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Exam Code: EMT Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
Emergency Medical Technician
Medical Technician learning
Killexams : Medical Technician learning - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/EMT Search results Killexams : Medical Technician learning - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/EMT https://killexams.com/exam_list/Medical Killexams : Kings Mountain High EMT program finishes first semester

Instructor David Trammel works with senior Nyirah Petty during an EMT class Tuesday morning, Dec. 6, 2022, at Kings Mountain High School.

Kings Mountain High school students are wrapping up their first semester in a pilot program which will allow them to work as emergency medical technicians immediately following high school.

David Trammel, former director of operations at the now-closed Shelby Rescue Squad, teaches the class, which started at the beginning of the school year.

“We’re trying to show that there's other avenues for some students that don't want to go to a four-year college,” Trammel said.

He said he started out with 13 students at the beginning of the year and has dropped down to 11.

Students are learning how to do patient care, treat the sick and wounded, learn about transporting patients, how to check off an ambulance and become familiar with the different equipment used on a daily basis.

After the Christmas break, Trammel hopes the students will be able to do ride-alongs with Cleveland County EMS to show them what it's really like to come to work every day.

Trammel said initially, he was reluctant to take on the task of teaching high school students but now enjoys it.

“I look forward to it every day,” he said. “To come and see what else I am able to show them. They’re an amazing group of people. Education I guess is where my heart is. If we’re not here, our profession will soon die out.”

He said even if they don’t all go on to work in EMS, the practical skills they’ve learned will benefit them. One of the students was able to check her grandmother’s blood pressure and listen to her lungs when she was having problems.

It could also pave the way for a future career in medicine.

Seniors Nicole Poston and Caleb Broome learn together during an EMT class Tuesday morning, Dec. 6, 2022, at Kings Mountain High School.

Trammel said some EMTs have gone on to become physician’s assistants, or work as a coast guard helicopter medic. Others go on to become nurses.

“I know going into this not all of them are going to follow being EMS,” he said.

During the next phase of the program, students will get uniforms and wear a special patch.

“We’re ready for the next phase and trying to close out this phase,” Trammel said.

Some of the students will go on to take the state test for emergency medical responders and move on to become an emergency medical technician, which means they can ride in the back of the ambulance unassisted, practice a few more skills and are granted the ability to give more medications.

Next semester they will see a medical helicopter and learn what they would need to do to pursue a career in that field. They will learn how to drive and park an ambulance and do more hands-on type training.

“The next half is the more fun filled part, less in the classroom,” Trammel said. “At the end of the course they will go back and take the state EMT test and become certified as an emergency medical technician. For the ones seeking employment, they can get a job at Cleveland County EMS. That was part of the basic goal, anyone coming straight out of the class, that they would come to work.”

Jackie Echols, one of the 11 students, said she decided to sign up because it seemed like a good opportunity to learn medical skills while still in high school.

“I really enjoy it, and I've learned so much and even if I decide if it's not for me to go into that field, I've learned quite a bit and can use it in the future,” she said. “I've always been really interested in it, and the opportunity came up and I worked my butt off last year so I could have an open spot in my schedule for fun things this year.”

As for the future, Echols said she’s interested in going into the ministry but knows she’ll probably need another job and that may be as an EMT.

“We have clinicals next semester, 48 hours we have to work on the truck so that hopefully I'll be able to get a taste if I can really handle it.”

She said if she passes the state test, she hopes to begin working this summer.

“I think it's a phenomenal opportunity at the high school level getting to go into that,” Echols said. “I think it's an awesome program.”

Rhonda Benfield, Career Technical Education district coordinator, said in initial discussions about the program, the goal was to expand it to all four traditional high schools in the county.

“This is a partnership between Cleveland County Schools Career and Technical Education and Cleveland County EMS,” Benfield said. “They are providing a tremendous amount of support for the program, including the teacher.”

She said whether that happens will depend on the county and if they feel they can expand it and how.

“Probably as the year draws to an end, we'll look at that program and see,” she said. “There’s ongoing conversations with Cleveland County EMS. There will be more conversations about where do we go from here, do we expand on it, how do we expand on it.”

