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Killexams : Medical Professional test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CPM Search results Killexams : Medical Professional test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CPM https://killexams.com/exam_list/Medical Killexams : Why a medical test may be required for life insurance Many life insurance companies will want the results of a medical  test before approving your application. / Credit: Getty Images © Provided by CBS News Many life insurance companies will want the results of a medical test before approving your application. / Credit: Getty Images

Life insurance provides a financial safety net for you and your loved ones in the event of your death. By making a payment to the insurance company each month, depending on your billing schedule, you can ensure that your beneficiaries will receive compensation. 

While putting a life insurance policy into place (and maintaining it) is relatively simple, there are some important steps you will need to take to finalize the plan. For example, a medical examination may be required. While not always mandatory, many insurance companies will want to have the results of an test reviewed before signing off on your plan. 

If you're currently in the market for life insurance, or just want to increase the coverage you already have, now is a good time to do so. You can start by getting a quote today.

It's important to understand how to prepare properly to obtain the life insurance policy you desire. Read on to learn more.

Why are life insurance medical exams required?

Medical exams are conducted by life insurance companies to ensure they have a clear picture of who they're insuring (and for how much). It's easy to lie or exaggerate about your health and well-being when applying for a policy. But the company won't just take your word for it and let you pay lower premiums. They'll want to confirm your health status. This will likely be done in two ways:

  • A questionnaire (online or paper): This is where you will answer some basic questions including your age, height, sex, weight, etc. You'll be asked if you smoke or previously did. You'll likely be asked about your alcohol consumption, if you're on any medicine and if you have any allergies. Be honest when answering, because the company will determine the truth when they complete the in-person medical exam.
  • Physical exam: This is done at no cost to the applicant. It's completed either in an office or the insurance company can send a medical professional representative to your home to complete it. If you've had your annual wellness visit with your primary care physician then you already know what to expect. You will have to step on a scale to check your weight. They'll check your blood pressure. They'll ask additional questions not addressed in the questionnaire. You'll also need to provide blood and urine samples. It should be relatively quick (think under 30 minutes).

You likely won't get immediate approval or rejection on the spot. The results of the test need to be returned to the insurance company for that to happen.

If you're ready to start a new policy or want to supplement the life insurance you already have, speak to a provider and get a price estimate.

Can I get a life insurance policy without a medical exam?

If you don't want to take a medical test to get life insurance, you don't necessarily need to. Some providers may not require a medical test in exchange for a life insurance policy. You can explore those right now and expedite the approval process

Here are some common reasons why you may not have to get a medical test for life insurance:

  • You're young: If you're under 30 and healthy. 
  • You want basic coverage: If you're not seeking a particularly high amount of coverage you may not have to take an exam. 
  • Someone else is insuring you: This would be applicable when being added to a relative's supplemental life insurance.

It's important to note that these guidelines don't apply across providers. The necessity of a medical test is specific to all of the above factors - and the provider you are submitting an application with. 

The insurance you would get without submitting to an test is different than the traditional types you may receive should you agree to the standard vetting process. That doesn't mean one type is better than the other, but it's something to be aware of.

No-exam life insurance policies, for instance, are popular if you fall into one or more of the above categories. This type of coverage is guaranteed and is easier to finalize since you're not taking an exam. 

Despite its benefits, this insurance type also has some drawbacks. 

For example, the death benefit may be limited. It also may come with higher monthly premiums than other, more traditional insurance types. This is because the insurer has no real record of your medical history or health status and is therefore taking on additional risk by approving you for coverage. 

When determining whether a medical test is needed - and what kind of protection you can apply for - it's best to speak to a provider directly who can assist you and answer any questions you may have. 

Factors that affect life insurance rates

If you're well then a medical test can help ensure that you pay a low rate for life insurance coverage. Conversely, if you're unhealthy the test will demonstrate this, likely leading to a more substantial cost. But your performance on a medical exam, should you choose to take one, is only one factor that affects life insurance rates. Here are a few others to know:

  • Age: The younger you are, the less you'll typically have to pay. As you age, the rate will rise.
  • Gender: It may seem unfair for one sex to pay more but, statistically, women live longer than men. Since men often (but not always) die at an earlier age than women, they can expect to pay more for their life insurance coverage.
  • Policy type: The type of life insurance you choose (and are eligible for) will influence your rate. Term life insurance is generally cheaper but whole life insurance policies have cash options that may be appealing to you, depending on your circumstances and goals.

