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CFE Investigation Certified Fraud Examiner
ACFE Investigation test plan
Killexams : ACFE Investigation test plan - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CFE-INVESTIGATIONS Search results Killexams : ACFE Investigation test plan - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CFE-INVESTIGATIONS https://killexams.com/exam_list/ACFE Killexams : The Association of Certified Fraud Examiners and The Institute of Internal Auditors Announce Education Partnership

The partnership will elevate competency for fraud investigators and auditors.

AUSTIN, Texas, Nov. 30, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- The Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE) – the world's largest organization of anti-fraud professionals – today announced a new partnership with The Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA) that will see both organizations collaborate on education initiatives that will serve the interests of both global memberships in fraud investigation and auditing.

Anti-fraud professionals and internal auditors both strive to protect the organizations they serve and, though the primary focus is different, the opportunities to collaborate are vast. ACFE and IIA members often have similar interests and perspectives on fraud investigation and auditing – in fact, some practitioners are members of both organizations – and this partnership is a natural evolution that will allow both organizations to formalize and recognize this shared interest.

"This partnership brings the power of fraud auditing, detection, and fraud investigation together in order to help businesses and organizations deal head-on with the risks and challenges of fraud," said Brad Monterio, Executive Vice President of Member Competency & Learning at The IIA. "With increasingly complex technologies comes potential for fraud – this partnership will help both professions learn how to audit and investigate for fraud within these complex technology environments, including cryptocurrency, blockchain, non-fungible tokens (NFTs), robotic process automation (RPA), and others."

"Audit and anti-fraud professionals must intentionally seek out new information and best practices to ensure they stay one step ahead of bad actors," said Andi McNeal, Vice President of Education for the ACFE. "This partnership brings the necessary resources and conversations to the forefront so that everyone charged with protecting organizations against fraud—whether in audit or in another anti-fraud role—is able to effectively carry out those responsibilities."

The partnership launches today with a series of webcasts, called "Fraud Perspectives," which will cover important fraud-related topics. Each webcast in the series will feature a CIA-credentialed fraud auditor and a CFE-credentialed fraud investigator, who will offer their unique perspectives on timely, relevant topics.

The first webcast in the series will be offered today from 12:00 p.m.–1:15 p.m. ET and is free for ACFE and IIA members. Six paid webcasts will follow in 2023.

  • January 11, 2023 – "Fraud Perspectives: Blockchain, Crypto, and KYC"

  • March 15, 2023 – "Fraud Perspectives: Virtual Remote Work Forever"

  • May 10, 2023 – "Fraud Perspectives: Nonfungible Tokens"

  • July 19, 2023 – "Fraud Perspectives: Deepfake Technologies"

  • September 13, 2023 – "Fraud Perspectives: ESG and Regulatory Reporting"

  • November 15, 2023 – "Fraud Perspectives: The Metaverse"

Although the partnership will start with collaboratively developed education, the ACFE and IIA will be exploring additional opportunities to work together, including joint research projects, impactful thought leadership, and working together on conference and event programs.

About The Association of Certified Fraud Examiners

Founded in 1988 by Dr. Joseph T. Wells, CFE, CPA, the ACFE is the world's largest anti-fraud organization. Together with more than 90,000 members, the ACFE works to reduce business fraud worldwide and inspire public confidence in the integrity and objectivity within the profession. For more information, visit ACFE.com.

About The Institute of Internal Auditors

The Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA) is a nonprofit international professional association that serves more than 218,000 global members and has awarded 180,000 Certified Internal Auditor (CIA) certifications worldwide. Established in 1941, The IIA is recognized throughout the world as the internal audit profession's leader in standards, certification, education, research, and technical guidance. For more information, visit theiia.org.

Media Contacts:

Stefanie Hallgren
The Association of Certified Fraud Examiners 
SHallgren@ACFE.com 
+1-512-276-8167

Chris Almonte
The Institute of Internal Auditors 
Chris.Almonte@theiia.org 
+1-407-937-1349

Cision

View original content:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/the-association-of-certified-fraud-examiners-and-the-institute-of-internal-auditors-announce-education-partnership-301689669.html

SOURCE Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 22:30:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/now/association-certified-fraud-examiners-institute-123000058.html
Killexams : Investigation launched into nursing test results after more than half fail

An investigation has been launched into why more than half of those who took the Quebec nursing licence test earlier this year failed it, even as the province is struggling with a nursing shortage.

The commissioner for admissions to professions, André Gariépy, will take a look at the results of the exam, his office said in a news release on Monday evening. 

Nursing students have told CBC Montreal that the exam, which is mandatory to obtain a nursing licence in Quebec, didn't reflect what they had been studying in school. 

The nurses' order, known by its French acronym the OIIQ, said 54.6 per cent of students failed the licensing test written at the end of September. For those who took the test for the first time, the failure rate was 48.6 per cent — the highest rate recorded in four years. 

Since 2018, the success rate for first-time test-takers has generally ranged from 71 to 96 per cent. 

Gariépy's office said media coverage and a exact deluge of complaints prompted the investigation. The commissioner, who oversees admissions to professional orders (including nurses) in the province, received 27 complaints about the test in exact days. 

The investigation will focus on the "various concerns that have been raised about the test itself and the status of the candidates." 

The commissioner encouraged nursing candidates who failed the September test to sign up to rewrite it in March. They should also "review the feedback provided on individual performance at the September session," the commissioner wrote, and "review the guides and materials and participate in information activities to prepare for the exam."

Meanwhile, the OIIQ says it won't change its standards. 

The nursing order issued a news release on Tuesday saying its test was not different from past years and it was developed by a panel of experts from clinical and university settings.

"Additional resources" would be put in place to support students, the order said. 

"However, relaxing the criteria is not being considered from a public protection perspective," it added. "Instead, we will focus on targeted support to enable all candidates to pass the test in future rounds."

