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Killexams : CA-Technologies Administrator information search - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CAT-160 Search results Killexams : CA-Technologies Administrator information search - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CAT-160 https://killexams.com/exam_list/CA-Technologies Killexams : California Gov. Newsom Names Deputy CIO, Several Tech Leaders
Gov. Gavin Newsom on Thursday filled a key opening in state technology leadership with the appointment of a new deputy state chief information officer.

A veteran of more than 20 years’ service in state government, Jared C. Johnson, will hold the dual role of deputy state CIO and chief deputy director of the California Department of Technology.

Johnson, 46, joins a leadership team led by state CIO and CDT Director Liana Bailey-Crimmins. He succeeds Russ Nichols, who retired in November after serving as deputy state CIO and acting state CIO before Bailey-Crimmins’ appointment in June. Nichols was the award-winning agency chief information officer for the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation before his elevation to the CDT role in March 2021.


Johnson had served as deputy director of CDT’s Data Center Support Services since 2021. Previously, he held several positions at the California Franchise Tax Board from 2005 to 2021, including as director of the Operations Management Bureau, section manager for IT Service Support and Data Processing Services, senior manager of the Data Processing Services Section, manager of the Command Center, and lead for eService Infrastructure Support.

Johnson was supervisor of the IT Business and Support Services Unit at the Department of Pesticide Regulation from 2003 to 2005. He was a system test analyst on the INC Project at the California Franchise Tax Board from 2005 to 2006. Before that, he was an IT analyst for what was then the California Technology, Trade and Commerce Agency from 1999 to 2003.

The appointment does not require Senate confirmation, and the annual salary is $198,000.


In addition to Johnson’s promotion, Newsom’s office also announced appointments in the California Government Operations Agency (GovOps), CDT’s parent organization:
  • Christina Spagnoli, 41, of Fair Oaks has been appointed senior adviser at GovOps, where she has served as deputy secretary of legislation since 2019. Spagnoli was vice president of State Government Relations at the California Bankers Association from 2018 to 2019. She was capitol director for Assemblymember Blanca Rubio from 2016 to 2018, chief lobbyist and legislative director for Planned Parenthood Affiliates of California from 2014 to 2016, and legislative director in the office of Assembly Majority Whip Jimmy Gomez from 2013 to 2014. She held several other legislative roles before that.
  • Luis Larios, 32, of Sacramento has been appointed GovOps’ deputy secretary of Legislation and External Affairs after serving as a deputy appointments secretary for Newsom since 2020. He was a senior assistant to Assemblymember Miguel Santiago from 2019 to 2020 and a legislative aide for Assemblymember Mike Gipson from 2017 to 2019, in addition to several previous legislative roles.
  • Sergio Gutierrez, 47, of Wilton has been appointed chief deputy director in the Office of Data and Innovation (ODI). Gutierrez had been agency chief information officer at the California Environmental Protection Agency since 2010 and acting deputy director and CIO at the California Department of Toxic Substances Control from 2012 to 2013. Before that, Gutierrez was chief of the Statewide Network Support Bureau at the California Department of Insurance from 2007 to 2010, among other previous roles.
  • Kimberly Hicks, 40, of Fairfax has been appointed deputy director of Advanced Analytics and Evaluation for ODI. Hicks has served on the math faculty at the City College of San Francisco since 2022 and has been a data scientist at Marin Data Science Consultants and the city and county of San Francisco. Hicks worked in the private sector before her work in government.

This article was originally published by Industry Insider-California, Government Technology's sister publication.

Dennis Noone is the managing editor of Techwire.

Mon, 12 Dec 2022 11:14:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.govtech.com/workforce/california-gov-newsom-names-deputy-cio-several-tech-leaders
Killexams : Five takeaways from the fusion energy breakthrough © Provided by The Hill

The Biden administration has announced a breakthrough on nuclear fusion, fueling hopes of further progress toward clean energy.

Nuclear fusion — the process in which atoms are fused together to create energy — has long been studied as a potential power source.

But various hurdles have prevented the reaction from being a viable option for clean energy, and a commercial effort is still likely decades away.

Here’s what you should know about the Energy Department’s announcement:

1. It’s the first time a net energy gain has come from fusion

The crux of Tuesday’s news is that scientists at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California were able to produce more energy via fusion than they put in. They put in 2.05 megajoules of energy and got out 3.15 megajoules. 

This is the first time scientists in a lab were able to create a net energy output through fusion, demonstrating that it is possible to do so.

“It’s the first time it has ever been done in a laboratory anywhere in the world. Simply put, this is one of the most impressive scientific feats of the 21st century,” Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm told reporters at a press conference. 

While the technology isn’t ready to be commercialized yet, the successful experiment raises the prospects of larger-scale deployment of fusion energy.  

Previously, the lab came relatively close to breaking even when it generated 70 percent of the energy it put into a fusion reaction last year.

2. It’s seen as another potential source of carbon-free energy

If fusion can become a large-scale power source, it will provide another way of generating carbon-free energy as the world looks to transition away from planet-warming fossil fuels. 

U.S. officials have said they hope to broadly have an entirely clean electric grid by 2035 and commercially viable fusion power within a decade.

Like wind, solar and traditional nuclear energy — where an atom is split apart instead of fused together — nuclear fusion doesn’t emit any planet-warming gasses or air pollution. 

“This milestone moves us one significant step closer to the possibility of zero-carbon, abundant fusion energy powering our society,” Granholm said. 

