Exam Code: CCB-400 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
Cloudera Certified Specialist in Apache HBase
Cloudera Specialist information hunger
Killexams : Cloudera Specialist information hunger - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CCB-400 Search results Killexams : Cloudera Specialist information hunger - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CCB-400 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Cloudera Killexams : Latest News Mentioning Cloudera

Shaun Bierweiler, formerly senior vice president of public sector at Riverbed Technology, has elevated to the role of chief revenue officer of the San Francisco-based information technology company. Bierweiler disclosed his promotion in a LinkedIn job update posted Wednesday. In October 2020, he joined Riverbed from Cloudera, where he spent four yea...

Mon, 14 Feb 2022 19:44:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.govconwire.com/s/company/cloudera/
Killexams : Cloudera reinvigorates its partner programme No result found, try new keyword!Cloudera has announced Cloudera Partner Network, a redesigned partner programme that recognises and rewards partners for their contribution to Cloudera’s go-to-market success. Cloudera Partner ... Thu, 10 Nov 2022 19:06:00 -0600 text/html https://www.itp.net/channel/cloudera-reinvigorates-its-partner-program Killexams : CTA benefits specialist charged with using phony retiree death information to loot $350,000 from pension plan

A Chicago Transit Authority retirement specialist has been indicted on federal charges alleging she used phony beneficiary information for dozens of recently deceased retirees to steal more than $350,000 from the agency’s pension system.

Ayanna Nesbitt, 50, of Chicago was charged in an indictment made public Friday with five counts of wire fraud. An arraignment was set for Tuesday before U.S. District Judge Matthew Kennelly.

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According to the charges, Nesbitt created and obtained approval for fraudulent requests to make death-benefit payments and refund pension contributions to purported beneficiaries of CTA retirees and other eligible members of the pension plan.

Nesbitt then directed the funds into bank accounts she controlled as well as other accounts held by family members or associates, then used the money for personal expenses for herself and others, the charges alleged.

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In all, between March 2019 and September 2021, Nesbitt obtained approval for 43 false death-benefit or pension-refund requests totaling $357,000, according to the indictment.

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Nesbitt’s attorney did not immediately respond to requests for comment Friday.

According to Nesbitt’s LinkedIn profile, she has worked as a CTA retirement specialist for 17 years. She also was a CTA bus operator from 1996 to 2004, according to the profile.

In 2016, Nesbitt and the then-head of the CTA retirement plan were sued in U.S. District Court by a woman who claimed that they had defrauded her of retirement payments she was due after her husband’s 2014 death.

Lawyers for the retirement plan disputed the allegation, writing in a motion to dismiss that documents “clearly and unequivocally” showed the woman’s husband had chosen to accept all of his retirement benefits during his lifetime, with no lump payment going to his beneficiaries in the event of his death.

U.S. District Judge Charles Kocoras dismissed the suit in June 2016 on the grounds that it lacked federal jurisdiction, records show.

The CTA is a separate entity from the retirement plan. Representatives of the plan were not immediately available for comment.

jmeisner@chicagotribune.com

Fri, 02 Dec 2022 06:12:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/criminal-justice/ct-cta-benefits-specialist-federal-fraud-charges-20221202-ivmzbf2donfsna4cpn7aavm7a4-story.html
Killexams : Drug Information Specialists

All pharmacists provide some level of drug information, whether to other clinicians or to patients. In fact, a recent survey found that 96.4% of 491 hospitals have staff pharmacists who routinely answer drug information questions,[1] and a separate survey of colleges of pharmacy showed that 89% of first professional pharmacy degree programs require at least one didactic course in drug information.[2] While most pharmacists are equipped with knowledge regarding the practice of drug information, the ever-expanding list of pharmaceuticals, as well as the overwhelming amount of clinical data, makes it difficult for practitioners to stay current with recent developments. This also results in the need for more advanced problem-solving skills in order to answer the more complex questions that challenge practitioners today.