Nursing candidates have three attempts to pass the exam. The OIIQ said all candidates who failed the September test received a response detailing why they failed and that there were online tools available to pass it, including a guide and preparatory workshops. 

"We are confident that a return to in-person teaching, as well as support for students, will be a factor in success," said Luc Mathieu, the president of the OIIQ. 

In a previous interview with CBC Montreal, Chantal Lemay, a spokesperson for the order, blamed the pandemic's effects on the students' learning environment for the poor test performances.

Chantal Lemay is the spokesperson for the Quebec Order of Nurses. (Radio-Canada)

Joseph Oujeil, a nursing professor at CÉGEP du Vieux Montréal and CÉGEP André-Laurendeau, said he was surprised so many of his students failed the exam. 

He said the failure rate was not normal and comes at a terrible time, as Quebec faces a nursing shortage.

"I think the average results need to be looked at," Oujeil said, suggesting the order make the passing grade 50 per cent instead of the usual 55 per cent.

He said students told him the test "doesn't reflect the real reality of what we're teaching them in school or during their studies and it also doesn't reflect what they've seen in their clinical training."

Anyone with information about the test or the status of those who took it can communicate confidentially with the commissioner by emailing commissaire@opq.gouv.qc.ca

Sat, 19 Nov 2022 19:23:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/nursing-exam-invesigation-1.6651983
Killexams : A DOL ESG Investigation Story


Todd Kading, co-founder and chief executive officer of LeafHouse Financial in Austin, Texas, says that even before environmental, social and governance investing was big news in the industry, he felt there would be a market for it among his clients. “Because it was so big in Europe,” he explains. “I especially thought there would be an interest from nonprofits and younger retirement investors.”

Kading says he never liked the exclusionary investment practices of what were once called “socially responsible investing,” but he felt that “E,” “S” and “G” were good mechanisms to judge whether an entity he? invested in had long-term sustainability.

So, his firm set out to develop an ESG evaluation tool. “Going back to the [Department of Labor’s] 2018 guidance, it said to do all of your ‘normal’ investment research, and if an investment passes that and it passes ESG screenings as well, then it is ok to select that investment,” he notes. “So, we went with that.”

The result was “LIST,” which stands for LeafHouse Investment Sustainability Technology. “We got the word out that we are a third-party fiduciary offering an ESG-centric product for all plan sponsors that are interested,” Kading says.

He explains that the technology uses LeafHouse’s normal GPA—or Grade Point Average—screening. Then investment experts determine whether the investments are appropriate quantitatively and qualitatively. Finally, ESG factors are considered. Investments must pass all three processes to be selected.

Then the DOL took a new stance. Near the end of Donald Trump’s presidency, it published a final rule that said retirement plan sponsors should only consider “pecuniary,” or performance-related, factors when selecting investments for their investment lineup, rather than expressly limiting the use of ESG funds. It took a softer stance than the initial proposed rule, which drew intense criticism.

Kading speculates that the DOL contacted his firm wanting to investigate it’s ESG screening process because it had done no research prior to issuance of the new rule. He’s not the only one that says this. At the time the DOL proposed its rule, Lisa Woll, CEO of US SIF: The Forum for Sustainable and Responsible Investment in Washington, D.C., said in a statement, “The proposed rule suggests, but without evidence, that the growing emphasis on ESG investing may be prompting ERISA [Employee Retirement Income Security Act] plan fiduciaries to make investment decisions for purposes distinct from providing benefits to participants and beneficiaries and defraying reasonable expenses of administering the plan.” [emphasis added by PLANADVISER]

“[The DOL] just wanted to investigate someone prominently using ESG investing in ERISA plans,” Kading says. And he jokes, “because our firm is so good at marketing, we stood out.”

This led to nearly a year of back and forth with the DOL. As is proper with any DOL investigation, LeafHouse brought in its attorney to make sure it was complying with everything the DOL was asking.

Kading says his firm definitely provided some education to the DOL, adding that it’s understandable given that the investigators are not industry veterans. “At first, they wanted to look at every single plan client, but we had to explain that some plans don’t use ESG screening,” he says. “Then they wanted to look at all funds in all plans that use ESG, but we had to educate them that only some funds use ESG screening.”

Finally, the DOL agreed to look at only the clients and funds that used LeafHouse’s LIST.

The investigation wasn’t a daily task; it happened in phases. “The first phase was having our attorney look over the DOL’s requests. It took a couple of months to define the scope of the investigation,” Kading explains. “There were a couple of months of working with the DOL on how much they get into our files, and there were a couple of months of educating the DOL about what it all means.”

Finally, LeafHouse received a letter from the DOL that it was closing the investigation. “My interpretation was that we were doing everything right,” Kading says.

He acknowledges that a DOL investigation sounds scary, but he points out that everything the agency does is an investigation. “It doesn’t mean anything is wrong.”

“The negative thing about all the publicity [surrounding the investigation] isn’t that it happened,” Kading says. “It’s that advisers might get scared from doing something about ESG investing.”

His message to his peers: “You shouldn’t be afraid to have these conversations with plan sponsors.”
Wed, 09 Nov 2022 09:01:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.planadviser.com/dol-esg-investigation-story/
Killexams : Here are 5 big investigations House Republicans are planning to launch

CNN  — 

Earlier this week, CNN projected that Republicans will win the House majority. Shortly afterward, they made it very clear what their priority will be: Investigating President Biden and his administration on a variety of fronts.

“In just 47 days, House Republicans will have the gavel, and we will be prepared to hold the Biden administration accountable from day one,” House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy tweeted Thursday. “Our investigations are just getting started.”

