Memorize DP-100 Cheatsheet before attempting real exam

killexams.com served legit, valid and up to date DP-100 Practice Test with Actual Exam Questions and Answers for new subjects of Microsoft DP-100 Exam. Practice our Real DP-100 Questions and Answers to enhance your knowledge and pass your DP-100 exam in first attempt. We are making sure that your success when you face DP-100 exam in actual exam.

Exam Code: DP-100 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
DP-100 Designing and Implementing a Data Science Solution on Azure

Set up an Azure Machine Learning workspace (30-35%)
Create an Azure Machine Learning workspace
• create an Azure Machine Learning workspace
• configure workspace settings
• manage a workspace by using Azure Machine Learning Studio
Manage data objects in an Azure Machine Learning workspace
• register and maintain data stores
• create and manage datasets
Manage experiment compute contexts
• create a compute instance
• determine appropriate compute specifications for a training workload
• create compute targets for experiments and training

Run experiments and train models (25-30%)
Create models by using Azure Machine Learning Designer
• create a training pipeline by using Designer
• ingest data in a Designer pipeline
• use Designer modules to define a pipeline data flow
• use custom code modules in Designer
Run training scripts in an Azure Machine Learning workspace
• create and run an experiment by using the Azure Machine Learning SDK
• consume data from a data store in an experiment by using the Azure Machine Learning
SDK
• consume data from a dataset in an experiment by using the Azure Machine Learning
SDK
• choose an estimator
Generate metrics from an experiment run
• log metrics from an experiment run
• retrieve and view experiment outputs
• use logs to troubleshoot experiment run errors
Automate the model training process
• create a pipeline by using the SDK
• pass data between steps in a pipeline
• run a pipeline
• monitor pipeline runs

Optimize and manage models (20-25%)
Use Automated ML to create optimal models
• use the Automated ML interface in Studio
• use Automated ML from the Azure ML SDK
• select scaling functions and pre-processing options
• determine algorithms to be searched
• define a primary metric
• get data for an Automated ML run
• retrieve the best model
Use Hyperdrive to rune hyperparameters
• select a sampling method
• define the search space
• define the primary metric
• define early termination options
• find the model that has optimal hyperparameter values
Use model explainers to interpret models
• select a model interpreter
• generate feature importance data
Manage models
• register a trained model
• monitor model history
• monitor data drift

Deploy and consume models (20-25%)
Create production compute targets
• consider security for deployed services
• evaluate compute options for deployment
Deploy a model as a service
• configure deployment settings
• consume a deployed service
• troubleshoot deployment container issues
Create a pipeline for batch inferencing
• publish a batch inferencing pipeline
• run a batch inferencing pipeline and obtain outputs
Publish a Designer pipeline as a web service
• create a target compute resource
• configure an Inference pipeline
• consume a deployed endpoint

Set up an Azure Machine Learning workspace (30-35%)
Create an Azure Machine Learning workspace
• create an Azure Machine Learning workspace
• configure workspace settings
• manage a workspace by using Azure Machine Learning sStudio
Manage data objects in an Azure Machine Learning workspace
• register and maintain data stores
• create and manage datasets
Manage experiment compute contexts
• create a compute instance
• determine appropriate compute specifications for a training workload
• create compute targets for experiments and training

Run experiments and train models (25-30%)
Create models by using Azure Machine Learning Designer
• create a training pipeline by using Azure Machine Learning Ddesigner
• ingest data in a Designer designer pipeline
• use Designer designer modules to define a pipeline data flow
• use custom code modules in Designer designer
Run training scripts in an Azure Machine Learning workspace
• create and run an experiment by using the Azure Machine Learning SDK
• consume data from a data store in an experiment by using the Azure Machine Learning
SDK
• consume data from a dataset in an experiment by using the Azure Machine Learning
SDK
• choose an estimator for a training experiment
Generate metrics from an experiment run
• log metrics from an experiment run
• retrieve and view experiment outputs
• use logs to troubleshoot experiment run errors
Automate the model training process
• create a pipeline by using the SDK
• pass data between steps in a pipeline
• run a pipeline
• monitor pipeline runs

Optimize and manage models (20-25%)
Use Automated ML to create optimal models
• use the Automated ML interface in Azure Machine Learning Studiostudio
• use Automated ML from the Azure Machine Learning SDK
• select scaling functions and pre-processing options
• determine algorithms to be searched
• define a primary metric
• get data for an Automated ML run
• retrieve the best model
Use Hyperdrive to rune tune hyperparameters
• select a sampling method
• define the search space
• define the primary metric
• define early termination options
• find the model that has optimal hyperparameter values
Use model explainers to interpret models
• select a model interpreter
• generate feature importance data
Manage models
• register a trained model
• monitor model history
• monitor data drift

Deploy and consume models (20-25%)
Create production compute targets
• consider security for deployed services
• evaluate compute options for deployment
Deploy a model as a service
• configure deployment settings
• consume a deployed service
• troubleshoot deployment container issues
Create a pipeline for batch inferencing
• publish a batch inferencing pipeline
• run a batch inferencing pipeline and obtain outputs
Publish a Designer designer pipeline as a web service
• create a target compute resource
• configure an Inference pipeline
• consume a deployed endpoint

Designing and Implementing a Data Science Solution on Azure
Microsoft Implementing availability
Killexams : Microsoft Implementing availability - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/DP-100 Search results Killexams : Microsoft Implementing availability - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/DP-100 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Microsoft Killexams : 43 Trillion Security Data Points Illuminate Our Most Pressing Threats

The "Microsoft Digital Defense Report" is a compilation of insights from 43 trillion daily security signals that provides organizations with a high-level picture of the threat landscape and current state of cybersecurity. This annual report aggregates security data from organizations and consumers across the cloud, endpoints, and the intelligent edge to help better predict what attackers will do next.

Keep practicing for a high-level overview of our findings, and click here to access the full report.

The State of Cybercrime

2022 saw a significant increase in indiscriminate phishing and credential theft to gain information for targeted ransomware, data exfiltration and extortion, and business email compromise attacks. Human-operated ransomware was the most prevalent type of ransomware attack observed, with one-third of targets successfully compromised and 5% ransomed. The evolving cybercrime-as-a-service (CaaS) economy is also a concern, as Microsoft blocked 2.75 million site registrations successfully to get ahead of criminal actors that planned to use them to engage in global cybercrime.