She said the pilot program at Kings Mountain High School has been successful so far and out of the 13 students, 11 are continuing with the program and following high school, they could go on to immediately begin working as an emergency medical technician.

“It’s very very exciting to provide an opportunity for employment for students after high school,” she said.

Kings Mountain was selected to be the pioneer because the school had a strong interest in the program.

In a time when there is a need in all industries, it benefits employers as well to have a source of trained employees ready to go to work.

Seniors Jackie Echols and Payton Whitley work on an oral pathway during an EMT class Tuesday morning, Dec. 6, 2022, at Kings Mountain High School.

“I would love to see us do more things like that in our community,” Benfield said. "The different career fields and industries are having a hard time staffing positions. This is a great situation to be in.”

Rebecca Sitzes can be reached at rsitzes@gannett.com

This article originally appeared on The Shelby Star: Kings Mountain High EMT program finishes first semester

Sun, 11 Dec 2022 20:03:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://news.yahoo.com/kings-mountain-high-emt-program-100309760.html
Killexams : State program offers free education for prospective emergency medical workers

CARTHAGE — A deal such as the one being offered through Panola College for a free college education is hard, if not impossible, to beat, according to Miranda Hagans.

Hagans is the chair/instructor of the college’s emergency medical services department.

“This is really an amazing opportunity,” she said.

Hagans said prospective future paramedics and emergency medical technicians (EMTs) can have the lion’s share of expenses paid for through a statewide program approved by the state Legislature. For students living within the college’s district inside Panola County, enrollment should be free. For others, the cost would minimal, Hagans said.

She said there is $12.5 million available in the state to help shore up the shortage of emergency medical workers through Texas Senate Bill 8. The funding is available for programs beginning in January for which registration is in progress, Hagans said.

More than $100,000 has been committed in the region served by Panola College. The deadline for signing up for classes beginning in January is Dec. 19, Hagans said.

She said 65 percent of the state allocation, or more than $8 million, is earmarked to boost emergency programs in the state’s rural counties with a population fewer than 50,000 people. Designated rural areas include the Panola College service area of Panola, Shelby and Harrison counties.

“There is a huge national need and a huge Texas need,” Hagans said.

The program will pay up to $2,000 for EMTs to go to school and up to $8,000 for paramedics.

“It’s a great deal to get a college education. For in-district students, it completely pays for it,” she said. “For out-of-district, it’s about $350 the student would have to pay for EMT program and only about $150 for paramedics.”

For EMTs, the program runs one semester, or 16 weeks. The paramedic certification program is a full year starting in January, with graduation in December.

“The school actually has to apply for the students’ behalf,” Hagans said. “This money is only available for two years — this year and next year.”

Panola College has a couple of EMT students signed up already and eight paramedic students registered starting in January. There is more room in both programs.

For the paramedic program, there are openings for 20 students per class, she said. The paramedic sessions meet Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m.

EMT classes meet Tuesday and Thursday, with day classes meeting 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. and night classes meeting 5 until 9 p.m.

Stipulations for qualifying students to not have to repay the funds includes passing the course, and then within 90 days after finishing the course, the student needs to pass the national registry for getting credentials. EMT students will be required to work in Texas for a year, while paramedic graduates will be required to work in the state for at least two years.

Another requirement is that students work at least 96 hours a month, which Hagans said should not be an issue.

“Everywhere is hiring and everywhere is super short-staffed,” she said. “This is a great opportunity to get everybody hired and to work. As long as they fulfill those requirements, they don’t have to pay a penny back.”

For information on the program and to get registered, prospects may contact Hagans at (903) 694-4024 or email at mhagans@panola.edu.

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 06:08:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.news-journal.com/news/education/state-program-offers-free-education-for-prospective-emergency-medical-workers/article_9ea9d43c-0429-54a1-b7b3-6e89b48475cb.html
Killexams : All medical colleges in UP to have para-medical courses
All medical colleges in UP to have para-medical courses
Lucknow: Para-medical courses will now be taught in all medical institutes across Uttar Pradesh to increase the number of skilled paramedical staff and Improve the quality of medical care.