Speak with a life insurance expert today who can help you find the right plan for you. 

Mon, 28 Nov 2022 06:54:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/why-a-medical-exam-may-be-required-for-life-insurance/ar-AA11SuNB
Killexams : Medical professionals see a rise in flu tests and positive cases

We all know this season brings in cold weather and the flu but this winter season the number of flu cases has medical professionals noticing an increase.

It may be more cases or just more people getting tested than previous years.

It’s cold, it may rain, or it may snow but it is definitely flu season and those in the medical field say the numbers are higher this season than in the past.

Dr. Anne O’keefe the Vice Chair of Public Health at the Creighton School of Medicine said they are seeing very high rates of influenza, COVID 19 and RSV and all of these are happening at the same time. 

She said the three illnesses are unpredictable even though the flu comes every year, and it has its peak points, but they’re still learning about COVID. 

She also said because more people are interacting with each other, and less people are wearing masks the viruses are spreading more quickly.

"The only ones that we absolutely know about are people who get laboratory test that we’ve got those numbers are the highest we’ve had in a long time. There may also be a lot of other people that are sick with influenza that they're not sick enough to see the doctor," said Dr. O’keefe.

Dr. O’keefe said they may be having more cases because more people are getting tested.

Something those at the Douglas County Health Department agree with and also suggest.

"RSV, influenza and COVID have very similar symptoms and so in order to have the best knowledge of how to potentially treat influenza or COVID because they are antivirals the only way to know if you have COVID or influenza and not another condition like RSV is to get tested. If you’re tested earlier, it is potential your healthcare provider might provide antivirals that can help prevent the severity of illness or hospitalization," said Chad Wetzel, Interim Supervisor of Epidemiology, DCHD.

There are several places you can get tested for either virus and Chad Wetzel the Interim Supervisor of Epidemiology for DCHD said take your pick.

"Testing can be done at local providers healthcare faculties, hospitals, pharmacies with quick care clinics and some local health departments also provide testing," said Wetzel. 

DCHD doesn’t provide flu testing, but they do offer free at home COVID testing kits.

If you do notice coughing, sore throat, headache, body aches or fever make sure to get tested for all three so you can get the right medication.

The experts said these viruses are passed through coughs and sneezes.

To lower your chances of getting sick make sure to wash your hands, cover your mouths and wear a mask if needed.

There are vaccines for COVID and influenza.

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 16:33:26 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/medical-professionals-see-a-rise-in-flu-tests-and-positive-cases/ar-AA154ELo
Killexams : What to know about testing for depression and anger

There are various self-report measures to assess depression that doctors may use to diagnose someone. While there are no diagnostic criteria for anger, tests can evaluate anger emotions and possible contexts where they are more likely to occur.

This article looks at depression and anger tests and how to interpret their results. It also explores depression and anger, their symptoms, diagnoses, and treatments.

The severity and frequency of depressive symptoms vary from person to person. Some will experience only a few symptoms, while others will experience many.

Below are the symptoms of depression:

  • depressed mood
  • reduction in interest or pleasure (anhedonia)
  • sleep disturbances
  • guilt feelings or thoughts of worthlessness
  • fatigue or energy changes
  • problems concentrating
  • weight changes
  • suicidal thoughts
  • slowing or increase in physical movements

Anger can happen as a result of an internal or external event and denotes the body’s fight-or-flight response.

Anger is not a mental disorder. However, it may affect how a person behaves and feels physically and mentally.