So, what, exactly are they panning to investigate? Well, a whole lot of things. Here’s a list of areas:

1) The southern border. On Friday, Republican members of the House Judiciary Committee sent a letter to Department of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas telling him and other department officials to be prepared to provide their testimony once the 118th Congress convenes in January. At a hearing earlier this week, Republicans on the Homeland Security Committee questioned Mayorkas on the number of migrants entering the US via the southern border. US border authorities encountered more than 2 million migrants in fiscal year 2022, an increase from the 1.7 million encounters in 2021. In announcing his 2024 presidential bid earlier this week, Donald Trump focused heavily on immigration. “Our southern border has been erased and our country is being invaded by millions and millions of unknown people, many of whom are entering for a very bad and sinister reason, and you know what that reason is,” said Trump. (He did not explain what he believed the reason to be.)

2) The Afghanistan withdrawal. President Joe Biden’s decision to remove US troops from Afghanistan last year around the 20-year anniversary of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks turned into a disaster. The withdrawal led to a frantic attempt by many Afghans to flee the county, with devastating scenes of people clinging to the wings of planes as they tried to escape before the Taliban government officially assumed power. A bombing outside the Kabul airport in August 2021 killed 13 US service members and about 170 Afghans. CNN previously reported that Biden had made the decision to withdraw troops over the objection of many of his senior-most military advisers.

3) The origin of the Covid-19 pandemic. Back in 2019, Republicans on the House Energy and Commerce Committee launched their own investigation into the origins of the novel coronavirus. At that time, they sent a letter to Frances Collins, who was the head of the National Institutes of Health, requesting “an independent, expert investigation of the origin of COVID-19,” which they insisted was “of paramount importance to public health and biosecurity.” Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, the top Republican on the Energy and Commerce panel, has said that “how the pandemic started, that’s probably the most important public health question that needs to be answered.” Two studies released in July both concluded that a seafood market in Wuhan was most likely the epicenter for the virus.

4) The Department of Justice. Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan, who is widely expected to chair the House Judiciary Committee when Republicans formally take over the majority in January 2023, sent a letter to Attorney General Merrick Garland on November 2, requesting a slew of documents on everything from the Justice Department’s alleged “targeting” of Project Veritas to the search for classified documents at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort. In a report released on November 4, Jordan insisted that “the Federal Bureau of Investigation, under the stewardship of Director Christopher Wray and Attorney General Merrick Garland, is broken.”

5) Hunter Biden. Kentucky Rep. James Comer, who is in line to chair the House Oversight Committee in January, said this week that “in the 118th Congress, this committee will evaluate the status of Joe Biden’s relationship with his family’s foreign partners and whether he is a President who is compromised or swayed by foreign dollars and influence.” At the center of that future investigation is the president’s son. As CNN noted earlier this week: “At the heart of Comer’s investigation is digging into a series of suspicious activity reports that Republicans claim banks have filed related to Hunter Biden’s financial activities.” Hunter Biden has denied any wrongdoing.

This is far from a complete list of the investigations various Republican-led committees will embark on over the next two years. But it does deliver you a sense of the breadth which they plan to investigate the Biden administration, and how that will complicate efforts to get anything done on a bipartisan basis.

Fri, 18 Nov 2022 07:08:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.cnn.com/2022/11/18/politics/house-republican-investigations-biden/index.html
Killexams : Lakota superintendent passes psychological test after investigation

The Lakota school board met for a special meeting on Monday.

Lakota Local Schools superintendent Matt Miller passed a psychological examination and was deemed fit to continue leading one of the largest school systems in Ohio after months of controversy, school board president Lynda O'Connor announced Monday evening. Miller was vindicated for a second time earlier this month after an investigator found claims against Miller to be false.

In an effort to get back to school business and eliminate further spread of false allegations against the district leader, or any school district employees, the school board is adding restrictions to the public comment portion of its public meetings.

Further details on these restrictions are listed further down in this story. It's not clear when they will start being enforced.

'She actually listens.' Aiken social worker works with students to curb fighting, truancy

Enquirer analysis: How did southwest Ohio schools do on state report cards?

O'Connor read a statement regarding Miller's examination and a exact investigation into false claims against him during Monday's meeting. The statement was approved by board members Isaac Adi, Julie Shaffer and Kelley Casper. Board member Darbi Boddy voted against the statement.

Miller was investigated by the Butler County Sheriff's Office and an independent investigator hired by the district who also completed a full forensic examination of Miller's professional and personal devices and cloud storage. Neither investigation found Miller had participated in wrongdoing. If the board had received "any credible evidence of misconduct," O'Connor said, Miller would have been placed on administrative leave immediately.

Most recently, Miller was evaluated by an independent psychiatrist to determine his fitness for duty. O'Connor said Monday that the psychiatrist determined a week prior that Miller is "unreservedly fit for duty."

Lakota Local Schools board of education president Lynda O'Connor says superintendent Matt Miller passed his psychological test and is fit for duty.

"While we understand that some members of our community may disagree, the board is confident that it exercised all due diligence in this matter. These claims against Mr. Miller were found to be false by multiple agencies. These claims appear to have been a personally motivated attack and would not have been brought if he were not the superintendent," O'Connor said.

O'Connor stated the board fully supports Miller, adding that he "has been an excellent leader" and is "one of the shining lights in education, both in Ohio and nationally."

"It's now time for the board’s focus to return to our core work, that of educating Lakota students," O'Connor said.

Boddy, who did not support O'Connor's statement, continued to repeat false claims against Miller during Monday's meeting.

"Our community is not proud of our superintendent," Boddy said. To Miller, she said, "The fact remains that you do not have the ethics that are wanted in a superintendent of Lakota."

O'Connor asked Miller if he'd like to address those claims, which he declined at first on advice of his attorney.

But when Boddy continued to repeat the allegations later during Monday's meeting, including statements from the sheriff's investigation about "pillow talk" and sexual fantasies between Miller and his former wife, Miller interrupted.

"It's taken out of context," Miller said. He did not elaborate.