The courses that will be offered include diploma in laboratory technician, diploma in operation theatre technician, diploma in optometry, diploma in orthopaedic and plaster technician, diploma in x-ray technician, diploma in anaesthesia and critical care technician, diploma in emergency and trauma care, diploma in hospital record keeping, diploma in CT scan technician, diploma in cardiology technician, diploma in dialysis technician, diploma in neonatal care technician, diploma in sanitation and diploma in pharmacy.

According to the government spokesman, some of the courses were already there on about 500-plus seats in the state but with the latest planning, all state-run colleges will run the maximum possible number of diploma courses.

The medical education department has planned a total 2,714 seats that will be available at over a dozen medical institutes across the state. The courses will run by engaging experienced faculty members of the medical colleges.

For example, a professor in surgery could teach the curriculum of diploma in OT technician as a surgeon has both theory and practical knowledge regarding the operation theatre, said the spokesman.

Dr. Abhishek Shukla, secretary general association of international doctors, said, "The course will help get trained and skilled para-medical staff for the sensitive work inside OT, ICU, where an untrained staff can be a big issue for the patient and doctor too."

The doctors engaged in teaching work for para-medical courses will also get a fixed honorarium.

Courses will run in the state run medical colleges, including in Azamgarh, Kannauj, Gorakhpur, Agra, Badaun, Jalaun, Saharanpur, Banda, Ambedkar Nagar, Meerut, Prayagraj, Jhansi, Hardoi, Mirzapur, Ghazipur, Firozabad, Siddharth Nagar, Fatehpur, Jaunpur, Basti and Ayodhya.

Sat, 10 Dec 2022 23:10:00 -0600 en text/html https://health.economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/education/all-medical-colleges-in-up-to-have-para-medical-courses/96152022
Killexams : All medical colleges in UP to offer paramedical courses, 2714 seats to be added

Lucknow: Para-medical courses will now be taught in all medical institutes across Uttar Pradesh to increase the number of skilled paramedical staff and Improve the quality of medical care.

The courses that will be offered include diploma in laboratory technician, diploma in operation theatre technician, diploma in optometry, diploma in orthopaedic and plaster technician, diploma in x-ray technician, diploma in anaesthesia and critical care technician, diploma in emergency and trauma care, diploma in hospital record keeping, diploma in CT scan technician, diploma in cardiology technician, diploma in dialysis technician, diploma in neonatal care technician, diploma in sanitation and diploma in pharmacy.

Also Read:AIIMS Bibinagar Changes names of 2 BSc Paramedical Courses, Check out details

According to the government spokesman, some of the courses were already there on about 500-plus seats in the state but with the latest planning, all state-run colleges will run the maximum possible number of diploma courses.

The medical education department has planned a total 2,714 seats that will be available at over a dozen medical institutes across the state.

The courses will run by engaging experienced faculty members of the medical colleges.

For example, a professor in surgery could teach the curriculum of diploma in OT technician as a surgeon has both theory and practical knowledge regarding the operation theatre, said the spokesman.

The courses will run by engaging experienced faculty members of the medical colleges.

For example, a professor in surgery could teach the curriculum of diploma in OT technician as a surgeon has both theory and practical knowledge regarding the operation theatre, said the spokesman.

Also Read:AIIMS releases Open Round Online Seat Allocation results for BSc Paramedical Courses 2022

Sun, 11 Dec 2022 16:29:00 -0600 en text/html https://medicaldialogues.in/news/education/all-medical-colleges-in-up-to-offer-paramedical-courses-2174-seats-to-be-added-103852
Killexams : Lack of EMTs causing concern in parts of Eastern Kentucky Eastern Kentucky emergency officials are making a coordinated effort to keep their ambulances stocked full of qualified and trained emergency medical technicians. © Provided by Lexington WKYT Eastern Kentucky emergency officials are making a coordinated effort to keep their ambulances stocked full of qualified and trained emergency medical technicians.