Physical symptoms include:

  • chest tightness
  • rapid heartbeat
  • tense muscles
  • stomach-churning
  • feeling hot
  • sweaty hands, which usually denotes anxiety

A person will also have mental symptoms:

  • nervousness or tension
  • inability to relax
  • irritability
  • humiliation
  • resentment

An angry person may also present with behavior changes, including:

  • shouting
  • sulking
  • ignoring people
  • breaking things
  • starting fights
  • self-harming

There are many diagnostic tools to assess depression and some tools do exist to assess anger.

Based on the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition, text revision (DSM-5-TR), a person must have five or more symptoms listed above within 2 weeks to receive a diagnosis of depression.

At least one of those 5 or more symptoms must be depressed mood or anhedonia for a person to receive a depression diagnosis.

Physicians and mental health clinicians consider psychological self-report tests diagnostic tools.

On the other hand, DSM-5-TR does not classify anger as a mental disorder. For this reason, there are no diagnostic criteria for anger issues.

Although it is a key criterion in several mental health conditions, including:

Feeling angry is not always a sign of a mental health condition. However, doctors may associate it with certain types of disorders. A person can speak with a doctor to help determine the underlying cause.

The Patient Health Questionnaire is an example of an assessment a physician or psychologist may use in their clinic may help diagnose depression.

These statements cover how often the following statements have bothered the person over the last 2 weeks.

Each answer has a corresponding point between zero to three.

A mental health professional will be the one to use this type of test and will interpret the results with a person. A person must consult a psychologist or medical professional to determine their score and diagnosis.

A person should not use this test to diagnose depression. However, a high score may indicate that a person may be at risk of harming themselves.

Regardless of their score, a person who thinks they need help or mental health support may call 911, call or text 988, or go to 988lifeline.org.

Learn more about mental health services available.

At present, there are no specific diagnostic criteria for anger. Doctors will determine if a person is experiencing other mental health disorders based on their symptoms and behaviors.

However, the American Psychiatry Association offers a test as a resource. While not yet widely used, it is a reputable measure of anger.

For adults, the DSM-5-TR Level 2 cross-cutting questionnaire lists symptoms an adult may have felt during the past 7 days.

For children between 11–17, the DSM-5-TR Level 2 cross-cutting questionnaire lists symptoms a child may have felt during the past 7 days.

Each answer has a corresponding point between 1–5 for both tests.

People must consult a mental health professional or psychologist to determine their or a child’s score and diagnosis.

A person should not use this test to diagnose anger. Regardless of the score, a person who thinks they need help with their anger or mental health support may call 911, call or text 988, or go to 988lifeline.org.

The American Psychological Association offers several tips to help manage anger:

  • relaxation tools such as imagery and breathing exercises
  • cognitive restructuring
  • better planning and problem-solving
  • use of humor to defuse rage
  • practice better communication
  • change in one’s immediate surroundings
  • schedule the timing of talks

Psychologists and licensed mental health professionals can help people develop techniques and strategies to help change their thinking and behavior. They may also help a person build assertiveness during difficult situations.

Learn more about controlling anger.

Self-report measures exist to assess depression so doctors can provide a person with a diagnosis. While there are no specific diagnostic criteria for anger, doctors use certain tests to evaluate anger and possible contexts where it may be more likely to occur.

It is essential for people experiencing depressive or anger symptoms to consult a mental health professional or psychologist.

Mon, 28 Nov 2022 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/depression-and-anger-test
Killexams : 6 Things We Learned at IMSA’s Mandatory GTP Test at Daytona By Jonathan Ingram of Autoweek | Slide 1 of 7: It wasn't the Roar Before the Rolex 24, but it was the next best thing as race teams representing Acura, BMW, Cadillac and Porsche participated in a mandatory two-day IMSA test this week at Daytona International Speedway. The event marked the last time all the cars will be in one place before the Roar Before the 24 testing, Jan. 20-22.The season, and IMSA's new GTP era kicks off for real with the Rolex 24 at Daytona, Jan. 28-29 at Daytona.Here's some of the highlights from the December test days:

It wasn't the Roar Before the Rolex 24, but it was the next best thing as race teams representing Acura, BMW, Cadillac and Porsche participated in a mandatory two-day IMSA test this week at Daytona International Speedway. The event marked the last time all the cars will be in one place before the Roar Before the 24 testing, Jan. 20-22.

