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Killexams : GAQM Foundation student - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CTFL Search results Killexams : GAQM Foundation student - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CTFL https://killexams.com/exam_list/GAQM Killexams : Colleges Face More Pressure to Keep Students With Mental-Health Conditions Enrolled

A lawsuit filed last week against Yale University has reignited a debate about how colleges should best help students who are going through serious mental-health crises.

The complaint against Yale reflects a larger shift in which colleges are under increasing pressure — from the federal government, court rulings, advocacy groups, and students themselves — to accommodate students with mental-health conditions so they can stay enrolled while they receive treatment.

The new lawsuit centers on colleges’ withdrawal policies, which have been the subject of scrutiny by mental-health advocacy groups in exact years. The plaintiffs, two current students and a nonprofit that’s pushing for mental-health reform at the university, argue that Yale’s policies are punitive and violate the Americans with Disabilities Act by depriving students of access to an education.

The complaint recounts students’ “traumatic” experiences of being pushed out of college after disclosing symptoms of distress and facing barriers to reinstatement. (According to a joint filing on Wednesday, the lawsuit had been put on hold while the parties try to come to an agreement out of court.)

A similar lawsuit filed against Stanford University in 2018 resulted in a settlement and policy changes that were hailed as a model of student-centered, compassionate, and transparent practices. At Stanford, forced mental-health leaves are now supposed to be a last resort, and students can apply to stay in campus housing even if they do go on leave.

The Stanford and Yale lawsuits are part of a broader push in exact years to make campus mental-health policies more flexible and student-centered.

College officials say that involuntary leaves are rare, and that most students are accommodated and stay enrolled while they’re going through mental-health treatment. But in some severe cases, administrators say it’s best for students to pause their studies until they’re ready to return to campus. Drawing that line, however, is a challenge.

Colleges and universities need to explore all potential reasonable accommodations that might enable the student to safely remain on campus and meet the college’s academic standards without resorting to exclusion.

Mental-health advocates say colleges often don’t get it right. Colleges should — and are legally obligated to, the lawsuit against Yale argues — provide reasonable accommodations to students with mental-health diagnoses so they can continue their education. And if withdrawal is necessary, advocates stress that the process for a student to re-enroll should not present financial and academic roadblocks.

Monica Porter, the policy and legal advocacy attorney with the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, which is one of the law firms involved in suing Yale, said students and their families are becoming more aware of their rights for reasonable accommodations.

Part of the shift, too, is that mental health is becoming less stigmatized, said Asia Wong, director of counseling and health services at Loyola University New Orleans. For students, instead of feeling the need to hide their mental-health conditions, there’s been a shift to “this is an illness I’m living with, and I believe that it’s within my rights to be accommodated for that,” Wong said.

Exclusion as ‘Last Resort’

There has been renewed interest from the Biden administration’s Education and Justice Departments in protecting the legal rights of students with mental-health conditions, as well as from lawmakers.

Senator Ed Markey, Democrat of Massachusetts, sent a letter to the two departments last week, encouraging federal officials to scrutinize colleges’ use of involuntary leaves and issue guidance on the matter.

Federal investigations have forced several colleges to change their mental-health protocols. exact landmark settlements include Brown University’s from August 2021, which required the university to modify its leave of absence and readmission policies. It also required the school to pay more than $600,000 in damages to students who had been denied readmission.

In 2018, Northern Michigan University had to overhaul a policy that threatened to punish students if they discussed thoughts of self harm with their peers as part of a Justice Department settlement. And in 2016, the department reached an agreement with Princeton, requiring the university to communicate the accommodations available to students before going on leave.

“Before resorting to exclusion or putting a pause on a student’s formal relationship with the university, colleges and universities need to explore all potential reasonable accommodations that might enable the student to safely remain on campus and meet the college’s academic standards without resorting to exclusion,” Porter said. “Exclusion should be a last resort and only resorted to in extremely rare cases if no reasonable accommodation can be identified.”

Victor Schwartz, a psychiatrist and the senior associate dean for wellness and student life at the City University of New York School of Medicine, spent eight years as medical director of the Jed Foundation, a suicide-prevention organization, advising colleges on how to handle students who might pose a threat to their own or others’ safety.

As the mental-health landscape has changed, Schwartz said Yale’s policies have not followed the larger cultural shift toward becoming more transparent and student-friendly. He thinks that in the last 15 to 20 years, as advocacy around the issue has increased, more colleges are seeing the virtue in being as reasonably flexible as possible.

Still, “it’s a complicated balancing act,” he said.