PIKEVILLE, Ky. (WKYT) - Eastern Kentucky emergency officials are making a coordinated effort to keep their ambulances stocked full of qualified and trained emergency medical technicians.

Dale Morton is the director of emergency transport services at Pikeville Medical Center. They’re the only level two trauma center in the state.

“You just can’t throw somebody that’s rolled a 4-wheeler forty foot over a bank in the backseat of a car and bring ‘em to us, that person needs care on their way here,” he said.

He says PMC sees patients from 26 counties in four states and he says it’s often the work of EMTs making the difference in whether or not a trauma patient has a good outcome.

“It is a rewarding job because you get the satisfaction of knowing because someone walked out of a hospital three weeks after having a heart attack because you provided good quality CPR while you were en-route to the hospital with that person,” Morton said.

They often see patients involved in accidents along the Hatfield-McCoy Trail system in rural Appalachia and time is of the essence.

“You know they always talk about the golden hour which is the first hour after the injury and that’s the hour the EMT or paramedic has them in the back of the ambulance getting ‘em to us,” he said.

The commonwealth needs more EMTs, but the interest has struggled to meet demand.

For many, the financial burden keeps them sidelined. That is until PMC announced a $200,000 grant provided by Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services to offer EMT training to at least 36 men and women for free.

Women, like Christine Tchalikian, an athletic trainer at the University of Pikeville, are taking advantage of this education.

“When our kids get hurt, if it’s something out of our jurisdiction, we call EMT during football games,” she said. “EMS is on-site in case we need to ship off kids, so I just wanted that extra step to give myself knowledge to be more helpful to my athletes and to the community.”

The training is 400 hours and taught a couple of nights a week and the occasional Saturday by Pikeville firefighters, hoping to keep quality medical personnel in the region.

“There are so many backgrounds in the classroom which is also great because you get to learn from those other backgrounds,” she said. “You have dispatchers, you have firefighters, you have CNA’s, you have all of these people who are trying to better themselves and better the community by learning and being EMT’s so it’s a great experience.”

It’s life-saving knowledge that could change the future of healthcare for Eastern Kentucky.

The first class is underway, but they are recruiting for the second class. Contact Mitch Case at Mitch.case@pikevilleky.gov, the Sr. Battalion Chief with the Pikeville Fire Department for additional information.

Mon, 12 Dec 2022 07:44:40 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/lack-of-emts-causing-concern-in-parts-of-eastern-kentucky/ar-AA15ciCm
Killexams : Brain MRI Data & Machine Learning Models Might Help In Diagnosing ADHD

Although Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common neurological conditions that affects children and adults, it is still widely misunderstood. ADHD symptoms are commonly misdiagnosed or remain undiagnosed — particularly among girls and women.

In a new study, researchers made a breakthrough by potentially finding a far more robust mechanism through which ADHD diagnosis via brain MRI scans might become a reality in the future. A team of three researchers at the Yale School of Medicine delved into the data from MRI tests that were conducted on 7,805 children based in the United States. They managed to identify biomarkers of ADHD by using that data as vital input for machine learning models that might potentially be able to diagnose the neurological condition.

The researchers used data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study that investigates brain development in the U.S. on a longterm basis. The children included in the study were between the ages of 9 to 12 years. The 7805 children included by Huang Lin, a post-graduate researcher at the Yale School of Medicine and colleagues underwent MRI scans, resting-state functional MRI, and diffusion tensor imaging. Out of this group of children, 1,798 were diagnosed with ADHD.

By using statistical analysis methods of this data, the researchers were able to delve into the association of ADHD with the children’s brain volume, white matter integrity, and surface area.

Compared to children who do no have ADHD, the team found that those who were diagnosed with ADHD have abnormal connectivity in the networks of the brain that are responsible for processing memory and auditory inputs. The brain scans of children with ADHD also revealed that their brain cortex was experiencing thinning and on a microstructural level, there were significant changes in the white matter of their brains’ frontal lobe.

