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Killexams : Medical Technician learner - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/DTR Search results Killexams : Medical Technician learner - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/DTR https://killexams.com/exam_list/Medical Killexams : Kings Mountain High EMT program finishes first semester

Instructor David Trammel works with senior Nyirah Petty during an EMT class Tuesday morning, Dec. 6, 2022, at Kings Mountain High School.

Kings Mountain High school students are wrapping up their first semester in a pilot program which will allow them to work as emergency medical technicians immediately following high school.

David Trammel, former director of operations at the now-closed Shelby Rescue Squad, teaches the class, which started at the beginning of the school year.

“We’re trying to show that there's other avenues for some students that don't want to go to a four-year college,” Trammel said.

He said he started out with 13 students at the beginning of the year and has dropped down to 11.

Students are learning how to do patient care, treat the sick and wounded, learn about transporting patients, how to check off an ambulance and become familiar with the different equipment used on a daily basis.

After the Christmas break, Trammel hopes the students will be able to do ride-alongs with Cleveland County EMS to show them what it's really like to come to work every day.

Trammel said initially, he was reluctant to take on the task of teaching high school students but now enjoys it.

“I look forward to it every day,” he said. “To come and see what else I am able to show them. They’re an amazing group of people. Education I guess is where my heart is. If we’re not here, our profession will soon die out.”

He said even if they don’t all go on to work in EMS, the practical skills they’ve learned will benefit them. One of the students was able to check her grandmother’s blood pressure and listen to her lungs when she was having problems.

It could also pave the way for a future career in medicine.

Seniors Nicole Poston and Caleb Broome learn together during an EMT class Tuesday morning, Dec. 6, 2022, at Kings Mountain High School.

Trammel said some EMTs have gone on to become physician’s assistants, or work as a coast guard helicopter medic. Others go on to become nurses.

“I know going into this not all of them are going to follow being EMS,” he said.

During the next phase of the program, students will get uniforms and wear a special patch.

“We’re ready for the next phase and trying to close out this phase,” Trammel said.

Some of the students will go on to take the state test for emergency medical responders and move on to become an emergency medical technician, which means they can ride in the back of the ambulance unassisted, practice a few more skills and are granted the ability to give more medications.

Next semester they will see a medical helicopter and learn what they would need to do to pursue a career in that field. They will learn how to drive and park an ambulance and do more hands-on type training.

“The next half is the more fun filled part, less in the classroom,” Trammel said. “At the end of the course they will go back and take the state EMT test and become certified as an emergency medical technician. For the ones seeking employment, they can get a job at Cleveland County EMS. That was part of the basic goal, anyone coming straight out of the class, that they would come to work.”

Jackie Echols, one of the 11 students, said she decided to sign up because it seemed like a good opportunity to learn medical skills while still in high school.

“I really enjoy it, and I've learned so much and even if I decide if it's not for me to go into that field, I've learned quite a bit and can use it in the future,” she said. “I've always been really interested in it, and the opportunity came up and I worked my butt off last year so I could have an open spot in my schedule for fun things this year.”

As for the future, Echols said she’s interested in going into the ministry but knows she’ll probably need another job and that may be as an EMT.

“We have clinicals next semester, 48 hours we have to work on the truck so that hopefully I'll be able to get a taste if I can really handle it.”

She said if she passes the state test, she hopes to begin working this summer.

“I think it's a phenomenal opportunity at the high school level getting to go into that,” Echols said. “I think it's an awesome program.”

Rhonda Benfield, Career Technical Education district coordinator, said in initial discussions about the program, the goal was to expand it to all four traditional high schools in the county.

“This is a partnership between Cleveland County Schools Career and Technical Education and Cleveland County EMS,” Benfield said. “They are providing a tremendous amount of support for the program, including the teacher.”

She said whether that happens will depend on the county and if they feel they can expand it and how.

“Probably as the year draws to an end, we'll look at that program and see,” she said. “There’s ongoing conversations with Cleveland County EMS. There will be more conversations about where do we go from here, do we expand on it, how do we expand on it.”

She said the pilot program at Kings Mountain High School has been successful so far and out of the 13 students, 11 are continuing with the program and following high school, they could go on to immediately begin working as an emergency medical technician.

