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Exam Code: DVA-C01 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
DVA-C01 AWS Certified Developer -Associate (DVA-C01)

Format : Multiple choice, multiple answer
Type : Associate
Delivery Method : Testing center or online proctored exam
Time : 130 mins to complete the exam

The AWS Certified Developer - Associate examination is intended for individuals who perform a development role and have one or more years of hands-on experience developing and maintaining an AWS-based application.

Recommended Knowledge and Experience
- In-depth knowledge of at least one high-level programming language
- Understanding of core AWS services, uses, and basic AWS architecture best practices
- Proficiency in developing, deploying, and debugging cloud-based applications using AWS
- Ability to use the AWS service APIs, AWS CLI, and SDKs to write applications
- Ability to identify key features of AWS services
- Understanding of the AWS shared responsibility model
- Understanding of application lifecycle management
- Ability to use a CI/CD pipeline to deploy applications on AWS
- Ability to use or interact with AWS services
- Ability to apply a basic understanding of cloud-native applications to write code
- Ability to write code using AWS security best practices (e.g., not using secret and access keys in the code, instead using IAM roles)
- Ability to author, maintain, and debug code modules on AWS
- Proficiency writing code for serverless applications
- Understanding of the use of containers in the development process

Exam Content
There are two types of questions on the examination:
 Multiple choice: Has one correct response and three incorrect responses (distractors).
 Multiple response: Has two or more correct responses out of five or more options.
Select one or more responses that best complete the statement or answer the question. Distractors, or incorrect answers, are response options that an examinee with incomplete knowledge or skill would likely choose. However, they are generally plausible responses that fit in the content area defined by the test objective. Unanswered questions are scored as incorrect; there is no penalty for guessing.

Unscored Content
Your examination may include non-scored questions that are placed on the test to gather statistical information.
These questions are not identified on the form, and do not affect your score.

Exam Results
The AWS Certified Developer - Associate (DVA-C01) examination is a pass or fail exam. The examination is scored against a minimum standard established by AWS professionals guided by certification industry best practices and guidelines.
Your results for the examination are reported as a score from 100–1,000, with a minimum passing score of 720.
Your score shows how you performed on the examination as a whole and whether or not you passed. Scaled scoring models are used to equate scores across multiple exam forms that may have slightly different difficulty levels.
Your score report contains a table of classifications of your performance at each section level. This information is designed to provide general feedback concerning your examination performance. The examination uses a compensatory scoring model, which means that you do not need to “pass” the individual sections, only the overall examination. Each section of the examination has a specific weighting, so some sections have more questions than others. The table contains general information, highlighting your strengths and weaknesses. Exercise caution when interpreting section-level feedback.

Domain 1: Deployment 22%
Domain 2: Security 26%
Domain 3: Development with AWS Services 30%
Domain 4: Refactoring 10%
Domain 5: Monitoring and Troubleshooting 12%
TOTAL 100%

Domain 1: Deployment
1.1 Deploy written code in AWS using existing CI/CD pipelines, processes, and patterns
1.2 Deploy applications using Elastic Beanstalk
1.3 Prepare the application deployment package to be deployed to AWS
1.4 Deploy serverless applications

Domain 2: Security
2.1 Make authenticated calls to AWS services
2.2 Implement encryption using AWS services
2.3 Implement application authentication, and authorization

Domain 3: Development with AWS Services
3.1 Write code for serverless applications
3.2 Translate functional requirements into application design
3.3 Implement application design into application code
3.4 Write code that interacts with AWS services by using APIs, SDKs, and AWS CLI

Domain 4: Refactoring
4.1 Optimize application to best use AWS services and features
4.2 Migrate existing application code to run on AWS

Domain 5: Monitoring and Troubleshooting
5.1 Write code that can be monitored
5.2 Perform root cause analysis on faults found in testing or production

AWS Certified Developer -Associate (DVA-C01)
Amazon -Associate syllabus
Killexams : Amazon -Associate syllabus - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/DVA-C01 Search results Killexams : Amazon -Associate syllabus - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/DVA-C01 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Amazon Killexams : Physics Wallah On Amazon MiniTV: Alakh Pandey’s Life Killexams : Physics Wallah On Amazon MiniTV: Alakh Pandey’s Life

Amazon miniTV is set to launch a series based on the life of Alakh Pandey, who founded the ed-tech start-up PhysicsWallah

Physics Wallah Trailer
on Amazon miniTV

Amazon MiniTV
new series

The series on PhysicsWallah will highlight Alakh Pandey’s life, career and his journey towards establishing a unicorn with a valuation of more than $1 billion

Alakh Pandey’s life, career 

Born in Uttar Pradesh, Alakh’s family faced financial crisis which forced him to take tuition for Class 4 students while he was in Class 8. By the time he reached Class 11, he started tutoring students up to Class 9

Alakh went on to do BTech from Harcourt Butler Technical Institute (HBTI), Kanpur and topped the entire college by securing 80% marks in Physics. He took coaching for college students to fund his fee. But soon after, he dropped out of college and came back home

Alakh’s Education, Career

Alakh’s YouTube
channel Physics Wallah 

In 2015, Alakh launched his own YouTube channel where he uploaded his recorded Physics tutorial sessions. Initially, his Youtube videos on Class 12 subjects did not gain any traction…

Physics Wallah 
YouTube channel

…but later in 2017, he uploaded fresh videos for Class 10 and they became an instant hit among the students. The videos on ICSE board exams fetched him more than 10k subscribers. Alakh Pandey soon started monetising his YouTube channel, Physics Wallah

Physics Wallah: A 
YouTube Sensation

Alakh’s YouTube videos became a hit among the medical students preparing for NEET. His lectures were mainly based on the NCERT syllabus and his teaching style became his USP

Physics Wallah on Amazon 

Amazon miniTV show Physics Wallah’s release date is December 15 and will be available for free to those who have an account on Amazon shopping app

Physics Wallah’s videos are watched not only by Indian students but also those based out of Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan, and Dubai

Physics Wallah's Fame

PhysicsWallah: The
Start-Up

Alakh soon founded his own start-up with the same name PhysicsWallah (PW), which is an ed-tech platform providing tutorials, reading material and doubt-clearing sessions

PhysicsWallah 
Becomes Unicorn

In 2022, PhysicsWallah raised $100 million in its maiden funding round, making it the latest edtech to enter India's unicorn club

How To Access
Amazon miniTV

Amazon miniTV comes along with Amazon shopping app account and Amazon shoppers can access Amazon miniTV series for free

How to watch 
Physics Wallah trailer on
Amazon miniTV

Login to Amazon shopping app account with the help of a username and password or phone number
- Amazon.in shopping app home page will appear
- Click on miniTV icon on the homepage
- miniTV homepage will open, type PhysicsWallah in the search bar
- Physics Wallah trailer will play

Tanishq’s First Retail Showroom In US: All You Need To Know

Produced by: Bhoomika
Designed by: Mohsin

Next Visual Story 

Click Here
Fri, 09 Dec 2022 00:57:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.businesstoday.in/visualstories/entertainment/physics-wallah-on-amazon-minitv-alakh-pandeys-life-14955-09-12-2022
Killexams : Amazon report says schools need Artificial Intelligence strategy

New research from Amazon reveals a need to tackle the STEM skills gap in schools in the North East to help meet future demand for jobs in computer science and AI.

The results from secondary school teachers in the North East, also found that teaching Artificial Intelligence skills in secondary schools could help to fill increasing demand for computer science and AI related roles, underpinning billions in economic output for the UK economy.

The need to boost AI learning in schools in the North East is supported by new YouGov research –commissioned by Amazon – among secondary school teachers and parents. The research shows:

Seventy per cent of secondary school teachers surveyed in the North East agree that AI should be part of their school’s syllabus, while 82% of teachers in the North East surveyed believe access to free AI and computer science learning resources linked with the curriculum would help students better engage in computer science.

Among teachers surveyed in the North East, 50% have limited access to computer science resources, rising to 80% when focused exclusively on AI.

While two thirds of secondary school teachers n the North East believe that education in computer science better prepares students for future careers in all sectors, more than one in three say AI learning is only part of an opt-in or extra paid-for club and not part of the syllabus.

Almost three quarters of those teachers say children don’t have enough information to understand future career opportunities that involve computer science and AI, and the majority say that without increased STEM education and resources, there will be long-term skill gaps

The research comes as Amazon launches the inaugural Alexa Young Innovator Challenge in the region, an educational programme for secondary school pupils to create an Alexa Skill to promote social good in their community.