During ransomware recovery engagements, 93% of Microsoft investigations revealed insufficient privilege access and lateral movement controls. The most effective defense against ransomware includes multifactor authentication (MFA), frequent security patches, and zero-trust principles across network architecture.

The Nature of Nation-State Threats

Nation-state cyber threat groups have shifted from exploiting the software supply chain to exploiting the IT services supply chain. Oftentimes they target cloud solutions and managed services providers to reach downstream customers in government, policy, and critical infrastructure sectors.

Nation-state actors are also getting savvier, pursuing new and unique tactics to deliver attacks and evade detection in response to strengthened cybersecurity postures. Zero-day vulnerabilities are particularly key for initial exploitation. On average, it takes only 14 days for an exploit to become available in the wild after a vulnerability is publicly disclosed. These zero-day exploits are often discovered by other actors and reused broadly in a short period of time, leaving unpatched systems at risk.

Attacks on Devices and Infrastructure

Did you know that 68% of "Microsoft Digital Defense Report" respondents believe that adopting Internet of Things/operations technology (IoT/OT) is critical to their strategic digital transformation? Yet 60% of those same respondents recognize that IoT/OT security is one of the least secured aspects of their infrastructure. Attacks against remote management devices are on the rise, with more than 100 million attacks observed in May 2022 — a fivefold increase in the past year.

Accelerating digital transformation has increased the cybersecurity risk to critical infrastructure and cyber/physical systems. Likewise, growing IoT solutions have increased the number of attack vectors and the exposure risk of organizations. While policymakers are seeking to build trust in critical infrastructure cybersecurity through increased regulations, the public and private sector must collaborate to find a balance between compliance and truly effective cybersecurity practices.

Tackling Cyber Influence Operations

Democracy needs trustworthy information to flourish, yet we’ve observed a 900% year-over-year increase in the proliferation of deepfakes since 2019. AI-enabled media creation and manipulation make it easier than ever for cybercriminals to create highly realistic synthetic images, videos, audio, and text. This false content can then be optimized and disseminated to target audiences, challenging our collective understanding of the truth.

In response, governments, the private sector, and civil society must work together to increase transparency of these influence campaigns and to expose and disrupt their operations. We recommend implementing strong digital hygiene practices and considering ways to reduce any unintended enabling of cyber influence campaigns by your employees or your business practices. Business should support information literacy campaigns, civic engagement campaigns, and industry-specific counter-influence groups to help defend against propaganda and foreign influence.

The Path to Cyber Resilience

Nation-state actors have escalated their use of offensive cyber operations to destabilize governments and impact global trade operations. As these threats increase and evolve, it’s crucial to build cyber resilience into the fabric of the organization.

Basic security hygiene still protects against 98% of attacks, yet many threat actors succeed simply because these foundational security practices have not been followed. In fact, more than 90% of accounts that were compromised by password-based attacks did not have strong authentication practices in place. Organizations should enable MFA, apply zero-trust principles, implement modern anti-malware software, ensure all systems are kept up to date, and protect data by knowing where important information is located and whether the right systems are implemented.

Download the full "Microsoft Digital Defense Report" to better understand today’s cyber threat landscape. For even more details, check out our latest webinar, "Build Cyber Resilience by Leveraging Microsoft Experts' Digital Defense Learnings."

Explore more threat intelligence insights on Microsoft Security Insider.

Fri, 09 Dec 2022 02:36:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.darkreading.com/microsoft/43-trillion-security-data-points-illuminate-our-most-pressing-threats
Killexams : Where Microsoft’s open source policy went wrong

In 2001, then-Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer called Linux “a cancer that attaches itself in an intellectual property sense to everything it touches.” This comment was only one part of Microsoft’s anti open source campaign that began with Bill Gates’ 1976 letter, Open Letter to Hobbyists, which took aim at piracy in the hobbyist community.

Over the past decade, Microsoft has changed its tune on the open source community. It has sponsored open source conferences, hired open source developers, and emerged as one of the top contributors to the Linux kernel. Most recently, Microsoft announced, then postponed, a new Microsoft Store policy designed to prevent outside developers from monetizing previously free and open source software. While the policy would have helped curtail fraud, it also would have inadvertently prevented IP owners from profiting off their own work.

After receiving backlash from the open source community, Microsoft delayed enforcement of the policy to clarify its intentions. But whatever the new policy looks like, it must strike the right balance between upholding the freedoms that open source software is built on, while also protecting against piracy and fraud.

Good intentions

Microsoft’s heart is in the right place when it comes to repairing ties with the open source community. Fraud is common on app stores: Of the top 1,000 apps on Apple’s App Store, nearly 2% are scams that have finessed an estimated $48 million from customers. Microsoft’s policy would mitigate a specific type of fraud but would unfortunately also restrict how developers can monetize their open source software.

Setting restrictions on monetization is a delicate matter. Open source software thrives because of its versatility: Users can run, redistribute, and inspect applications without worry. Restrictions on that freedom set a dangerous precedent. Instead, Microsoft’s new policy should promote novel ways for developers to profit from their open source software.

Here are four monetization methods Microsoft could support that would allow open source developers to profit from their creations.

Copyright © 2022 IDG Communications, Inc.

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 21:16:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.infoworld.com/article/3680048/where-microsofts-open-source-policy-went-wrong.html
Killexams : Tech Layoffs in U.S. Send Foreign Workers Scrambling to Find New Jobs

“Not only are tech companies laying people off in unprecedented numbers, but they are also implementing hiring freezes,” she said, “and thus, there are likely few alternative jobs for immigrant workers.”

Mr. Jain, who lost his job at Microsoft in October, is among tens of thousands of Indian engineers who for years have been creating software at information technology companies like Cisco, social-media platforms like Meta and online retailers like Amazon. Because of their crucial role, and a dearth of American STEM graduates, many foreign workers are being sponsored by their employers for U.S. permanent residency.

While parked in the backlog waiting for approval, the immigrants have built lives in the United States: They have had American children, taken out mortgages and become rooted in their communities.