Other board members expressed support for Miller during Monday's meeting and a desire to move forward after the investigation.

"It has not been pleasant for any of us," Casper said. "I'm glad we are going to be able to get back to what we should be doing, which is educating children."

Several policy changes were brought to the board on Monday, including major changes to the district's public participation policy. The board did not vote on these changes Monday, but will vote to approve them at the next board meeting in December.

All board members but Boddy expressed support for the following changes:

  • Attendees who wish to speak at a board meeting must register their intention to participate after the agenda is published and up to 9 a.m. on the day of the meeting. Participants can register online on the district's website, or in person at Lakota Central Offices during regular business hours. Individuals may not register others to speak during public participation unless the person wishing to speak is not physically able to register themselves.

  • Attendees cannot display posters or other objects that are distracting or obstruct others' view of the meeting. Violators could be asked to leave the board meeting.

  • Public commenters can speak on items in the published agenda or a set of 14 specific syllabus including curriculum, facilities, finance, safety, special education, technology and transportation.

  • Public commenters cannot speak about specific employees during public comment.

"I'm sorry, but it looks like you're trying to shut the community up from speaking up against Matt Miller who's trying to bully people into being quiet," Boddy said. "That's what this looks like and it's bad timing. It's a bad policy and you're not respecting the parents of our community and their voices."

Shaffer said one of the reasons for restricting comments about specific employees is due to concerns about retention.

"I want to make sure that our staff knows that we are not going to support potentially libelous or slanderous information be presented at the mic," Shaffer said.

Lakota Local Schools board member Julie Shaffer said she supports changes to the district's public participation policy in order to bring more order to board meetings.

The board spent over an hour discussing the public participation changes during last week's policy committee meeting, O'Connor said, especially after a lawsuit was filed against the district in late September by Curt Hartman on behalf of Liberty Township resident Diane Hughes.

Judge: Lakota must allow public comment despite school board vote to suspend it

Hartman filed a motion for a temporary restraining order against the district along with the suit, claiming O'Connor had denied Hughes and others access to participate in public comments because of their desire to speak critically of Miller. The board voted to approve a settlement with Hughes on Monday, which included $15,000 to Hartman, and Hughes was the first speaker during Monday's public comment section.

Once the new public participation policy is voted on and approved, comments about Miller or any other Lakota employee won't be permitted. That includes positive comments, too. O'Connor said she encourages the community to send feedback on specific teachers and other staff to the board and administrators "through other channels" such as email.

"This is going to be difficult to enforce," O'Connor said. She suggested the board reconsider the new policy in six months and make any necessary adjustments. "I'm hoping that this is going to work out much better all the way around."

The next board of education meeting will take place on Dec. 12 at 6:30 p.m. at Lakota Plains Junior School, located at 5500 Princeton Road in Liberty Township.

This article originally appeared on Cincinnati Enquirer: Lakota superintendent passes psychological test after investigation

Tue, 22 Nov 2022 08:51:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/now/lakota-superintendent-passes-psychological-exam-160126204.html
Killexams : House Republicans plan investigations and possible impeachments with new majority

WASHINGTON — House Republicans' majority will be smaller than expected, but they're eager to use their new oversight powers and pass a spate of bills to draw contrasts with Democrats and deliver the Biden administration heartburn.

In this moment of divided government and fierce partisanship, it’s perhaps appropriate that the GOP conference is expected to be led by Reps. Kevin McCarthy of California and Steve Scalise of Louisiana, veteran lawmakers known more for their skills in political combat than for their policy acumen.

Although House Republicans will still face a Democratic White House and Senate aimed at blocking their legislative aims, McCarthy — who is working feverishly to cement his ascension to speaker despite growing discontent in his ranks — has already made it clear the party plans to launch investigations into the Biden administration and at least one of the president’s family members.

Republicans win control of the House after midterm elections

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But McCarthy and other leaders will have their hands full as they try to keep their wafer-thin majority united and corral conservative bomb throwers who are clamoring to shut down the government and impeach President Joe Biden and his top allies.

"The era of one-party Democrat rule in Washington is over. Washington now has a check and balance. The American people have a say in their government," McCarthy, flanked by his new leadership team, said Tuesday after he won his race to be the party's nominee for speaker.

Here’s what the new 118th Congress will look like under House GOP rule:

Investigations

Investigations will dominate the new Congress, from the origins of the Covid-19 pandemic and allegations of politicization at the Justice Department to America's botched withdrawal from Afghanistan. But none will attract as much attention as the GOP’s planned investigation into the business dealings of the president’s son Hunter two years before a potential Biden re-election bid.

Rep. James Comer, R-Ky., the incoming Oversight Committee chairman, has said an investigation into Hunter Biden and other Biden family members and associates will be a priority as Republicans try to determine whether the family’s business activities “compromise U.S. national security and President Biden’s ability to lead with impartiality.”

Republicans allege that Hunter Biden has used his father’s successful political career to enrich himself: He joined the board of a Ukrainian natural gas company in 2019, and an investment firm he co-founded helped a Chinese firm buy a Congolese cobalt mine from a U.S. company in 2016, among other financial endeavors.

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“Hunter and other members of the Biden family have a pattern of peddling access to the highest levels of government to enrich themselves,” Comer said in a statement. “The American people deserve to know whether the President’s connections to his family’s business deals occurred at the expense of American interests and whether they represent a national security threat.”

At a press conference Thursday Comer and other House Republicans made clear that their investigation is focused on the sitting president.

"We want the bank records and that’s our focus," Comer said. "We’re trying to stay focused on: Was Joe Biden directly involved with Hunter Biden’s business deals and is he compromised? That’s our investigation."

The younger Biden is already under federal investigation, which he has said will show “I handled my affairs legally and appropriately.”