Schools will have the chance to win prizes, including £2,500 worth of tech products for the winner and a £2,500 donation to their school.

“AI is the world’s fastest growing technology and the UK is striving to be among the world’s leaders in this field, with 56% of businesses planning to increase investment in AI technologies within the next three years,” said Lauren Kisser, Technology Director at Amazon.

“Through the Challenge, we hope to not only build confidence in students’ ability to understand and control this incredible technology but also inspire young minds, regardless of their background, to realise their potential as creators, thinkers and builders of the future; using AI to create innovative solutions to real world problems.”

Dr Ian Pearson, who worked on the Alexa Challenge, said: “There is no doubt that AI will play a vital role in our future, but it’s far more than just the development of the hardware - we need people at every stage of the process to make real progress. There is a real misconception around developing technologies, and almost half of students surveyed said they don't understand what jobs they can do in the future that involve AI so we hope we can inspire them to consider roles within technology and computer science.”

The future world of work is being showcased at Amazon’s Jobs Fair of the Future, hosted at its headquarters in central London.

Read next:

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 16:19:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.thenorthernecho.co.uk/news/23178880.amazon-report-says-schools-need-artificial-intelligence-strategy/
Killexams : Teaching AI in North East schools will help raise billions for UK economy

There is a need to boost the STEM skills gap in schools in the North East. Image by Alex Knight

New research from Amazon reveals a need to tackle the STEM skills gap in schools in the North East to help meet future demand for jobs in computer science and AI.

The results from secondary school teachers in the North East, also found that teaching Artificial Intelligence skills in secondary schools could help to fill increasing demand for computer science and AI related roles, underpinning billions in economic output for the UK economy.

The need to boost AI learning in schools in the North East is supported by new YouGov research –commissioned by Amazon – among secondary school teachers and parents. The research shows:

Seventy per cent of secondary school teachers surveyed in the North East agree that AI should be part of their school’s syllabus, while 82% of teachers in the North East surveyed believe access to free AI and computer science learning resources linked with the curriculum would help students better engage in computer science.

Among teachers surveyed in the North East, 50% have limited access to computer science resources, rising to 80% when focused exclusively on AI.

While two thirds of secondary school teachers n the North East believe that education in computer science better prepares students for future careers in all sectors, more than one in three say AI learning is only part of an opt-in or extra paid-for club and not part of the syllabus.

Almost three quarters of those teachers say children don’t have enough information to understand future career opportunities that involve computer science and AI, and the majority say that without increased STEM education and resources, there will be long-term skill gaps

The research comes as Amazon launches the inaugural Alexa Young Innovator Challenge in the region, an educational programme for secondary school pupils to create an Alexa Skill to promote social good in their community.

Schools will have the chance to win prizes, including £2,500 worth of tech products for the winner and a £2,500 donation to their school.

“AI is the world’s fastest growing technology and the UK is striving to be among the world’s leaders in this field, with 56% of businesses planning to increase investment in AI technologies within the next three years,” said Lauren Kisser, Technology Director at Amazon.

“Through the Challenge, we hope to not only build confidence in students’ ability to understand and control this incredible technology but also inspire young minds, regardless of their background, to realise their potential as creators, thinkers and builders of the future; using AI to create innovative solutions to real world problems.”

Dr Ian Pearson, who worked on the Alexa Challenge, said: “There is no doubt that AI will play a vital role in our future, but it’s far more than just the development of the hardware - we need people at every stage of the process to make real progress. There is a real misconception around developing technologies, and almost half of students surveyed said they don't understand what jobs they can do in the future that involve AI so we hope we can inspire them to consider roles within technology and computer science.”

The future world of work is being showcased at Amazon’s Jobs Fair of the Future, hosted at its headquarters in central London.

Read next:

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 16:19:00 -0600 en-GB text/html https://uk.news.yahoo.com/teaching-ai-north-east-schools-061900440.html Killexams : Amazon Academy to shut down in India, Get Details Here

According to reports, Amazon will be closing down its online edtech platform Amazon Academy in India. Check details of the Amazon Platform here. 

Amazon Academy
Amazon Academy

Amazon Academy Shut Down: According to the latest reports, Amazon.com has stated that it will be shutting down its online learning platform Amazon Academy for High School students in India. The platform is being shut down less than two years of its launch without a reason being stated.

The Amazon Academy Platform was launched last year amidst a boom in the virtual learning field during the COVID-19 pandemic. The platform offered to coach for competitive exams such as Joint Entrance exam (JEE) and NEET entrance exams.

According to reports, based on an assessment, the e-commerce portal stated that it took the decision to discontinue Amazon Academy in phases to take care of the current customers. The shutting down of the platform has come at a time when many edtech platforms have come under pressure with schools and offline coaching centres reopening across the country post the COVID-19 lockdown. 

Amazon has however pointed out that the candidates who have enrolled will have access to full course materials online for an extended period of a year until October 2024. The company at the launch of the app has stated that the online preparation will equip students with in-depth knowledge and practice routines required for the entrance exams through curated study materials, live lectures, and assessments in subjects like Maths, Chemistry and Physics. 

Amazon collaborated with Sri Chaitanya to introduce a full syllabus course for JEE and NEET exams. Amazon Academy provided candidates with study materials for the JEE and NEET Exams, mock tests for students to prepare for the exams, along with practice questions. Students who were taking the exams.

Also Read: NEET PG Counselling 2022: MCC Adds More Seats in Stray Vacancy Round, Check Details Here

REGISTER FOR RESULTS UPDATES
Thu, 24 Nov 2022 17:47:00 -0600 text/html https://www.jagranjosh.com/news/amazon-academy-to-shut-down-in-india-get-details-here-165699
Killexams : For Frictionless Syllabus Access, Some Professors Bypass the College

Humans write syllabi, which means they make subjective choices about words, tone and content. And students read them—or not, depending on whether they have access, find them approachable or understand their significance. Even when students read these documents, their past experiences may influence how they make sense of them.

Some professors who recognize that syllabi are not neutral documents have experimented with creating liquid syllabi—public, accessible, mobile-friendly websites that include traditional syllabus ingredients along with humanizing elements that ensure students feel supported. Many report that their efforts to create liquid syllabi pay dividends in terms of student retention and success, especially for those who need frictionless access.

But some colleges do not recognize these innovative, tech-enabled syllabi. That means that some instructors perform this work on their own time, sometimes at their own expense, and in addition to writing and submitting traditional syllabi. Also, in bypassing the university’s website and learning management systems, some instructors feel vulnerable, even if they remain committed to providing students with barrier-free access to course information and materials.

“We lose most of our students between the moment that they register for classes and the first day of school,” said Jennifer Ortiz, professor of English literature at West Los Angeles College, one of nine colleges in the Los Angeles Community College District, whose liquid syllabus for her College reading and Composition II class is available before her class starts. Students who click on the link do not need to recall a username or password or navigate a cumbersome platform to receive her message recognizing their commitment to educational goals and acknowledging many societal challenges. “We’re trying to capture students before they provide up or say, ‘I don’t want to show up that first day.’”

Equity-Minded, Humanistic Syllabi

A syllabus is often considered a contract between an instructor and their students. It communicates how the course will be taught, outlines how students will be evaluated and promotes the values of an institution or an individual instructor.

“Syllabi can become instruments of all the ways in which you can fail this course or instruments of all the ways in which you can be successful in this course,” said Estela Bensimon, professor of higher education at the University of Southern California’s Rossier School of Education and director of the Center for Urban Education. Bensimon and her team created an inquiry tool that helps professors evaluate their syllabi from a racial equity perspective. Equitable syllabi demystify college policies and practices, communicate care and support, and communicate a belief that all students are expected to succeed, among other attributes, according to the tool.

But a syllabus that is difficult or impossible to access during the vulnerable period between when a student registers for a class and when the student starts the class may never make an impact—positive or otherwise. That’s because students often arrive at college with mind-sets. Those from nonmajority groups, for example, may wonder about whether they belong, a phenomenon known as belongingness uncertainty. Some may also feel at risk of confirming negative stereotypes associated with their identities, known as stereotype threat. Others from varied racial groups and genders suffer from impostor syndrome.