Training in Drug Information Practice

Drug information certified are pharmacists whose primary responsibility is the provision of drug information. As with any specialty, formalized training beyond that received in pharmacy school is not required; however, this focused training does Improve the practitioner's clinical credibility and ability to compete with others for employment opportunities. These two intangible attributes may also be obtained with time and experience.

The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) provides residency accreditation in drug information. There are currently 31 ASHP-accredited drug information specialty residencies located throughout the United States. These residency programs are housed in community, academic, and industrial settings and offer a variety of learning opportunities. Although there are additional drug information residency programs that are not ASHP accredited, the standards and objectives for such accreditation may be used to describe the clinical skills set of the drug information specialist which go beyond the minimum standards required of all pharmacists.[3]

Most drug information residency programs provide the resident with 12 months of directed, postgraduate practical experience in the provision of comprehensive drug information. During this 12-month period, the resident is exposed to various aspects of drug information practice that range in scope and complexity, with the ultimate goal of training the resident to become a competent drug information specialist. Many of the competencies required of a drug information resident are specific to executive issues, such as the development and management of a drug information center, but there are many more competencies that construct the foundation of a drug information specialist's clinical practice. Drug information certified must be up-to-date with relevant drug-related literature in order to provide the most current information. They are often tasked as a pharmacy representative to pharmacy and therapeutics (P&T) committees. Responsibilities may include preparing medication-use policies and procedures, improving a health system's adverse-drug-reaction reporting and medication-use evaluation programs, and creating and distributing newsletters containing pertinent medication-use information. The drug information specialist must have advanced literature search and assessment skills to develop drug monographs. Additional responsibilities often include developing patient safety initiatives, ensuring compliance with Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations's standards, and appropriately utilizing drug-contracting opportunities to decrease drug expenditures. Drug information certified may also work in pharmacy informatics.

Career Opportunities in Drug Information

As previously mentioned, drug information certified work in a variety of settings, each with its own unique scope of practice. Academic drug information centers staffed by drug information certified offer pharmacy students practical experience in utilizing available medical media and developing literature-search strategies. Of 88 colleges of pharmacy surveyed, 20% require a drug information practice experience and 70% offer the experience as an elective.[2] These centers are often located within colleges of pharmacy or university hospitals. Most offer their services to a limited range of health care professionals, such as those within certain facilities or within the region or state. Others offer their services to community pharmacists and patients. Many health maintenance organizations (HMOs) and group purchasing organizations (GPOs) have contractual relationships with academic drug information centers, which in turn offer their services to the respective members of the organizations. In addition, HMOs, GPOs, and pharmacy benefit management companies (PBMs) have internal drug information departments that assist their members on a grander scale by providing many of the items utilized by P&T committees in making medication-use decisions. Many PBMs also provide consumer-based drug information via the Internet that is prepared by drug information specialists.

Proprietary and generic drug manufacturers are staffed with pharmacists who provide drug information specifically for the drugs manufactured by the respective companies. Although there is some information they cannot legally share and all information received should be critically evaluated, they do maintain a database of clinical studies, both published and unpublished, that provides hard-to-find information. These drug information certified are available to health care professionals and the public and should be contacted if a patient has an unexpected adverse drug reaction. In addition, drug information certified have practical knowledge of clinical trial design and often provide valuable insight as medical writers and in governmental agencies analyzing drug efficacy and safety claims.

An Underutilized Resource

Drug information certified are trained to provide clear, concise, and accurate drug information in a variety of settings. Not only do they provide quality service, but pharmacist-provided drug information, adverse-drug-reaction monitoring, and formulary management have been associated with significant reductions in the total cost of care in hospital settings, as well as reductions in patient deaths.[4] The presence of a drug information center providing these services in 232 hospitals reduced total cost of care per hospital by $5,226,128.22 (p = 0.003), including a $391,604.94 reduction in drug costs per hospital, and was associated with a total of 10,463 fewer deaths.[4] Disappointingly, an online survey of health care professionals showed that only 1% of respondents contact a drug information center when the need arises.[5] Another recent survey found that only 5.9% of 491 hospitals have a staff position dedicated to the provision of drug information and 4.1% have a formal drug information center.[1] Granted, contacting a drug information specialist may not be the fastest way to obtain drug information in an emergency situation; nonetheless, this underutilization raises several questions.