Comer and Senate Republicans, including Rand Paul of Kentucky, also vow to investigate Dr. Anthony Fauci, the retiring director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, who became the face of the government's response to Covid-19 — and a target of the right.Another big thorn in the Biden administration’s side: Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, a Trump loyalist and former leader of the far-right Freedom Caucus who is poised to chair the powerful Judiciary Committee and will be itching to haul Attorney General Merrick Garland and FBI Director Christopher Wray to Capitol Hill.

In a letter to Garland this month, Jordan previewed some of his potential investigations next year, urging the Justice Department to preserve records related to its probe of the conservative group Project Veritas and how it obtained a copy of the diary of the president’s daughter Ashley Biden, the shuttering of the Justice Department’s Trump-era program targeting Chinese spying and the FBI’s search of Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida in August.

Image: Kevin McCarthy Holds Press Conference After Dispute Over Jan 6th Committee Members (Kevin Dietsch / Getty Images) © Kevin Dietsch Image: Kevin McCarthy Holds Press Conference After Dispute Over Jan 6th Committee Members (Kevin Dietsch / Getty Images)

A fierce critic of the Justice Department under Biden, Jordan also rolled out a 1,000-page report on allegations of politicization of the Justice Department and the FBI based on interviews with FBI whistleblowers.

While the House Jan. 6 committee, which Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., launched in the wake of the Capitol attack, will disband at the end of this Congress, Republicans have their own ideas for select House committees in the new year. McCarthy has vowed to create a select committee to investigate China. And many other GOP members want to form a special panel to investigate the Biden administration’s chaotic and deadly withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan; a suicide bombing at the Kabul airport killed 13 service members and scores of Afghans.

“If there was one that I would say 100% needs to happen as a select committee, it’s got to be Afghanistan,” said Rep. Kat Cammack, R-Fla., a member of the Homeland Security Committee who is expected to run for a leadership spot. “When you look at the 13 Gold Star families that never should have been Gold Star families — for them alone, they deserve answers. 

“But for the equipment that got left behind, the Americans that got left behind, the families of those that we lost,” she said, “there’s a lot of answers that need to be uncovered.”

Impeachment

After House Democrats impeached President Donald Trump twice, some of his staunch allies in Congress are looking for payback. Far-right Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga., has filed multiple articles of impeachment against Biden and Garland this Congress, although McCarthy said that so far he hasn’t seen anything that rises to the level of impeachment.  

However, that’s not expected to satisfy those on his right flank. A growing number of Republicans say they have their sights set on impeaching Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas, bashing his handling of the border surge. In fiscal year 2022, there were a record 2.76 million undocumented immigrant crossings, 1 million more than in the previous year, according to Customs and Border Protection data. Mayorkas has defended the administration’s border policies.

“He is ignoring his duty to execute the laws of the United States to secure the border," said Republican Chip Roy, a member of the House Judiciary Committee who represents the border state of Texas. "And as a direct consequence of that, Americans are dead, migrants are dead, China’s empowered, cartels are empowered, fentanyl is pouring into our communities.

“He knows it," Roy said. "He’s lying about it. He should be impeached for it. It’s a dereliction of duty. It’s not even a close call.”

Image: Donald Trump, Kevin McCarthy (Andrew Harnik / AP file) © Andrew Harnik Image: Donald Trump, Kevin McCarthy (Andrew Harnik / AP file)

DHS spokesman Luis Miranda responded to GOP calls for Mayorkas' impeachment in an email: “Many of those criticisms are coming from Members of Congress who voted against the funding DHS needs to do its job, and who oppose the kind of comprehensive reform needed to create lawful pathways and update our immigration system.”

Roy, a member of the Trump-aligned Freedom Caucus, said that he believes Biden has engaged in conduct that has damaged America but that he will “reserve judgment” on whether he should be impeached.

Legislation

Democrats still occupy the White House, so any legislation Republicans pass on a partisan basis won’t be signed into law by Biden. But House Republicans say they will waste no time showing the parties’ stark differences as they battle for control of the White House in 2024.

McCarthy has said that when the new Congress is seated on Jan. 3, House Republicans will immediately vote to repeal the $80 billion in new funding for the IRS that was included in Biden’s Inflation Reduction Act to help crack down on tax cheats and ramp up enforcement.

“That very first day, we’ll repeal these new 87,000 IRS agents. I think government should be here to help you, not to go after you,” McCarthy said last week on Fox Business.

After the “Commitment to America” agenda McCarthy laid out in September, Republicans also plan to pass a “Parents’ Bill of Rights” that would deliver parents more say in the curricula that are taught in their children’s schools, boost domestic oil and natural gas production and cut the permitting process to address high energy and gas prices, and provide funding for more police officers and border security in response to rising crime rates.

“We’re going to get after it on Day One,” Cammack said. “And it’s going to almost feel like whiplash to our Democratic colleagues, where we’ve seen this very weird, slow, lackadaisical approach to legislation.”

Still, such a narrow majority means McCarthy will have little margin for error, and rabble-rousers like Greene who have shown little deference to GOP leadership in the past could have outsize influence in what the caucus is able to pass through the House.

Spending and debt

In their successful 2022 campaign, Republicans argued that record inflation was being driven by trillions of dollars in government spending that Democrats were pumping into the economy; Democrats have claimed inflation is a “global phenomenon” spurred by the pandemic.

Now in power, Republicans vow to hold hearings on the causes of the inflation spike and to deeply cut spending to help curb the country’s record debt. 

“Americans are paying for this debt every time they go to the store or fill up the gas tank,” said Rep. Jason Smith of Missouri, the top Republican on the Budget Committee, who is running to be chairman of the tax-writing Ways and Means Committee. “It’s eating away their paychecks, and it’s because Democrats have abandoned basic budgeting and oversight. Republicans will restore both.”