“When the human brain is in a state of belongingness uncertainty, it is scanning—oftentimes unconsciously—for the same things we scan for in a face-to-face environment,” said Michelle Pacansky-Brock, a faculty mentor for online teaching and learning at Foothill–De Anza Community College. “It’s scanning for verbal and nonverbal cues. It’s looking for a smiling face or a warm gesture.” Pacansky-Brock, who is the lead principal investigator on a project focused on humanizing online STEM classes, coined the term “liquid syllabus” in a 2014 blog post.

A brief, if imperfect, welcome video as part of an instructor’s liquid syllabus can help mitigate students’ sense of belongingness uncertainty, Pacansky-Brock said. Ideally, the faculty member would film the video in a nonacademic setting, use welcoming language that speaks to social inclusion and offer a window into who they are outside the classroom.

An online syllabus for English 102Instead of authoritative statements such as “no late assignments accepted,” the instructor could provide context about how late assignments may undermine a student’s overall studies and provide them with choices that include submitting on time for full credit or late for reduced credit.

Most important, when the welcome video is part of a liquid syllabus that is accessed via a public website, students do not encounter the barrier that learning management systems, which require usernames, passwords and navigation tools, sometimes present.

Frictionless access to mobile-friendly syllabi supports equity, as Black and Hispanic U.S. adults are less likely than white adults to have a traditional computer and broadband at home, according to a 2021 Pew Research Center study.

“In order for us to really close equity gaps, we have to begin thinking about how students access college materials, especially something as important as a syllabus,” Ortiz said, noting that when she was in college, she found the contractual language on syllabi intimidating. Her students access her liquid syllabi much more frequently than when the syllabi were stored in a learning management system. Many return to the documents throughout the semester, for example, for the hyperlinks she added to campus resources such as counseling, disability accommodations and basic needs.

“Higher ed isn’t a neutral space … Look at our racial equity gaps,” Ortiz said, noting that a syllabus is not just another document. “Faculty always say, ‘Well, the rules are on the syllabus’ or ‘look at the syllabus,’ so we know that this document is very important” in informing student experiences.

Barriers to Barrier-Free Syllabi

Many colleges aspire to provide students with mobile-friendly, frictionless access to course materials, but they have been slow to respond. Some faculty members have stepped in to fill that accessibility gap by offering liquid syllabi, even when doing so introduces other challenges.

“Some of our administrative duties haven’t been reconsidered”—that is, considering work done on making syllabi more accessible, Ortiz said. For each of the six classes Ortiz is teaching this semester, she was required to submit PDF or Word document versions of her syllabi. She also created liquid syllabi, which required learning new tech skills and making sure that important information was embedded on her course websites that exist outside the university system. “We’re essentially doing double work.”

Liquid syllabus websites that stand apart from the college’s learning management system and college website are not without risks. Because the websites are public, faculty who create them could be targeted due to controversial subjects they teach or because of their identities.

“I’ve talked to the faculty of color who are concerned about sharing their appearance in video because they don’t want to be judged and discriminated against by their students,” Pacansky-Brock said. “There’s a lot that needs to be untangled. It’s complicated.”

Lisa Paciulli, a lecturer in the biology department at North Carolina State University, generally avoids putting personal information online, but she paid a graduate student with her own money to create her public, online syllabi because she feels strongly that students should have easy access to information about her courses.

“My secret hope is that the only people who will ever see [my liquid syllabi] are my students,” said Paciulli. “It would be better if it were somehow within the university website or system.”

The Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning at the University of Wisconsin at Green Bay offers support, including template design and word choices, for instructors who create liquid syllabi. But once the liquid syllabi are created, they “live” in the institution’s learning management system, said Breeyawn Lybbert, associate professor of chemistry, which requires usernames and passwords.

“There is some pressure [from liquid syllabi enthusiasts] to be part of the living document,” said Heidi Sherman, associate professor of humanities at the University of Wisconsin. Still, Sherman considers liquid syllabi to be a “great partner” for her general education students who, without easy access to course information “may be a bit less motivated to keep up with the work.”

The support she received from her university’s teaching and learning center ensured she did “not need to reinvent the wheel.” She also sees liquid syllabi as supporting sustainability efforts. “Before I used a liquid syllabus, I probably printed hundreds and hundreds of pages for the syllabi. So much paper and ink and money, and then students lost them.”

Despite risks of going outside college learning management systems and websites, many faculty members remain committed to the practice of ensuring access and inclusivity by way of liquid syllabi.

“So many times, we hear administration say that faculty don’t want to change,” Pacansky-Brock said. “This kind of grassroots adoption shows that’s not true. We need to pay attention to what’s preventing the change, recognize those as barriers and start to take those apart.”

Mon, 28 Nov 2022 02:38:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2022/11/11/frictionless-syllabus-access-some-bypass-college
Killexams : Syllabus: Lower Intermediate

 

Lower Intermediate Course – A=activity, L=listening, R=reading, V=video

 

Grammar

Vocabulary

News and Drama

Unit 1 – Nice to meet you!

 

L Question forms
6 Minute Grammar

R Keith Wallace, travel journalist
Question forms practice

R Questions forms
Grammar reference

L Suffixes
6 Minute Vocabulary

V Ways to say hello

R Formal and informal writing

 

L News Report
Tipping

L The Race – Episode 1
Asking questions and giving information

Unit 2 – What to wear

 

L Present simple and present continuous
6 Minute Grammar

V Tom Ford, fashion designer
Using present simple and present continuous

R Present simple and present continuous
Grammar reference

L Adjectives and adverbs
6 Minute Vocabulary

V Smart or scruffy?
Describing your clothes

L News Report
How fashionable is business?

L The Race – Episode 2
Present simple and present continuous

 

Unit 3 – Like this, like that

 

L 'Like' as a verb and preposition
6 Minute Grammar

L London voxpops
What's it like where you live?

R 'Like'
Grammar reference

L Prefixes
6 Minute Vocabulary

V Do you like cats?
Vocabulary to describe cats

L Nick Grimshaw, DJ
Using 'like' as a filler word

L News Report
How dangerous are cats?

L The Race – Episode 3
Using the word 'like'

Unit 4 – The daily grind

 

L Adverbs of Frequency
6 Minute Grammar

L London voxpops
Commuting and adverbs of frequency

R Adverbs of frequency
Grammar Reference

L Chunks of language
6 Minute Vocabulary

L Travel vocabulary

L Pronunciation
Two ways to say 'often'

L News Report
Extreme commuting

L The Race – Episode 4
Adverbs of frequency

Unit 5 – Christmas every day

 

L 'Have to' and 'must'
6 Minute Grammar

L 'Have to' and 'must'
Future and past usage

L Jagtar's interview
Language practice

R 'Have to' and 'must'
Grammar reference

L Binomials
6 Minute Vocabulary

L Informal English
'Have got to' versus 'have to'


V Pronunciation
Silent letters

L News Report
Christmas dinner

L The Race – Episode 5
'Have to' and 'must'

Unit 6 – Great achievers

 

L Past Simple
6 Minute Grammar

L Rob and the triathlon
Learn the past simple

A Danny Murphy, footballer
Past simple questions & negatives

R Past Simple
Grammar reference

L -ing and –ed adjectives
6 Minute Vocabulary

L The pub quiz
Using the past simple

V Pronunciation
Past simple endings

L News Report
Is Ronaldo the perfect player?