“The frontal lobe is the area of the brain involved in governing impulsivity and attention or lack thereof—two of the leading symptoms of ADHD,” Lin said in a press release. He further added that this data was robust enough to be fed into machine learning models that might be able to diagnose children with ADHD.

“Our study underscores that ADHD is a neurological disorder with neuro-structural and functional manifestations in the brain, not just a purely externalized behavior syndrome,” Lin added in her statement. “At times when a clinical diagnosis is in doubt, objective brain MRI scans can help to clearly identify affected children.”

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 03:15:00 -0600 Anuradha Varanasi en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/anuradhavaranasi/2022/11/29/brain-mri-data--machine-learning-models-might-help-in-diagnosing-adhd/
Killexams : ‘A generational approach.’ How a Manatee school offers much more than education

Nov. 30—Longtime teachers often say there's only so much they can do to help kids inside the classroom when there are struggles at home, but a growing program in Manatee County is making a difference in both.

Manatee Elementary in Bradenton has been transformed by a new Community Partnership School model that brings together nonprofits to offer not just academic help, but overall health and wellness options to kids and their families.

And this year, Daughtrey Elementary has joined the effort.

The main goal is to make it easier for Title I students, most of whom come from economically disadvantaged families, to keep their focus on education by offering critical services to students and their families on the school's campus.

Manatee Elementary, one of the oldest schools in Manatee County, serves 586 students from pre-K to fifth grade, and a majority living within walking distance.

Now instead of students missing school for a doctor's appointment or coming to class hungry, the partnership provides mental and physical health care on campus, as well as a food pantry.

Overcoming barriers

Designed by The Children's Home Society of Florida and the University of Central Florida, the model brings together five core partners in a long-term agreement to provide on-campus services.

At Manatee Elementary, those partners are the Children's Home Society of Florida, the School District of Manatee County, MCR Health, Manatee County Boys & Girls and the University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee.

They collaborate with the school to help students overcome learning barriers like poverty, food insecurity, a lack of affordable healthcare and mental health care. And they frequently bring in other community support to provide opportunities for students to succeed both inside and outside of the classroom.

"I don't look at this as helping one student at a time. It's a generational approach," said Renita Houston, Community Partnership School Director at Manatee Elementary. "It doesn't just stop with the students. We reach the whole family."

She attended the school when she was younger and wished the school had those services when she was there. Now, she's paying it forward and plans to make a lasting impact on students and their families.

Manatee Elementary has been operating under the learning model for the past three years thanks to grants and donors.

The model is partially financed by a $7.1 million dollar grant shared among 15 new community schools around Florida, as well as contributions from the Manatee Community Foundation and its donors.

The Conrad and Ruth Ann Szymanski Fund of the Manatee Community Foundation awarded a grant of $20,436 last year to support Manatee Elementary, and the Syzmanskis often volunteer their time at the school's food pantry.

Food on the table

Out of the 36 community partnership schools across Florida, Manatee Elementary is one of the few selected to have a food pantry on its campus.

The pantry is funded by United Way, and is stocked weekly with items from Feeding Tampa Bay.

It helps not just students and their families, but also the surrounding community. And rental assistance is also available for parents and community members.

Letitia Marshall of Bradenton often shops at the pantry and has a daughter who attends Manatee Elementary.

"Since you all first announced this program, I've been coming every week," Marshall told Feeding Tampa Bay in a video interview. "It provides food on my table, and I thank God for the canned food, poultry, vegetables and cereal."

Some of the school's parents don't have cars, so they can walk to the pantry, Graduation Enhancement Technician Vanessa Goldsmith told the Bradenton Herald.

"Some parents can't get to the grocery store, but we're here for their convenience to help fulfill their needs. It's just awesome," she said.

Goldsmith is raising a granddaughter who attends the school and sees the benefits from the partnership.

"When my granddaughter is sick, she's treated onsite at MCR (Health), and when she's old enough she'll go to the Boys & Girls club on campus," Goldsmith said. "It's convenient for myself and other parents. Parents have told me they appreciate that we have this program."