Today, the Internet provides a plethora of information for both health care professionals and their patients. Many practitioners probably use the Internet when seeking answers to questions. However, at least one study judged significantly more responses obtained from a drug information center as accurate when compared with those received from a Usenet newsgroup (p = 0.001).[6] Also, there is no quality control for these types of newsgroup services and other similar medical information sources housed on the Internet, and practitioners may be jeopardizing their own credibility when using these resources. Another source of information is facility-housed references, including print and electronic products. Electronic drug information products are becoming increasingly popular. A recent survey showed that 60.4% of 491 hospitals subscribed to some sort of electronic product.[1] Two interesting surveys on drug information references have been conducted.[7,8] In one survey, 40.9% of 22 respondents said they were not satisfied with the drug information resources to which their pharmacy currently subscribed.[7] In another survey, 38% of 71 respondents said they used a drug information reference at least 10 times a day, and another 35.2% used such a reference 3-5 times daily.[8] This discrepancy shows that practitioners regularly use some sort of drug information reference, even though they are not always satisfied with the information obtained.

With so many pharmacists retrieving information from drug information references, the underutilization of drug information certified as a resource cannot be attributed to a lack in the number of questions that need to be answered. Perhaps practitioners do not know how to find drug information specialists. Industry-based certified can be contacted via the manufacturer's Web site, and the Physicians' Desk Reference provides a listing of contact information for drug manufacturers.[9] Drug Topics's Red Book contains a list of academic drug information centers, and many colleges of pharmacy provide these services to the pharmacies in their respective states.[10] It is also worth contacting HMOs or GPOs, where applicable, to learn about the services they provide.

Drug information certified are a valuable resource available to support appropriate drug use and Improve quality of patient care. New practitioners are urged to take advantage of the expertise of drug information specialists, either within or outside of their own institutions.

Sat, 03 Dec 2022 10:01:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/530769
Killexams : Do This to Avoid 'Protein Hunger'

Photo: Timolina (Shutterstock)

Protein is great. Our bodies are largely made of protein, and if you lift weights, I bet you already know that eating enough protein is important for building muscle. But what if you just want to be healthy in general? What if you don’t even care that much about being healthy, but want to avoid overeating? Protein is important for you too.

A new study has put the spotlight on a lack of protein as a potential driver of overeating. Its findings supply more support to an existing concept called the “protein leverage hypothesis.” This is the idea that we will eat until we get enough protein, and so if our diet is made of low-protein foods, we may end up eating a lot of food, and thus a lot of calories, just to get our fill of protein. Sometimes people call this “protein hunger.”

Why protein is important

Our bodies don’t just need protein to build new muscle tissue. We also need protein to heal and repair damage. Our bodies continually break tissues down and rebuild them, and we need protein for that task as well. Protein is also the building material for enzymes, which do everything from digesting food to detoxifying chemicals in our livers to helping our blood clot. Many hormones are made of protein; the receptors that receive hormonal messages are made of protein as well.

So we need a steady influx of protein just to keep our body functioning. And if we exercise—which is important for a healthy body—we need protein to support that as well. Without enough protein, we can actually lose muscle mass over time. Loss of muscle is one of the perils of aging, but we can reverse it with strength training and, yes, sufficient protein.

And if the protein leverage hypothesis is correct, we also need protein to keep us from overeating.

Put all that together, and it’s worth making sure to get enough protein in your diet. At an absolute minimum, we need 0.36 grams of protein per pound of body weight per day (so, 72 grams for a 200-pound person). We’ve run the numbers for various body sizes and activity levels here.