“We can use it to produce clean electricity, transportation fuels, power heavy industry [and] so much more,” she added. “It would be like adding a power drill to our toolbox in building this clean energy economy.”

Unlike traditional nuclear energy, called fission, fusion doesn’t generate radioactive waste that requires long-term storage. And unlike traditional hydropower dams, it doesn’t require finding — and flooding — a new reservoir.

The main place that fusion power would be useful if plugged into the current American grid would be as what is called “base load” power: a stable constant amount of electricity that current grids rely on.

In the U.S., about 19 percent of electricity comes from nuclear power, while 60 percent comes from fossil fuels such as coal, natural gas and petroleum, and the rest is from renewables, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

Carolyn Kuranz, associate professor of nuclear engineering and radiological sciences at the University of Michigan, told The Hill on Monday that nuclear fusion does create byproducts that have small amounts of radioactive material, but she said the material can stay on the power plant site and be used to fuel future fusion reaction instead of needing to go elsewhere.

Paul Dabbar, who was the Energy Department’s under secretary for science during the Trump administration, also pointed to some advantages that fusion could have over wind and solar in an interview with The Hill this week. 

“It needs to be windy, it needs to be sunny, it takes a lot of land,” he said of the other energy sources, though he noted that battery technology could be used to Boost on the intermittency issue.

However, fusion comes with its own drawbacks. A future fusion industry built around large, expensive individual plants would be dependent on an expanded, high-capacity electric grid to move power across the region or country — something that feels almost as far away at this point as commercial fusion power. 

3. Breakthrough positions US as leader in global quest for fusion 

The successful net power-producing experiment is a clear mark of success for America’s burgeoning public and private investment into fusion energy — particularly as the European Union, China and South Korea build out their own programs.

In January, China’s Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) sustained a record 17-minute fusion reaction, Smithsonian reported.

And the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) in southern France will be the largest fusion facility in the world when it begins experiments in 2025, according to a statement.

In March, the Energy Department released a decadelong roadmap to bring commercial fusion to electricity markets.

That initiative touted the $2.5 billion that the private sector poured into fusion last year — about 3.5 times what the government spends directly.

An April White House summit also promoted the fact that two-thirds of private fusion companies and suppliers are based in the U.S. — and that American companies are the main recipients of international fusion funding.

But while it is tempting to think of fusion in terms of a “race” between countries, the drive for fusion power is highly international and collaborative.

U.S. companies built the central solenoid magnet for the ITER tokamak — necessary to create the magnetic fields that power and control the superheated plasma during a fusion reaction, according to the U.S. government.

And the Energy Department in November announced nearly $50 million for fusion research — of which part will go to support U.S. researchers at ITER and EAST, as The Hill reported.

4. Fusion still years off from becoming a mainstream energy source

The development was a major step toward fusion energy, but you’re not likely to be using this type of energy to turn on your lights anytime soon. 

Granholm told reporters the administration hopes to see commercial fusion within a decade. 

“The president has a decadal vision to get to a commercial fusion reactor within, obviously, 10 years, so we’ve got to get to work,” she told reporters. 

Kim Budil, director of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, where the breakthrough occurred, said it could be even longer, taking “decades” before the technology is commercialized. 

“There are very significant hurdles” in both science and technology, Budil said. 

Dabbar told The Hill this week that he thinks the first commercial demonstration fusion reactors could crop up between 2030 and 2035 and that large-scale deployment could come a few years after that. 

“It takes a long time for energy systems to go from testing to full-scale deployment,” he said. 

5. It has military implications

The applications of this discovery — like the experiment itself — go well beyond peacetime.

While the ultimate implications of this test are a milestone on the road to clean energy, the “more immediate” implications were military, said Marvin Adams, deputy administrator of the National Nuclear Security Administration.

So are the program’s roots: The National Ignition Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory uses extremely powerful lasers to “ignite” hydrogen and cause a self-sustaining explosion — a system developed in part to test advanced nuclear weapons without having to detonate an entire bomb. 

“You start with a little spark, and then the spark gets bigger and bigger and bigger, and then the burn propagates through,” physicist Riccardo Betti of University of Rochester told public radio station WBUR.

This is a tiny-scale version of the same process used to kick off a hydrogen or “thermonuclear” bomb — which uses fusion power to release 1,000 times as much energy as the bomb dropped on Hiroshima in 1945, Time reported.

Fusion reactors don’t contain nearly enough fuel to produce that kind of explosion — and a thermonuclear bomb requires a separate atomic explosion to trigger ignition, according to the International Atomic Energy Agency.

But U.S. officials hinted at military applications. Fusion is “an essential process in modern nuclear weapons” and a milestone like this one was a strong argument for American military power, Adams noted.

The successful test demonstrates America’s “world-leading expertise in weapons-relevant technologies” while continuing “to show our allies that we know what we’re doing,” Adams said.

For the latest news, weather, sports, and streaming video, head to The Hill.

Tue, 13 Dec 2022 09:26:01 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/five-takeaways-from-the-fusion-energy-breakthrough/ar-AA15fo5P
Killexams : California’s coming offshore wind boom faces big engineering hurdles

This week, dozens of companies are expected to compete for the right to lease the first commercial wind power sites off the coast of California in a federal online auction that could kick-start the state’s next clean energy boom.

Collectively, the winners will pay at least tens of millions of dollars for exclusive rights to submit plans to the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management for wind turbines at five sites that stretch across more than 370,000 acres of the Pacific. Three of the areas are clustered near Morro Bay along the central coast, starting about 20 miles due west from the picturesque seaside town of Cambria. Two more are located off Humboldt County in the north. 

