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AZ-220 Microsoft Azure IoT Developer thinking | http://babelouedstory.com/

AZ-220 thinking - Microsoft Azure IoT Developer Updated: 2024

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Exam Code: AZ-220 Microsoft Azure IoT Developer thinking January 2024 by Killexams.com team

AZ-220 Microsoft Azure IoT Developer

The content of this test will be updated on September 24, 2020. Please download the test skills outline below to see what will be changing.

Implement the IoT solution infrastructure (15-20%)

Provision and manage devices (20-25%)

Implement Edge (15-20%)

Process and manage data (15-20%)

Monitor, troubleshoot, and optimize IoT solutions (15-20%)

Implement security (15-20%)



Implement the IoT Solution Infrastructure (15-20%)

Create and configure an IoT Hub

 create an IoT Hub

 register a device

 configure a device twin

 configure IoT Hub tier and scaling

Build device messaging and communication

 build messaging solutions by using SDKs (device and service)

 implement device-to-cloud communication

 implement cloud-to-device communication

 configure file upload for devices

Configure physical IoT devices

 recommend an appropriate protocol based on device specifications

 configure device networking, topology, and connectivity

Provision and manage devices (20-25%)

Implement the Device Provisioning Service (DPS)

 create a Device Provisioning Service

 create a new enrollment in DPS

 manage allocation policies by using Azure Functions

 link an IoT Hub to the DPS

Manage the device lifecycle

 provision a device by using DPS

 deprovision an autoenrollment

 decommission (disenroll) a device

Manage IoT devices by using IoT Hub

 manage devices list in the IoT Hub device registry

 modify device twin tags and properties

 trigger an action on a set of devices by using IoT Hub Jobs and Direct Methods

 set up Automatic Device Management of IoT devices at scale

Build a solution by using IoT Central

 define a device type in Azure IoT Central

 configure rules and actions in Azure IoT Central

 define the operator view

 add and manage devices from IoT Central

 monitor devices

 custom and industry-focused application templates

 monitor application health using metrics

Implement Edge (15-20%)

Set up and deploy an IoT Edge device

 create a device identity in IoT Hub

 deploy a single IoT device to IoT Edge

 create a deployment for IoT Edge devices

 install container runtime on IoT devices

 define and implement deployment manifest

 update security daemon and runtime

 provision IoT Edge devices with DPS

 IoT Edge automatic deployments

 deploy on constrained devices

 secure IoT Edge solutions

 deploy production certificates

Develop modules

 create and configure an Edge module

 deploy a module to an Edge device

 publish an IoT Edge module to an Azure Container Registry

Configure an IoT Edge device

 select and deploy an appropriate gateway pattern

 implement Industrial IoT solutions with modules like Modbus and OPC

 implement module-to-module communication

 implement and configure offline support (including local storage)

Process and manage data (15-20%)

Configure routing in Azure IoT Hub

 implement message enrichment in IoT Hub

 configure routing of IoT Device messages to endpoints

 define and test routing queries

 integrate with Event Grid

Configure stream processing

 create ASA for data and stream processing of IoT data

 process and filter IoT data by using Azure Functions

 configure Stream Analytics outputs

Configure an IoT solution for Time Series Insights (TSI)

 implement solutions to handle telemetry and time-stamped data

 create an Azure Time Series Insights (TSI) environment

 connect the IoT Hub and the Time Series Insights (TSI)

Monitor, troubleshoot, and optimize IoT solutions (15-20%)

Configure health monitoring

 configure metrics in IoT Hub

 set up diagnostics logs for Azure IoT Hub

 query and visualize tracing by using Azure Monitor

 use Azure Policy definitions for IoT Hub

Troubleshoot device communication

 establish maintenance communication

 verify device telemetry is received by IoT Hub

 validate device twin properties, tags and direct methods

 troubleshoot device disconnects and connects

Perform end-to-end solution testing and diagnostics

 estimate the capacity required for each service in the solution

 conduct performance and stress testing

Implement security (15-20%)