“Healthy” foods are often low in protein

If you’ve heard the average American eats “too much” protein, stay with me a minute. It’s true that, on average, we eat more than the minimum requirement of 0.36 grams per pound. But the minimum requirement is low; it’s meant to be the amount that will keep you from being protein-deficient. Athletes will eat more, up to a full 1 gram per pound of body weight. Most of us should be somewhere between those numbers, especially if we’re active. And protein isn’t something where “too much” is harmful, so it’s good to err on the side of getting more than the recommendation rather than less.

So what happens when we decide we want to eat healthy? Chances are, if you’re on a diet, some of the things you’ll cut out are good sources of protein: burgers, cheese, fatty red meat, processed meats like hot dogs and deli meat.

Maybe you’ll swap the burgers for chicken breast, which should be fine from a protein standpoint—but then you’re also eating smaller portions. A Big Mac has 26 grams of protein in those two little patties; this chicken-based American Heart Association certified Lean Cuisine meal only has 14 grams. If you’re going for plant-based meals instead, those tend to be even lower in protein. A salad with dressing usually has no protein unless you’re adding something like chicken, cheese, or nuts—and there usually isn’t much protein in a sprinkling of cheese or nuts.

The amount of protein you need when you’re eating in a calorie deficit is actually the same, or arguably more, than when you’re not trying to lose weight. It’s fine if you don’t want to eat a Big Mac, but a proper low-calorie replacement for that meal would be something that still gives you 26 grams of protein, but with fewer calories from fats and carbs.

Which foods are high in protein?

To help you navigate this issue, let’s talk about which foods are high in protein, and which look like they should be, but aren’t.

Foods that are high in protein without being high in calories include:

  • Chicken breasts and thighs
  • Ground beef, especially leaner mixes like 90/10
  • Greek yogurt or Skyr
  • Whey powder and other protein powders
  • Fish (depending on how fatty it is)
  • Tofu and tempeh
  • Beans and lentils, although they come with a sizable helping of carbs—depending on the type of bean and the way it’s prepared, these could easily be on either of our two lists.

Foods that may not be as high in protein as you think they are:

  • Eggs have 6 grams of protein each; it adds up, sure, but an egg is not a protein bomb.
  • Foods that have the word “protein” on their label are usually still pretty low in protein. A protein muffin may have more protein than a regular muffin, but neither is actually that high in protein.
  • Quinoa has more complete proteins than other foods in its category, but it’s not high in protein by itself. Quinoa has more protein than rice but about the same amount as pasta or wheat bread.
  • Peanut butter has more protein than, say, actual butter. But the thin smear you spread on toast will only add a few grams to your daily total.

These are all still good foods to eat, but don’t mistake a two-egg omelet for a meal that gets you ahead of your protein requirement for the day. The 12 grams of protein in that omelet are far less than the 27 grams in a smallish chicken breast.

Especially if you’re trying to eat healthy, it’s worth looking up the nutrition information for a typical day’s meals and seeing how your protein intake adds up. And if you need ideas, we have a collection of cheap, easy, high-protein meals here.

  

Thu, 10 Nov 2022 05:03:00 -0600 en text/html https://lifehacker.com/do-this-to-avoid-protein-hunger-1849768279
Killexams : Cloudera Expands Partner Opportunities, Accelerates Go to Market

Revamped Cloudera Partner Network offers a more robust partner ecosystem to drive demand, fuel growth and establish new revenue pathways

SANTA CLARA, Calif., Nov. 2, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Cloudera, the hybrid data company, today announced Cloudera Partner Network, a redesigned partner program that recognizes and rewards partners for their contribution to Cloudera's go-to-market success. Cloudera Partner Network includes a competency-based, points-driven approach to leverage expanded program opportunities, more comprehensive tools and support, and industry-leading incentives and promotions. The program was designed to help partners guide their customers to adopt modern data strategies based on the Cloudera hybrid data platform. Cloudera Partner Network replaces the Cloudera Connect partner program.

Cloudera, Inc. (PRNewsfoto/Cloudera, Inc.)