Annual average wind speeds around the Morro Bay sites reach 8 to 10 meters per second, exceeding those around some large offshore wind farms already developed in the North Sea. Towering turbines on the locations up for lease could deliver 4.5 gigawatts of clean electricity to the California grid, enough to power more than 1.5 million homes. 

The state has an even more ambitious goal: building 25 gigawatts of offshore wind by 2045. That’s equivalent to nearly a third of the state’s total generating capacity today, or enough to power 25 million homes.

But the audacious plans for offshore wind face a daunting geological challenge: the continental shelf drops steeply just a few miles off the California coast. That makes it prohibitively expensive to erect standard offshore wind turbines, which are set atop fixed structures that extend to the seafloor. The turbines built near Morro Bay and off Humboldt, where water depths reach up to 1,300 meters (around 4,300 feet), will need to be placed on floating platforms, a speculative and very costly technology.  

Some companies have begun using such platforms, which are tethered to the sea bottom on moorings, in places such as the coasts of Portugal and Scotland. But these sites still produce relatively little power. To meet its ambitious plans, California will need to develop sprawling fleets of these floating wind turbines very quickly.

The hope is that the state, as a huge consumer of electricity, will provide a giant early market for the technology, helping to scale it up, pushing down costs, and driving innovation in the nascent sector. That would boost US efforts to develop more offshore wind power, a clean energy sector where the nation has long lagged regions like China and the UK. If the floating industry does prove viable, it will also unlock vast amounts of renewable resources around the globe that have largely been off limits to date.

But there are enormous engineering and regulatory challenges ahead. Achieving California’s targets could require creating or upgrading ports, constructing new vessels, streamlining permitting processes, building up a West Coast wind manufacturing sector, and shifting to new types of platforms that could be cheaper to deliver and install. And all of that would have to occur at an incredibly rapid pace.

David Hochschild, chair of the California Energy Commission, readily acknowledges the looming difficulties, but he says the state is committed to working through them. 

“This is a technology that is ripe and ready,” he says. “We’re all in.”

High hopes 

The appeal of floating wind is obvious. Somewhere around 60 meters deep (nearly 200 feet) it becomes impractical for developers to build what are called fixed wind foundations. But the winds above deep waters far off the coast are often ideal: strong and consistent. 

Off Morro Bay and other potential California sites, the winds dip at midday but rise in the early evening, in nearly perfect sync with consumer demand—and in much the opposite pattern from the electricity generated by solar farms. 

Those characteristics will help the state’s grid operators draw more of their electricity from carbon-free sources through the evening, which will serve an increasingly crucial function as the California power sector moves off fossil fuels, says Alla Weinstein, chief executive of Trident Winds, which is a partner in the Castle Wind joint venture, which is bidding in the auction this week.

The state’s climate laws will require 90% of its electricity to come from such resources by 2035. That same year, California will mandate that all new passenger vehicles sold in the state must be zero-emissions, placing growing demands on the grid.

Hochschild says California also hopes a boom in floating wind will spur economic development, including the emergence of a state-based manufacturing sector near ports that could supply turbine blades, towers, and other components. Offshore wind development could spark tens of billions of dollars in investments over the next quarter-century, he says.

In addition to their monetary bids, companies participating in the auction can earn credits by committing to invest in workforce training, support the development of domestic wind supply chains, and engage with indigenous tribes and other underserved communities, among other considerations. These credits will be considered in determining the winner.

But California is pinning a lot of hopes on an industry that scarcely exists today. 

a floating wind turbine

SEBASTIEN SALOM GOMIS / AFP VIA AP IMAGES

Only a handful of mostly small demonstration projects have been developed so far, totalling around 125 megawatts, according to a Department of Energy report published earlier this year. The largest floating farm in the world so far is the nearly 50-megawatt Kincardine project off the shores of Scotland. There are also small projects operating in China, Japan, France, Norway, and Portugal, the report notes. 

There are big plans to build more globally. The total capacity of projects in the pipeline—including large sites in Australia, Brazil, South Korea, and the United Kingdom—doubled in 2021, to more than 60 gigawatts.

The Biden administration has set a US goal of developing 15 gigawatts of floating wind by 2035 and established a program designed to cut the cost of the technology by 70% over that time. (It’s also aiming to build 30 gigawatts of all types of offshore wind by 2030.)

High costs 

For now, however, floating wind power remains hugely expensive. 

It’s hard to put precise figures on the technology today, given the small pool of projects across different regions, but the levelized cost is roughly $200 per megawatt-hour, according to the DOE report. (Levelized costs of energy are the average calculated across a project’s lifetime, taking into account the costs of building and operating it.)

Standard offshore wind, land-based wind projects, and large-scale solar farms run around $80, $30 and $35 per megawatt-hour, respectively, according to the US National Renewable Energy Laboratory. That wide gulf will clearly discourage grid operators from signing long-term power purchase agreements unless they’re incentivized or required to by policies or regulators.

California's climate laws could do just that, pushing grid operators to source more and more of their electricity from carbon-free sources across more hours of the day, even if it is initially more expensive.

In addition to the high costs, any US floating wind development will also have to grapple with some onerous regulations. Under a century-old law, any ship delivering goods or people from one US site to another must be built, owned, and primarily crewed by American citizens. Past findings and precedents suggest that floating wind sites will fall under those restrictions, says Carl Valenstein, an attorney focused on maritime industries at Morgan, Lewis & Bockius.