L The Race – Episode 6
Using the past simple

Unit 7 – The Titanic

 

L Past simple and continuous
6 Minute Grammar

V Eva's story
Past simple and continuous

R Learn the language
Past simple and continuous

A Past simple and continuous
Quiz

R Past simple and continuous
Grammar reference

L Lexical sets
6 Minute Vocabulary

R Titanic vocabulary

V Eva's animated story
Titanic survivor

R Karen's letter
Titanic survivor

L Gus's audio story
Titanic survivor

L News Report
Happy and sad jobs

L The Race – Episode 7
Past simple and continuous

Unit 8 - Travel

 

L Articles
6 Minute Grammar

L Learn the language
Articles

A When to use 'the'

L When to use the zero article

R Articles
Grammar reference

L Compound adjectives
6 Minute Vocabulary

L Holiday vocabulary

V Pronunciation
Articles in spoken English

V Talking about your city
St Petersburg

L News Report
The island at the end of the earth

L The Race – Episode 8
Articles

Unit 9 – The big wedding

 

L 'Going to' and present continuous
6 Minute Grammar

A Past, present or future?
Wedding stories

A 'Going to' and the present continuous
Planning a wedding

R 'Going to' and present continuous to talk about the future
Grammar reference

L Word stress
6 Minute Vocabulary

R Wedding vocabulary

L Pronunciation
'Gonna'

V Is that rain?
Different ways to talk about the future

Language for making plans

L News Report
A wedding on a budget

L The Race – Episode 9
'Going to' and present continuous to talk about the future

Unit 10 – Sunny’s job hunt

 

L Verb patterns
6 Minute Grammar

R When to use the gerund and when the infinitive after a verb

R Verb patterns
Grammar reference

L Job Suffixes
6 Minute Vocabulary

R Sunny's mistakes
Writing a covering letter

L Craig, BBC HR Manager
Interview advice

L News Report
Girl power in Ghana's schools

L The Race – Episode 10
Verb patterns

Unit 11 – The bucket list

 

L Present Perfect
6 Minute Grammar

L Londoners' experiences
Past participles and the present perfect

A Asking questions
Present perfect questions

R Present perfect
Grammar reference

L Contractions
6 Minute Vocabulary

A Life experiences
Collocations

R Susan Boyle's present perfect life

V Pronunciation
Present perfect

L News Report
Swiss children used as slave labour

L Frankenstein – Episode 1
Present perfect with 'never' and 'ever'

Unit 12 – Moving and immigration

 

L Present perfect with 'for' and 'since'
6 Minute Grammar

R Present perfect reminder

R Present perfect with 'for' and 'since'
Grammar reference

L Adjective order
6 Minute Vocabulary

L Sourena, broadcast journalist
Changing jobs

L How long have you lived here?
Students speak about the UK

L News Report
Mushrooms are the business for Burmese migrant

L Frankenstein – Episode 2
Present perfect with 'for' and 'since'

Unit 13 – Welcome to BBC Broadcasting House

 

L Comparatives and superlatives
6 Minute Grammar

R Newest, largest and bigger
Comparatives and superlatives explained

R Much and more
More about comparatives

R Comparing nouns

R Comparatives and superlatives
Grammar reference

L Similar words
6 Minute Vocabulary

R Find out about the BBC
Superlatives and comparatives activity

V The BBC
A superlative guide

L Describing change in your neighbourhood

L News Report
Minecraft player builds virtual city

L Frankenstein – Episode 3
Present perfect with 'yet', 'just' and 'already'

Unit 14 – New Year, New Project

 

L 'Just', 'already' and 'yet' with the present perfect tense
6 Minute Grammar

R 'Just' and 'already'
The rules

A 'Yet'
More rules

R 'Just', 'already' and 'yet' with the present perfect tense
Grammar reference

L Compound nouns
6 Minute Vocabulary

V New Year's resolutions

A A vegetarian breakfast?
Present perfect with 'yet', 'just' and 'already' practice


L 'Just', 'yet' and 'already' in business
Business vocabulary

L The Sagrada Familia
A listening activity

L News Report
Too many graduates, not enough jobs

L Frankenstein – Episode 4
Comparatives and superlatives

Unit 15 – From Handel to Hendrix

 

L Defining relative clauses
6 Minute Grammar

R Handel and Hendrix
Getting a handle on relative clauses

R Which, where or that

R Relative clauses
A structure

R Defining relative clauses
Grammar reference

L Homophones
6 Minute Vocabulary

V Famous London
Descriptions with relative clauses

A What does … mean?
A useful question

L The Handel House Museum
A listening activity

L News Report
The Taj Mahal in your living room

L Frankenstein – Episode 5
Relative clauses

Unit 16 – What’s the weather like?

 

L May, might and could
6 Minute Grammar

R The weather supercomputer
Understanding  might, may and could

R Predicting the weather
Using will and might

R May, might and could for possibility
Grammar reference

L Weather words
6 Minute Vocabulary

A Welcome to the weather
Weather vocabulary and symbols

V A weather forecast
Understanding a weather forecast?

V Climate change
Cause and effect relationships

R Climate change
Is the risk from extreme weather set to rise?

L Meet a weather presenter
Using 'could' and 'couldn't

L Britain's great storm

L News Report
Entrepreneurial spark

L Frankenstein – Episode 6
'May', 'might' and 'could'

Unit 17 – The Digital Revolution

 

L Used to
6 Minute Grammar

R Talking about change
A guide to used to

R Used to and the past simple
What's the difference?

V Used to or use to?

R Used to
Grammar reference

L New words
6 Minute Vocabulary

V Modern technology is great?
selfie, photobomb and trolling

L Modern technology – the debate
old-school, bizarre, video call …

R Robot trucks do the jobs
Mining and tech vocabulary

L Christine's life
Using 'used to'

L News Report
Experimental schools of the 1970s

L Frankenstein – Episode 7
Used to

Unit 18 – A detective story

 

L Subject questions
6 Minute Grammar

A Inspector Stone's case  notes (Ep 1)
Possessive 's' and subject questions

R Gathering the evidence
Forming subject questions

R The Inspector finds a notebook
Word order

R 'Whose' or 'who's'?

L Inspector Stone's case notes
Intonation and question tags

R Subject-object questions
Grammar reference

L Male and female job words
6 Minute Vocabulary

V Inspector Stone Episode 1
Wedding vocabulary

V Inspector Stone Episode 2
Listening for specific information
More on subject questions

V Inspector Stone Episode 3
Practising the past simple negative

R The mother of the bride
Find the past simple negative mistakes

V Inspector Stone Episode 4
Intonation and solving the crime

L News Report
Murder mystery

L Frankenstein – Episode 8
Subject questions

Unit 19 – A place to live

 

L 'Too', 'very', 'enough'
6 Minute Grammar

A Modifying adjectives with 'too', 'very' and 'enough'

R 'Too much', 'too many', 'enough', 'not enough', 'very'
Grammar reference

L Strong adjectives
6 Minute Vocabulary

V Goldilocks and the three bears
'Too', 'very' and 'enough'

R London’s housing crisis
Housing vocabulary

V 'ough' words
Pronunciation tips for words like ‘enough’

L 'Too', 'very' and 'enough'
Using these words to say what’s wrong

L News Report
School shortage

L Frankenstein – Episode 9
'Too much', 'too many', 'enough', 'not enough', 'very'

Unit 20 – The Cult of Celebrity

 

L Tenses
6 Minute Grammar – present simple, present continuous, past simple, present perfect, going to, present continuous with future meaning

V Daisy's audition
Present simple, present continuous, past simple, present perfect

V Living in The Box
Present simple, present continuous, past simple, present perfect

R Mixed tenses
Grammar reference

L –ic and –ical adjectives
6 Minute Vocabulary

V Life after The Box
Talking about plans for the future

R Daisy goes global
Fame vocabulary

R A disease called fame
Fame vocabulary 

L News Report
Robin Williams honoured

L Frankenstein – Episode 10
Past simple, present simple, present perfect, present continuous, 'going to' future

Unit 21 – Welcome to your new job

 

L Indirect questions
6 Minute Grammar

R Indirect questions

R Indirect questions
Grammar reference

L Multi-word verbs
6 Minute Vocabulary

V Going Up: Amith's First Day
Polite language

R Indirect questions with 'if' and 'whether'

L 'I wonder if you could help me'
Listening to phone messages

R French cafe causes a stir
Read an article about a French cafe

L News Report
Work after sport

L Alice in Wonderland – Part 1
Indirect questions

Unit 22 – Beyond the planets

 

L Present and past passives
6 Minute Grammar

R The passive voice

R Present and past passives
Grammar reference

L Onomatopoeia
6 Minute Vocabulary

L NASA's last shuttle flight
Space vocabulary

R Is there hope for the future?
Stories about the future

L News Report
Comets

L Alice in Wonderland – Part 2
Present and past simple passives

Unit 23 – Great expectations!