The program was designed to help partners guide their customers to adopt modern data strategies

"Our extensive partner network helps us reach new markets and customers. Investing in the channel means that more businesses, across all verticals, will be able to go beyond data to accelerate their business," said Rachel Tuller, Head of Global Partner Strategy and Alliances. "Partners drive growth for us, while helping their customers make the most of their data and insights, in any cloud. We have listened to their feedback, evaluated their needs, and launched a new program designed to help them thrive in an increasingly competitive marketplace. Cloudera Partner Network represents an increased investment in the channel to ensure each partner derives tangible value as we continue to grow together."

"Cloudera has always focused on helping businesses make the most of their data, and the new Cloudera Partner Network will help us build more strategic relationships, add more value to our customers and close larger, more profitable deals," said Baz Khuti, President at Modak USA. "The new incentives, tools and training resources will better support our customers on their data and digital transformation journeys."

Members will enjoy the following benefits through the Cloudera Partner Network:

  • Improved and enhanced tools to better enable and support go to market, such as an intuitive Marketing Automation Platform and Asset Library

  • Increased financial commitment through new rebate and market development fund programs

  • Enhanced training and enablement, with a dedicated Partner Success Team

  • Program benefits that support delivery of the new CDP One SaaS solution

  • Shortened time to market capabilities with FastTrack Onboarding Program

Cloudera Partner Network is tier-based. As partners collect points and earn competencies, they advance through the levels – Member, Select, Premier, and Strategic. At each tier, they receive access to exclusive discounts and other membership benefits, including access to the new analyst recommended CDP One SaaS solution.

About Cloudera

At Cloudera, we believe data can make what is impossible today, possible tomorrow. Cloudera taught the world the value of big data, creating an industry and ecosystem powered by the relentless innovation of the open-source community. We empower our customers, leaders in their industries, to transform complex data into clear and actionable insights. Through our hybrid data platform, organizations are able to build their data-driven future by getting data - no matter where it resides - into the hands of those who need it. Learn more at Cloudera.com.

Cloudera and associated marks are trademarks or registered trademarks of Cloudera, Inc. All other company and product names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

Cision

View original content to download multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/cloudera-expands-partner-opportunities-accelerates-go-to-market-301665499.html

SOURCE Cloudera, Inc.

Wed, 02 Nov 2022 01:05:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/cloudera-expands-partner-opportunities-accelerates-130000002.html
Killexams : Hunger, Nutrition, and Health: Stepping Up to the Plate

Cate Collings, MD

The historic White House Conference on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health was an invigorating experience full of innovative ideas and ambitious goals to end hunger in America by 2030. The White House unveiled a strategy and an impressive $8 billion in public-private commitments to help millions of people with food insecurity and diet-related chronic diseases.

Much hard work remains to translate these ideas and proposals into actions that Improve the health of individuals and families. But health professionals, primary care physicians in particular, may be wondering what this coordinated focus on nutrition will mean for their practices and how they can ensure that their patients experience the greatest benefits.

One recurring conference theme was the need to more effectively screen for food insecurity in medical encounters. Important food assistance programs like the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, Children (WIC), the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), and even school lunch programs were initially focused primarily on eliminating sheer calorie deficit. While some of these programs have implemented nutrition standards, there remains room for improvement to the nutritional content of the food that these programs provide to better supply the nourishment humans need to help prevent and treat chronic disease. In other words, as a practicing provider, begin to discern differences between food insecurity and nutritional insecurity. Your patient may be experiencing one, neither, or both of these conditions.

As a board-certified lifestyle medicine physician, I see this White House conference as an extremely promising sign that much-needed policy and regulatory changes are coming that will expand access to nutritional counseling and food as medicine. Some federal legislation has already been proposed that represents a first step. The Medical Nutrition Equity Act and the Medical Nutrition Therapy Act, for example, would significantly expand coverage of medical nutrition therapy services.

Expanded access to medically tailored meals or food packages and produce prescriptions, particularly in communities with high rates of diet-related disease, was also a Topic of conference discussion.