Most are on high-skilled worker visas known as H-1Bs. More than 500,000 people, are in the United States under the visas, the largest number hailing from India, followed by China, with the majority in science and technology fields.

Demand for such talent has soared as the U.S. economy has become increasingly reliant on technology. Between 2000 and 2019, the number of tech workers in the United States jumped by 44 percent, to 10.8 million from 7.5 million. For their programming, coding and other skills, many receive six-figure salaries.

As of 2019, foreign-born workers made up almost a quarter of all STEM workers in the country, up from about 16 percent in the year 2000, according to an analysis of census data by the American Immigration Council.

The visa holders are concentrated in California, home to Twitter, Meta and Apple, and in Washington state, home to Amazon, Microsoft, Zillow and Expedia. But they are also in states like Arkansas, toiling at the headquarters of Tyson, the poultry processor, to Excellerate production efficiencies, and at Walmart, to design systems for self-checkouts.

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 20:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.nytimes.com/2022/12/09/us/tech-immigrant-workers-visas.html
Killexams : Microsoft’s Distributed Application Framework Orleans Reaches Version 7

Microsoft Orleans, a .NET framework for building scalable distributed cloud applications, has been updated for .NET 7 and released as Orleans 7.0.0 on November 8th, 2022. The improvements in this release include better performance, simplified development dependencies, and a simplified identification schema for the grains, a unit of execution in Orleans.

Orleans started in 2010 as a project inside Microsoft Research around virtual actors, an abstraction over the actor model of computation. It was then used as the technology of choice for building the Microsoft Azure back-end for the popular game franchise Halo. The core technology behind Orleans was transferred to 343 Industries, a Microsoft Xbox Game Studios subsidiary, and it was made available as an open-source project on GitHub in 2015. Another actor-based programming framework, comparable to Orleans, is Akka.

In Orleans, the desired distributed functionality is modelled as a grain, an addressable unit of execution that can send and receive messages to other grains and maintain its own state if necessary. The grains are virtual actors, persisted to durable storage and activated in memory on demand, in the same sense as virtual memory is an abstraction over a computer's physical memory.

The grains had to inherit from the Grain base class in the previous versions of Orleans. Now the grains can be POCO objects. To get access to the code previously available only inside the Grain class, they can now implement the IGrainBase interface instead.

The Orleans runtime keeps track of the activation/deactivation and finding/invoking grains as necessary. It also keeps clusters of silos, the containers for the execution of grains. The communication with the Orleans runtime is done using the client library.

The last Orleans major version before 7.0 was version 3.0, released in 2019. The planned 4.0 release was later ported to .NET 7 and renamed to 7.0 to match the broader .NET 7 ecosystem launches.

Version 7.0.0 claims significant performance benefits over version 3, between 40% and 140%, across different machine configurations and scenarios. The Orleans source code includes a benchmarking application that Microsoft used to measure those improvements.

The development experience is improved by reducing the number of NuGet packages that are needed to be referenced, leaving three major rolled-up packages: one for the client projects, one for the server projects, and one for the abstractions and SDK. These packages then reference the needed individual Orleans packages. For comparison, NuGet lists 77 Orleans packages at the moment.

Another major improvement in Orleans 7.0.0 involves a simplified identification schema. In the previous version of Orleans, the grains could have a compound grain key. For example, one grain could use long data type as a key type while another grain could use a Guid with a string. It made the code calling the grains by their identifier cumbersome. In 7.0.0, the grains have an identity in the form of type/value where both type and value are strings.

The new identification schema and the new serialisation mechanism that is more version-tolerant are the reasons why Orleans 7.0.0 hosts won’t be able to coexist with Orleans 3.X hosts in the same cluster. Microsoft claims that the changes were needed to simplify and generalise some cumbersome aspects of Orleans and that the version jump to .NET 7 was the perfect opportunity to do those tough choices. The official recommendation is to deploy a new cluster and gradually decommission the old one.

For a deeper understanding of how an Orleans application looks like, there is a sample text adventure game on GitHub that is designed for scale and showcases how to model a game in Orleans and how to connect an external client (a game client) to the Orleans cluster. While most of Orleans samples are modelled around games, Orleans can be used for various distributed computation problems, from managing an IoT network of connected water heaters to removing the database as a bottleneck in calculations.

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 19:30:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.infoq.com/news/2022/12/orleans-dotnet-7/
Killexams : Microsoft’s Warning About How Hackers Are Bypassing MFA – What You Need to Know

How Hackers Are Bypassing MFA

With many companies shifting to multi-factor authentication (MFA) for verifying users, hackers have had to change their approach. Microsoft recently issued a warning that threat actors are gaining ground by adapting their techniques to bypass MFA protections. Luckily, the company has advice on how businesses can mitigate these attacks making things more difficult for remote workers.

The Rise of MFA

Five years ago, most companies still relied on password access to resources. That became a problem as hackers used various ways to access those credentials. Social engineering was particularly effective, especially if a bad actor managed to imitate a higher-up in the company to manipulate an unsuspecting employee into giving up valuable information.

Today, many users access work resources from a personal device like a cell phone or home PC. These unmanaged devices are a prime target for token theft, a method increasingly used by hackers. Because they typically have weaker security protections, cyber thieves can get what they need from untracked personal devices without being detected by corporate IT security.

Microsoft raised the alarm about token theft being used to bypass MFA because of how relatively easy it can be to do. You don’t need to be a master coder or purchase expensive hacking tools to initiate a bypass MFA attack. The methods are difficult to detect because most businesses aren’t actively looking out for the threat.

Top Bypass MFA Attack Methods

Adversary-in-the-middle (AiTM) frameworks and pass-the-cookie attacks are the leading methods employed by threat actors to get past MFA protections.

AiTM Frameworks

Similar to tools used to steal passwords in the past, hackers use AiTM frameworks to intercept tokens. A top example is Evilginx2, which inserts a false framework between an employee and a work application they’re trying to access. If successful, the bad actor can seize both a user’s credentials and the generated MFA token.

It’s bad enough if a hacker phishes a regular user. They can wreak a lot more havoc if they get hold of a token with Global Administration privilege. They can try and completely hijack an Azure AD tenant, resulting in loss of control and a compromised tenant.