The season, and IMSA's new GTP era kicks off for real with the Rolex 24 at Daytona, Jan. 28-29 at Daytona.

Here's some of the highlights from the December test days:

© IMSA
Fri, 09 Dec 2022 02:28:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/sports/more-sports/6-things-we-learned-at-imsa-s-mandatory-gtp-test-at-daytona/ss-AA156jUq
Killexams : Medical professionals detail 2-year-old Dante Mullinix's injuries

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Wed, 07 Dec 2022 07:02:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.yorkdispatch.com/story/news/crime/2022/12/07/medical-professionals-detail-2-year-old-dante-mullinixs-injuries/69709780007/
Killexams : Announcer for Atlanta Hawks suffers apparent medical emergency during on-air segment, video shows © Provided by The Hill

(NEXSTAR) – The longtime announcer for the Atlanta Hawks appeared to suffer an on-air medical episode before Monday night’s game against the Oklahoma City Thunder.

Bob Rathbun, a broadcaster for the Bally Sports network and the play-by-play announcer for the Hawks since the mid-90s, was discussing Monday’s matchup with former Hawks star Dominique Wilkins when he appeared to fall back in his chair and begin convulsing, as seen in an on-air clip shared widely on Twitter.

Wilkins, also a color commentator on Bally Sports, stopped mid-sentence upon seeing his colleague, the clip shows. The camera then cut away from Rathbun and Wilkins to a shot of the court at Atlanta’s State Farm Arena.

Off-screen, a voice could also be heard saying, “Oh, my god!” right after the cutaway, according to one video shared on YouTube.

Bally Sports South issued a statement shortly after the incident, confirming Rathbun was transported to a nearby hospital.

“Prior to tonight’s game against Oklahoma City Thunder, play-by-play announcer Bob Rathbun briefly lost consciousness on the court,” the network wrote. “Emergency medical professionals on-site treated Rathbun for dehydration. He is stable, responsive and heading to Emory Midtown for further evaluation.”

On Tuesday, Bally Sports shared an update on Rathbun’s condition.

“Bally Sports play-by-play broadcaster for the Atlanta Hawks, Bob Rathbun, stayed in Emory Midtown Hospital in Atlanta overnight for observation and further tests. As of this morning, all tests were very favorable and Bob is in great spirits,” Bally Sports wrote in an emailed statement obtained by Nexstar.

“Upon completion of remaining tests, Bob plans to be released from the hospital later today. Bob’s health is of the utmost concern to Bally Sports and the Atlanta Hawks and he will return to the broadcast booth only after he is well rested and fully recovered.”

Rathbun, 68, has been the “voice” of the Atlanta Hawks since 1996, Sports Illustrated reported. He is also an author and motivational speaker, according to his official website.

The Thunder, meanwhile, beat the Hawks 121-114 on Monday night, rallying from a 14-point deficit to overtake Atlanta in the third quarter, Nexstar’s KFOR reported.

The Hawks are next scheduled to play the Knicks on Wednesday.

For the latest news, weather, sports, and streaming video, head to The Hill.

Tue, 06 Dec 2022 03:23:04 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/sports/more-sports/announcer-for-atlanta-hawks-suffers-apparent-medical-emergency-during-on-air-segment-video-shows/ar-AA14YzgX
Killexams : Best No-Exam Life Insurance Of December 2022

We scored companies based on these measurements:

Price (50% of score): We averaged the no-exam life insurance rates for males and females in excellent health at ages 30, 40 and 50 for $500,000 and $1 million and a term length of 20 years.

Maximum face amount for lowest eligible age (10% of score): Companies with higher no-exam life insurance coverage amounts for the lowest age earned more points. Note that maximum no-exam coverage can sometimes become lower if you apply at a higher age.

Age eligible for best length/amount (10% of score): Companies offering no-exam life insurance to folks over age 50 earned extra points.

Accelerated death benefit available (10% of score): This important feature lets you access part of your own death benefit in the event you develop a terminal illness

Option to convert to a permanent life insurance policy (10% of score): This is a good option to have in place if you decide you want a longer policy, especially if your health has declined and you don’t want to shop for new life insurance.