Sometimes, it is in a student’s best interest to take a break from college, Schwartz said — especially if they can’t get access to the treatment they need on or around campus, or if they can’t keep up with their academic work. There are also rare instances where students pose a risk to the community. But there are other scenarios in which returning home would have a negative impact on a student, he said.

“Ideally, you need to be taking a holistic picture,” he said.

Finding That Balance

Wong, the counseling director at Loyola New Orleans, said the question of whether a student should take a leave of absence boils down to a key issue: Can the university reasonably accommodate the student? Or is the student better served by taking some time off?

“If the second case is the case, then the university should be working to make it as easy as possible for the student to return,” Wong said.

Schwartz thinks reinstatement policies like Yale’s — which was updated in the past year but previously required coursework, an interview, and letters of recommendation — were created in good faith. Colleges want to make sure that students are in a position to succeed in terms of their health and academics when they return to campus.

For many students, the loss of tuition dollars can end their higher-education opportunities.

But when the bar is too high, rigid policies have the unintended consequences of making students hesitant to take leave, and frightened about the implications of alerting their university when they are experiencing a crisis, Schwartz said.

“When students believe it’ll be costly and hinder their academic progress to leave school, or if there will be hurdles to coming back, they might not leave when they ought to,” he said. Ideally, there should be a flexible system of tuition reimbursement or making students aware of tuition insurance, he said. Because “for many students, the loss of tuition dollars can end their higher-education opportunities.”

The recommendations made by Elis for Rachael, the nonprofit involved in the lawsuit against Yale, include eliminating roadblocks to reinstatement and allowing for the possibility of continued access to campus health care, facilities, and housing while a student is on leave. Schwartz said allowing students on leave to access campus, versus barring them, is by and large a sensible approach and in line with what a lot of colleges are doing.

Ben Locke, chief clinical officer at Togetherall, a peer-to-peer forum for students that’s monitored by mental-health professionals, worked in counseling services at Pennsylvania State University for two decades. It’s a good thing, Locke said, that colleges are rethinking their mental-health policies to have more parity with general health leave, and eliminating some of the barriers to re-enrollment.

But he stressed that involuntary-leave policies exist for a reason. There are severe instances, he said, where keeping a student enrolled — or in student housing — poses a danger or disruption to other students and their learning.

“One of the huge challenges in reporting on and understanding these things is that due to confidentiality rules, you’re generally going to be missing the entire side of the story that holds much of the detail,” he said. “And that doesn’t mean that institutions haven’t done things wrong and should be held accountable, but it does mean we need to be really cautious about drawing very firm conclusions that institution has done X, Y or Z wrong, and we have no idea what actually happened with the student.”

He also said that calls for continuity of health care and housing for students on leave are contractually complicated.

“The school’s responsibility to a student who is no longer a student changes dramatically,” he said. “And I think that that really does complicate some of these requests.”

He added: “There has to be a line somewhere.”

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 11:04:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.chronicle.com/article/colleges-face-more-pressure-to-keep-students-with-mental-health-conditions-enrolled
Killexams : Applications available for foundation’s 2023 SCV scholarships

News release 

Nearly a quarter of a million dollars will be available to graduating seniors in the William S. Hart Union High School District this year from the Santa Clarita Valley Scholarship Foundation, and applications are now available. 

The foundation administers scholarships sponsored by local businesses, community organizations and individuals, as well as awards that are established in memory of, or to honor community leaders, educators, or alumni.   

The mission of the SCV Scholarship Foundation is to reward local students for exemplary high school accomplishment or financial need and to encourage students to seek higher education.  

“Our donors are very generous and really come through year after year for the students,” said Carol Rock, president of the foundation. “As our volunteers evaluate and select the right student for each award, we’re often moved to tears or inspired to do better by these future college students. We have some amazing kids in our community.” 

In 2022, a total of $245,995 was awarded to 143 graduating Hart district seniors. The foundation is on track to exceed that amount in donations this coming award season.  

To qualify for an award from the SCV Scholarship Foundation, students must complete an application, available at www.scvsf.org. They must meet all requirements and deadlines. 

Students must be residents of the Santa Clarita Valley and have attended 11th and 12th grades in the William S. Hart Union High School District, which includes Academy of the Canyons, Bowman, Canyon, Castaic, Golden Valley, Hart, Learning Post Academy, Saugus, Valencia, or West Ranch high schools. 

Students must be graduating with the class as indicated on their application form and be in full compliance with the district’s Student Rights and Responsibilities Summary. Students must have at least a 2.0 GPA and plan on continuing their education.  

In addition to the application, students must write an approximately 350-word essay addressing the writing prompt given on the application. If selected as an award recipient, students are expected to write a thank you/acknowledgement letter to their donor.  