Pass-the-Cookie Attacks

A pass-the-cookie attack compromises browser cookies to gain access to corporate resources. Cookies get created and stored for a session after getting authenticated by Azure AD in a browser. If a hacker can break into a personal device, they can steal that cookie and pass it to a different browser or system, easily bypassing company security checks.

More employees are working from home than ever, connected to company workspaces by a personal device. The lack of security protections on those devices makes them an ever-growing threat to an organization’s security posture. Many people use the same device to log in for work and to browse their social media profiles. If they’re signed into both at the same time, a cyber attacker could easily compromise tokens generated for both.

There’s a lot of malware available that malicious actors can use to hack browser cookies. A bad actor doesn’t need to know anything about a user’s email address or password. They only need the information held within the cookie.

Dealing With MFA Bypass Attacks

Below is an overview of what Microsoft believes organizations should do to protect themselves against the rise in MFA bypass attacks.

Increased Visibility

Microsoft recommends that organizations make inroads into gaining more visibility into how users authenticate themselves. Companies should know which devices are being used by employees to log into various resources. Incorporating compliance tools along with other device-based conditional policies makes it easier to track and update them through security patches, antivirus software, and endpoint detection and response (EDR) solutions.

Adherence to Security Baselines

Microsoft also recommends following its security baselines to lower the risk of an end-user’s device being compromised by an MFA bypass attack. Using conditional access policies and other controls can also lower instances of token theft.

  • Making session lifetime shorter forces users to authenticate themselves more frequently
  • Cutting down on how long a token remains viable forces hackers to make more token theft attempts, increasing their chance of getting caught
  • Using Microsoft Defender for Cloud apps to implement Conditional Access App Control offers protection against workers using unmanaged devices

Blocking of Initial Access

Companies should use phishing-resistant MFA solutions for added protection. The loss of convenience for users is worth boosting the security around Global Admin privileges and high-risk business applications.

Segregation of Privileged Users

It’s also a good idea to move users with advanced tenant privileges into a separate cloud-only identity. That’s the only space where they should be free to perform any administrative activities. Doing so reduces the attack services in case any on-premises services get compromised.

Because it may not be practical for organizational decision-makers to enforce strict controls over all devices and applications, the focus should be placed on protecting:

  • Users like Global Admins, Billing Admins, and Authentication Admins
  • Finance applications a hacker could use for financial gain
  • Applications containing a lot of personally identifiable information (PII)
  • Access to productivity cloud apps and Office 365 services like Teams and SharePoint

Detecting and Responding to Bypass MFA Attacks

Companies can flag suspicious token events using protections like Microsoft Defender for Cloud Apps and Azure Active Directory Identity Protection. Organizations should focus on tracking high-severity alerts and users who constantly trigger warnings.

After a token gets stolen, businesses can revoke refresh tokens and force users to reauthenticate themselves. Resetting user passwords is a critical part of the revocation process. Keep in mind that the compromised token doesn’t get invalidated immediately. They can remain functional for up to an hour, giving hackers enough time to do what they want with a user’s account.

Organizations should reinforce their security protections by setting alerts to review high-risk tenant modifications, including the creation of or changes to:

  • Security configurations
  • Exchange transport rules
  • Privileged users or roles

Protect Your Company Against Advanced Security Threats

Axiad Cloud portfolio helps organizations protect their users, machines, and interactions with a set of powerful products driven from a SaaS platform. Learn more about how we can help by scheduling a demo of our solution.

The post Microsoft’s Warning About How Hackers Are Bypassing MFA – What You Need to Know appeared first on Axiad.

*** This is a Security Bloggers Network syndicated blog from Blog - Axiad authored by Axiad Team. Read the original post at: https://www.axiad.com/blog/how-hackers-are-bypassing-mfa/

Tue, 06 Dec 2022 05:31:00 -0600 by Axiad Team on December 6, 2022 en-US text/html https://securityboulevard.com/2022/12/microsofts-warning-about-how-hackers-are-bypassing-mfa-what-you-need-to-know/ Killexams : Microsoft and ID@Azure just opened the floodgates for indie game devs with new credits null © Windows Central null
  • Microsoft announced a new way for independent game developers to gain access to powerful tools often used by larger studios.
  • Starting today, ID@Azure members can apply to be members of the Microsoft for Startups Founders Hub and receive benefits of both programs.
  • Microsoft's ID@Azure launched earlier this year and can be used to create games for consoles, PCs, and mobile devices.

Earlier this year, Microsoft launched ID@Azure, which is a program that helps independent game studios gain access to tools used by much larger gaming companies. ID@Azure can be used to develop games for consoles, PCs, and mobile devices and has been used by hundreds of developers since its launch, according to Microsoft. Today, it was announced that ID@Azure will join forces with the Microsoft for Startups Founders Hub to expand the resources available to game developers.

ID@Azure allows game developers to use PlayFab services for free (with limits). PlayFab is a backend platform for live games that lets developers implement and manage multiplayer features like in-game chat, leaderboards, and in-game currencies.

Similarly to ID@Azure, the Microsoft for Startups Founders Hub allows smaller organizations to use tools and benefits that are common among larger studios. Founders Hub members can use Visual Studio Enterprise, GitHub Enterprise, PowerBI Pro, and Microsoft 365, including Microsoft Teams.

Members of the Founders Hub also receive benefits from Microsoft partners, such as Miro and OpenAI.

Starting today, ID@Azure members can apply for the Founders Hub. Those that qualify will receive the benefits of both programs. They'll also get an additional $1,000 of Azure credits and potentially unlock up to $150,000 credits. The previous maximum was $5,000.

Microsoft highlighted a few titles that use ID@Azure and PlayFab services. Turbo Golf Racing and You Suck at Parking! made their way to Xbox Game Pass and Homeworld Mobile released on tablets and phones.

Wed, 07 Dec 2022 03:27:22 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/microsoft-and-id-at-azure-just-opened-the-floodgates-for-indie-game-devs-with-new-credits/ar-AA151HEy
Killexams : Microsoft Surface Pro 9 5G review null © Future / Lance Ulanoff null

Microsoft Surface Pro 9 5G: Two-minute review

You don't review a laptop such as the Microsoft Surface Pro 9 5G (or indeed any product) in a vacuum. You have to look at it from the perspective of what came before, what else is available in the market, your experience with the product, and, in our case, our long-time association with Surface gadgets.