The problem is there are limited numbers of compliant ships that could tow out and plant the assembled floating turbines. Foreign-flag vessels could do some of the work on site, and it’s possible certain US ships could be retrofitted to achieve some of the tasks. But it’s clear the American ship-building sector will need to get moving fast for the US to have any hope of meeting both the fixed and floating offshore wind targets.

“At some point in the next year, people are going to have to ask the question: Where are we going to get the ships to implement these plans along the current timelines?” Valenstein says. “If a lot of these projects get going, those capacity constraints will be really felt—and you don’t get these ships built overnight.”

California faces still more challenges. Many of the state’s ports are too shallow and its bridges too low to accommodate the giant turbines, towers, and platforms, which are far easier to assemble before they’re carried to the offshore site.

In addition, it could cost tens of billions of dollars to develop the electricity transmission capacity needed to plug all the envisioned offshore wind turbines into the grid. California’s Independent System Operator, which manages the state’s main electricity network, found that just accommodating four gigawatts of electricity from the sites near Humboldt County could cost between $5 and $8 billion.

Finally, there’s the question of permitting. 

Winning the federal auction is merely the start. Every winning developer will still need to work through lengthy environmental review and approval processes with a variety of federal, state, and local agencies, ultimately securing no fewer than 30 permits. Weinstein says it could take five to seven years.

And Californians have a well-earned reputation for blocking and stalling major developments. They are particularly touchy about coastal projects—whether they can see them or not.

Catching the wind 

Despite the challenges, fans of floating wind remain optimistic. 

Walt Musial, who leads the research efforts on offshore wind at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, predicts that costs will come down as the industry moves beyond the pilot scale and developers gain experience building more and bigger floating wind facilities.

Research groups estimate that the costs could fall from around $200 per megawatt-hour to between $58 and $120 by 2030. That would leave floating offshore wind more expensive than solar and onshore wind, but it could still serve an important role in an overall energy portfolio. 

The technology is improving as well. Turbines themselves continue to get taller, generating more electricity and revenue from any given site. Some research groups and companies are also developing new types of floating platforms and delivery mechanisms that could make it easier to work within the constraints of ports and bridges. 

The Denmark-based company Stiesdal has developed a modular, floating platform with a keel that doesn’t drop into place until it’s in the deep ocean, enabling it to be towed out from relatively shallow ports. 

Meanwhile, San Francisco startup Aikido Technologies is developing a way of shipping turbines horizontally and then upending them in the deep ocean, enabling the structures to duck under bridges en route. The company believes its designs provide enough clearance for developers to access any US port. Some 80% of these ports have height limits owing to bridges or airport restrictions.

A number of federal, state, and local organizations are conducting evaluations of California and other US ports, assessing which ones might be best positioned to serve floating wind projects and what upgrades could be required to make it possible.

Government policies in the US, the European Union, China, and elsewhere are also providing incentives to develop offshore wind turbines, domestic manufacturing, and supporting infrastructure. That includes the Inflation Reduction Act that Biden signed into law this summer.

Finally, as for California’s permitting challenges, Hochschild notes that the same 2021 law requiring the state’s energy commision to set offshore wind goals also requires it to undertake the long-term planning necessary to meet them. That includes mapping out a strategy for streamlining the approval process.

For all the promise of floating wind, there’s little question that ensuring it’s cost-competitive and achieving the targets envisioned will require making massive investments in infrastructure, manufacturing, and more, and building big projects at a pace that the state hasn’t shown itself capable of in the exact past.

If it can pull it off, however, California could become a leading player in a critical new clean energy sector, harnessing its vast coastal resources to meet its ambitious climate goals.

Mon, 05 Dec 2022 05:59:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.technologyreview.com/2022/12/05/1064243/californias-coming-wind-boom-faces-big-engineering-hurdles/
Killexams : Nuclear fusion breakthrough ‘could bring limitless clean energy’ The National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory in California - David Butow/Corbis via Getty Images © David Butow/Corbis via Getty Images The National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory in California - David Butow/Corbis via Getty Images

A breakthrough in nuclear fusion could bring limitless clean energy and help the fight against climate change, experts have predicted.

On Tuesday, scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in California, are expected to announce that they have achieved the “holy grail” of getting more energy out of a fusion reaction than it took to trigger it.

The team reportedly used 2.1 megajoules of energy to create the conditions for the reaction, and achieved a 2.5 megajoules return – an achievement known as fusion ignition.

“It’s a bit like striking a match and, with this experiment, the match kept burning,” said Dr Robbie Scott, of the Science and Technology Facilities Council, who contributed to the research.

“This is a momentous achievement. Fusion has the potential to provide a near limitless, safe, clean, source of carbon-free baseload energy. It cannot be understated what a huge breakthrough this is for laser fusion research.”

In 1920, Arthur Eddington, an English astrophysicist, first suggested that stars draw their incredible energy from the fusion of hydrogen into helium.

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory mimics conditions at the centre of the Sun by using the largest laser in the world to fuse together heavy hydrogen isotopes, deuterium and tritium, into helium.

Lasers enter the ends of a cylinder, hitting its inner walls, making them glow x-ray hot, and those x-rays then heat a central sphere containing nuclear fuel.

As the sphere vapourises in the heat, plasma rushes off at incredible speeds, creating an implosion that fuses the deuterium and tritium into helium, releasing a huge amount of extra energy at the same time.