Completed applications must be turned in to each student’s counselor no later than 3 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 20. For more information, visit www.scvsf.org

Wed, 30 Nov 2022 08:37:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/applications-available-for-foundations-2023-scv-scholarships/ar-AA14KQUM
Killexams : Mary Kay Ash Foundation Awards $1M in Domestic Violence Shelter Grants Across U.S.

The Mary Kay Ash Foundation announced today that it has awarded $1 million in domestic violence shelter grants across the U.S. The grants were awarded to 50 domestic violence shelters, which each received $20,000 grants.

The Texas grant recipient was Mosaic Family Services, located at 12225 Greenville Avenue in Dallas.

The foundation said it is committed to funding “the vital work of women’s shelters,” supporting women and children as they “seek refuge and relief on their journey to a life free of abuse.” Its annual shelter grant program helps to finance critical needs including emergency shelter, transitional housing, counseling, and legal aid.

“Even in 2022, we’re still seeing the escalating effects the COVID-19 pandemic has had on domestic violence around the country—and the world,” said Ryan Rogers, VP of the Mary Kay Ash Foundation board of directors and grandson of company founder Mary Kay Ash. “At The Mary Kay Ash Foundation, we believe in helping women Strengthen their circumstances and live their best lives. We’re honored that our contributions to shelters in each state will directly impact nearly 150,000 women.”

The foundation was established in 1996 with the overarching purpose of eliminating cancers affecting women. In 2000, the Foundation furthered its mission to include the prevention and elimination of domestic violence. To date, the foundation says it has awarded more than $92 million to women’s shelters and domestic violence service providers, as well as cancer research programs and related causes throughout the country.

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R E A D   N E X T

  • In this week’s roundup of hires, promotions, and accolades in North Texas, you’ll also find news from Allied Electronics & Automation, Cooksey Communications, Stream Data Centers, NexBank, McKissack & McKissack, Zirtue, and more.

  • The Dallas Foundation's 2022 Field of Interest grants aim to assist 51 organizations embracing a wide range of issues—including the arts, critical needs, children and families, animal welfare, and more. Here's the full list of recipients.

  • Ryan Rogers will become chief executive of the multibillion-dollar direct-selling beauty empire founded by Mary Kay Ash, who is noted as “one of the original glass ceiling breakers." Rogers, who is currently the company's chief investment officer will become CEO and president on Jan. 1. CEO David Holl has helmed the cosmetics company since 2006. He'll retire after nearly 30 years with Mary Kay and remain chairman of the board.

  • The T.D. Jakes Foundation, Dallas Mavericks, and Goldman Sachs announced the winners of its free, two-week immersive 'Hackathon' for kids aged 14 to 18. Six local high school students won for developing an app for people suffering from mental illness to get the help they need. The chairman of T.D. Jakes Foundation has today's "Last Word" on Dallas Innovates.

  • The Perot family’s support will expand the number of students admitted to UT Southwestern's dual-degree program as well as research disciplines in which they study, to include biomedical engineering, computational biology, bioinformatics, and data science. The funding will enhance the curriculum and experiences of Medical Scientist Training Program students and increase efforts to recruit students from elite U.S. colleges, including top international students who want to stay in the U.S. for their careers.

Fri, 09 Dec 2022 08:06:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://dallasinnovates.com/mary-kay-ash-foundation-awards-1m-in-domestic-violence-shelter-grants-across-u-s/
Killexams : ADM Scholarship Foundation announces November Students of the Month

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Mon, 28 Nov 2022 02:01:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/news/local/dallas-county/2022/11/28/adm-scholarship-foundation-announces-november-students-of-the-month/69681669007/
Killexams : Metallica foundation gives scholarships to local students

ST. LOUIS (KMOV) -- A heavy metal band is working to bring good-paying jobs to the St. Louis region.

A foundation set up by the band Metallica is providing scholarships for students at East Central College in Union, Missouri. Justin Medlock is in the welding program at the college.

“Welding was just a creative process I really wanted to do,” Medlock said.

The program will increase his skills and potential earning power. A scholarship from Metallica will help pay for it.

“I’m not sure what I would have done without the Metallica scholarship,” he said. “It helped me out quite a bit.”

So far, 27 students at East Central College have received scholarships as part of a $100,000 award to the school from a foundation set up by the band. The students receiving money from it are called “Metallica scholars.”

Herman Hueffmeier always wanted to go back to school and start a new career but couldn’t afford it. The scholarship helped with buying tools and a computer.

“It relieved the stress,” Hueffmeier said. “It took a lot of stress off my shoulders so I could concentrate on my schooling.”