This reviewer has been using Surface devices since Microsoft introduced them a decade ago. It's been a journey of mostly (but not always) incremental changes, many of which ensured that legacy users wouldn't be left behind. Even when Microsoft unveiled the mold-breaking Surface Pro X, it kept the OG Surface design chugging along with the Surface Pro 7.

That changed with last year's Surface Pro 8, which adopted the Pro X look for the Intel platform and was Microsoft's first USB-3-free Surface Pro device.

Microsoft's Surface Pro 9 5G takes the strategy a step further by applying the Pro brand to an ARM-based system while retiring the Pro X line. It also makes a further break with the past by dropping the 3.5mm headphone jack (a moment of silence, please).

In general, this is a winning formula. Microsoft has all but perfected the Surface Pro X design for a wider Pro-grade audience. It's thin and sturdy with an expansive screen that provides all the space and visual performance you need for productivity, creativity, and consumption (it's a nice Netflix screen).

As a 5G system, the Surface Pro 9 5G stands ready to keep you connected at home and on the go without the need for a Wi-Fi connection.

The ARM system brings some neural engine-based tricks you won't get with the Intel model, such as eye tracking, gaze correction, noise suppression, and better background blurs that can blur multiple people at once. It's all mostly trouble-free, but there were hiccups, including a complete collapse of our Adobe Creative Cloud Photoshop and too many Microsoft Edge crashes.

You will pay dearly for Microsoft's most road-ready Surface Pro. The Microsoft Surface Pro 9 5G starts at $1,299.99 and that's without the Surface Pro Signature Keyboard and Slim Pen 2, which we consider critical additions to the Surface Pro 5G package and that will add another $279.99 to the package.

Ultimately, there is a lot to love about the Microsoft Surface Pro 9 5G but inconsistent operation and an eye-popping price might keep it off of our Best Laptops list.

Microsoft Surface Pro 9 5G: Price and availability

  • How much does it cost? 
  • $1,299 / £1,299 Microsoft SQ3 5G Platinum, 8GB RAM, 128GB SSD
  • $1,399 Microsoft SQ3 5G Platinum, 8GB RAM, 256GB SSD
  • $1,599 / £1,599 / AU$2,599 Microsoft SQ3 5G Platinum, 16GB RAM, 256GB SSD
  • $1,899 Microsoft SQ3 5G Platinum, 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD
  • When is it out? It is available now
  • Where can you get it? Surface Pro 9 went on sale on October 25th in the US, Canada, and China, with additional markets to follow in the coming weeks. Check Microsoft.com for updates on local availability.

Microsoft's Surface line has never been what you might call an affordable option. That probably didn't matter much as Microsoft was leading the PC industry out of the wilderness to new design and market opportunities. Things are a bit different now, with many of the biggest names in PCs producing beautiful convertibles that either reflect or outdo what Microsoft has to offer. Plus, there's the cost-of-living crisis to consider. Who will be willing to splurge nearly $1,500 for a laptop?

The base Surface Pro 9 starts at $999 / £1,099 / AU$1,649 (without the Surface Pro Signature Keyboard and Slim Pen 2 - another $279). The Surface Pro 9 5G, which adds mobile connectivity and some cool neural-powered capabilities, starts at $1,299.99 / £1,299. In Australia, the Surface Pro 9 5G starts with more RAM (16GB, AU$2,599).

That's quite a premium for what may not be that much more utility. It really depends on how deeply you cherish constant connectivity and some AI capabilities. Plus, that has to be balanced with a subsystem that may or may not fully support your business-class software.

Microsoft Surface Pro 9 5G: Design

  • Lightweight aluminum casing
  • Smarter placement of buttons
  • Two high-speed USB-C ports
  • No 3.5mm headphone jack

For those who spent the better part of a decade using various Surface Pro devices, the Surface Pro 9 5G (and Surface Pro 8 before it) is a mix of mostly good news and a little bad.

The good news is that the 13-inch screen is significantly larger than that of, say, the Surface Pro 7, which measured 12.3 inches. However, the redesign of the Surface Pro series has resulted in a larger and slightly heavier device. 

Its 287mm x 209mmx 9.3mm aluminum (formerly magnesium) body is wider and thicker than the Surface Pro 7 (292mm x 201mm x 8.5mm). And, at 878g, it's 13 grams heavier.

None of this is particularly noticeable and we'd suggest the minor bulk increase is well worth it, considering the more expansive screen.

It's a similar design to the last model, with a kickstand that can smoothly rotate until it's almost flat against the upper half of the convertible. That smooth motion makes it easy to find a perfectly "lappable" position.

The differences between the Surface Pro 9 and Pro 9 5G chassis that we're testing are minimal, but worth nothing. Whereas the Intel model has actual vent holes in the uniform ventilation channel running around the body, the fanless SQ3 model only has the channel. While there was no indication of our system overheating, the back of the Surface Pro 9 5G did get noticeably warm to the touch during normal operation.

Microsoft has shuffled the buttons and ports a bit since the Surface Pro 8. There's no more 3.5mm headphone jack, which may bother some who invested in either affordable earbuds or more expensive over-the-ear headphones that still use the port.

The system's two USB ports have shifted from the same side as the Surface Connector power port to the opposite side of the unit, where they have the space to themselves. Microsoft smartly repositioned the power sleep button from the side back to the top of the Surface Pro 9 5G (a space it occupied on all previous Pros up to the Surface Pro 8) and next to the volume rocker button.

The other difference between the Surface Pro 9 and its 5G counterpart is the antenna cutouts, which are at roughly 1.5-inch intervals to enable mmWave 5G.

Even though the Microsoft Surface Pro 9 5G doesn't ship with the Surface Pro Signature Keyboard Cover and Slim Pen 2, we're reviewing them as a package. As such, we'll talk about the combined design of the tablet, keyboard, and pen here. As we noted above, the keyboard and pen combo list for $279 / approximately £294.28 / AU$386.95.

For us, the Signature Keyboard Cover is an indispensable companion for the Surface Pro 9 5G package.

