented that, when asked medical questions, ChatGPT can create deceptive forgeries of scientific references, even listing the names of real authors with previous publications in scientific journals.

Grossman, who had worked little with the software before the study, was surprised by how confidently ChatGPT was able to synthesize information nearly instantaneously, answers that would take trained professionals hours to compile.

“The responses were phrased in a very professional and sophisticated manner, and it just seemed it can contribute to a sense of confidence in the accuracy of the tool,” she said. “A user, a consumer, or others that may not be able to discern can be swayed by the appearance of authority.”

A spokesperson for OpenAI, the organization that develops ChatGPT, said it advises users not to rely on responses as a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment.

The spokesperson pointed to ChatGPT’s usage policies, which indicate that “OpenAI’s models are not fine-tuned to provide medical information.” The policy also states that the models should never be used to provide “diagnostic or treatment services for serious medical conditions.”

Although Grossman was unsure of how many people use ChatGPT to address medication questions, she raised concerns that they could use the chatbot like they would search for medical advice on search engines like Google.

“People are always looking for instantaneous responses when they have this at their fingertips,” Grossman said. “I think that this is just another approach of using ‘Dr. Google’ and other seemingly easy methods of obtaining information.”

For online medical information, she recommended that consumers use governmental websites that provide reputable information, like the National Institutes of Health’s MedlinePlus page.

Still, Grossman doesn’t believe that online answers can replace the advice of a health care professional.

“[Websites are] maybe one starting point, but they can take their providers out of the picture when looking for information about medications that are directly applicable to them,” she said. “But it may not be applicable to the patients themselves because of their personal case, and every patient is different. So the authority here should not be removed from the picture: the healthcare professional, the prescriber, the patient’s physicians.”

For more CNN news and newsletters create an account at CNN.com

Sat, 09 Dec 2023 18:49:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.aol.com/chatgpt-struggles-answer-medical-questions-134911474.html
ChatGPT struggles to accurately answer medical questions, study says

(CNN) – Doctors and medical personnel will probably want to stay away from using artificial intelligence for medical advice.

Researchers at Long Island University posed 39 real-life medication-related queries to the free version of ChatGPT. The study found that ChatGPT provided accurate responses to only about 10 of the questions.

For the other 29 prompts, the answers were incomplete or inaccurate, or they didn’t even address the questions.

Interestingly, when researchers asked for scientific sourcing for answers, the platform fabricated references and citations in some cases.

A spokesperson for OpenAI, the organization that develops ChatGPT, said it advises users not to rely on responses as a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment.

Sun, 10 Dec 2023 04:50:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.wtoc.com/2023/12/10/chatgpt-struggles-accurately-answer-medical-questions-study-says/?outputType=apps




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