The breakthrough comes nearly 90 years after Prof Ernest Rutherford, a Cambridge University physicist, oversaw an experiment fusing deuterium into helium, observing that “an enormous effect was produced”.

The first patent for a fusion reactor was filed in 1946 in the UK, but since then scientists have struggled to control their experiments or achieve useful levels of energy.

In February, the Joint European Torus (JET) at the Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, in Oxfordshire, broke the world record for the amount of energy produced from the process. 

But the 59-megajoules result still took far more energy to create than was achieved.  

The new result marks the first time that fusion ignition and energy gain has ever been achieved and heralds a future in which the world could completely decarbonise while still meeting increasing energy demands.

Gianluca Gregori, a professor of physics at the University of Oxford who specialises in high power lasers and fusion energy, said: “For many years fusion energy has been described as the holy grail of the world's energy problems – a limitless and clean energy source that would address the ever-increasing demands free from carbon emissions.

“While this is not yet an economically viable power plant, the path for the future is much clearer.”

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in California - Reuters © Provided by The Telegraph Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in California - Reuters

However, scientists warned that it would still take several years or decades before the breakthrough could be scaled up to provide a useful power source.

Jeremy Chittenden, a professor of plasma physics at Imperial College London, said: “To turn fusion into a power source, we’ll need to boost the energy gain still further.

“We’ll also need to find a way to reproduce the same effect much more frequently and much more cheaply before we can realistically turn this into a power plant.

Robin Grimes, a professor of materials physics at Imperial, said: “This is a key step on a possible pathway to commercial fusion. It demonstrates and underpins our basic understanding of the physics and is an engineering triumph.

“Nevertheless, extracting this energy in a way that it can be harnessed and developing the materials that can stand up to continuous operation are massive challenges.

“There is no doubt, the prize is worth the effort. Success, however long it takes, would be transformational.”

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Mon, 12 Dec 2022 04:45:13 -0600 en-GB text/html https://www.msn.com/en-gb/money/technology/nuclear-fusion-breakthrough-could-bring-limitless-clean-energy/ar-AA15bQGT
Killexams : Report: California gun data breach was unintentional

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California's Department of Justice mistakenly posted the names, addresses and birthdays of nearly 200,000 gun owners on the internet because officials didn't follow policies or understand how to operate their website, according to an investigation released Wednesday.

The investigation, conducted by an outside law firm hired by the California Department of Justice, found that personal information for 192,000 people was downloaded 2,734 times by 507 unique IP addresses during a roughly 12-hour period in late June. All of those people had applied for a permit to carry a concealed gun.

The data was exposed just days after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that people have a right to carry guns in public. The decision invalidated a California law that said people must give a reason for wanting to carry a concealed weapon, such as a threat to their safety. Lawmakers then tried to pass new restrictions for concealed carry permits, but failed.

Investigators said they “did not uncover any evidence that the timing of the (data breach) was driven by a nefarious intent or was personally or politically motivated in any way.” Instead, they said state officials planned to publish what they thought was anonymous data “to meet anticipated heightened public interest in firearms-related data” following the court ruling.

An intentional breach of personal information carries more stiff fines and penalties under California law, according to Chuck Michel, an attorney and president of the California Rifle & Pistol Association. He said the association is preparing a lawsuit against the state and is encouraging people impacted by the exposure to talk with an attorney about filing their own lawsuits.

Michel noted the leaked data likely included information from people in sensitive positions — including judges, law enforcement personnel and domestic violence victims — who had sought gun permits.

“There is a lot of gaps and unanswered questions, perhaps deliberately so, and some spin on this whole notion of whether this was an intentional release or not,” he said. “This is not the end of the inquiry.”

The Department of Justice contracted with the Morrison Foerster law firm to investigate the data exposure. The firm said it had “the mandate and autonomy to conduct an independent investigation that followed the facts and evidence wherever they led.”

Officials at the California Department of Justice did not know about the breach until someone sent Attorney General Rob Bonta a private message on Twitter that included screenshots of the personal information that was available to get from the state's website, the investigation said.

State officials at first thought the report was a hoax. Two unnamed employees — identified only as “Data Analyst 1” and “Research Center Director” — investigated and mistakenly assured everyone that no personal information was publicly available.

Meanwhile, the website crashed because so many people were trying to get the data. Another group of state officials worked to bring the website back online, unaware of the breach. They got the website working again at about 9:30 p.m.

State officials would not disable the website until about noon the next day. By then, the information had already been downloaded thousands of times.

State officials thought they were providing anonymous information in the aggregate for research and media requests about the use of guns in California. But the employee who created the website included several datasets that contained personal information.

Investigators found that no one — neither the employee who compiled the data nor the officials that supervised the employee — knew the proper security settings to prevent the data from being available for public download.

“This was more than an exposure of data, it was a breach of trust that falls far short of my expectations and the expectations Californians have of our department,” Bonta, the attorney general, said in a news release. “I remain deeply angered that this incident occurred and extend my deepest apologies on behalf of the Department of Justice to those who were affected.”

Other information was also mistakenly released, including data from firearms safety certificates, dealer record of sale and the state's assault weapons registry. That data included dates of birth, gender and driver's license numbers for more than 2 million people and 8.7 million gun transactions. But investigators said there wasn't enough information in those datasets to identify anyone.

Investigators recommended more training and planning for state officials, including a review and update of policies and procedures.