At 10.75 inches wide, the keyboard is essentially full-sized and offers comfortable spacing between the keys plus 1.5mm of travel on a per-key basis for a satisfying type feel. The Alcantara cover makes for a comfortable palm rest and below the keys is a thumb-reachable and expansive 4-inch wide touchpad.

Microsoft re-engineered the type cover attachment system with the Surface Pro X to create a craftily hidden cubby for the Slim Pen 2. Instead of the pen using strong magnets to hug one side of the Surface Pro, this Pen has its own magnetized recharging bed that's hidden away when a half-inch of the type cover hugs the bottom of the Surface Pro 9 5G screen. The two components marry along the bottom edge of the Surface Pro 9 5G, which features a Surface Type Cover port.

To reveal the pen, we just pull the keyboard away from the screen and pluck out the Pen. It's always fully charged and ready to use with a pen-friendly display.

Overall, this is a more elegant and secure way to manage the pen.

Microsoft Surface Pro 9 5G: Cameras and Audio

  • Great camera for video conferencing
  • Unlock with your face
  • Good-enough rear camera
  • Great mics
  • Good audio

One thing Surface Pro devices have long excelled at is video conferencing, not least because they had 1080p-capable front-facing cameras long before the competition. This author often got complimented on the quality of his video feed on Surface Pro 6 and Surface Pro 7. The Surface Pro 9 5G is no exception.

The front-facing camera is still 1080p and does an even better job of making you a video call champ. On this SQ3-based model, the AI, if you enable Windows Studio Effects, keeps you in the frame by shooting wide then moving the frame around to keep you in the picture. It also makes your eyes appear as if they are still focused on the camera even when they're not, and offers better bokeh effects that can keep multiple people in the frame unblurred.

What's more, it's also supported by dual far-field microphones, which means no one will have any trouble hearing you, while the SQ3's neural engine brings special background noise-canceling capabilities.

Next to that camera is the Windows Hello camera, which we recommend setting up. It lets you unlock your computer with your face and is highly secure (it can't be fooled with a picture).

The rear of the device offers the same 10MP shooter as the last model. It creates decent if unexceptional images. It can also shoot 4K video, though we wonder how often people are shooting hand-held video with their Surface laptops.

There are also a pair of 2W Dolby Atmos-supporting stereo speakers that provide robust, clear sound. They're good for meeting audio. If you're not working, the speakers provide an excellent aural companion to any action-packed Netflix video.

Microsoft Surface Pro 9 5G: Display and Pen

  • Increasingly classic LCD screen
  • Good for touch and pen
  • 13-inch is the just-right size
  • An excellent, ergonomic pen

Even though Microsoft has yet to upgrade its PixelSense screen technology to OLED or MicroLED, the screen is undeniably one of the better mobile work and design displays in the business.

That's because, despite that lack of core tech change, this screen offers dynamic 120Hz and a high resolution of  2880 x 1920 (267 ppi), among other things. To put that in perspective, the mini-LED-based Liquid Retina XDR display found on the Apple iPad Pro 12.9, which is also capable of 120Hz, has a resolution of 2732 x 2048, and offers a slightly lower 264 ppi.

When it comes to brightness and contrast, the Surface Pro 9 5G doesn't compare favorably to the aforementioned iPad Pro 12.9. It has a max brightness of 450 nits (iPad Pro 12.9 has a max of 1,600 nits) and a contrast ratio of 1200:1 (iPad Pro 12.9 promises 1,000,000:1).

The relative lack of brightness means that the Surface Pro 9 5G might not be the best outdoor work companion, but at home and in the office, you probably won't notice that difference any more than you will the contrast ratio differences. Naturally, some of these specs might give creative professionals pause. Even so, drawing, editing, browsing, and working in production apps never suffered during our testing.

Of course, it also has the benefit of being both a touch- and pen-friendly screen.

We've long become accustomed to occasionally tapping the screen to select something on a Surface device and highly recommend picking up the Slim Pen 2 for both artistic and note-taking pursuits. 

Not only does it look as if black ink is flowing out of the tip of the beautifully designed Slim Pen 2 and onto the screen, but the latest Pen offers even more precise haptic feedback to make it feel as if you're scratching a pencil across real paper.

Aside from that haptic tweak, the Slim Pen 2 is no different than the one found on the Surface Pro 8, and that's fine with us. We like the drafting pen design, which is lightweight, comfortable to hold, and never slips from your grip.

Unlike an Apple Pencil 2, Microsoft's Slim Pen 2 makes use of both ends of the digital writing implement. There's the business side, which is as useful for drawing in Sketchable as it is for journaling in Journal, and then there's the eraser side, which is both a button and a digital eraser. There's also a button along the pen body that you can use to activate various features in a number of apps. In Sketchable, for instance, it can be used to quickly access the eye-dropper color picker.

Microsoft Surface Pro 9 5G: Windows 11

The news on Windows 11 running on the ARM-based SQ3 is mostly but not all good.

Microsoft's Surface Pro 9 5G is an excellent home for Windows 11, which is unsurprising considering that Microsoft designs both the platform and these computers. In general, it's a stable environment for the 37-year-old OS. However, there are some persistent reminders that Windows is not running on an Intel X86 platform.

During normal use, we encountered a number of bugs. Some were small (weird screen glitches) and others hampered our productivity. Microsoft's own Edge browser had a habit of crashing and wouldn't run smoothly until we rebooted our system. And, yes, we updated the OS.

More worrisome, though, was an Adobe Creative Cloud bug that is now preventing Adobe Photoshop CC 2023 from running on the Surface Pro 9 5G. When we looked up the bug on Google, we found that this was an issue first seen with the ARM-based Surface Pro X. It's disappointing that this issue has somehow carried over to Microsoft's latest SQ3-based Surface Pro 9.

Obviously, thin and light systems such as the Surface Pro might not be a creator's first choice and you may never personally run Adobe Photoshop on a Surface Pro 9 5G. However, we've been doing just that on Surface Pro devices for years, and think it's fair to expect that any system with the "Pro" name should be able to do so.