Hueffmeier is studying heating and cooling at the school. East Central is the only college in Missouri to receive a grant from Metallica’s foundation.

The scholarships are also helping to break gender barriers.

“I never considered a job in machining or manufacturing before,” Jessica Brown said.

Brown faced financial barriers as well. She is a single mom in her 30s.

“I don’t need that debt and it held me back,” she said. “And through this scholarship, I’ll graduate debt free.”

More than $40,000 is still available in Metallica scholarships for the spring semester.

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 09:34:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.kfvs12.com/2022/11/30/metallica-foundation-gives-scholarships-local-students/
Killexams : Boston College Alumni Establish "Friends of the Heights" Foundation to Provide BC Student-Athletes with NIL Opportunities and Support Charities

Student-athletes receive compensation through partnerships with community nonprofit organizations

BOSTON, Dec. 2, 2022 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ -- Boston College alumni and friends establish Friends of the Heights Fund (FHF), a foundation with a mission to service the Name, Image, and Likeness (NIL) needs of Boston College student-athletes through partnerships with community nonprofit organizations. FHF has partnered with Heading Home, which assists the homeless in Boston, and The Pete Frates Family Foundation, which helps families impacted by the cost of ALS care. Additionally, FHF has also partnered with Team Impact, a foundation that matches children facing serious illness and disability with college sports teams.

Student-athletes that participate in the program select a community-oriented charitable organization to donate their time, name, image, and likeness. The charity receives the benefit of the student athlete's time and/or use of the student-athlete's image. In exchange, the student-athlete receives a stipend funded by donations from individuals and/or organizations.

FHF is independent of Boston College, as the University is prohibited from arranging third-party compensation for student-athletes and their NIL contracts.

Scott Mutryn, a former Boston College quarterback, serves on the FHF Board of Directors.

"It is crucial that Boston College and our student-athletes maximize the potential for NIL partnerships and support our community nonprofits through service-oriented work," said Mutryn. "The only way that we can ensure our athletes are supported is through donations to Friends of the Heights."

FHF has formed an Advisory Council of thoughtful former Boston College student-athletes, coaches, and leaders to help provide guidance to the Board of Directors. The founding members of the Advisory Council are:

  • Jerry York, former Boston College men's ice hockey coach and the winningest coach in NCAA history
  • Charlotte North, former Boston College women's lacrosse player who holds the NCAA career goals record.

FHF is responsible for receiving donor contributions, managing payments to student-athletes, maintaining the fund's tax-exempt status, and reporting to donors. To date, FHF has received at least $500,000 in founding donations and commitments.

For more information on the foundation or to make a monetary contribution to the program, visit https://www.friendsoftheheights.org/.

Media Contact

Kellie McCrory, MCA Group, 1 2146540402, kellie@mcaprgroup.com

 

SOURCE Friends of the Heights Fund

© 2022 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

Fri, 02 Dec 2022 05:04:00 -0600 text/html https://www.benzinga.com/pressreleases/22/12/n29944111/boston-college-alumni-establish-friends-of-the-heights-foundation-to-provide-bc-student-athletes-w
Killexams : Metallica foundation gives scholarships to local students

ST. LOUIS (KMOV) -- A heavy metal band is working to bring good-paying jobs to the St. Louis region.

A foundation set up by the band Metallica is providing scholarships for students at East Central College in Union, Missouri. Justin Medlock is in the welding program at the college.

“Welding was just a creative process I really wanted to do,” Medlock said.

The program will increase his skills and potential earning power. A scholarship from Metallica will help pay for it.

“I’m not sure what I would have done without the Metallica scholarship,” he said. “It helped me out quite a bit.”

So far, 27 students at East Central College have received scholarships as part of a $100,000 award to the school from a foundation set up by the band. The students receiving money from it are called “Metallica scholars.”

Herman Hueffmeier always wanted to go back to school and start a new career but couldn’t afford it. The scholarship helped with buying tools and a computer.

“It relieved the stress,” Hueffmeier said. “It took a lot of stress off my shoulders so I could concentrate on my schooling.”

Hueffmeier is studying heating and cooling at the school. East Central is the only college in Missouri to receive a grant from Metallica’s foundation.

The scholarships are also helping to break gender barriers.

“I never considered a job in machining or manufacturing before,” Jessica Brown said.

Brown faced financial barriers as well. She is a single mom in her 30s.

“I don’t need that debt and it held me back,” she said. “And through this scholarship, I’ll graduate debt free.”

More than $40,000 is still available in Metallica scholarships for the spring semester.

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 05:34:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.kmov.com/2022/11/30/metallica-foundation-gives-scholarships-local-students/
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