Guaranteed renewals (5% of score): This option lets you extend the coverage after your initial level term period has expired, such as at the end of 10, 20 or 30 years.

Renewal rates can be significantly higher, but renewing can provide extended coverage to someone who may no longer qualify for a new life insurance policy because of health.

Median time from application to approval (5% of score): We gave more points to companies with lower no-exam life insurance approval times.

The timeline for approval could be within seconds or a month, depending on the company and possibly even your health.

Sources: Bestow, Ethos, Fabric, Haven Life, Jenny Life, Ladder, Policygenius and Forbes Advisor research.

Looking For Life Insurance?

Compare Policies With Leading Life Insurance Companies

Mon, 05 Dec 2022 20:26:00 -0600 Ashlee Tilford en-US text/html https://www.forbes.com/advisor/life-insurance/best-no-exam-life-insurance/
Killexams : Senator Tammy Duckworth tests positive for COVID-19 No result found, try new keyword!Democratic Sen. Tammy Duckworth of Illinois will work in isolation through the end of this week after being diagnosed with COVID-19. Fri, 09 Dec 2022 00:00:00 -0600 text/html https://www.sacbee.com/news/article269750596.html Killexams : Medical professionals: Flu/RSV cases surging in northcentral region

FILE - A flu vaccine is readied at the L.A. Care and Blue Shield of California Promise Health Plans' Community Resource Center where they were offering members and the public free flu and COVID-19 vaccines Friday, Oct. 28, 2022, in Lynwood, Calif. On Friday, Dec. 2, 2022, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said that 7.5% of outpatient medical visits the previous week were due to flu-like illnesses. That's as high as the peak of the 2017-18 flu season and higher than any season since. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill, File)

The surge of cases of seasonal influenza across the country are mirrored in the rates locally with numbers “probably the highest we have ever seen in a decade at this time of year,” according to Dr. Rutul Dalal, infectious disease specialist at UPMC Williamsport.

“They are definitely going up and, at noon yesterday, we had 202 influenza positive cases…the outpatient test results for influenza A and B are pretty high,” he said in an interview with the Sun-Gazette on Tuesday.

Geisinger health system, headquartered at Danville, is also seeing a surge in cases in children.

“In general there is an overall significant viral respiratory surge and there are fewer pediatric inpatient beds nationwide. Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, there’s been a 15 to 20% reduction in pediatric hospital beds nationwide. So the capacity right now for pediatric hospital beds is very limited,” said Dr. Dana Smith, D.O., pediatrician at Geisinger Lewisburg-Pediatrics.

“Our children’s hospital in Danville and our inpatient facility at Geisinger, Wyoming Valley, two places where we have inpatient beds for pediatrics have been at or near capacity since probably the end of October,” said Mike McMullen, communications specialist, at Geisinger.

“So what that means is, as we check kids out or discharge a child, we have other kids checking in but that’s starting to slow down a little bit on the RSV side, but it’s picking up on the flu side,” he said.

The annual winter flu season usually doesn’t get going until December or January, but this one began early and has been complicated by the simultaneous spread of other viruses, according to an Associated Press story.

Meanwhile, 44 states reported high or very high flu activity last week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday. In the week of Nov. 13, the local hospital system had 23 cases and the next week that had almost doubled to 44, he noted.

In addition to influenza, cases of RSV or respiratory syncytial virus are also rising. Dalal said that the hospital is seeing about 40 to 45 patients positive for RSV on almost a weekly basis.

Usually most cases of influenza and RSV can be treated at home, but parents should watch for certain signs before taking the child with suspected RSV for emergency care and possible hospitalization.