These are not deal breakers, as we were eventually able to stabilize Edge (it may have been a mid-review Edge update that did it) and there are other image editing options including Window's own Photos. Still, it's a reminder that this isn't your grandparents' Windows system with that trusty, always-compatible X86 underneath. Then again, ARM compatibility is a thousand times better than it was when Microsoft tried this with one of the earliest Surface systems and Windows RT

One benefit of having an ARM-based CPU is that you can easily run mobile apps on the desktop platform - you just have to choose from the Amazon App store's somewhat narrow list.

Microsoft has not given anyone a clear explanation for why we still can't get Google Play on its SQ3-based Surface. We have nothing against Amazon's App store, the same one you'll find on all its Fire Tablet devices, but it is not the full Android store. 

To access these Android Apps, you have to run the awkwardly-named Windows Subsystem for Android. Fortunately, that only needs one activation and, after that, you go direct to Amazon App Store for the Android apps.

The App store takes almost a full minute to launch and the list of apps is mostly of the Candy Crush variety, However, we did find a few that we liked, including Among Us, Hill Climb Racing 2, and Angry Birds 2.

Game performance ranges from just OK to good. We saw some stuttering and had a few issues with audio (as in, no audio at all).

We did eventually get our games running smoothly and especially enjoyed tearing around and completing tasks in Among Us.

For now, the ability to run Android apps on a Windows platform remains little more than a curiosity, but that is set to change as Google Play Games is finally coming to Windows 11. It was not ready in time for this review, though.

Microsoft Surface Pro 9 5G: Performance and Battery

  • Peppy
  • Good for most laptop-grade tasks
  • All-day battery life

Despite the lack of full support for some of the PC world's most powerful apps, this is generally a well-performing system that never makes you feel like you're carrying a phone in PC's clothing.

We had multiple apps and many browser tabs open while driving a second HD screen and never saw a performance issue.

Benchmark numbers, especially on Geekbench, fall nearly in line with Apple's best mobile silicon, the A16 Bionic. As expected, the ARM-based system was bested across virtually all benchmarks save battery – where the Surface pro 9 5G got almost an hour more Wi-Fi-based web surfing. Microsoft promises 19 hours. Anecdotally, we got almost 16 hours of battery life with mixed-use. As always, your battery mileage will vary depending on core use.

As the 5G in the name denotes, the Microsoft Surface Pro 9 5G is always ready to connect. We didn't get a pre-paid plan for it and had no opportunity to test out its 5G capabilities. That said, we used it with a variety of WiFi networks and tethered it to our 5G phones. In all cases, it performed well.

  • Performance and Battery: 4/ 5

If you put battery life and versatility at the top of your Windows 11 PC wishlist, there are few better-positioned systems than the Microsoft Surface Pro 9 5G. 

It's a tablet with phone-like battery life and a touch screen. It's a big-screen laptop with exquisite Slim Pen 2 compatibility. It's a productivity maven when you pay that extra $279 for the Surface Signature Keyboard and Slim Pen 2 combo. It's got at least 10 hours of battery life (and maybe a lot more if you manage it right) and is ready to connect to your nearest 5G network.

Microsoft Surface Pro 9 5G: Report card

Value Microsoft's Surface line has never been what you might call an affordable option. 3.5 / 5
Design For those who spent the better part of a decade using various Surface Pro devices, the Surface Pro 9 5G (and Surface Pro 8 before it) is a mix of mostly good news and a little bad. 4.5 / 5
Cameras and Audio One thing Surface Pro devices have long excelled at is video conferencing. They had 1080p-capable front-facing cameras long before the competition. This author often got complimented on the quality of his video feed on Surface Pro 6 and Surface Pro 7. The Surface Pro 9 5G is no exception. 4 / 5
Display and Pen Even though Microsoft has yet to upgrade its PixelSense screen technology to OLED or MicroLED, the screen is still undeniably one of the better mobile work and design displays in the business. 4/5
Performance and Battery Despite the lack of full support for some of the PC world's most powerful apps, this is generally a well-performing system that never makes you feel like you're carrying a phone in PC's clothing. 4/ 5
Windows 11 The news on Windows 11 running on the ARM-based SQ3 is mostly but not all good. 3.5/5
Total A thin and light that excels in battery life and versatility 4 / 5

Should you buy a Microsoft Surface Pro 9 5G?

Buy it if...

Don't buy it if...

Also consider

Mon, 05 Dec 2022 08:36:02 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/microsoft-surface-pro-9-5g-review/ar-AA13NMr9
Killexams : Microsoft's Certificate-Based Authentication Enables Phishing-Resistant MFA

Microsoft has removed a key obstacle facing organizations seeking to deploy phishing-resistant multifactor authentication (MFA) by enabling certificate-based authentication (CBA) in Azure Active Directory.

The release of CBA in Azure AD, announced during last month's Microsoft Ignite conference, promises to pave the way for large enterprises to migrate their on-premises AD implementations to the cloud. It's a move Microsoft is encouraging enterprises to take to protect their organizations against phishing attacks.

Further, last week Microsoft took the first step toward enabling phishing-resistant MFA on employee-owned iOS and Android devices without requiring IT to install user certificates. Specifically, Microsoft on Wednesday issued a preview release of Azure AD with CBA support on mobile devices using security keys from Yubico.

Meeting Federal Standards

CBA capability in Azure AD is immediately critical to federal government agencies, which face a March 2024 deadline to deploy phishing-resistant MFA in compliance with US President Joe Biden's 2021 Executive Order (14028) on Improving the Nation's Cybersecurity.

The executive order directs all federal government agencies and those the government does business with to move to zero-trust architecture (ZTA) security. Phishing-resistant MFA is a requirement detailed in the follow-on guidance, Memorandum MB-22-09, issued early this year by the US Office of Budget and Management (OMB).

OMB's memorandum specifies that all civilian and intelligence agencies implement cloud-based identity architectures resistant to phishing. That means eliminating legacy MFA solutions that attackers can compromise, including SMS and one-time password (OTP) based authentication susceptible to phishing attacks.

SMS phishing attacks, also called "smishing," are fraudulent text messages that appear legitimate, directing victims to enter personal information into a fake website. "Smishing has turned increasingly into a meaningful attack vector; I see it all the time," says Andrew Shikiar, executive director of the FIDO Alliance.

Beyond federal agencies and contractors, preventing phishing from MFA bypass attacks has become crucial to all enterprises. This year, MFA relay attacks have escalated; for example, in the August compromise of Twilio's broadly used MFA service, the attackers prompted unwitting users to share their Okta credentials.