Implement device authentication in the IoT Hub

 choose an appropriate form of authentication

 manage the X.509 certificates for a device

 manage the symmetric keys for a device

Implement device security by using DPS

 configure different attestation mechanisms with DPS

 generate and manage x.509 certificates for IoT Devices

 configure enrollment with x.509 certificates

 generate a TPM endorsements key for a device

 configure enrollment with symmetric keys

Implement Azure Security Center (ASC) for IoT

 enable ASC for IoT in Azure IoT Hub

 create security modules

 configure custom alerts
Microsoft Azure IoT Developer
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Microsoft Azure IoT Developer
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Question: 167
Question Set 2
Note: This question is part of a series of questions that present the same scenario. Each question in the series contains
a unique solution that might meet the stated goals. Some question sets might have more than one correct solution,
while others might not have a correct solution.
After you answer a question in this question, you will NOT be able to return to it. As a result, these questions will not
appear in the review screen.
You have an Azure IoT solution that includes an Azure IoT hub, a Device Provisioning Service instance, and 1,000
connected IoT devices.
All the IoT devices are provisioned automatically by using one enrollment group.
You need to temporarily disable the IoT devices from the connecting to the IoT hub.
Solution: From the Device Provisioning Service, you disable the enrollment group, and you disable device entries in
the identity registry of the IoT hub to which the IoT devices are provisioned.
Does the solution meet the goal?
A. Yes
B. No
Answer: A
Explanation:
You may find it necessary to deprovision devices that were previously auto-provisioned through the Device
Provisioning Service.
In general, deprovisioning a device involves two steps:
Question: 168
Testlet 1
Case Study
This is a case study. Case studies are not timed separately. You can use as much test time as you would like to
complete each case . However, there may be additional case studies and sections on this exam. You must manage your
time to ensure that you are able to complete all questions included on this test in the time provided.
To answer the questions included in a case study, you will need to reference information that is provided in the case
study. Case studies might contain exhibits and other resources that provide more information about the scenario that is
described in the case study. Each question is independent of the other question on this case study.
At the end of this case study, a review screen will appear. This screen allows you to review your answers and to make
changes before you move to the next sections of the exam. After you begin a new section, you cannot return to this
section.
To start the case study
To display the first question on this case study, click the Next button. Use the buttons in the left pane to explore the
content of the case study before you answer the questions. Clicking these buttons displays information such as
business requirements, existing environment, and problem statements. If the case study has an All Information tab,
note that the information displayed is identical to the information displayed on the subsequent tabs. When you are
ready to answer a question, click the Question button to return to the question.
Existing Environment. Current State of Development
Contoso produces a set of Bluetooth sensors that read the temperature and humidity. The sensors connect to IoT
gateway devices that relay the data.
All the IoT gateway devices connect to an Azure IoT hub named iothub1.
Existing Environment. Device Twin
You plan to implement device twins by using the following JSON sample.
Existing Environment. Azure Stream Analytics
Each room will have between three to five sensors that will generate readings that are sent to a single IoT gateway
device. The IoT gateway device will forward all the readings to iothub1 at intervals of between 10 and 60 seconds.
You plan to use a gateway pattern so that each IoT gateway device will have its own IoT Hub device identity.
You draft the following query, which is missing the GROUP BY clause.
SELECT
AVG(temperature),
System.TimeStamp() AS AsaTime
FROM
Iothub
You plan to use a 30-second period to calculate the average temperature practicing of the sensors.
You plan to minimize latency between the condition reported by the sensors and the corresponding alert issued by the