Changes won't happen overnight, but there are several ways that physicians can prepare to thrive in a health system that encourages and rewards the restoration of health through nutrition and food as medicine.

Seek Nutrition Education

Writing a prescription for a medically tailored meal without understanding the science behind it is no better than a cardiologist prescribing a medication without understanding the drug's properties or benefits. Food as medicine is best prescribed by a clinician knowledgeable about nutrition and chronic disease. But few physicians receive sufficient nutrition education in medical school. We now face an opportunity for physicians to marry food-as-medicine prescriptions with fundamental knowledge of the "what and why" of those prescriptions.

In partnership with the White House Conference on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health, the American College of Lifestyle Medicine (ACLM) made a $22 million in-kind commitment to provide 5.5 hours of complimentary CME coursework to 100,000 physicians and other medical professionals treating patients in areas with a high prevalence of diet-related disease. It's easy to take advantage of this opportunity by registering here for the Lifestyle Medicine and Food as Medicine Essentials education bundle.

Inventory Your Community's Resources

Become familiar with nonprofit or private organizations that may already be helping to meet hunger and nutrition needs in your community. The Teaching Kitchen Collaborative has an interactive map of teaching kitchens and medically tailored meal and produce prescription programs. The American Academy of Family Physicians has a good Neighborhood Navigator tool to identify resources by zip code.

Startup companies that deliver medically tailored meals to patients' homes are growing in number and attracting investor attention. By identifying and connecting with these organizations, physicians can form partnerships that synergize healthcare and nutritious food sources in the community. Saint Luke's Health System's REACHN (Resilience, Education, Activity, Community, Health, Nutrition) Program is an example of a dynamic community partnership. As you prescribe lifestyle modification and connect your patients to relevant resources, emphasize to them that a lifestyle medicine prescription delivers only positive side effects, focused on eradicating the root cause of disease with the goal of health restoration.

Locate Registered Dietitians in Your Area

As more diagnoses become eligible for nutritional counseling, physicians will have increasing opportunities to collaborate with registered dietitians to whom you refer patients. It is vital that perspectives on nutrition interventions are aligned between the referring physician and the receiving dietitian. Know the style and methods of dietitians in your region so that recommendations are united and can be reinforced by members of the care team.

To promote effective collaboration, physicians and dietitians may want to participate in nutrition-related CE/CME activities together, share relevant journal articles, and review patient resources and group class topics. A good first step is for physicians to encourage dietitians to register for the free ACLM Lifestyle Medicine and Food as Medicine Essentials education bundle.

Be an Instrument of Change

If you are passionate about nutrition, work within your health system to influence change. Highlight the national priorities around food as medicine as represented at the White House conference. Encourage the replication of successful, scalable nutrition and food-as-medicine delivery models, and educate fellow clinicians on the resources that already are available. Promote partnerships with organizations in the business of providing and delivering medically tailored meals, and organize activities that raise awareness in the community. Join the growing Health Systems Council, a collaborative learning community of almost 80 health systems that are integrating lifestyle medicine, and be on the lookout for opportunities to support advocacy efforts related to nutrition policy.

Clinicians who lead the integration of nutrition programming now will demonstrate their value as the US health system evolves into one that finally, at long last, recognizes the outsized role of poor nutrition in chronic disease.

Tue, 15 Nov 2022 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/983932
Killexams : Why hunger is rising in Minnesota and what can be done to help

More people in Minnesota are struggling to put food on the table.  

Food shelves across the state are seeing more people than last year and compared to the months before the COVID-19 pandemic. Schools also are reporting more students running up school lunch debt.  

Many families are having trouble making ends meet, some for the first time and even when adults are working. Inflation has pushed up the cost of groceries by 12 percent compared to a year ago. And, the extra money flowing to households from financial support programs that were in place during the COVID-19 pandemic has now dried up, including the child tax credit, universal free school meals and expanded SNAP benefits.