Experts anticipate such attacks will rise next year. "I think social engineering and MFA bypass attacks will continue to grow in 2023, where some other major service providers suffer meaningful breaches like we did this year," Shikiar says.

Moving From ADFS to Azure AD

Microsoft emphasized that CBA in Azure AD is critical in paving the way for federal government agencies to comply with the president's executive order. CBA provides a migration path from on-premises Active Directory Federation Services (ADFS) to the cloud-based Azure AD.

Now that CBA is available in Azure AD, organizations can use the cloud-based version of Active Directory to require users to login directly from all Microsoft Office and Dynamics programs and some third-party apps, which will authenticate them with an organization's public key infrastructure (PKI) using X.509 certificates. The X.509 certificate renders applications resistant to phishing because each user and device has its unique certificate.

Until now, organizations choosing to implement CBA in the cloud had to use third-party authentication services to enforce certificate policies. "What Microsoft is doing is removing the hurdle of having to have a separate service, and between you and the cloud, they're supporting that natively," says Derek Hanson, VP of solutions architecture and standards at Yubico.

"This removes the last major blocker for those of you who want to move all of your identities to the cloud," said Joy Chik, president of Microsoft's identity and network access division, during a session at the company's Ignite conference.

Chik emphasized that connecting applications to Azure AD paves the way for retiring on-premises ADFS, which organizations typically use to enable PKI. However, most organizations have relied on ADFS for decades, and migrating to Azure AD is a complex move. Nevertheless, Chik said it is necessary. "ADFS has become a primary attack vector," she said.

Indeed, most enterprises that use X.509 for authentication rely on federated servers — and in most cases, that means ADFS. Doug Simmons, managing director and principal consulting analyst at TechVision Research, estimates that at least 80% to 90% of enterprises use ADFS.

"I really don't know of any organizations that are not using ADFS," Simmons says. Now that CBA is available in Azure AD, Simmons agrees that organizations will begin the process of migrating from ADFS. "I think they will likely make the migration within the next two years," he says.

Fulfilling the Government Mandates

During the past year, Chik said that Microsoft has added more than 20 capabilities to ensure that all the critical authentication capabilities in ADFS are available in Azure AD. 

"Certificate-based authentication is critical for customers in regulated industries," Chik said. "This includes US federal agencies, which must deploy phishing-resistant MFA to comply with the White House executive order on cybersecurity."

Simmons notes that enabling agencies to meet this mandate is critical for Microsoft to retain and expand government deployments, especially agencies that require authentication that complies with the FIPS 140 and FIDO2 standards.

"From what I understand, Microsoft needs Azure to stay ahead of the [federal government game] or risk being further overtaken by Google, AWS, and others," Simmons explains. "So this would be necessary to demonstrate said compliance and fully integrated support."

Earlier this year, Microsoft launched Entra, an identity and access management (IAM) platform anchored by Azure AD and using other tools, including Permissions Management, Tested ID, Workload Identities, and Identity Governance.

"With Entra, they are making a significant investment in multicloud administrative security," Simmons adds. "Multicloud is key because they realize the world doesn't end with Azure. In fact, most of their customers — and probably all of our customers — have the big three clouds in production. To better secure cross-cloud admin, they need to make strong authentication available to the privileged users, who can be developers and admins. Just supporting phone-based push MFA isn't enough for some organizations, especially when it comes to the US government and defense."

Bringing Azure AD CBA Support to Mobile Devices

Microsoft's release this week of the public preview of Azure AD CBA support on iOS and Android devices enables the use of certificates on hardware security keys, initially Yubico's YubiKey. Microsoft's director of identity security Alex Weinert announced the release in a brief blog post.

"With Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) on the rise, this feature will give you the ability to require phishing-resistant MFA on mobile without having to provision certificates on the user's mobile device," Weinert wrote.

Yubico, which led the development of the FIDO authentication standards, worked with Microsoft to enable its YubiKeys, the first FIPS-certified, phishing-resistant authenticator currently available for Azure AD on mobile. Ultimately, contractors and US Department of Defense personnel will be able to embed their DoD common access cards (CAC) and personal identity verification (PIV) cards into their mobile devices.

"CBA is currently the only form of phishing-resistant authentication within Azure that is supported on mobile devices, which is an important factor for an organization when deciding which scheme to adopt," said Yubico solutions architect Erik Parkkonen in a blog post

Besides taking some configuration steps within Azure AD and installing the Microsoft Authenticator app on Android or iOS/iPadOS, users must install the Yubico Authenticator app on mobile devices.

Users must then install their personal identity verification (PIV) credential independent of the Azure solution, Parkkonen noted. Further, administrators can deploy Microsoft's latest Conditional Access authentication strength policies to enforce CBA. Microsoft late last month released a preview of the new Conditional Access authentication strength capabilities.

Thu, 17 Nov 2022 23:57:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.darkreading.com/dr-tech/microsoft-certificate-based-authentication-enables-phishing-resistant-mfa
Killexams : DISA, Lumen to Implement Cloud-Based Phone System via Microsoft Teams App

The Defense Information Systems Agency and Lumen Technologies (NYSE: LUMN) are collaborating to launch a cloud-based telephony infrastructure in an effort to provide Department of Defense employees with virtual phone access via a Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT) business communication platform.

Lumen was awarded a $221 million contract to deploy and operate the DOD365 Integrated Phone System, which will be available through Microsoft Teams by the end of November, DISA said Wednesday.

Dialing into and out of meetings, making and receiving commercial calls as well as other audio-conferencing capabilities will be enabled by DIPS to modernize collaboration and communications among defense agencies and military services.

The DOD365-Joint tenant, which also includes the White House and combatant commands, will have access to the DIPS contract following compliance with DISA requirements.

“As we continue to evaluate what capabilities work and do not, we are taking strategic and decisive action to offer the department the best services and tools available to meet its mission,” said Christopher Barnhurst, deputy director of DISA.

Sun, 27 Nov 2022 10:00:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.govconwire.com/2022/11/disa-lumen-to-offer-virtual-phone-via-microsoft-teams-app/
DP-100 exam dump and training guide direct download
Training Exams List