 

L First conditional
6 Minute Grammar

L Advice for new mums
Using the first conditional

R First conditional
Grammar reference

L Silent letters
6 Minute Vocabulary

L Baby talk
Idioms relating to having a baby

L Parents-to-be
'If' + present simple + will

R Different countries, different systems
Reading about healthcare and pregnancy

L News Report
Dads attending births

L Alice in Wonderland – Part 3
The first conditional               

Unit 24 – Eco-tourism

 

L The second conditional
6 Minute Grammar

L Would the world be better if…
Second conditionals

R Second conditional
Grammar reference

L Re- pre- and pro-
6 Minute Vocabulary

R Would you go to Antarctica?
Eco-tourism vocabulary

L My dream holiday
Talking about dream destinations

L News Report

If cars could run themselves

L Alice in Wonderland – Part 4
The second conditional

Unit 25 – Moving house

 

L State verbs
6 Minute Grammar

A State verbs: 'love' and 'hate'

R State verbs and action verbs
Grammar reference

L Phrasal verbs and context
6 Minute Vocabulary

R Finding somewhere to live
Vocabulary relating to living together

L Getting along with your housemates
Talking about living together

R How can you avoid choosing a terrible flatmate?
Talking about the problems of living together

L News Report
Sharing accommodation

L Alice in Wonderland – Part 5
State verbs

Unit 26 – It must be love

 

L Present perfect and past simple
6 Minute Grammar

R Present perfect and past simple
Grammar reference

L Spelling words that begin with /s/
6 Minute Vocabulary

L She’s the one
Talking about relationships

R The man who robbed a bank for love

L News Report
Breaking News

L Alice in Wonderland – Part 6
Present perfect and past simple

Unit 27 – Job hunting success… and failure

 

L Question tags
6 Minute Grammar

A Making questions in English

A Find the correct question tags

R Question tags
Grammar reference

L Business jargon
6 Minute Vocabulary

R The ideal candidate
Vocabulary of job adverts

R The dos and don'ts of job interviews
Vocabulary relating to job interview processes

L News Report
Job interviews

L Alice in Wonderland – Part 7
Question tags

Unit 28 – Speeding into the future

 

L 'Will', 'going to', 'might' and 'be likely to'
6 Minute Grammar

R Predicting the future
'Will', 'going to', 'be likely to' and 'might'

R 'Will', 'going to', 'be likely to', 'might'
Grammar reference

L British and American English
6 Minute Vocabulary

R Too much tech?
Vocabulary relating to digital technology

R Do we need to rescue our kids from the digital world?
Vocabulary relating to use of digital technology

L News Report
The future of travel

L Alice in Wonderland – Part 8
'Will', 'going to', 'might'

Unit 29 – Lost arts

 

L 'Used to' and 'would'
6 Minute Grammar

R 'Used to' and 'would'
Grammar reference

L Pronouncing verbs and nouns
6 Minute Vocabulary

L The Knowledge
'Used to' and 'would' in context

R How to plant the perfect tree
Suggestions, instructions and advice

L News Report
Health stories

L Alice in Wonderland – Part 9
'Used to' and 'would'

Unit 30 – Tales of survival

 

L 'Can', 'could', 'be able to', 'manage'
6 Minute Grammar

R Turning tragedy into triumph
'Can', 'could', 'be able to' and 'manage to' in context

R Present and past modals of ability
Grammar reference

L Words with double letters
6 Minute Vocabulary

R Surviving in tough times
Talking about ability

R After Typhoon Haiyan
Vocabulary relating to natural disasters

L Meet Jackie
Broadcasting in and about disaster zones

L News Report
Surviving the tsunami

L Alice in Wonderland – Part 10
Expressions of ability in the past and present

Sun, 27 Nov 2022 11:25:00 -0600 text/html https://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/hygiene/lowerintermediate-syllabus
Killexams : Read a Story of Queer Love and Hope for the Future in the Apocalypse

Photo: David McNew (Getty Images)

Now for something a bit different to distract you this Thanksgiving. io9 has run short fiction before, from our collaborations with Lightspeed Magazine to excerpts from novels big and small. But here’s “Post-Nihilism,” an original tale of love and hope in a near-future world ravaged by climate disaster, from Gizmodo’s own Blake Montgomery. Enjoy! - James Whitbrook, Deputy Editor


Professor Francis Jude arrived from Oregon at the Golden Fields Tower flustered, winded, alone. His train had been delayed. He ran to the class he was supposed to be teaching.

Late, he stood in a semicircular lecture hall before three dozen students. He was overdressed in a tie and tight blazer of radiant orange. His students wore neutral tones: loose-fitting jumpsuits of beige, brown, blue, and gray, checkered with wide pockets. His long arms, though thick and strong, appeared gaunt and gangly as they extended too far out of his orange and blue sleeves. Sweat ran down his angular face. His gold glasses fogged under his untrimmed brown hair.

He shuffled through his papers at his desk. Out of breath, he said, “I apologize for my tardiness. Welcome to Historical Philosophy. As I’m sure you read in the course description, our class will delve into philosophical movements while also studying contemporaneous events and societal shifts.

“We will begin by discussing Post-Nihilism, one of the least-known intellectual undercurrents of the century leading up to 2200, but, I would argue, one of the most essential and most closely tied to history.

“The first examples of what scholars would later call Post-Nihilism were memoirs documenting the authors’ own individual experiences, an uncommon beginning for a philosophical movement. These authors had been actively and intently suicidal as they observed the deteriorating state of the natural world, but they all emerged alive from their severe battles with depression and went on to chronicle their experiences. As Benedict Dymphna wrote—”

A student in the front row raised her hand.

“Yes?” asked professor Jude.

“I’m sorry professor, but I think we’re out of time. I have to get to my next lecture.”

“Ah, of course. We will pick up on the same Topic when class reconvenes.”

The classroom emptied, and professor Francis Jude sat, breathless and alone.


Francis screwed up the courage to eat dinner at the tower cafeteria, which was open to all every night. He had not yet stocked his fridge, and though the city in the wind turbine offered several restaurants, he thought his chances of meeting new friends better at a long table. He signed up for pasta and sat among the other residents. He had forgotten to change into the olive-green jumpsuit issued to him and still sported his fluorescent outfit.

The gargantuan white wind windmill soaring above the flaxen Oakland hills contained an entire community: apartments, schools, restaurants, a hospital, grocery stores, pharmacies, shops, nightclubs, libraries, a city hall, municipal agencies, utilities, recreation centers, businesses, a university, and more. At its base, parks and farms, the only locales of life that now required sprawling horizontal real estate, occupied a limited circle. Its massive blades thrummed past windows at all hours. The town in a tube drew its power from the wide circuits of the windmill, which cranked three enormous generators in its skull.

Dozens of mammoth city-cum-turbines like Golden Fields Tower pocked the landscape, and each rested within its own 25-mile radius, allowing a wide and undeveloped green divide to stretch between. The framework arose from a rigid lattice of laws dictating city structure. Rails connected them like the roots of aspens. The windows of a train car would offer passing views of the parched and charred hulls of old metropolises.

Though the dinner seating order was assigned—each thing and each person in the compact city had their exact places and appointed times—the chair across from Francis remained empty as the table filled.

“It’s Maximilian. He’s often neither here nor there,” said the young woman sitting next to Francis through a mouthful of noodles. The brown profusion of curlicues on her head bounced as she chewed and spoke, not dissimilar from the pasta on her plate. She wore a tan jumpsuit. Francis caught the aroma of the astringent sauce through his hooked nose. She continued, “If you don’t tell the quartermasters where you’re eating, they sign you up for the cafeteria by default. Maxi never goes to restaurants, but he doesn’t often show up here either.”

“I’ve seen him stumbling around the hallways coming back from the turbine,” said a man in a nearby chair. He wore jumpsuit the dark brown of tree bark. In a hissing whisper, he said, “It’s Magentol.”

“Really?” said the woman.

“Magentol?” asked Francis.

“The turbine lubricant that makes you hallucinate like you’re in a soft dream. Makes you loopy and talkative. Makes your body feel like it’s calm and glowing. Best you’ve ever felt. Addictive as anything. Surely people used it in your tower. It’s everywhere,” the man replied.

“Ah. In my old home we simply called it Grease,” said Francis. “And its devotees ‘Grease monkeys.’”

The man said, “We call them that, too, but be careful. Those words will get you into a fight. It’s more like a slur here.”

“I’ve never seen it in person. I heard it does horrible things to you,” whispered the woman.

“That is true,” said Francis. “My tower was evacuated due to a rapidly spreading pathogen, but those who had already been infected were forced to stay. The quarantined residents often turned to Grease. Their hands and feet calcified, not unlike sclerosis. It was very sad and painful for those who had to remain and those who had to leave them behind.”

“What happened to them?” asked the woman.

“They’re still there. Most succumbed to the mania of Grease overdoses and killed themselves,” said Francis. “The despair at their circumstances drove them further into their addictions.”