Allison O’Toole, is the CEO of Second Harvest Heartland, a food bank that distributes food to about 400 food shelves in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Deisy De Leon Esqueda, is the manager of the ECHO Food Shelf in Mankato. Rob Williams is the founder and president of Every Meal, a nonprofit organization based in Roseville which works in schools to distribute food directly to students.

MPR News host Angela Davis led a conversation about rising food insecurity in Minnesota and possible solutions. Here are some highlights:

Do you consider food insecurity to be getting worse both nationally and in Minnesota?

Allison O’Toole: Yes. Times are tougher than ever before right now. We know that grocery bills and everyday expenses are off the charts making them really hard, if not impossible, for families to afford. We're hearing about a 40 percent increase in food shelf visits across our state.

Before you keep reading, take a moment to donate to MPR News. Your financial support ensures that factual and trusted news and context remain accessible to all.

Deisy De Leon Esqueda: Yes. We are seeing people that are coming in for the first time. Our numbers have actually increased from 2019 to now from 85 average households per day to 110, 120. Some families are coming in for the first time and then some have not been to the food shelf in years and are now finding themselves in this predicament and coming back.

What do you mean when you say you meet the needs of culturally diverse clients?

Deisy De Leon Esqueda: Minnesota is becoming more diverse. Before we used to supply food out and I would say, “Oh, you can make a hot dish out of this.” Well, not everybody likes hot dishes and that's not always their comfort food. We're trying to do the best that we can to be able to meet their needs by giving them food that they're actually going to consume. That way people feel excited and accepted.

Allison O’Toole: What also happened through the pandemic is the disparities and who is hungry has been revealed again. We call that the racial hunger divide, where communities of color experience at least twice the rates of food insecurity than their white neighbors. So we are investing millions of dollars in making sure people and communities have the food they know and love and will eat.

What can the state legislature do in terms of policy?

Allison O’Toole: We had the privilege of hosting the Governor and Lieutenant Governor on Monday this week at Second Harvest Heartland. So, we talked a lot about this, and the state has a more than $10 billion surplus sitting there. We need to put that to good use for Minnesota families: bolstering the funding for food shelves and food banks, making big bold changes, and investing in things like Universal School meals. Hungry kids cannot learn.

Deysi De Leon Esqueda: During the pandemic, we saw our numbers decrease by almost half and that was due to these programs being established and money going out as just checks. We saw those programs work and now about 39 percent of all our visits made to the Food Shelf are children under the age of 17.

What about these long holiday breaks when kids may be out of school for two weeks? Any change this year compared to years past?

Rob Williams: We have seen a huge increase, about a 34 to 35 percent increase in kids in our schools asking for food support. Thanksgiving, winter break and spring break are also significant food gaps, and we've actually had to eliminate our winter break program which typically involves about 120 different locations throughout the state where kids can go and access food, just due to the high demand in our weekend program.

Your stories:

Shayne from Plymouth

The first phone call was from a disabled veteran that struggled with food insecurity six years ago when he and his family were living in Oklahoma. “There were weeks when we'd have only 20 dollars for food. We basically would be living off of oatmeal, cabbage and potatoes because those are the cheapest things you could buy, and I was too proud to ever go into a food,” he said.

After his family started to receive boxes of food from a food shelter, he educated himself, found a work opportunity in Minnesota, and moved to the state with his entire family. In Minnesota, he found out about the benefits he was entitled to being a disabled veteran. “I think that the state can keep reaching out to people because some are too proud to go into the food shelf. And there's a lot of people entitled to benefits that don't know it,” he said.

Jessica from Fargo

The second phone call was from a divorced mom that wanted to share how it was to be hungry. She used to work at a grocery store, but her paychecks were not enough to afford meals for herself and her kids. Within a year of demanding physical work, she ended up weighing 112 pounds. “I would have loved to sit down to dinner with my kids and I couldn't because the smallest food alone was enough,” she said.