The illness can be more severe in premature and very young infants who might have trouble clearing their mucus secretions due to the airway being smaller, Smith explained

“Parents and guardians should be watching for labored breathing. If the child is bobbing their head to breathe or if their chest is sucking into their ribs when trying to inhale and then watching for dehydration so decreased wet diapers, less production of tears and saliva and feel too sick to eat or drink,” she said

“Flu is a little bit different. Flu is an infection of the respiratory tract. It still spreads easily from person to person. Symptoms are fever, chills, headache, muscle aches, dizziness, decreased appetite, fatigue, cough, runny stuffy nose, sore throat, nausea, weakness and diarrhea,” Smith said.

Most kids will get better with supportive care at home. The treatment for the flu is pushing fluids, drinking lots of fluids, resting.

Dalal listed additional symptoms that might require a visit to the ER. Nasal flaring, which means the child is trying hard to take a deep breath; nail beds that are getting blue; more rigorous abdominal movements when breathing in or a wheeze; and an unbreaking fever.

“These are the signs one needs to watch for before rushing your kid to the ER,” he said.

Although RSV is usually associated with very young children, it is deadly for the elderly.

“Elderly, immunocompromised individuals, as well as people who have an advanced age can definitely have bad outcomes,” Dalal said.

“Anyone who is 75 and above has a very high risk of dying from it, which means that we should not only be looking out for our younger individuals, but also in the elderly,” he said.

Citing the death rates from RSV for older people 65 and above, especially those immunocompromised, Dalal said that group is five times more likely to die from RSV compared to a child who is two years and younger.

The incidence rate, though, for the pediatric population is much higher than in the elderly.

Symptoms of the flu include fever, chills, cough, shortness of breath and body aches. Dalal said a person should seek emergency care if they show signs of a persistent desaturation or a lowering of the oxygen saturation or a fever that won’t go down. Otherwise they should treat themselves at home and consult a primary care doctor.

To prevent getting infected with the flu or RSV, both doctors suggest practicing good hygiene habits, such as washing your hands, wearing a mask, staying home from school or work if you are sick and social distancing, if possible.

With children, wipe down toys if they play with other children, particularly as Christmas is coming and families gather. Although there is no vaccine for RSV, vaccinations for influenza can be given to children six months and up.

Adding to the double whammy from these diseases this year is the fact that COVID cases are still rising. Both doctors noted that children over six months are also eligible for COVID vaccinations.

The dominant flu strain so far is the kind typically associated with higher rates of hospitalizations and deaths, particularly in people 65 and older, according to the AP story.

Nationwide, the CDC estimates there have been at least 78,000 hospitalizations and 4,500 deaths from flu so far this season. The deaths include at least 14 children, according to statistics reported by the AP.

Today's breaking news and more in your inbox

Wed, 07 Dec 2022 17:34:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.sungazette.com/news/top-news/2022/12/medical-professionals-flu-rsv-cases-surging-in-northcentral-region/
Killexams : Where to Get an HIV Test, and How Often You Should Get Tested

Getting diagnosed today with HIV, or human immunodeficiency virus, does not mean the same thing as it did years ago. Current treatments mean that someone who tests positive for HIV can live a lengthy life, be largely asymptomatic and may keep the virus so undetectable that they won't pass it on to a sexual partner. 

Dec. 1 is World AIDS Day, a date marked by the World Health Organization to refocus the commitment on ending AIDS as a global public health threat by 2030. Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome develops in people who have had an undetected or untreated HIV infection, usually for years. Certain populations have less access to testing and to the medication that controls HIV and prevents AIDS than others living in the US. 

If you've been through a typical sex ed class, you've probably heard that learning your HIV status is a good idea, regardless of individual factors that influence your risk of contracting it. But has any information changed since you were last in school? Here's what we know now about HIV tests, and where you can get one.

Who needs an HIV test? How often should I get one?

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that all people get at least one HIV test during their lifetime. However, many people are recommended to test more often. How often you might benefit from a test is personal and depends on several factors, including your sexual history or identity, what drugs you use and more. Here are some more specific recommendations: 

If you're a man who has sex with men and you're not in a monogamous relationship where the two of you already know your status: You should get an HIV test at least once a year. Some sexually active gay or bisexual men might benefit from testing more often, like once every three or six months. 