Stream Analytics job.
Existing Environment. Device Messages
The IoT gateway devices will send messages that contain the following JSON data whenever the temperature exceeds
a specified threshold.
The level property will be used to route the messages to an Azure Service Bus queue endpoint named criticalep.
Existing Environment. Issues
You discover connectivity issues between the IoT gateway devices and iothub1, which cause IoT devices to lose
connectivity and messages.
Requirements. Planning Changes
Contoso plans to make the following changes:
Use Stream Analytics to process and view data.
Use Azure Time Series Insights to visualize data.
Implement a system to sync device statuses and required settings.
Add extra information to messages by using message enrichment.
Create a notification system to send an alert if a condition exceeds a specified threshold.
Implement a system to identify what causes the intermittent connection issues and lost messages.
Requirements. Technical Requirements
Contoso must meet the following requirements:
Use the built-in functions of IoT Hub whenever possible.
Minimize hardware and software costs whenever possible.
Minimize administrative effort to provision devices at scale.
Implement a system to trace message flow to and from iothub1.
Minimize the amount of custom coding required to implement the planned changes.
Prevent read operations from being negatively affected when you implement additional services.
HOTSPOT
You create a new IoT device named device1 on iothub1. Device1 has a primary key of Uihuih76hbHb.
How should you complete the device connection string? To answer, select the appropriate options in the answer area.
NOTE: Each correct selection is worth one point.
Answer:
Explanation:
Box 1: iothub1
The Azure IoT hub is named iothub1.
Box 2: azure-devices.net
The format of the device connection string looks like:
HostName={YourIoTHubName}.azure-
devices.net;DeviceId=MyNodeDevice;SharedAccessKey={YourSharedAccessKey}
Box 1: device1
Device1 has a primary key of Uihuih76hbHb.
Reference:
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/iot-hub/quickstart-control-device-dotnet
Question: 169
You plan to deploy a standard tier Azure IoT hub.
You need to perform an over-the-air (OTA) update on devices that will connect to the IoT hub by using scheduled
jobs.
What should you use?
A. a device-to-cloud message
B. the device twin reported properties
C. a cloud-to-device message
D. a direct method
Answer: D
Explanation:
Releases via the REST API. All of the operations that can be performed from the Console can also be automated using
the REST API. You might do this to automate your build and release process, for example.
You can build firmware using the Particle CLI or directly using the compile source code API.
Note: Over-the-air (OTA) firmware updates are a vital component of any IoT system. Over-the-air firmware updates
refers to the practice of remotely updating the code on an embedded device.
Reference:
https://docs.particle.io/tutorials/device-cloud/ota-updates/
Question: 170
You have an IoT device that gathers data in a CSV file named Sensors.csv. You deploy an Azure IoT hub that is
accessible at ContosoHub.azure-devices.net. You need to ensure that Sensors.csv is uploaded to the IoT hub.
Which two actions should you perform? Each correct answer presents part of the solution. NOTE: Each correct
selection is worth one point.
A. Upload Sensors.csv by using the IoT Hub REST AP
C. From the Azure subscription, select the IoT hub, select Message routing, and then configure a route to storage.
D. From the Azure subscription, select the IoT hub, select File upload, and then configure a storage container.
E. Configure the device to use a GET request to ContosoHub.azure-devices.net/devices/ContosoDevice1/
files/notifications.
Answer: AC
Explanation:
C: To use the file upload functionality in IoT Hub, you must first associate an Azure Storage account with your hub.
Select File upload to display a list of file upload properties for the IoT hub that is being modified.
For Storage container: Use the Azure portal to select a blob container in an Azure Storage account in your current
Azure subscription to associate with your IoT Hub. If necessary, you can create an Azure Storage account on the
Storage accounts blade and blob container on the Containers
A: IoT Hub has an endpoint specifically for devices to request a SAS URI for storage to upload a file. To start the file
upload process, the device sends a POST request to {iot hub}.azure-devices.net/devices/{deviceId}/files with the