Francis returned to his apartment to find that the plumbing below his bathroom sink, unsupervised and rambunctious, had boiled over in his absence. Though the water had receded, a thin brown residue remained. He discarded his teaching clothes in favor of a sleeveless shirt and attempted to scrub it away with the thin bandana he had brought with him. The anemic fabric failed him, and he grew frustrated again with how little the authorities had allowed him to bring with him from his home. His apartment had only a bed and one chair. With a sigh and an exclamation of disgust audible two units over, he left for the communal cleaning supply closet.

Within the large storeroom, Maximilian Kolbe slumped against a dark wall in a ragged posture. His head swayed to a wild, invisible tango as he drank from a hefty, conspicuous flask. His shaggy blonde hair glinted even in gloom. The telltale liquid merriment sheened his smiling lips a reddish purple.

Francis heard Maximilian’s gulps as he entered. The saccharine scent of Magentol filled his nose—soap and rotting fruit. “Hello? Is someone in here?” he asked. He flipped the light switch and brought down jarring fluorescent beams.

“Piss off. And turn that off,” said Maximilian.

Francis did not know where the supplies he needed were shelved. He flicked the switch down in hopes of currying favor.

“Where would I find disinfectant and sponges?” he asked.

“I’m a repairman in work hours, but I’m off now. I’m not a janitor at any time”—here Maximilian slurred—“Good luck finding a cleaning closet librarian.”

“Why are you in here?” asked Francis.

“Because not many people come in here. When they do, they’re in and out. No one comes to a cleaning closet for a leisurely stay, so no one bothers me,” said Maximilian.

“Your apartment is private, too,” answered Francis.

“That’s true, but somehow it feels more sad to drink there alone than do it in here, and the clubs are closed. I’m older than you, I think, and I remember when I could drink in my own damn yard, whether I was alone or with my friends,” Maximilian said.

“Were you the empty seat at dinner yesterday?” Francis asked.

“Good guess, glasses.”

“My name is Francis Jude.”

“I don’t care,” Maximilian said as he took a deep draught. Bright liquid dribbled through his thick beard and splattered on his chest. The drink gleamed like neon blood. “This stuff kills my appetite. One good thing about it. You may be younger than I am, but I’ve still got the body I had a decade ago.”

At Maximilian’s remark, Francis noticed the unzipped crag in the other man’s jumpsuit, black in the light of the dim alcove, that opened to the underwear at his waist. The wiry muscles were indeed there. Francis stirred.

He asked, “What is it you’re drinking?”

“Come on, you know. I’m sure people chugged the turbine cleaning fluid in your old tower, too. Want any?” asked Maximilian.

“You call it Magentol here, I hear? Why do you take it?” Francis sat on a creaking crate. He did not think he would ever learn where the supplies were, though as his eyes adjusted, he enjoyed looking at Maximilian more and more. He could make out the strength of the repairman’s jawline and neck, the veins that led into the hairy chest.

“I’ve got an endless supply of it as a turbine repairman. And because we’ll destroy the whole world someday, just like we almost did before. We’ll finish the job. I’ll be done with it then. Or maybe I’ll be done with life. But while I’m here on earth, I like to hear music, to dance… ‘To and fro in the seven chambers, there stalked, in fact, a multitude of dreams, and these, the dreams, writhed in and about, taking hue from the rooms, and causing the wild music of the orchestra to seem as an echo to their steps…’”

“Poe. ‘The Masque of the Red Death,’” said Francis.

“Right on the money there, Dr. Brains. That’s the best description of what this red-pink mess feels like. Nothing beyond me and the party. What I see is different every time, something like another line from that story: ‘There were much of the beautiful, much of the wanton, much of the bizarre, something of the terrible, and not a little of that which might have excited disgust.’ It’s a ball for one.”

“Do you dance yourself?” asked Francis.

“I am dancing, can’t you see?” replied Maximilian.

“You are sitting.”

“That’s where you’re wrong,” said Maximilian. “Right now I’m two-stepping down the line with quite a few handsome cowboys.”

“That does sound lovely,” said Francis.

“You might be the first person to say so. Everyone else tries to scurry away when they see what I’m sipping,” said Maximilian. “You sure you don’t want some?”

“No, thank you. But I do love dancing,” said Francis. “I have been looking forward to your tower’s party on Saturday. We did not have them in my tower for fear of spreading infections.”

“Yours was the bad one in Oregon?” asked Maximilian.

“Yes. I left before it was declared a pandemic,” Francis said. “Now it is locked down. It grows less and less likely anyone will ever leave or be permitted to return.”

“I’m sorry,” said Maximilian. “That’s a damn shame.”

“Thank you. It has been very difficult leaving my family and my old university behind,” said Francis.

“Will you dance with me?” asked Maximilian. “I like how your arms look in that shirt. You seem quite strong.”

“What?”

“I asked if you’d do a dance with me.”

Francis had expected to ogle Maximilian from afar. The prospect of touching flustered him. He said, “I, uh, I don’t, uh…”

“Oh, fine, never mind, professor. The sponges you need are on the second shelf up to the left.”

“I did not mean to offend, I simply, uh, I…” Francis grabbed at the disinfectant and scrubbers. Several tumbled down around his embarrassed head. He flushed in the darkness as he scooped them up.

“Thank you for helping me, Mr…?”

“Maxi. Maximilian Mary Kolbe.” The slouching man drank deeply. “Everybody seems to have some plumbing issues their first days, and I’ve cleaned up more of that poop-hued scum I’m sure you’ve got than I care to remember. See you around.”

Francis, still blushing, returned to his apartment.


Professor Jude continued his first lecture in his second class. A dozen students in a semicircle scribbled notes.

“The dominant theme of Post-Nihilism is ecological devastation. The immolation of the natural world we see all around us poisoned the writers against themselves, as they saw no hope for humanity and therefore no hope for themselves as individuals. The movement’s most famous practitioner, Benedict Dymphna, coined the phrase ‘The Unworlding’ to describe both his own deteriorating mental state and the fraying of the natural world. The term is the title of his best-known work. Dymphna found himself suffering inner crises that reflected the destruction of the earth around him, mental breakdowns induced more by the events of the world than the ontological frictions of consciousness, though he was not so circumspect at the time. One of his most famous vignettes described him going for the same morning walk every day but returning home covered in more and more ash than the day before. The darkness of the burning world quite literally weighed on him and clouded his sight.

“The writers explained their post-depression emotional and mental state as a synthesis. Theirs was a newfound enthusiasm for life that recognized their previous despondency. Each rejected the label of ‘optimist’ with vehemence and disdain. One writer, assuming the name of the poet Mary Oliver as an homage, described her emotions as ‘tempered, blackened happiness,’ ‘singed sincerity,’ and ‘burnt joy.’ Many began to see the phenomenological world in similar terms. Another, Teresa José, was more blunt, calling her approach ‘mutant pragmatism.’ Dymphna popularized bodily metaphors among major voices in the movement. The most common comparisons in his work are to scar tissue or to broken bones healing. My favorites, though, are his descriptions of eyes: ‘Sight and the sky are blinding after cataracts. How brilliant, how blue, how beautiful.’

“Academics soon noticed the themes of the memoirs and codified them in literary analysis papers, which gave rise to strident critiques of the philosophy the writers expressed. The new worldview had struck a nerve.

“Post-Nihilism was itself a reaction to other ideas, the antithesis to a preexisting thesis. The memoirists and then the literary theorists found ethics rooted in despair to be cold comfort in the face of worldwide environmental catastrophe. The ideas of Existentialism and Absurdism, for example, proved useless when faced with a literal, global crisis of existence rather than one rising from within the self. As Dymphna defiantly wrote, ‘There will be no meaning in our world only if there is no survival.’ He was at once bleak and bold.”


Francis arrived early at the all-tower party too early. He dressed in the formal fashion of his tower—loudly patterned jacket and tie—but as more residents filtered in, he realized that they wore cleaned versions of the same muted, casual clothes they donned every day.

He approached Maximilian, who wore his same dirty black work jumpsuit, matte but for the glossy stains left by turbine repair.

“May I lead you in a dance?” the professor asked.

“Hey there, glasses. So you’ve got dancing feet now?” asked Maximilian.

“You seem less indisposed,” said Francis. He hoped the joke did not poke too hard. He wondered if the tower’s gossiping residents would stare as they joined hands and began the steps of the dance.