“It’s very very exciting to provide an opportunity for employment for students after high school,” she said.

Kings Mountain was selected to be the pioneer because the school had a strong interest in the program.

In a time when there is a need in all industries, it benefits employers as well to have a source of trained employees ready to go to work.

Seniors Jackie Echols and Payton Whitley work on an oral pathway during an EMT class Tuesday morning, Dec. 6, 2022, at Kings Mountain High School.

“I would love to see us do more things like that in our community,” Benfield said. "The different career fields and industries are having a hard time staffing positions. This is a great situation to be in.”

Rebecca Sitzes can be reached at rsitzes@gannett.com

This article originally appeared on The Shelby Star: Kings Mountain High EMT program finishes first semester

Sun, 11 Dec 2022 20:03:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/kings-mountain-high-emt-program-100309760.html
Killexams : 24 cadets graduate from Hancock's EMS Academy

After 16 weeks of classroom and field instruction, 24 cadets graduated from Allan Hancock College’s Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Academy on Thursday, Dec. 8.  

The cadets were recognized for completing the Emergency Medical Services Academy 1A during a ceremony at Hancock’s Public Safety Training Complex in Lompoc.  

Upon completion of the training, the cadets can provide basic life-saving skills and have passed a national registry test to become emergency medical technicians (EMTs).  

College officials say that during their time at the academy, the cadets learned critical skills such as patient handling and moving, emergency vehicle driving, and more. Much of the training was hands-on and utilized the state-of-the-art equipment and technology available.

In addition to traditional classroom learning environments, the cadets also trained in one of the only community college EMS simulation labs in the state. Hancock’s high-tech lab includes simulation manikins and an ambulance simulator that allows students to experience and practice the treatment of a patient while in a moving vehicle.  

Hancock’s EMS Academy is one of many Careers and Technical Education (CTE) programs the college offers.

"A lot of us are going to a different field of different first responders. So personally I'm going into nursing and I can't have asked for a better experience having a program foundation like this," said Valedictorian, Ariana Abayari.

Potential students are encouraged to explore these and other degree and certificate programs on the college’s Guided Pathways website.

Registration is currently open for winter and spring classes.

Copyright 2022 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 11:34:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.ksby.com/news/local-news/24-cadets-graduate-from-hancocks-ems-academy
Killexams : High Tech on the Low Episode 78: What Is Your Blood Actually Saying

In my podcast, I explore the many different facets of the world of high tech from development to marketing, to sales, to entrepreneurship, all with the goal of collecting key insights on startups for listeners to gain value from this knowledge-sharing. So what did I discover this week?

AI is about to take over everything, or so they say. With recent advancements in the field and the hype surrounding such new tools as Dall-E and ChatGPT, it would seem as though AI is becoming integrated ever more so into our lives and business processes. That being said, AI adoption will take time, yet, in certain industries, it is already being used.

Scopio Labs’ mission is to revolutionize the way medical diagnoses are made by harnessing the power of artificial intelligence and machine learning. Erez and his team recognized that traditional medical diagnosis techniques have limitations when it comes to detecting certain conditions and diseases. They believed that by using AI, they could create a more accurate and efficient way of diagnosing medical conditions. “Today, traditional diagnosis techniques through blood analyses, for example, still rely on the naked eye of a highly trained technician, and fewer and fewer people are going into this field, and a microscope,” Erez explains, “it is not scalable and is prone to error.”

Connecting Computational Photography, Hardware, and AI

A main area in which Scopio Labs is making significant progress is in the field of blood analysis. As mentioned above, traditionally, blood tests involve time-consuming processes, often relegated to a lab setting, which can make them inconvenient and expensive for healthcare providers. Likewise, recent figures show fewer people are going into the medical technician field. Since only the highest skilled technicians perform blood tests, the healthcare industry could be in the grips of a manpower crisis soon.

Through combining principles of computational photography, AI, and microscopic hardware, Erez has managed to flip the traditional blood analysis model on its head. Using only a small amount of blood, the Scopio solution is able to detect a wide range of abnormalities and potential health issues in blood samples and allows technicians to do so even remotely. “Imagine, a technician can review samples without coming to the lab, which was never able to be done before,” Erez adds.