“This failure requires immediate correction, which is why we are implementing all of the recommendations from this independent report," Bonta said.

This story was first published on Nov. 30, 2022. It was updated on Dec. 1, 2022, to correct that the California Rifle & Pistol Association is preparing an individual lawsuit against the state, not a class action lawsuit.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

Wed, 30 Nov 2022 10:16:00 -0600 en text/html https://kdhnews.com/business/technology/report-california-gun-data-breach-was-unintentional/article_2b034c10-632b-5a9d-b129-d428f9635636.html
Killexams : Biden-Harris Administration Announces Groundbreaking Joint Initiative to Drive Investment to Entrepreneurs Scaling Critical and Emerging Technologies

Washington D.C., Dec. 03, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today, the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) announced a new joint effort to establish the Small Business Investment Company Critical Technologies Initiative (SBICCT), designed to grow investment in critical technologies vital to U.S. national security. This new partnership will support the Biden-Harris Administration’s whole-of-government effort to bolster America’s leadership in global innovation and to strengthen our national security by incubating and scaling technologies.

Administrator Guzman joined Defense Secretary Austin at the Reagan National Defense Forum in Simi Valley, California, where they held a joint letter signing event, announcing this groundbreaking milestone in the longstanding partnership between SBA and DoD.

“SBA and DoD’s new historic initiative will help make sure America maintains its edge in technologies critical to national security,” said SBA Administrator Isabella Casillas Guzman. “DoD’s newly established Office of Strategic Capital will leverage SBA’s expertise and successes aligning and scaling public and private capital through its Small Business Investment Company program to address funding gaps in the innovation ecosystem. We are proud to be deepening SBA’s longstanding partnership with DoD to drive forward America’s technological and defensive strength – and in turn America’s national security and prosperity.”

“Earlier this week, I announced the creation of the Department’s Office of Strategic Capital and I’m delighted that OSC’s first official activity will be a partnership with the Small Business Administration,” said Defense Secretary Austin. “This partnership will help secure funding for critical areas for national defense—and ensure that our warfighters get the capabilities they need, before they need them.”

Underpinning this partnership is a new regulation that the SBA has proposed, which expands the SBIC program and introduces a new financial instrument called the Accrual Debenture. This instrument is designed to align with the cash flow patterns of startups, and supports the long duration often required to incubate and scale technology investments. Many defense technologies require heavy research and development investment, and this instrument is designed to attract the patient private capital necessary to support these innovations.

The partnership is made official through a letter of intent between SBA and DOD, which advances the Biden-Harris Administration’s commitment to growing our national security innovation base and establishing the U.S. as the world leader in innovative technologies.

###

About the U.S. Small Business Administration

The U.S. Small Business Administration helps power the American dream of business ownership. As the only go-to resource and voice for small businesses backed by the strength of the federal government, the SBA empowers entrepreneurs and small business owners with the resources and support they need to start, grow or expand their businesses, or recover from a declared disaster. It delivers services through an extensive network of SBA field offices and partnerships with public and private organizations. To learn more, visit www.sba.gov.

CONTACT: Press Offce United States Small Business Administration press_office@sba.gov
Sat, 03 Dec 2022 07:57:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/biden-harris-administration-announces-groundbreaking-194100382.html
Killexams : The Download: a long covid app, and California’s wind plans

This is today's edition of The Download, our weekday newsletter that provides a daily dose of what's going on in the world of technology.

A new app aims to help the millions of people living with long covid

The news: A new app could help people with long covid cope with their condition by giving them a clearer understanding of what helps—and hinders—their health. The platform, called Visible, collects data every day to help people understand how their symptoms fluctuate.

How it works: Visible tracks a user’s heart rate variability in order to recommend when someone should take it easy for the next few days to avoid exhausting themselves, checking their heart rate in the morning and getting them to score their symptoms in the evening. 

Why it matters: Millions of people around the world live with long covid. Behind the numbers, there is an enormous amount of individual pain, misery, and frustration, especially regarding medical ignorance about the condition. Visible’s co-founder hopes to not only help individual people better manage long covid, but to provide better data to help researchers gain a better understanding of the condition too. Read the full story.

—Rhiannon Williams

Read more of our reporting on long covid:

+ A battle is raging over long covid in children. While potentially millions of children suffer from this mysterious illness, researchers are still debating how big a problem it is. Read the full story.

+ We’ve only just begun to examine the racial disparities of long covid. It may take years to understand the full impact of the pandemic and its aftermath on Black people in the US. Read the full story.

+ From April 2021: Could covid lead to a lifetime of autoimmune disease? Evidence is growing that in some people covid infections are producing autoantibodies targeting the body’s organs. If true, it could mean years of lingering sickness and misery for many. Read the full story.

California’s coming offshore wind boom faces big engineering hurdles

This week, dozens of companies are expected to compete for the right to lease the first commercial wind power sites off the coast of California in a federal online auction that could kick-start the state’s next clean energy boom.

The state has an ambitious goal: building 25 gigawatts of offshore wind by 2045. That’s equivalent to nearly a third of the state’s total generating capacity today, or enough to power 25 million homes.

But the plans are facing a daunting geological challenge: the continental shelf drops steeply just a few miles off the California coast, alongside enormous engineering and regulatory obstacles. Read the full story.

—James Temple

The must-reads

I’ve combed the internet to find you today’s most fun/important/scary/fascinating stories about technology.