“And you seem less embarrassed,” replied the smirking repairman.

“Both can be true,” said Francis.

“Fair enough. I’ll provide you one dance, but I’m leading,” said Maximilian.

Francis smelled chemical sweetness on the other man’s breath. “Are you high?”

Maximilian did not answer.

“Why do you take it?” asked Francis.

“I told you, I like to dance,” Maximilian replied.

“But we have music here,” said Francis. “And won’t you lose your legs?”

“Do you know how ‘The Masque of the Red Death’ ends, professor?”

Goosebumps pricked the back of Francis’ neck. “The guests of the prince die of the plague.”

“Yeah, they do,” said Maximilian.

“The allusion hits somewhat close to home, so to speak,” said Francis.

“What? Oh, my god. I’m so sorry, professor. That’s not where I meant to go.” Maximilian missed a step. Their left feet bumped each other.

Francis sighed. “Then what did you mean?”

“The ebony clock is the only thing left standing, towering over all the dancers and ticking the time away as everyone falls,” said Maximilian.

“And?”

“And that’s what’s going to happen to us. The windmill will loom over us, white as death. I’m a fair bit older than you, I see in the light. I used to reside in a proper city. These towers may be a big shift from how we lived before, but they don’t really do anything. They’re just a bandage on gangrene. We’re the same destructive, sicko species as when we nearly ended the earth. So might as well have a magenta drink while you can, right?”

Francis kissed him. The professor did not want to answer the charge. Maximilian reciprocated the affection.


Two weeks later, professor Jude said, “Good afternoon, students. We will be continuing our discussion of Post-Nihilism today.”

“The writers we have covered are tied to a specific generation of Americans, one that lived in both the country as it was before The Unworlding, largely uncaring and indifferent to the natural world’s status, even as our environment descended into chaos, and as it is today, far more concerned with the global harmony of humanity and the earth. The most prominent and visible example, of course, is the reimagining of our cities inside massive windmills.”

Maximilian swaggered into the classroom through the door behind Francis. His heavy boots hit the floor with declarative thuds as he sauntered to the back row.

“Students, this is, uh, this is my boyfriend, Maximilian Kolbe. I did not expect him here today. Welcome.”

Francis’ students lit up at the prospect of their professor’s personal life interfering with their class. Their glee made Francis nervous. Maximilian took no notice, gave a languid wave.

Francis continued, “You see the societal shift in attitude most evidently in the way our cities are now structured. In California and the western United States, for instance, we live in densely populated wind turbines for three primary reasons: to minimize any use of fossil fuels, to maximize the use of scarce water resources, and to mitigate fire danger. We originally implemented interstices of 25 miles between each tower so as to allow for recovery from the huge rashes of fires that plagued our region. Over time, however, we discovered that the ecological recuperation that the spacing permitted benefited human beings as well as the earth as water and air became cleaner. The integration of cities into cohesive units, though a bumpy migration, engendered a more egalitarian understanding and led to more comprehensive care for citizens overall. Though sensitivity towards the planet’s climate may prevail among your young cohort and even among much of mine, I would advise you not to take it for granted, as it came at a great cost.”

“Ha!” Maximilian barked a laugh in the back row. “Kids, let me pose a question to you.”

“Mr. Kolbe, please, I am not finished with the—”

“Do any of you believe this junk? That we’ve moved past what happened to the world into a sunnier future where everyone won’t kill themselves?” he asked.

The students, a frozen Greek chorus, did not answer.

“Anybody want some Magentol? It’ll make you imagine the world isn’t ending. You’ll feel better, I promise,” Maximilian asked his rapt, speechless audience. He pulled a flask from a pocket and guzzled. He leered at the students, and his teeth glowed pink.

Francis flamed red. He stood stiff behind his desk. He said, “Students, we will finish this lecture in next week’s class. Do not forget the reading assignment.”

“No, stay! I want to hear whether you believe humanity has any kind of future. I certainly don’t,” said Maximilian.

The students did not move.

Francis swept the papers from his desk in a loud gesture that turned the heads of the entire class.

“Leave, now!” he shouted, trembling.

They shuffled forth. Some left their books in their muffled hurry. Maximilian stared at Francis and felt ashamed.

“Why did you come to my class? And why did you do it high?” asked Francis. His question echoed through the lecture hall.

Maximilian did not answer. He looked down.

“Answer my question,” said Francis.

Maximilian did not meet his boyfriend’s gaze.

“This is where I work. I cannot have you disrupting my class with drunken rants, embarrassing me, and offering my students Magentol.”

Maximilian, so gregarious a moment before, said nothing as he watched the floor.

“Answer me, you stupid Grease monkey!” Francis yelled. “Or are you good for nothing but turning screws and drinking? Did that slime make you mute?”

Maximilian looked up in awe and pain. Francis saw, for the first time, disgust and hurt overtake his boyfriend. Maximilian’s face fell again, this time into a wounded glare as his shoulders rose in a gesture of protection. Where before there had been a permanent and assertive thrust of the chin, there was now only downtrodden, aching rage. He stood and walked to the exit.

“Maxi, wait!”

The repairman did not. He slammed the door of the classroom.


Francis returned to his apartment expecting a tirade from the other man. Only a note met him.

“Don’t call, and don’t ever call me a Grease monkey again.”

Francis found Maximilian sitting alone at the scene of the party, now an empty room, swilling and slumping, leaning to and fro on top of an empty folding table.

Maximilian did not turn to Francis when the latter came in. He stared out a window at the stars.

“I can’t believe in that Post-Nihilism stuff, Francis. This world’s just as bad and messed up and doomed as it was before,” he said.

“You have survived greater disasters than I, Maxi. Do you see no power or appeal in returning to hope?” Francis asked

“You wouldn’t understand. What you think of as a new day I see as the slow ending of my life and the world. You don’t know what it was like moving from a city to whatever this tower is.”

“I left many people I loved behind as well,” said Francis.

“You know I used to be married to one of the writers from your class?” asked Maximilian. “I read your syllabus one night while you were asleep. Benedict Dymphna. My Benny. He’s the one who read ‘The Masque of the Red Death’ to me. I never would’ve picked it on my own, but sometimes, if I glug enough of this muck, I hear him saying, ‘All is still, and all is silent, save the voice of the clock. The dreams are stiff-frozen as they stand.’”

“I did not know that,” said Francis.

“I thought everyone had forgotten about him except me,” said Maximilian. He took another drink. “I haven’t seen a copy of his book in years. One that wasn’t mine, anyway. I kept them all. They’re in a sealed box. I can’t bear to open it, but I can’t bear to throw it out.”

Francis said, “His work is very much alive. He is the first Post-Nihilist I talk about because his descriptions of his project and the aims of his writing capture the movement so well.”

Maximilian said, “Do you know what happened to him after he stopped writing? After he put down all those killer lines about hope in that book you teach?”

Francis, silent, put his arm around Maximilian.

“He couldn’t stand how much the world was changing. He was so depressed, then he wasn’t, then he was again,” Maximilian said. “He wouldn’t move into a tower with me, wouldn’t provide up our life together in Oakland even as it fell apart around us. Finally, he was forced to. Our old apartment building burned down, so he came to my little cubby in the turbine. I was already working there. He saw that I was happy, and then we both were for a while. That’s when he wrote ‘The Unworlding,’ that little intermission between his despairs. I like to think I was his inspiration. He’s the one who gave me the nickname Maxi. I called him Benny.

“We would drink Magentol together. He’s how I got into it, but he would always drink more of it than I would. We didn’t know how bad it was for you then. It made his moods worse, and he would rant and rage around the tower. It was embarrassing, and now I’m just like him. He grew to hate it. He would quit and relapse, quit and relapse, always so depressed and angry with himself. I tried to make him stop drinking… Then one day I came home and he was gone.” Maximilian grew quiet.

Francis knew what came next. He answered the silence: “He drank so much he threw himself from the tower.”

Maximilian began to weep. “I’m sorry I ruined your class. I really made an ass of myself,” he said. “I don’t want to drink this stuff, but I can’t stop. I don’t want to lose my hands. I don’t want to lose my legs. But I can’t stop. I’ve been so lonely without Benny.”

His sobbing intensified, and he buried his face in Francis’ shoulder.

“I am sorry for what I said to you after class, Maxi. It was cruel,” said Francis.

“Do you tell your students what happened to him? To Benny?” Maximilian asked into Francis’ shirt.