To achieve their spending goals, some Republicans have gone so far as to say they won’t support additional military aid for Ukraine next year until some domestic issues are addressed. Other top Republicans are threatening to block raising the country’s debt borrowing limit to force Biden and Democrats to overhaul costly entitlement programs like Medicare and Social Security.

Defaulting on the debt, however, could spook global markets and send the U.S. economy into a recession. So could a government shutdown, which Greene and other far-right lawmakers have threatened in exact days.

Smith said in an interview, “As it relates to the debt ceiling, Americans rightly expect that their elected officials will use every tool we have to fix whatever crises the country faces — whether it’s the spike in prices, an unsecured border, rising debt, you name it.

“Republicans will use every tool we have to bring relief to Americans and put the country back on the right track.”

This article was originally published on NBCNews.com

Thu, 17 Nov 2022 01:15:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/house-republicans-plan-investigations-and-possible-impeachments-with-new-majority/ar-AA14dynM
Killexams : Groups plan pushback to Biden investigations

WASHINGTON – Hours after winning control of the House, Republicans laid out plans Thursday for investigations of President Biden, his administration and his family, and were met with promises of a multimillion-dollar counteroffensive from a network of groups allied with Democrats.

On Capitol Hill, the incoming Republican chair of the House Oversight Committee, Rep. James Comer of Kentucky, said the panel would focus on trying to link Biden to the business dealings of his son, Hunter Biden, continuing an effort begun in 2018 that never established the elder Biden's complicity in any wrongdoing but led to former President Donald Trump's first impeachment.

Comer told reporters his aim was "to show you this is an investigation of Joe Biden," and not just his son.

The Hunter Biden investigation is only one element of a broader planned effort by House Republicans to use their new oversight powers to examine a wide range of Biden administration figures and policies. The White House, which is building its own defense team, has quietly signaled support for some of the efforts by nonprofit groups with ties to some of the biggest donors in Democratic politics, according to people familiar with the groups.

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The efforts appear intended to take pressure off the administration by pushing back in a more adversarial manner than Biden's sensitive subjects, including the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan, the administration's Covid response and – perhaps most notably – the foreign business dealings of Hunter Biden.

"The White House cannot be the sole nucleus for publicly responding to the onslaught of congressional investigations," reads a memo from a nonprofit group called Facts First USA that has been circulating among major Democratic donors, members of Congress and others.

It details a $5million-a-year "SWAT team to counter Republican congressional investigations," including on issues that "may be too personal or delicate for the White House to be responding or to even be seen as directing a response" – an apparent reference to Hunter Biden.

David Brock, the Democratic activist behind Facts First, said his group "intends the White House where appropriate but will make our own judgments."

Another group, the Congressional Integrity Project, announced Wednesday that it intended to launch a multimillion-dollar "war room" to undermine investigations from the House. People involved in that initiative, which was first reported by Politico, have previously worked with Brock's team and have close connections to the White House and the Democratic Party.

The political arm of the Center for American Progress, the influential progressive think tank, is planning to cast the Republican investigations as "politically motivated revenge politics," according to its CEO, Patrick Gaspard, who served as White House political director under President Barack Obama.

Republicans appear to be divided on just how far to push things. Kevin McCarthy, the Republican nominee to be speaker of the House, has downplayed an impeachment of Biden, even as some on the far right in his party have called for such an effort as payback for the two impeachments by Democrats of Trump.

But Republican leadership has not ruled out impeaching Cabinet members, including Department of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas and Attorney General Merrick Garland, who have both recently fortified their staffs to deal with the challenge.

Moreover, McCarthy, Comer and Rep. Jim Jordan, the incoming chair of the House judiciary committee, have made it clear they intend to aggressively pursue investigations into Hunter Biden, the crisis at the border and the Justice Department, which Jordan accused of operating as a political arm of the White House.

Jordan said the focus of his committee would be "the political nature of the Justice Department and the linkage now to what was happening with the Hunter Biden story."

Jordan declined to say if he had evidence that Garland, or any other officials at Justice Department headquarters, had sought to influence federal prosecutors in Delaware investigating Hunter Biden. Comer, for his part, conceded that his effort to raise awareness of the issue faced public skepticism, although he blamed Democrats for devaluing the committee's work.

"I realize that congressional oversight doesn't have a lot of credibility," he said.

Biden's allies hope to stoke that distrust further, deploying the financial muscle of new outside groups like Facts First, funded by "dark money" from donors whose identities can be kept secret. The law enforcement inquiries into two figures who loom largest in the oversight investigations – Hunter Biden, who is under investigation for tax-related violations and other issues, and Trump – add another layer of intensity to the fight.

House Republicans have been working closely for months with outside groups affiliated with Trump and funded by anonymous cash to plan for the oversight.

The White House declined to comment.

But it has been compiling research on Republican arguments and the members of Congress making them, including trawling deeply conservative corners of the internet to build out a rapid-response database, according to a person familiar with the effort.

The White House also added lawyers and communications staff members, while working with outside lawyers to prepare for an anticipated barrage of subpoenas, as well as possible efforts to impeach Biden.

Thu, 17 Nov 2022 17:40:00 -0600 en text/html https://buffalonews.com/groups-plan-pushback-to-biden-investigations/article_45381d44-bae8-59c1-941f-ec956690e8b7.html
Killexams : Investigation launched into nursing test results after more than half fail

Thérèse Rizk is one of 54.6 per cent of Quebec's nursing students that failed their licensing test this year. Students like her say the test was confusing and did not reflect the reality of nursing. (CBC - image credit)

An investigation has been launched into why more than half of those who took the Quebec nursing licence test earlier this year failed it, even as the province is struggling with a nursing shortage.

The commissioner for admissions to professions, André Gariépy, will take a look at the results of the exam, his office said in a news release on Monday evening.

Nursing students have told CBC Montreal that the exam, which is mandatory to obtain a nursing licence in Quebec, didn't reflect what they had been studying in school.