Health care access

The model also helps faculty at Manatee Elementary better cater to the needs of each student and allows them to shape a plan for academic success.

"One student could be performing low in academics and need expanded learning," said program director Renita Houston. "Another student could be performing above grade level but lacks health care."

Doctor visits were once the primary reasons students would miss time in the classroom.

"We want our students to stay in school so they can learn," Houston said. "Anytime a student is uprooted from the learning environment. It's disruptive to their learning focus."

Through the partnerships, Manatee Elementary has provided health care in vision, dental, behavior and overall wellness to students and community members.

As the school's graduation enhancement technician, Goldsmith is responsible for ensuring students are in attendance and she said she has seen a decrease in medical-related absences since MCR Health established two onsite clinics.

"If the student has a headache, toothache or stomachache, parents can still bring those students to school and treat them on campus," Goldsmith said. "It's a good thing because those would be excuses for why a child would be absent."

Keeping teachers

Keeping students in school can be challenging, while retaining teachers to teach is another struggle.

"Staff retention isn't the best at Title I schools," Houston said. "The idea is to get teachers in and develop them so they stay."

Houston believes the partnership with the University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee could create incentive opportunities for teachers to boost retention.

"We're working on a teacher leadership academy with USFSM," she said. "Teachers interested in getting their graduate degree in education can do it right from our campus."

The teacher leadership academy would pilot at Manatee Elementary and could extend out to other schools and teachers.

Houston is proud to bring the community partnership model to her former elementary school and make a lasting impact on the kids' futures. She's awarded six students college scholarships prepaid by Take Stock in Children because of an opportunity presented to the school through the partnership.

Most partnership schools offer:

— Onsite access to health and wellness services

— Onsite food pantries

— Counseling

— Leadership opportunities

— Cultural enrichment activities

— After-school activities

— Parent resource centers

This story was originally published November 30, 2022 5:50 AM.

(c)2022 The Bradenton Herald (Bradenton, Fla.) Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Wed, 30 Nov 2022 05:01:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/a-generational-approach-how-a-manatee-school-offers-much-more-than-education/ar-AA14JSiF
Killexams : Burnout, low pay contribute to shortage of animal care professionals
Low pay and student loan debt may deter some from pursuing careers in veterinary science. - Pixabay/public domain

Low pay and student loan debt may deter some from pursuing careers in veterinary science.

Pixabay/public domain

Professionals who care for dogs, cats, birds and other household pets are encountering staff shortages and worker burnout as the industry is seeing an increase in pet care needs.

Indiana Veterinary Medical Association President Dr. Aaron Johnson said veterinarians encounter a high level of stress, fatigue in the workplace, and receive salaries that are lower than their counterparts who care for humans. These factors can have serious consequences.

“The suicide rate amongst veterinarians is one of the highest in the country in terms of professionals,” Johnson said. “One out of six veterinarians have considered suicide. So, it's a very real issue there.”

Angry clients and cyber bullying also contribute to a shortage of veterinarians and technicians. Johnson said he urges people to practice kindness to frequently overworked animal care staff.

“Some of the challenges that we're dealing with in the profession and really just trying to ask for pet owners to be patient and realize that veterinarians are working, and veterinary staff are working as hard as they absolutely can and working through lunches and long hours,” Johnson said. “Exhibiting that little bit of understanding and grace I think helps with their well-being and helps them to be able to provide the best care possible.”

Veterinary technicians are important to the animal care profession, but low pay and student loan debt may deter some from pursuing careers in veterinary science. But Johnson said education and training is attainable without investing in multiple years of college.

“For veterinary technicians, at least, for example, at Purdue, there's two options. There's an associate's degree, which is a two year program; and that can be done right out of high school,” Johnson said. “At Purdue, you could stay on and do a bachelor's degree. Most veterinary technicians, it's a two-year program, and then they can get their credentials and practice.”

Johnson said research is being done to Improve the understanding of the current workforce situation and what can be done to fix these challenges.