The platform helps identify markers for diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and heart disease, allowing doctors to catch these conditions earlier and start treatment sooner. And, with only a small amount of blood, the platform is able to provide more accurate and comprehensive results than traditional blood tests conducted by highly-skilled technicians. This means that patients can be diagnosed and treated more quickly, improving their outcomes and potentially saving lives, while also making blood testing more efficient and cost-effective for healthcare providers.

Improving Access to Healthcare

One of the key reasons why Scopio Labs' technology is so important for society is its potential to Excellerate access to healthcare. Traditional blood tests require specialized equipment and trained personnel, making them inaccessible to many people, particularly in rural or underserved areas that lack the proper budget. The Scopio solution, however, requires only a small amount of blood and any device that can run the platform, which does not necessarily have to be in a lab. This means that people who may not have access to traditional blood testing services can still get the medical care they need.

Moreover, the adoption of AI in medical diagnosis procedures will make people more likely to survive serious diseases or illnesses. “With our technology, doctors will be able to catch concerning issues sooner,” Erez highlights, which means that overall medical costs, both on the individual and healthcare provider, could be drastically cut as the potential to save lives increases.  As more and more healthcare providers recognize the benefits of using technology to Excellerate the accuracy and efficiency of their diagnoses, Scopio Labs has positioned itself at the forefront of the trend, and their blood analysis technology could play a key role in the future of medical care.

The potential impact of Scopio Labs on the medical industry is enormous. The accessibility and affordability of their technology means that more people, regardless of location or income, can access high-quality medical care. By using AI to Excellerate medical diagnosis, the company will help healthcare professionals save lives and Excellerate patient outcomes.

Wed, 07 Dec 2022 18:01:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.geektime.com/jordan-kastrinsky-interviews-erez-naaman/ Killexams : Albany Tech to offer flexible evening classes in health care fields

Dec. 8—ALBANY — Albany Technical College will begin offering evening classes for the Medical Assisting Associate of Applied Science degree and diploma program and Pharmacy Technology Associate of Applied Science degree and diploma program starting spring semester of 2023.

Students can have a more flexible schedule to accommodate work and family obligations. This will enable expedited graduation for much-needed health care employees in the southwest Georgia region.

"We realized the demand for a night class offering, and I'm excited that we have been approved to move forward with these classes," LaTonya Harris, medical assisting chairperson/ instructor at Albany Tech, said in a news release. "New students will now see the flexibility needed in their busy schedules."

"This will undoubtedly expand opportunities in the Pharmacy Technology program, allowing Albany Technical College to serve the community's needs better," Janee Mobley, chair of the Pharmacy Technology program, said. "It is a better way to support students through the program and graduate students more efficiently into the work force."

The Medical Assisting program's primary goal is to prepare competent entry-level medical assistants in the cognitive (knowledge), psychomotor (skills), and affective (behavior) learning domains. The Medical Assisting program prepares students for employment in a variety of positions in today's medical offices.

The program provides learning opportunities that introduce, develop and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention and advancement. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills or to retrain in the area of medical assisting. Graduates of the program receive a Medical Assisting degree.

Most medical assistants work in physicians' offices, hospitals, outpatient clinics and other health care facilities. The median annual wage in the United States for medical assistants was $37,190 in May 2021 (U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics). The employment of medical assistants is projected to grow 16% from 2021 to 2031.

The Pharmacy Technology degree is designed to provide an individual with the entry-level skills required for success in a retail pharmacy or a hospital-based pharmacy department. Learning opportunities develop academic and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention and replacement. Graduates are prepared to function as pharmacy technicians in positions requiring preparations of medications according to prescription under the supervision of a pharmacist.

Pharmacy technicians help pharmacists dispense prescription medication to customers or health professionals. They usually need a high school diploma or equivalent and learn their duties through on-the-job training, or they may complete a post-secondary education program in pharmacy technology. Most states regulate pharmacy technicians, which is a process that may require passing an test or completing a formal education or training program.

The median annual wage for pharmacy technicians was $36,740 in May 2021 (U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics). The employment of pharmacy technicians is projected to grow 5% from 2021 to 2031.

For more information, contact Harris at (229) 430-3542 or lharris@albanytech.edu or Mobley at (229) 430-3596 or jmobley@albanytech.edu.