Jessica also mentioned that she didn’t have time to go to food shelters or welfare. “I just needed a paycheck that covered my bills,” she said.

Lane from Minneapolis

The final phone call was from a woman who recently moved from another state and highlighted the kindness of Minnesotans and how well caseworkers at SNAP and other benefits work compared to other states. “I was surprised by how much I qualified for here because I have been told in other states I did not,” she said.

Lane explained how her now adult kids couldn’t afford their own housing, or college and needed to stay home taking care of their younger siblings. “Not having the money for food or housing makes every bad situation imaginable work,” she said.  

If you need a food shelf or want to donate, search for organizations in your region of Minnesota at Hunger Solutions. You can also donate directly to Second Harvest Heartland, ECHO Food Shelf and Every Meal.

Subscribe to the MPR News with Angela Davis podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or RSS. 

Use the audio player above to listen to the full conversation. 

Wed, 23 Nov 2022 09:55:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.mprnews.org/episode/2022/11/22/why-hunger-is-rising-in-minnesota-and-what-can-be-done-to-help
Killexams : Opinion: Hunger doesn't take holidays off, so let's serve others all year long

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Sun, 20 Nov 2022 09:12:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.statesman.com/story/opinion/columns/guest/2022/11/20/opinion-hunger-doesnt-take-holidays-off/69654586007/
Killexams : Cloudera Expands Partner Opportunities, Accelerates Go-To-Market
(MENAFN- AETOSWire)

, the hybrid data company, today announced Cloudera Partner Network, a redesigned partner program that recognizes and rewards partners for their contribution to Cloudera's go-to-market success. Cloudera Partner Network includes a competency-based, points-driven approach to leverage expanded program opportunities, more comprehensive tools, and support, and industry-leading incentives and promotions. The program was designed to help partners guide their customers to adopt modern data strategies based on the Cloudera hybrid data platform. Cloudera Partner Network replaces the Cloudera Connect partner program.

“Our extensive partner network helps us reach new markets and customers. Investing in the channel means that more businesses, across all verticals, will be able to go beyond data to accelerate their business,” said Rachel Tuller, Head of Global Partner Strategy and Alliances.“Partners drive growth for us while helping their customers make the most of their data and insights, in any cloud. We have listened to their feedback, evaluated their needs, and launched a new program to help them thrive in an increasingly competitive marketplace. Cloudera Partner Network represents an increased investment in the channel to ensure each partner derives tangible value as we continue to grow together.”

“Cloudera has always focused on helping businesses make the most of their data. The new Cloudera Partner Network will help us build more strategic relationships, add more value to our customers and close larger, more profitable deals,” said Baz Khuti, President at Modak USA.“The new incentives, tools, and training resources will better support our customers on their data and digital transformation journeys.”

Members will enjoy the following benefits through the Cloudera Partner Network:

● Improved and enhanced tools to better enable and support go-to-market, such as an intuitive Marketing Automation Platform and Asset Library

● Increased financial commitment through new rebate and market development fund programs

● Enhanced training and enablement, with a dedicated Partner Success Team

● Program benefits that support the delivery of the new CDP One SaaS solution

    Shortened time-to-market capabilities with FastTrack Onboarding Program

Cloudera Partner Network is tier-based. As partners collect points and earn competencies, they advance through the levels – Member, Select, Premier, and Strategic. At each tier, they receive access to exclusive discounts and other membership benefits, including access to the new analyst-recommended CDP One SaaS solution.

About Cloudera

At Cloudera, we believe data can make what is impossible today, possible tomorrow. Cloudera taught the world the value of big data, creating an industry and ecosystem powered by the relentless innovation of the open-source community. We empower our customers, leaders in their industries, to transform complex data into clear and actionable insights. Through our hybrid data platform, organizations are able to build their data-driven future by getting data - no matter where it resides - into the hands of those who need it. Learn more at Cloudera.com.

Cloudera and associated marks are trademarks or registered trademarks of Cloudera, Inc. All other company and product names may be trademarks of their respective owners.


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