following JSON body:
{
"blobName": "{name of the file for which a SAS URI will be generated}"
}
Incorrect Answers:
D: Deprecated: initialize a file upload with a GET. Use the POST method instead.
Reference:
https://github.com/MicrosoftDocs/azure-docs/blob/master/articles/iot-hub/iot-hub-configure-file-upload.md
Question: 171
Note: This question is part of a series of questions that present the same scenario. Each question in the series contains
a unique solution that might meet the stated goals. Some question sets might have more than one correct solution,
while others might not have a correct solution.
After you answer a question in this question, you will NOT be able to return to it. As a result, these questions will not
appear in the review screen.
You have an Azure IoT solution that includes an Azure IoT hub, a Device Provisioning Service instance, and 1,000
connected IoT devices. All the IoT devices are provisioned automatically by using one enrollment group. You need to
temporarily disable the IoT devices from the connecting to the IoT hub.
Solution: From the IoT hub, you change the credentials for the shared access policy of the IoT devices.
Does the solution meet the goal?
A. Yes
B. No
Answer: B
Explanation:
Reference:
https://docs.microsoft.com/bs-latn-ba/azure/iot-dps/how-to-unprovision-devices
Question: 172
Note: This question is part of a series of questions that present the same scenario. Each question in the series contains
a unique solution that might meet the stated goals. Some question sets might have more than one correct solution,
while others might not have a correct solution.
After you answer a question in this question, you will NOT be able to return to it. As a result, these questions will not
appear in the review screen.
You have an Azure IoT solution that includes an Azure IoT hub, a Device Provisioning Service instance, and 1,000
connected IoT devices.
All the IoT devices are provisioned automatically by using one enrollment group.
You need to temporarily disable the IoT devices from the connecting to the IoT hub.
Solution: You delete the enrollment group from the Device Provisioning Service.
Does the solution meet the goal?
A. Yes
B. No
Answer: B
Explanation:
Instead, from the Device Provisioning Service, you disable the enrollment group, and you disable device entries in the
identity registry of the IoT hub to which the IoT devices are provisioned.
Reference:
https://docs.microsoft.com/bs-latn-ba/azure/iot-dps/how-to-unprovision-devices
Question: 173
HOTSPOT
You have an Azure IoT hub.
You plan to deploy 1,000 IoT devices by using automatic device management.
The device twin is shown below.
You need to configure automatic device management for the deployment.
Which target Condition and Device Twin Path should you use? To answer, select the appropriate options in the answer
area. NOTE: Each correct selection is worth one point.
Answer:
Explanation:
Box 1: tags.engine.warpDriveType=VM105a
Use tags to target twins. Before you create a configuration, you must specify which devices or modules you want to
affect. Azure IoT Hub identifies devices and using tags in the device twin, and identifies modules using tags in the
module twin.
Box 2: properties.desired.warpOperating
The twin path, which is the path to the JSON section within the twin desired properties that will be set.
For example, you could set the twin path to properties.desired.chiller-water and then provide the following JSON
content:
{
"temperature": 66,
"pressure": 28
}
Reference:
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/iot-hub/iot-hub-automatic-device-management
Question: 174
Question Set 2
Note: This question is part of a series of questions that present the same scenario. Each question in the series contains
a unique solution that might meet the stated goals. Some question sets might have more than one correct solution,
while others might not have a correct solution.
After you answer a question in this question, you will NOT be able to return to it. As a result, these questions will not
appear in the review screen.
You have an Azure IoT solution that includes an Azure IoT hub, a Device Provisioning Service instance, and 1,000
connected IoT devices.
All the IoT devices are provisioned automatically by using one enrollment group.
You need to temporarily disable the IoT devices from the connecting to the IoT hub.
Solution: From the Device Provisioning Service, you disable the enrollment group, and you disable device entries in