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 08:17:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://news.yahoo.com/albany-tech-offer-flexible-evening-221700045.html
Killexams : Brain MRI Data & Machine Learning Models Might Help In Diagnosing ADHD

Although Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common neurological conditions that affects children and adults, it is still widely misunderstood. ADHD symptoms are commonly misdiagnosed or remain undiagnosed — particularly among girls and women.

In a new study, researchers made a breakthrough by potentially finding a far more robust mechanism through which ADHD diagnosis via brain MRI scans might become a reality in the future. A team of three researchers at the Yale School of Medicine delved into the data from MRI tests that were conducted on 7,805 children based in the United States. They managed to identify biomarkers of ADHD by using that data as vital input for machine learning models that might potentially be able to diagnose the neurological condition.

The researchers used data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study that investigates brain development in the U.S. on a longterm basis. The children included in the study were between the ages of 9 to 12 years. The 7805 children included by Huang Lin, a post-graduate researcher at the Yale School of Medicine and colleagues underwent MRI scans, resting-state functional MRI, and diffusion tensor imaging. Out of this group of children, 1,798 were diagnosed with ADHD.

By using statistical analysis methods of this data, the researchers were able to delve into the association of ADHD with the children’s brain volume, white matter integrity, and surface area.

Compared to children who do no have ADHD, the team found that those who were diagnosed with ADHD have abnormal connectivity in the networks of the brain that are responsible for processing memory and auditory inputs. The brain scans of children with ADHD also revealed that their brain cortex was experiencing thinning and on a microstructural level, there were significant changes in the white matter of their brains’ frontal lobe.

“The frontal lobe is the area of the brain involved in governing impulsivity and attention or lack thereof—two of the leading symptoms of ADHD,” Lin said in a press release. He further added that this data was robust enough to be fed into machine learning models that might be able to diagnose children with ADHD.

“Our study underscores that ADHD is a neurological disorder with neuro-structural and functional manifestations in the brain, not just a purely externalized behavior syndrome,” Lin added in her statement. “At times when a clinical diagnosis is in doubt, objective brain MRI scans can help to clearly identify affected children.”

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 03:15:00 -0600 Anuradha Varanasi en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/anuradhavaranasi/2022/11/29/brain-mri-data--machine-learning-models-might-help-in-diagnosing-adhd/
Killexams : Ex-children's hospital doctor charged with sex crimes

RICHMOND, Va. -- A former medical director of a Virginia hospital that serves vulnerable children has been charged with four felony sex crimes in connection with abuse that authorities say happened at the facility years ago.

A grand jury indicted Dr. Daniel N. Davidow of Richmond, a former longtime medical director of the Cumberland Hospital for Children and Adolescents, last month, court records show. The records were unsealed Thursday, a local prosecutor announced Friday.

Robert F. Donnelly, an attorney for Davidow, told The Associated Press by email that “we are still learning details and facts, so we are not in a position to comment.”

The hospital, located in New Kent County, about half an hour east of the state capital, treats children and young adults with complex medical needs, including chronic illnesses, brain injuries and neurobehavioral disorders. An investigation into staff at the hospital by Virginia State Police has been ongoing since 2017. The facility is also facing civil lawsuits that say it operated without proper licensing and was “devoid of fundamental sanitation or humanity,” allegations the facility denies.

The lawsuits and other concerns from patients’ parents about the hospital, which have been highlighted by persistent reporting from Richmond TV station WTVR, have raised alarms at the highest levels of state government over at least two gubernatorial administrations.

In the civil lawsuits, more than three dozen former female patients allege Davidow sexually abused them during physical exams. In court documents and through an attorney, Davidow has previously denied those allegations.

Kevin Biniazan, an attorney representing the former patients in the civil case, said Friday he had confirmed the indictments were connected to allegations raised by two of his clients.

“The first thing that’s in my mind — and probably in the minds of all my clients — is that this was a long time coming,” he said. “And in many ways I hope that it provides the public and my clients a sense of validation. ... They’ve been doubted, and I think in many ways discouraged, from coming forward in many instances.”

Neither an attorney for the hospital nor representatives of its parent company immediately responded to an emailed inquiry from AP.