1 The Twitter Files weren’t the bombshell Elon Musk billed them as 
His carelessness triggered the harassment of some of Twitter’s content moderators, too. (WP $)
+ The files didn’t violate the First Amendment, either. (The Atlantic $)
+ Hate speech has exploded on the platform since he took over. (NYT $)
+ Journalists are staying on Twitter—for now. (Vox)
+ The company’s advertising revenue isn’t looking very healthy. (NYT $)

2 Russia is trying to freeze Ukrainians by destroying their electricity 
It’s the country’s vulnerable who will suffer the most. (Economist $)
+ How Ukraine could keep the lights on. (MIT Technology Review)

3 Crypto is at a crossroads
Investors, executives, and advocates are unsure what's next. (NYT $)
+ FTX and the Alameda Research trading firm were way too close. (FT $)
+ It’s okay to opt out of the crypto revolution. (MIT Technology Review)

4 Taylor Swift fans are suing Ticketmaster
They’re furious they weren’t able to buy tickets in the botched sale last month. (The Verge)

5 The internet is having a midlife crisis
What is it for? And more importantly, who is it for? (Slate $)
+ Tim Berners-Lee wanted the internet to have an ‘oh, yeah?’ button. (Slate $)

6 We need a global deal to safeguard the natural world
COP15, held this week in Montreal, is our best bet to thrash one out. (Vox)
+ Off-grid living is more viable these days than you may think. (The Verge)

7 What ultra-dim galaxies can teach us about dark matter  
We’re going to need new telescopes to seek more of them out. (Wired $)
+ Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa has some big plans for space. (Reuters)
+ A super-bright satellite could hamper our understanding of the cosmos. (Motherboard)
+ Here’s how to watch Mars disappear behind the moon. (New Scientist $)

8 An elite media newsletter wants to cover “power, money, and ego.”
It promises unparalleled access to prolific writers—and their audiences. (New Yorker $)
+ How to sign off an email sensibly. (Economist $) 

9 The metaverse has a passion for fashion 👗
Here’s what its best-dressed residents are wearing. (WSJ $)

10 We’ve been sending text messages for 30 years 💬
Yet we’re still misunderstanding each other. (The Guardian)

Quote of the day

“There is certainly a rising sense of fear, justifiable fear. And I would say almost horror.”

—Pamela Nadell, director of American University’s Jewish Studies program, tells the Washington Post she fears that antisemitism has become normalized in the US, in the light of Kanye West's exact comments praising Hitler.

The big story

The gig workers fighting back against the algorithms

April 2022

In the Bendungan Hilir neighborhood, just a stone’s throw from Jakarta’s glitzy central business district, motorcycle drivers gather in an informal “base camp.” They are drivers with Gojek, Indonesia’s largest ride-hailing firm. They’re also part of the backbone of a growing movement of resistance against the dispatch algorithms that dominate their lives.

Base camps grew out of a tradition that existed before algorithmic ride-hailing services came to Indonesia. They’re the network through which drivers around the city stay in tight communication. This sense of community is now at the heart of what distinguishes Jakarta’s drivers from other gig workers around the world, and could reveal a new playbook for resistance: a way for workers to build collective power, achieve a measure of security, and take care of one another when seemingly no one else will. Read the full story.

—Karen Hao & Nadine Freischlad

We can still have nice things

A place for comfort, fun and distraction in these weird times. (Got any ideas? Drop me a line or tweet 'em at me.)

+ Punk to politician is a pretty cool job trajectory.
+ The cast of the Lord of the Rings reuniting over Zoom is exactly what I need right now.
+ Loving your favorite music runs a lot deeper than simply liking how it sounds.
+ We’re approaching the end of the year, which means it’s the perfect time to dive into a controversial list of the year’s best movies.
+ Happy birthday to Jonathan the tortoise, who, by turning 190 yesterday, officially became the world’s oldest living land animal!

Mon, 05 Dec 2022 05:59:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.technologyreview.com/2022/12/05/1064260/download-long-covid-app-california-wind-plans/
Killexams : To rein in Big Tech, Europe looked beyond lawsuits. Will the US follow? No result found, try new keyword!THE Biden administration has made reining in big tech companies a priority. Perhaps the strongest signal was the government’s pick for the top antitrust enforcers: Jonathan Kanter, head of the ... Sat, 10 Dec 2022 18:00:00 -0600 text/html https://www.businesstimes.com.sg/working-life/rein-big-tech-europe-looked-beyond-lawsuits-will-us-follow Killexams : ClearSign Technologies Corporation Receives Concluding Purchase Order for California Refinery Multi Heater Project

Order Comprised of 16 Burners, Control Equipment and Spare Parts

TULSA, Okla., Nov. 30, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- ClearSign Technologies Corporation (Nasdaq: CLIR) ("ClearSign" or the "Company"), an emerging leader in industrial combustion and sensing technologies that Boost energy, operational efficiency and safety while dramatically reducing emissions, today announced that the Company has received the concluding purchase order to proceed with the last phase of the 20 burner project announced on March 29, 2022 for a California refinery.

ClearSign Logo (PRNewsFoto/ClearSign Combustion Corporation) (PRNewsfoto/ClearSign Combustion Corporation)

The purchase order is for the manufacture and delivery of the remaining 16 burners, control equipment and spare parts.  This purchase order follows the purchase order for a multi burner test and four burners required for that testing, and other ancillary items announced on September 1, 2022. Work associated with the September 1st purchase order has progressed into the final testing and demonstration phase.  The 20 burners are to be installed into two heaters at the customers refinery site in California in 2023 during their scheduled maintenance shutdown.