The nurses' order, known by its French acronym the OIIQ, said 54.6 per cent of students failed the licensing test written at the end of September. For those who took the test for the first time, the failure rate was 48.6 per cent — the highest rate recorded in four years.

Since 2018, the success rate for first-time test-takers has generally ranged from 71 to 96 per cent.

Gariépy's office said media coverage and a exact deluge of complaints prompted the investigation. The commissioner, who oversees admissions to professional orders (including nurses) in the province, received 27 complaints about the test in exact days.

The investigation will focus on the "various concerns that have been raised about the test itself and the status of the candidates."

The commissioner encouraged nursing candidates who failed the September test to sign up to rewrite it in March. They should also "review the feedback provided on individual performance at the September session," the commissioner wrote, and "review the guides and materials and participate in information activities to prepare for the exam."

Meanwhile, the OIIQ says it won't change its standards.

The nursing order issued a news release on Tuesday saying its test was not different from past years and it was developed by a panel of experts from clinical and university settings.

"Additional resources" would be put in place to support students, the order said.

"However, relaxing the criteria is not being considered from a public protection perspective," it added. "Instead, we will focus on targeted support to enable all candidates to pass the test in future rounds."

Nursing candidates have three attempts to pass the exam. The OIIQ said all candidates who failed the September test received a response detailing why they failed and that there were online tools available to pass it, including a guide and preparatory workshops.

"We are confident that a return to in-person teaching, as well as support for students, will be a factor in success," said Luc Mathieu, the president of the OIIQ.

In a previous interview with CBC Montreal, Chantal Lemay, a spokesperson for the order, blamed the pandemic's effects on the students' learning environment for the poor test performances.

Radio-Canada

Joseph Oujeil, a nursing professor at CÉGEP du Vieux Montréal and CÉGEP André-Laurendeau, said he was surprised so many of his students failed the exam.

He said the failure rate was not normal and comes at a terrible time, as Quebec faces a nursing shortage.

"I think the average results need to be looked at," Oujeil said, suggesting the order make the passing grade 50 per cent instead of the usual 55 per cent.

He said students told him the test "doesn't reflect the real reality of what we're teaching them in school or during their studies and it also doesn't reflect what they've seen in their clinical training."

Anyone with information about the test or the status of those who took it can communicate confidentially with the commissioner by emailing commissaire@opq.gouv.qc.ca.

Mon, 14 Nov 2022 19:19:00 -0600 en-CA text/html https://ca.news.yahoo.com/investigation-launched-nursing-exam-results-171938290.html
Killexams : House Republicans plan investigations and possible impeachments with new majority

WASHINGTON — House Republicans' majority will be smaller than expected, but they're eager to use their new oversight powers and pass a spate of bills to draw contrasts with Democrats and deliver the Biden administration heartburn.

In this moment of divided government and fierce partisanship, it’s perhaps appropriate that the GOP conference is expected to be led by Reps. Kevin McCarthy of California and Steve Scalise of Louisiana, veteran lawmakers known more for their skills in political combat than for their policy acumen.

Although House Republicans will still face a Democratic White House and Senate aimed at blocking their legislative aims, McCarthy — who is working feverishly to cement his ascension to speaker despite growing discontent in his ranks — has already made it clear the party plans to launch investigations into the Biden administration and at least one of the president’s family members.

But McCarthy and other leaders will have their hands full as they try to keep their wafer-thin majority united and corral conservative bomb throwers who are clamoring to shut down the government and impeach President Joe Biden and his top allies.

"The era of one-party Democrat rule in Washington is over. Washington now has a check and balance. The American people have a say in their government," McCarthy, flanked by his new leadership team, said Tuesday after he won his race to be the party's nominee for speaker.

Here’s what the new 118th Congress will look like under House GOP rule:

Investigations

Investigations will dominate the new Congress, from the origins of the Covid-19 pandemic and allegations of politicization at the Justice Department to America's botched withdrawal from Afghanistan. But none will attract as much attention as the GOP’s planned investigation into the business dealings of the president’s son Hunter two years before a potential Biden re-election bid.

Rep. James Comer, R-Ky., the incoming Oversight Committee chairman, has said an investigation into Hunter Biden and other Biden family members and associates will be a priority as Republicans try to determine whether the family’s business activities “compromise U.S. national security and President Biden’s ability to lead with impartiality.”

Republicans allege that Hunter Biden has used his father’s successful political career to enrich himself: He joined the board of a Ukrainian natural gas company in 2019, and an investment firm he co-founded helped a Chinese firm buy a Congolese cobalt mine from a U.S. company in 2016, among other financial endeavors.

“Hunter and other members of the Biden family have a pattern of peddling access to the highest levels of government to enrich themselves,” Comer said in a statement. “The American people deserve to know whether the President’s connections to his family’s business deals occurred at the expense of American interests and whether they represent a national security threat.”

At a press conference Thursday Comer and other House Republicans made clear that their investigation is focused on the sitting president.

"We want the bank records and that’s our focus," Comer said. "We’re trying to stay focused on: Was Joe Biden directly involved with Hunter Biden’s business deals and is he compromised? That’s our investigation."

The younger Biden is already under federal investigation, which he has said will show “I handled my affairs legally and appropriately.”

Comer and Senate Republicans, including Rand Paul of Kentucky, also vow to investigate Dr. Anthony Fauci, the retiring director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, who became the face of the government's response to Covid-19 — and a target of the right.Another big thorn in the Biden administration’s side: Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, a Trump loyalist and former leader of the far-right Freedom Caucus who is poised to chair the powerful Judiciary Committee and will be itching to haul Attorney General Merrick Garland and FBI Director Christopher Wray to Capitol Hill.