the identity registry of the IoT hub to which the IoT devices are provisioned.
Does the solution meet the goal?
A. Yes
B. No
Answer: A
Explanation:
You may find it necessary to deprovision devices that were previously auto-provisioned through the Device
Provisioning Service.
In general, deprovisioning a device involves two steps:
Question: 175
You plan to deploy an Azure IoT hub.
The IoT hub must support the following:
Three Azure IoT Edge devices
2,500 IoT devices
Each IoT device will spend a 6 KB message every five seconds.
You need to size the IoT hub to support the devices. The solution must minimize costs.
What should you choose?
A. one unit of the S1 tier
B. one unit of the B2 tier
C. one unit of the B1 tier
D. one unit of the S3 tier
Answer: D
Explanation:
2500* 6 KB * 12 = 180,000 KB/minute = 180 MB/Minute.
B3, S3 can handle up to 814 MB/minute per unit.
Incorrect Answers: A, C: B1, S1 can only handle up to 1111 KB/minute per unit
B: B2, S2 can only handle up to 16 MB/minute per unit.
Reference:
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/iot-hub/iot-hub-scaling
Question: 176
DRAG DROP
You deploy an Azure IoT hub. You need to demonstrate that the IoT hub can receive messages from a device.
Which three actions should you perform in sequence? To answer, move the appropriate actions from the
list of actions to the answer area and arrange them in the correct order.
Answer:
Explanation:
Step 1: Register a device in IoT Hub
Before you can use your IoT devices with Azure IoT Edge, you must register them with your IoT hub. Once a device
is registered, you can retrieve a connection string to set up your device for IoT Edge workloads.
Step 2: Configure the device connection string on a device client.
When youre ready to set up your device, you need the connection string that links your physical device with its
identity in the IoT hub.
Step 3: Trigger a new send event from a device client.
Reference:
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/iot-edge/how-to-register-device
Question: 177
Question Set 2
Note: This question is part of a series of questions that present the same scenario. Each question in the series contains
a unique solution that might meet the stated goals. Some question sets might have more than one correct solution,
while others might not have a correct solution.
After you answer a question in this question, you will NOT be able to return to it. As a result, these questions will not
appear in the review screen.
You have an Azure IoT solution that includes an Azure IoT hub, a Device Provisioning Service instance, and 1,000
connected IoT devices.
All the IoT devices are provisioned automatically by using one enrollment group.
You need to temporarily disable the IoT devices from the connecting to the IoT hub.
Solution: From the Device Provisioning Service, you disable the enrollment group, and you disable device entries in
the identity registry of the IoT hub to which the IoT devices are provisioned.
Does the solution meet the goal?
A. Yes
B. No
Answer: A
Explanation:
You may find it necessary to deprovision devices that were previously auto-provisioned through the Device
Provisioning Service.
In general, deprovisioning a device involves two steps:
Question: 178
DRAG DROP
You have an Azure IoT hub.
You plan to attach three types of IoT devices as shown in the following table.
You need to select the appropriate communication protocol for each device.
What should you select? To answer, drag the appropriate protocols to the correct devices. Each protocol may be used
once, more than once, or not at all. You may need to drag the split bar between panes or scroll to view content.
NOTE: Each correct selection is worth one point.
Answer:
Explanation:
Box 1: AMQP
Use AMQP on field and cloud gateways to take advantage of connection multiplexing across devices.
Box 2: MQTT
MQTT is used on all devices that do not require to connect multiple devices (each with its own per-device credentials)
over the same TLS connection.
Box 3: HTTPS
Use HTTPS for devices that cannot support other protocols.
Reference:
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/iot-hub/iot-hub-devguide-protocols
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Microsoft Microsoft thinking - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/AZ-220 Search results Microsoft Microsoft thinking - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/AZ-220 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Microsoft First, Microsoft Copilot came for your keyboard. Now, it wants to live in your File Explorer.