Corinne Geller, a Virginia State Police spokesperson, confirmed late Friday night that Davidow was in custody at a local jail and was being held without bond.

Davidow — who worked for the hospital as a full-time independent contractor, according to an attorney for the facility — faces two counts of aggravated sexual battery and two counts of object sexual penetration, all felonies.

Charging documents offer few additional details about the allegations, although they say both victims were children. The documents allege the abuse of one victim occurred from March 1, 2018, to April 30, 2018. The other child was abused from mid-October of 2017 to Dec. 1, 2017, the documents say.

T. Scott Renick, the commonwealth's attorney in New Kent County, said in a brief statement that the charges were brought in connection with “acts of sexual abuse and sexual assault that occurred” at the hospital. He said his office would have no further comment.

In the case of both of the sexual battery charges, the indictments say Davidow abused the victim through her “mental incapacity or physical helplessness.”

Renick's small office has been handling charging decisions in the Cumberland Hospital matter since Attorney General Jason Miyares handed it off earlier this year in a move than surprised some legal observers, given the nature and scope of the allegations.

Miyares' office had previously offered a procedural explanation for the change in course.

“We are grateful to the New Kent County Commonwealth Attorney’s office for finally seeking the justice that our clients deserve," Biniazan, the former patients' lawyer, said. “These indictments are a direct reflection of our clients’ bravery and their refusal to be silenced.”

Under the direction of the previous attorney general, Mark Herring, the office prosecuted two hospital staffers.

One, a 72-year-old psychotherapist, was charged with sexually abusing a patient and died by suicide the same day he was due in court for a plea hearing. The other, a behavioral technician, was sentenced in December to a year in prison after pleading no contest to an allegation that she intentionally burned a disabled child with scalding water.

Tue, 06 Dec 2022 08:01:00 -0600 en text/html https://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireStory/clarification-childrens-hospital-investigation-story-94621773
Killexams : Schoolcraft College, Trinity Health work to fill health worker shortage

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Thu, 08 Dec 2022 13:00:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/local/wayne-county/2022/12/09/schoolcraft-college-trinity-health-work-to-fill-health-worker-shortage/69706098007/
Killexams : ‘A generational approach.’ How a Manatee school offers much more than education

Nov. 30—Longtime teachers often say there's only so much they can do to help kids inside the classroom when there are struggles at home, but a growing program in Manatee County is making a difference in both.

Manatee Elementary in Bradenton has been transformed by a new Community Partnership School model that brings together nonprofits to offer not just academic help, but overall health and wellness options to kids and their families.

And this year, Daughtrey Elementary has joined the effort.

The main goal is to make it easier for Title I students, most of whom come from economically disadvantaged families, to keep their focus on education by offering critical services to students and their families on the school's campus.

Manatee Elementary, one of the oldest schools in Manatee County, serves 586 students from pre-K to fifth grade, and a majority living within walking distance.

Now instead of students missing school for a doctor's appointment or coming to class hungry, the partnership provides mental and physical health care on campus, as well as a food pantry.

Overcoming barriers

Designed by The Children's Home Society of Florida and the University of Central Florida, the model brings together five core partners in a long-term agreement to provide on-campus services.

At Manatee Elementary, those partners are the Children's Home Society of Florida, the School District of Manatee County, MCR Health, Manatee County Boys & Girls and the University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee.

They collaborate with the school to help students overcome learning barriers like poverty, food insecurity, a lack of affordable healthcare and mental health care. And they frequently bring in other community support to provide opportunities for students to succeed both inside and outside of the classroom.

"I don't look at this as helping one student at a time. It's a generational approach," said Renita Houston, Community Partnership School Director at Manatee Elementary. "It doesn't just stop with the students. We reach the whole family."

She attended the school when she was younger and wished the school had those services when she was there. Now, she's paying it forward and plans to make a lasting impact on students and their families.

Manatee Elementary has been operating under the learning model for the past three years thanks to grants and donors.

The model is partially financed by a $7.1 million dollar grant shared among 15 new community schools around Florida, as well as contributions from the Manatee Community Foundation and its donors.

The Conrad and Ruth Ann Szymanski Fund of the Manatee Community Foundation awarded a grant of $20,436 last year to support Manatee Elementary, and the Syzmanskis often volunteer their time at the school's food pantry.