Contact WFYI All Things Considered newscaster and reporter Terri Dee at tdee@wfyi.org

Mon, 12 Dec 2022 02:32:00 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.wfyi.org/news/articles/burnout-low-pay-contribute-to-shortage-of-animal-care-professionals
Killexams : Uttar Pradesh: Medical colleges across state to have para-medical courses Representative Image © Provided by Free Press Journal Representative Image

LucknowPara-medical courses will now be taught in all medical institutes across Uttar Pradesh to increase the number of skilled paramedical staff and Improve the quality of medical care.

The courses that will be offered include diploma in laboratory technician, diploma in operation theatre technician, diploma in optometry, diploma in orthopaedic and plaster technician, diploma in x-ray technician, diploma in anaesthesia and critical care technician, diploma in emergency and trauma care, diploma in hospital record keeping, diploma in CT scan technician, diploma in cardiology technician, diploma in dialysis technician, diploma in neonatal care technician, diploma in sanitation and diploma in pharmacy.

According to the government spokesman, some of the courses were already there on about 500-plus seats in the state but with the latest planning, all state-run colleges will run the maximum possible number of diploma courses.

Kerala: Girl attends medical college without qualifying entrance exam, probe ordered

The medical education department has planned a total 2,714 seats that will be available at over a dozen medical institutes across the state.

The courses will run by engaging experienced faculty members of the medical colleges.

For example, a professor in surgery could teach the curriculum of diploma in OT technician as a surgeon has both theory and practical knowledge regarding the operation theatre, said the spokesman.

Dr. Abhishek Shukla, secretary general association of international doctors, said, "The course will help get trained and skilled para-medical staff for the sensitive work inside OT, ICU, where an untrained staff can be a big issue for the patient and doctor too."

The doctors engaged in teaching work for para-medical courses will also get a fixed honorarium.

Courses will run in the state run medical colleges, including in Azamgarh, Kannauj, Gorakhpur, Agra, Badaun, Jalaun, Saharanpur, Banda, Ambedkar Nagar, Meerut, Prayagraj, Jhansi, Hardoi, Mirzapur, Ghazipur, Firozabad, Siddharth Nagar, Fatehpur, Jaunpur, Basti and Ayodhya.

Sun, 11 Dec 2022 00:34:18 -0600 en-IN text/html https://www.msn.com/en-in/health/health-news/uttar-pradesh-medical-colleges-across-state-to-have-para-medical-courses/ar-AA159v5M
Killexams : IIT Kanpur recruitment 2022: 131 Junior Technician and other posts on offer

IIT Kanpur has invited applications for 131 Junior Technician, Junior Engineer and other posts. Interested candidates can apply online at www.iitk.ac.in till January 9.

IIT Kanpur recruitment 2022 vacancy details: This recruitment drive is being conducted to fill 131 posts of which 4 posts are for Assistant Executive Engineer, 1 posts are for Assistant Registrar [P K Kelkar Library], 3 p

osts are each for the Assistant Registrar and Medical Officer, 10 vacancies are for the post of Junior Engineer, 4 vacancies are for the post of Junior Technical Superintendent (DoIP), 2 vacancies are for the post of Physical Training Instructor, 4 posts are for Staff Nurse and 100 posts are for Junior Technician.

IIT Kanpur recruitment 2022 application fee: For Group ‘A’ posts the application fee is 1000 and for SC & ST applicants the application fee is 500.

For Group ‘B’ & ‘C’ posts the application fee is 700 and SC/ST/PwD and Female candidates are not required to pay the application fees.

Direct link to apply

IIT Kanpur recruitment 2022: How to apply

Visit the official website at https://www.iitk.ac.in/new/recruitment

On the homepage, click on the apply link against Advt. No. 2/2022

Fill the application form

Upload all the required documents

Pay the application fee

Submit and take print out.

Sign on to read the HT ePaper epaper.hindustantimes.com

Fri, 09 Dec 2022 18:14:30 -0600 en-IN text/html https://www.msn.com/en-in/news/other/iit-kanpur-recruitment-2022-131-junior-technician-and-other-posts-on-offer/ar-AA1576ym
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