“I do not,” said the professor.

Maximilian drew back. “Why not? How can you keep that from them?”

“Dymphna meant to impart hope at the time he wrote ‘The Unworlding,’ no matter what he may have felt or chosen to do afterward. You know that. Life is very long. Hope is vital, but likewise is it fragile. We must learn the story before we learn why the story may not be the whole truth. If my students are to understand the almighty impulse that powers Post-Nihilism—and I want them to, I desperately do—Benedict’s work must stand as a beacon. He wrote about a willingness to endure even the end of the world. His books remain an inspiration, even if his life does not.”

“‘We must hope to live.’ He would say that to me a lot. I didn’t believe it most days. Sometimes I did, and those days were better than the others,” said Maximilian.

“Exactly,” said Francis.

“I’m glad you know him,” said Maximilian. “You’re not too jaded to dance, and you read, and you’ve got some hope. Benny would’ve liked you.”

“Will you dance with me, Maxi? And stay here with me?” asked Francis. He stood to plug in a speaker.

Maximilian put down his bottle and rested his head on Francis’ shoulder. The two stepped together slowly. Francis led. Maximilian sighed with relief.


Want more io9 news? Check out when to expect the latest Marvel, Star Wars, and Star Trek releases, what’s next for the DC Universe on film and TV, and everything you need to know about James Cameron’s Avatar: The Way of Water.

Thu, 24 Nov 2022 14:59:00 -0600 en text/html https://gizmodo.com/lgbtq-short-fiction-climate-change-blake-montgomery-1849818363
Killexams : Amazon brings Alexa Young Innovator Challenge to the East Midlands as new research reveals STEM gaps in local schools

New research from Amazon reveals a need to boost the STEM skills gap in schools in the East Midlands to help meet future demand for jobs in computer science and AI.

The research, which quizzed secondary school teachers in the East Midlands, is released as it’s also revealed that teaching Artificial Intelligence (AI) skills in secondary schools could help to fill increasing demand for computer science and AI related roles, supporting on average £71 billion of economic output annually to 2030 in the UK economy, according to a report published by Amazon and Capital Economics.

The need to boost AI learning in schools in the East Midlands is supported by new YouGov research –commissioned by Amazon – among secondary school teachers and parents. The research shows:

  • 63% 107 of secondary school teachers surveyed in the East Midlands agree that AI should be part of their school’s syllabus, while 82% 43 of teachers in the East Midlands surveyed believe access to free AI and computer science learning resources linked with the curriculum would help students better engage in computer science.
  • Among teachers surveyed in the East Midlands, almost two thirds (62%) 61 have limited access to computer science resources, rising to three quarters (76%) 70 when focused exclusively on AI.
  • While two thirds (67%) 125 of secondary school teachers surveyed in the East Midlands believe that education in computer science better prepares students for future careers in all sectors, less than one in three (31%) 152 say AI learning is only part of an opt-in or extra paid-for club and not part of the syllabus.
  • Two thirds (66%) 198 of secondary school teachers surveyed in the East Midlands say children don’t have enough information to understand future career opportunities that involve computer science and AI.
  • Three quarters (74%) 92 of secondary school teachers surveyed in the East Midlands who think schools should be making an active effort to increase education and resources around AI and CS, say that without increased STEM education and resources, there will be long-term skill gaps

The research comes as Amazon launches the inaugural Alexa Young Innovator Challenge in the East Midlands, an educational programme for secondary school pupils to create an Alexa Skill to promote social good in their community. Designed to inspire young people about the potential of AI, teachers and educators will be able to access free curriculum-linked lesson plans and materials to engage students, while supporting the development of AI learning in classrooms. By taking part, schools will have the chance to win prizes, including £2,500 worth of tech products for the winner and a £2,500 donation to their school. The 20 runners up will also receive an Amazon gift card to the value of £250, redeemable on Amazon.co.uk and £500 will be donated to their school.

Amazon’s research also estimates that demand for jobs that require computer science, AI or machine learning skills in the UK are expected to increase by 40% over the next five years.

In addition, research that looked at the potential future use of AI by UK businesses estimates that expenditure on AI-related labour could increase from £46 billion in 2020 to between £80 billion and £103 billion by 2025. In order to have enough AI talent in the UK workforce to fill computer science jobs by 2030, students will need to experience some form of AI-based learning during secondary school.  An insufficient supply of skilled labour is one of the reasons why UK businesses are slow to adopt AI, with just 15% of UK businesses having currently adopted the technology.

“AI is the world’s fastest growing technology and the UK is striving to be among the world’s leaders in this field, with 56% of businesses planning to increase investment in AI technologies within the next three years,” said Lauren Kisser, Technology Director at Amazon and UK Ambassador for Amazon Future Engineer. “Through the Alexa Young Innovator Challenge, we hope to not only build confidence in students’ ability to understand and control this incredible technology but also inspire young minds, regardless of their background, to realise their potential as creators, thinkers and builders of the future; using AI to create innovative solutions to real world problems.”

Amazon announces the Alexa Young Innovator Challenge as it reveals ten innovative AI and computer science jobs that could be available to young people in the future. Compiled in partnership with futurologist Dr. Ian Pearson, the careers range from metaverse architect to paramedic drone programmer, AI sports coach and environment protection agent. The jobs highlight the ways that AI and computer science could be used to tackle societal issues, including sustainability – insight that is particularly relevant to the one in five (22%) secondary school children who felt AI could be used to speed up problem solving around climate change.

Tue, 06 Dec 2022 18:00:00 -0600 en-GB text/html https://www.eastmidlandsbusinesslink.co.uk/mag/news/amazon-brings-alexa-young-innovator-challenge-to-the-east-midlands-as-new-research-reveals-stem-gaps-in-local-schools/
Killexams : UP board class 12 Education syllabus 2022-23: obtain the Education syllabus in PDF

UP board class 12 Education syllabus 2022-23: obtain the latest syllabus of Education published by Uttar Pradesh Board of High school and Intermediate education in PDF format.

up board class 10 education syllabus 2023

UP board class 12 Education syllabus 2022-23: Uttar Pradesh Madhyamik Shiksha Parishad has published the latest and updated syllabus of its secondary and higher senior secondary courses. The syllabus is available on the website of UPMSP. The syllabus for each subject can be downloaded separately. Alternatively, students can directly obtain the syllabus at Jagran Josh. 

Uttar Pradesh Board of High school and Intermediate education provides a course on Education, code 134, to its senior secondary students. The course covers the basics of the art of education. 

The Education paper for UPMSP students in 12th is conducted for 100 marks and the students get 3hours to answer it.

up board class 10 education syllabus 2023

The syllabus is divided into two parts with multiple units in both parts.

up board class 10 education syllabus 2023

The first part focuses on the development of modern academic ideologies. It has three units.

The second part focuses on educational psychology. This part also has three units.

Both parts carry equal weightage.

Imparting education is as crucial and complex as education itself. 

The syllabus is also reduced by 30%.  The list of deleted subjects is attached below:

up board class 10 education syllabus 2023

“Learning is not the product of teaching. Learning is the product of the activity of learners.” – John Holt

Education is not just what one reads and writes in textbook exercise. Rather education attained as that is only rot learning.

Education is, instead, connecting knowledge gained in class to life outside the school. This is what makes imparting education very tricky. 

Teachers need to possess deep understanding about the very construction of knowledge. They have to enable learner’s knowledge construction, creating a fear-free atmosphere in their classrooms while addressing diversity and maintaining unbiased and sensitive inclusion, equity and quality. 

Therefore , all candidates pursuing the course must study well and prepare to be the forebearers of education in their society.

All the best!

Sun, 06 Nov 2022 14:41:00 -0600 text/html https://www.jagranjosh.com/articles/up-board-class-12-education-syllabus-2022-23-1667793355-1
Killexams : Uniform education syllabus challenged in LHC

LAHORE: The current enforcement of the uniform education syllabus has been challenged in the Lahore High Court (LHC).

The court on Monday sought replies from the federal government, the Punjab Curriculum and Textbook Board (PCTB) and other respondents.

Justice Jawad Hasan heard the petition of Maryam Basheer while Barrister Ahmed Pansuta appeared on behalf of the petitioner.

Mon, 21 Nov 2022 09:15:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.pakistantoday.com.pk/2022/11/21/uniform-education-syllabus-challenged-in-lhc/
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