Food on the table

Out of the 36 community partnership schools across Florida, Manatee Elementary is one of the few selected to have a food pantry on its campus.

The pantry is funded by United Way, and is stocked weekly with items from Feeding Tampa Bay.

It helps not just students and their families, but also the surrounding community. And rental assistance is also available for parents and community members.

Letitia Marshall of Bradenton often shops at the pantry and has a daughter who attends Manatee Elementary.

"Since you all first announced this program, I've been coming every week," Marshall told Feeding Tampa Bay in a video interview. "It provides food on my table, and I thank God for the canned food, poultry, vegetables and cereal."

Some of the school's parents don't have cars, so they can walk to the pantry, Graduation Enhancement Technician Vanessa Goldsmith told the Bradenton Herald.

"Some parents can't get to the grocery store, but we're here for their convenience to help fulfill their needs. It's just awesome," she said.

Goldsmith is raising a granddaughter who attends the school and sees the benefits from the partnership.

"When my granddaughter is sick, she's treated onsite at MCR (Health), and when she's old enough she'll go to the Boys & Girls club on campus," Goldsmith said. "It's convenient for myself and other parents. Parents have told me they appreciate that we have this program."

Health care access

The model also helps faculty at Manatee Elementary better cater to the needs of each student and allows them to shape a plan for academic success.

"One student could be performing low in academics and need expanded learning," said program director Renita Houston. "Another student could be performing above grade level but lacks health care."

Doctor visits were once the primary reasons students would miss time in the classroom.

"We want our students to stay in school so they can learn," Houston said. "Anytime a student is uprooted from the learning environment. It's disruptive to their learning focus."

Through the partnerships, Manatee Elementary has provided health care in vision, dental, behavior and overall wellness to students and community members.

As the school's graduation enhancement technician, Goldsmith is responsible for ensuring students are in attendance and she said she has seen a decrease in medical-related absences since MCR Health established two onsite clinics.

"If the student has a headache, toothache or stomachache, parents can still bring those students to school and treat them on campus," Goldsmith said. "It's a good thing because those would be excuses for why a child would be absent."

Keeping teachers

Keeping students in school can be challenging, while retaining teachers to teach is another struggle.

"Staff retention isn't the best at Title I schools," Houston said. "The idea is to get teachers in and develop them so they stay."

Houston believes the partnership with the University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee could create incentive opportunities for teachers to boost retention.

"We're working on a teacher leadership academy with USFSM," she said. "Teachers interested in getting their graduate degree in education can do it right from our campus."

The teacher leadership academy would pilot at Manatee Elementary and could extend out to other schools and teachers.

Houston is proud to bring the community partnership model to her former elementary school and make a lasting impact on the kids' futures. She's awarded six students college scholarships prepaid by Take Stock in Children because of an opportunity presented to the school through the partnership.

Most partnership schools offer:

— Onsite access to health and wellness services

— Onsite food pantries

— Counseling

— Leadership opportunities

— Cultural enrichment activities

— After-school activities

— Parent resource centers

This story was originally published November 30, 2022 5:50 AM.

(c)2022 The Bradenton Herald (Bradenton, Fla.) Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Wed, 30 Nov 2022 05:01:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/a-generational-approach-how-a-manatee-school-offers-much-more-than-education/ar-AA14JSiF
Killexams : Former medical director at Virginia children's hospital charged with sex crimes: "This was a long time coming"

A former medical director of a Virginia hospital that serves vulnerable children has been charged with four felony sex crimes in connection with abuse that authorities say happened at the facility years ago. A grand jury indicted Dr. Daniel N. Davidow of Richmond, a former longtime employee of the Cumberland Hospital for Children and Adolescents, last month, court records show. 

The records were unsealed Thursday, a local prosecutor announced Friday. Robert F. Donnelly, an attorney for Davidow, told The Associated Press by email that "we are still learning details and facts, so we are not in a position to comment."