In a letter to Garland this month, Jordan previewed some of his potential investigations next year, urging the Justice Department to preserve records related to its probe of the conservative group Project Veritas and how it obtained a copy of the diary of the president’s daughter Ashley Biden, the shuttering of the Justice Department’s Trump-era program targeting Chinese spying and the FBI’s search of Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida in August.

Image: Kevin McCarthy Holds Press Conference After Dispute Over Jan 6th Committee Members (Kevin Dietsch / Getty Images)

A fierce critic of the Justice Department under Biden, Jordan also rolled out a 1,000-page report on allegations of politicization of the Justice Department and the FBI based on interviews with FBI whistleblowers.

While the House Jan. 6 committee, which Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., launched in the wake of the Capitol attack, will disband at the end of this Congress, Republicans have their own ideas for select House committees in the new year. McCarthy has vowed to create a select committee to investigate China. And many other GOP members want to form a special panel to investigate the Biden administration’s chaotic and deadly withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan; a suicide bombing at the Kabul airport killed 13 service members and scores of Afghans.

“If there was one that I would say 100% needs to happen as a select committee, it’s got to be Afghanistan,” said Rep. Kat Cammack, R-Fla., a member of the Homeland Security Committee who is expected to run for a leadership spot. “When you look at the 13 Gold Star families that never should have been Gold Star families — for them alone, they deserve answers.

“But for the equipment that got left behind, the Americans that got left behind, the families of those that we lost,” she said, “there’s a lot of answers that need to be uncovered.”

Impeachment

After House Democrats impeached President Donald Trump twice, some of his staunch allies in Congress are looking for payback. Far-right Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga., has filed multiple articles of impeachment against Biden and Garland this Congress, although McCarthy said that so far he hasn’t seen anything that rises to the level of impeachment.

However, that’s not expected to satisfy those on his right flank. A growing number of Republicans say they have their sights set on impeaching Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas, bashing his handling of the border surge. In fiscal year 2022, there were a record 2.76 million undocumented immigrant crossings, 1 million more than in the previous year, according to Customs and Border Protection data. Mayorkas has defended the administration’s border policies.

“He is ignoring his duty to execute the laws of the United States to secure the border," said Republican Chip Roy, a member of the House Judiciary Committee who represents the border state of Texas. "And as a direct consequence of that, Americans are dead, migrants are dead, China’s empowered, cartels are empowered, fentanyl is pouring into our communities.

“He knows it," Roy said. "He’s lying about it. He should be impeached for it. It’s a dereliction of duty. It’s not even a close call.”

Image: Donald Trump, Kevin McCarthy (Andrew Harnik / AP file)

DHS spokesman Luis Miranda responded to GOP calls for Mayorkas' impeachment in an email: “Many of those criticisms are coming from Members of Congress who voted against the funding DHS needs to do its job, and who oppose the kind of comprehensive reform needed to create lawful pathways and update our immigration system.”

Roy, a member of the Trump-aligned Freedom Caucus, said that he believes Biden has engaged in conduct that has damaged America but that he will “reserve judgment” on whether he should be impeached.

Legislation

Democrats still occupy the White House, so any legislation Republicans pass on a partisan basis won’t be signed into law by Biden. But House Republicans say they will waste no time showing the parties’ stark differences as they battle for control of the White House in 2024.

McCarthy has said that when the new Congress is seated on Jan. 3, House Republicans will immediately vote to repeal the $80 billion in new funding for the IRS that was included in Biden’s Inflation Reduction Act to help crack down on tax cheats and ramp up enforcement.

“That very first day, we’ll repeal these new 87,000 IRS agents. I think government should be here to help you, not to go after you,” McCarthy said last week on Fox Business.

After the “Commitment to America” agenda McCarthy laid out in September, Republicans also plan to pass a “Parents’ Bill of Rights” that would deliver parents more say in the curricula that are taught in their children’s schools, boost domestic oil and natural gas production and cut the permitting process to address high energy and gas prices, and provide funding for more police officers and border security in response to rising crime rates.

“We’re going to get after it on Day One,” Cammack said. “And it’s going to almost feel like whiplash to our Democratic colleagues, where we’ve seen this very weird, slow, lackadaisical approach to legislation.”

Still, such a narrow majority means McCarthy will have little margin for error, and rabble-rousers like Greene who have shown little deference to GOP leadership in the past could have outsize influence in what the caucus is able to pass through the House.

Spending and debt

In their successful 2022 campaign, Republicans argued that record inflation was being driven by trillions of dollars in government spending that Democrats were pumping into the economy; Democrats have claimed inflation is a “global phenomenon” spurred by the pandemic.

Now in power, Republicans vow to hold hearings on the causes of the inflation spike and to deeply cut spending to help curb the country’s record debt.

“Americans are paying for this debt every time they go to the store or fill up the gas tank,” said Rep. Jason Smith of Missouri, the top Republican on the Budget Committee, who is running to be chairman of the tax-writing Ways and Means Committee. “It’s eating away their paychecks, and it’s because Democrats have abandoned basic budgeting and oversight. Republicans will restore both.”

To achieve their spending goals, some Republicans have gone so far as to say they won’t support additional military aid for Ukraine next year until some domestic issues are addressed. Other top Republicans are threatening to block raising the country’s debt borrowing limit to force Biden and Democrats to overhaul costly entitlement programs like Medicare and Social Security.

Defaulting on the debt, however, could spook global markets and send the U.S. economy into a recession. So could a government shutdown, which Greene and other far-right lawmakers have threatened in exact days.

Smith said in an interview, “As it relates to the debt ceiling, Americans rightly expect that their elected officials will use every tool we have to fix whatever crises the country faces — whether it’s the spike in prices, an unsecured border, rising debt, you name it.

“Republicans will use every tool we have to bring relief to Americans and put the country back on the right track.”

This article was originally published on NBCNews.com

Thu, 17 Nov 2022 00:21:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://news.yahoo.com/house-republicans-plan-investigations-possible-140036535.html
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