"We are very pleased about how this project is progressing, and to have received the final stage of this significant commercial purchase order," said Jim Deller, Ph.D., Chief Executive Officer of ClearSign.  "We had previously mentioned that the timeline for this project had been shortened and are glad to be able to meet the needs of our customer.  This installation of our best in class ultra low NOx technology will be significant for us as it is in our target market of California and at a notable refinery."

About ClearSign Technologies Corporation

ClearSign Technologies Corporation designs and develops products and technologies for the purpose of improving key performance characteristics of industrial and commercial systems, including operational performance, energy efficiency, emission reduction, safety and overall cost-effectiveness. Our patented technologies, embedded in established OEM products as ClearSign Core™, and ClearSign Eye™ and other sensing configurations, enhance the performance of combustion systems and fuel safety systems in a broad range of markets, including the energy (upstream oil production and down-stream refining), commercial/industrial boiler, chemical, petrochemical, transport and power industries. For more information, please visit www.clearsign.com.

Cautionary note on forward-looking statements

All statements in this press release that are not based on historical fact are "forward-looking statements." You can find many (but not all) of these statements by looking for words such as "approximates," "believes," "hopes," "expects," "anticipates," "estimates," "projects," "intends," "plans," "would," "should," "could," "may," "will" or other similar expressions. While management has based any forward-looking statements included in this press release on its current expectations on the Company's strategy, plans, intentions, performance, or future occurrences or results, the information on which such expectations were based may change. These forward-looking statements rely on a number of assumptions concerning future events and are subject to a number of risks, uncertainties and other factors, many of which are outside of our control, that could cause genuine results to materially differ from such statements. Such risks, uncertainties and other factors include, but are not limited to, our ability to successfully install our burners in the California refinery and complete the anticipated project within the updated timeline, general business and economic conditions, the performance of management and our employees, our ability to obtain financing, competition, whether our technology will be accepted and adopted and other factors identified in our Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission and available at www.sec.gov and other factors that are detailed in our periodic and current reports available for review at www.sec.gov. Furthermore, the Company operates in a competitive environment where new and unanticipated risks may arise. Accordingly, investors should not place any reliance on forward-looking statements as a prediction of genuine results. The Company disclaims any intention to, and, except as may be required by law, undertake no obligation to, update or revise forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances that subsequently occur or of which the Company hereafter becomes aware.

Cision

View original content to get multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/clearsign-technologies-corporation-receives-concluding-purchase-order-for-california-refinery-multi-heater-project-301689950.html

SOURCE ClearSign Technologies Corporation

Wed, 30 Nov 2022 00:05:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/clearsign-technologies-corporation-receives-concluding-133000154.html
Killexams : Biden-Harris Administration Announces Groundbreaking Joint Initiative to Drive Investment to Entrepreneurs Scaling Critical and Emerging Technologies

Washington D.C., Dec. 03, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today, the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) announced a new joint effort to establish the Small Business Investment Company Critical Technologies Initiative (SBICCT), designed to grow investment in critical technologies vital to U.S. national security. This new partnership will support the Biden-Harris Administration’s whole-of-government effort to bolster America’s leadership in global innovation and to strengthen our national security by incubating and scaling technologies.

Administrator Guzman joined Defense Secretary Austin at the Reagan National Defense Forum in Simi Valley, California, where they held a joint letter signing event, announcing this groundbreaking milestone in the longstanding partnership between SBA and DoD.

“SBA and DoD’s new historic initiative will help make sure America maintains its edge in technologies critical to national security,” said SBA Administrator Isabella Casillas Guzman. “DoD’s newly established Office of Strategic Capital will leverage SBA’s expertise and successes aligning and scaling public and private capital through its Small Business Investment Company program to address funding gaps in the innovation ecosystem. We are proud to be deepening SBA’s longstanding partnership with DoD to drive forward America’s technological and defensive strength – and in turn America’s national security and prosperity.”

“Earlier this week, I announced the creation of the Department’s Office of Strategic Capital and I’m delighted that OSC’s first official activity will be a partnership with the Small Business Administration,” said Defense Secretary Austin. “This partnership will help secure funding for critical areas for national defense—and ensure that our warfighters get the capabilities they need, before they need them.”

Underpinning this partnership is a new regulation that the SBA has proposed, which expands the SBIC program and introduces a new financial instrument called the Accrual Debenture. This instrument is designed to align with the cash flow patterns of startups, and supports the long duration often required to incubate and scale technology investments. Many defense technologies require heavy research and development investment, and this instrument is designed to attract the patient private capital necessary to support these innovations.

The partnership is made official through a letter of intent between SBA and DOD, which advances the Biden-Harris Administration’s commitment to growing our national security innovation base and establishing the U.S. as the world leader in innovative technologies.

###

About the U.S. Small Business Administration

The U.S. Small Business Administration helps power the American dream of business ownership. As the only go-to resource and voice for small businesses backed by the strength of the federal government, the SBA empowers entrepreneurs and small business owners with the resources and support they need to start, grow or expand their businesses, or recover from a declared disaster. It delivers services through an extensive network of SBA field offices and partnerships with public and private organizations. To learn more, visit www.sba.gov.

CONTACT: Press Offce United States Small Business Administration press_office@sba.gov
Sat, 03 Dec 2022 05:44:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/now/biden-harris-administration-announces-groundbreaking-194100382.html
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