Children's Hospital Investigation
This aerial image taken with a drone shows Cumberland Hospital for Children and Adolescents on Tuesday Sept. 20, 2022, in Richmond, Va.  Steve Helber / AP

The hospital, located in New Kent County, about half an hour east of the state capital, treats children and young adults with complex medical needs, including chronic illnesses, brain injuries and neurobehavioral disorders. An investigation into staff at the hospital by Virginia State Police has been ongoing since 2017. The facility is also facing civil lawsuits that say it operated without proper licensing and was "devoid of fundamental sanitation or humanity," allegations the facility denies.

The lawsuits and other concerns from patients' parents about the hospital, which have been highlighted by persistent reporting from CBS affiliate WTVR, have raised alarms at the highest levels of state government over at least two gubernatorial administrations.

In the civil lawsuits, more than three dozen former female patients allege Davidow sexually abused them during physical exams. In court documents and through an attorney, Davidow has previously denied those allegations.

One of the victims interviewed by WTVR, K.J., told the station she was relieved by the indictments.

"It felt like for the longest time he still kind of had this hold over me because of what he's done, and that's not there anymore," K.J. said about the indictments. "That will be fully gone when I can look at him and say 'I'm okay, I'm safe.'"

Kevin Biniazan, an attorney representing the former patients in the civil case, said Friday he had confirmed the indictments were connected to allegations raised by two of his clients.

"The first thing that's in my mind - and probably in the minds of all my clients - is that this was a long time coming," he said. "And in many ways I hope that it provides the public and my clients a sense of validation. ... They've been doubted, and I think in many ways discouraged, from coming forward in many instances."

Neither an attorney for the hospital nor representatives of its parent company immediately responded to an emailed inquiry from AP.

Corinne Geller, a Virginia State Police spokesperson, confirmed late Friday night that Davidow was in custody at a local jail and was being held without bond.

He faces two counts of aggravated sexual battery and two counts of object sexual penetration, all felonies.

Charging documents offer few additional details about the allegations, although they say both victims were children. The documents allege the abuse of one victim occurred from March 1, 2018, to April 30, 2018. The other child was abused from mid-October of 2017 to Dec. 1, 2017, the documents say.

T. Scott Renick, the commonwealth's attorney in New Kent County, said in a brief statement that the charges were brought in connection with "acts of sexual abuse and sexual assault that occurred" at the hospital. He said his office would have no further comment.

In the case of both of the sexual battery charges, the indictments say Davidow abused the victim through her "mental incapacity or physical helplessness."

Renick's small office has been handling charging decisions in the Cumberland Hospital matter since Attorney General Jason Miyares handed it off earlier this year in a move than surprised some legal observers, given the nature and scope of the allegations.

Miyares' office had previously offered a procedural explanation for the change in course.

"We are grateful to the New Kent County Commonwealth Attorney's office for finally seeking the justice that our clients deserve," Biniazan, the former patients' lawyer, said. "These indictments are a direct reflection of our clients' bravery and their refusal to be silenced."

Under the direction of the previous attorney general, Mark Herring, the office prosecuted two hospital staffers.

One, a 72-year-old psychotherapist, was charged with sexually abusing a patient and died by suicide the same day he was due in court for a plea hearing. The other, a behavioral technician, was sentenced in December to a year in prison after pleading no contest to an allegation that she intentionally burned a disabled child with scalding water.

In June, Dr. Alexis Aplasca, the chief clinical officer for the Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services told WTVR that Davidow should lose his license.

"Not only is it a law here in Virginia, hearing the stories in the investigations and the details, it is also a moral obligation to ensure that I can do what is in my ability to ensure that it doesn't continue," Aplasca said.

Sun, 04 Dec 2022 20:17:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.cbsnews.com/news/daniel-davidow-doctor-charged-sex-crimes-cumberland-hospital-for-children-and-adolescents-virginia/
Killexams : CCH launches Journey Program for high school seniors

A new program at the hospital will give incoming college students a hands-on learning and mentorship experience in three different health care tracks, while also paying for class tuition and fees.

The new Journey Program is now open for applications from seniors graduating in May 2023 who are interested in a career in health care. The program focuses on three different tracks, a registered nurse, respiratory therapist and a medical laboratory technician, said Lisa Coleman, manager of professional development and emergency preparedness at the hospital.

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Thu, 08 Dec 2022 03:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.gillettenewsrecord.com/news/local/article_631bbc44-1571-5821-8411-671852c2dcfc.html
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