Like many viruses, HIV has a disproportionate effect on certain populations. Gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men have the highest risk of contracting HIV in the US, making up about 68% of new diagnoses in 2020. Black and Hispanic men are at higher risk.

If you've had more than one sexual partner since your last HIV test, the CDC recommends getting another one. You can get it at the same time as your test for other sexually transmitted infections, like chlamydia. Similarly, though kind of in reverse, if you've been diagnosed with another STI, you should also get a test for HIV. 

If you've tested positive for mpox (formally monkeypox), you might also consider getting an HIV test. About half (52%) of people confirmed to have had mpox so far around the world are living with HIV, according to the WHO. Also, the CDC recommends an HIV test for people who've tested positive for hepatitis or tuberculosis.

If you've exchanged drug equipment with another person, such as needles, syringes or cookers, you should get an HIV test. If you share drug equipment regularly, you should test for HIV at least once a year.

If you've exchanged sex for things like money, you should get an HIV test. If you do so regularly, you should get tested at least once a year (possibly every three months, for example). 

If you've had sex with a person who's been recommended a test based on the above criteria, or you don't know their sexual history, you should get an HIV test. 

If you're pregnant, your doctor will also probably recommend an HIV test early in your pregnancy. It's possible to be HIV-positive and supply birth to a child who's HIV-negative. But if someone starts treatment early in their pregnancy and they follow certain guidelines, they have a 99% chance of not passing HIV onto their baby, according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

You should also test if you had anal or vaginal sex with someone who has HIV. More information on timing recommendations if you suspect you were exposed are below.

A person gets their finger pricked for an HIV test

You can get an HIV test a few different ways, and they're all pretty quick.

Alex Levine/Getty Images

Where to get an HIV test 

HIV tests can be antibody, antigen/antibody tests or NAT (lab-based) tests. Most rapid HIV tests are antibody tests, which means they work by detecting antibodies your body produces if you have HIV, either through blood or a swab of the cheek.

Health clinics like Planned Parenthood offer HIV testing. You can also check in with your local health department, as smaller clinics often offer discounted or even free testing if you're worried you can't afford one.

If you'd rather test at home, you also have options. OraQuick is an at-home HIV testing kit that you can buy online for $39, and it requires a swab of your cheek — no blood involved. In 20 minutes, you'll get your results. 

There are other testing options, including mail-in HIV tests. Pharmacies such as CVS sell HIV tests, sometimes in kits that test for other STIs as well. Another home test option is Everywell's HIV test. 

HIV tests are generally accurate if you follow the test instructions, but if you get a positive result, follow up with your doctor to confirm the result and get next steps for treatment. If you test positive at your doctor's office or in a clinic, your health care provider might run a second test to confirm.

When to take a test if you think you were exposed to HIV 

In people who develop HIV, the infection can take a while to show up on a test. According to Planned Parenthood, it usually takes about three months since you were exposed for your body to build up enough antibodies to turn a test positive, so you might get a false negative if you take a home test before then. 

As soon as 10 days after an HIV exposure, you might test positive on a nucleic acid test (NAT), but even these lab-based tests can take up to 33 days post-exposure to be accurate, according to the CDC. 

If you have an exposure and take a negative test, get tested again as soon as the "window period" of whatever test you're using is over. For antibody tests, this means testing again after 90 days have gone by. For NAT tests, this means waiting 33 days. See the CDC's window period for different HIV tests here.

If you test positive for HIV: Take a deep breath. You are not alone, and there are medications available to you today that will keep the virus under control and possibly to a level where you become undetectable, which means your body is on top of the virus and you have effectively no chance of spreading it to a sex partner. According to the CDC, most people can get an undetectable viral load within six months of starting medication if they take it daily and as prescribed. 

Find a list of a few support groups for others with a positive HIV diagnosis here

The information contained in this article is for educational and informational purposes only and is not intended as health or medical advice. Always consult a physician or other qualified health provider regarding any questions you may have about a medical condition or health objectives.

Thu, 01 Dec 2022 10:40:00 -0600 See full bio en text/html https://www.cnet.com/health/medical/where-to-get-an-hiv-test-and-how-often-you-should-get-tested/
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