What you need to know

  • Microsoft appears to be working on a Copilot feature within File Explorer.
  • Code labeled "CopilotFEContextMenu" was recently discovered, likely referring to some form of integration between Copilot and File Explorer.
  • It's not clear what the feature would be able to do, but one theory is that it will allow you to send a file to Copilot with a click.

Microsoft is on a quest to get AI in front of as many consumers as possible. A large part of that effort is Copilot, which is already available on Microsoft Edge, Windows 11, and Microsoft 365. Based on a recent discovery by X user PhantomOcean3, Microsoft appears to be working on a tie-in between Copilot and the File Explorer on Windows.

At the moment, it's not clear what the feature would do, but it hints at Microsoft's plan to make Copilot easier to access from different parts of Windows. You can already open Copilot from the taskbar.

Fri, 05 Jan 2024 02:38:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.windowscentral.com/software-apps/windows-11/first-microsoft-copilot-came-for-your-keyboard-now-it-wants-to-live-in-your-file-explorer
Businesses are still stuck on Windows 10, refusing to update to Windows 11 No result found, try new keyword!With Windows 10 not set to reach End of Support (EOS) until October 2025, businesses look to be hanging on to it, and even after that date, they will still have the option to pay for a few extra years ... Tue, 02 Jan 2024 23:45:08 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/ Microsoft in 2023: year in review No result found, try new keyword!Windows 11 bugs continued to frustrate throughout the year, too, and there were some particularly stubborn flaws that took a lot of time to cure, sapping the patience of those affected. We’re thinking ... Fri, 29 Dec 2023 22:49:00 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/ 3 ways Microsoft dropped the ball with Copilot in Windows

Microsoft’s AI rejuvenation of ailing search engine Bing has done wonders for the service’s popularity and kick-started a genuine interest in its similarly flagging Edge browser. Being one of the first major platforms to ride the AI chatbot wave, Microsoft’s Bing Chat had the tech behind OpenAI’s trailblazing ChatGPT and a list as long as Florida of all the tall tales it couldn’t wait to tell you.

I’m a fan of Microsoft’s Bing Chat, even if it is more prone to hallucinations than your average Phish concertgoer. It works well for what it’s supposed to be, a search assistant with a few additional handy features that include image generation and generative AI chitter-chatter. But it’s a long way away from being classed as some sort of digital assistant. Which is why the announcement of Copilot for Windows caught my attention.

Copilot promised to be an AI assistant for Microsoft’s operating system that would finally deliver the experience that other desktop agents have failed to recreate. At the click of a button, you could converse with Copilot in real-time, have it aid you in tasks, suggest ideas, and even take the reins to perform actions on your behalf. It sounded like a dream and a genuinely exciting development for the platform.

This, and a range of other meaty features included in the recently released Windows 23H2 update, had me practically giddy as I referred to this new update as being Windows 12 in all but name. But I have to bust out a fork and tuck into some humble pie on this one. After getting to grips with Copilot over the initial release I was immediately turned off by the idea entirely. It wasn’t the AI assistant of my dreams, it was a bloody nightmare. Here’s why.

Bing Chat concept

A Bing by any other name

Now that Copilot for Windows is here, one thing is abundantly clear: it’s just a Bing sidebar for Windows with a few needless additions and a heavy amount of safeguarding. I can understand Bing’s many limitations and hurdles when handling a knowledge base that includes the entirety of the indexed internet. Still, Windows is a finite platform — so, when Copilot was announced, I expected much more.

I was geared up and ready for Copilot to be my operating system’s genuine copilot. I had visions of a Tony Stark-like reality whereby Microsoft had granted me my very own J.A.R.V.I.S. or F.R.I.D.A.Y. to allow me to automate and offload tasks and processes at will. Sadly, Microsoft Copilot is much more akin to a Clippy or Cortana — reduced to offering me tips and hints on how to get things done instead of just doing it for me.

Copilot’s potential could have been the introduction of a whole new way for us to interact with our operating systems. Knowing the Windows playground in and out, through and through, Copilot could have allowed us to interact with every aspect of Microsoft’s OS using nothing but natural language written or spoken. However, all Copilot is capable of doing is taking up space in your Taskbar — working more like a desktop variant of an Edge widget than anything truly groundbreaking.

Copilot in Windows 11

Anything it can do, I can do better (almost)

In my mind, Copilot for Windows was going to be a lot more “Sure thing, I’ll clean up your cluttered desktop for you” and a lot less “Here’s what I found on the web about how to declutter your desktop.” Copilot’s wings have been royally clipped and the chatbot is heavily limited as to what it can perform within the Windows operating system. Sure, you can ask Copilot to switch to dark mode or launch an app on your behalf but you’re still required to confirm your choice with a button click (after waiting however long for it to process your request).

It simply doesn’t feel like a streamlined experience. If anything it feels like it can be a more arduous one. Take, for example, asking Copilot to enable Do Not Disturb, a handy Windows feature that blocks notification popups from your background processes to let you focus on tasks at hand.

Ask Copilot to enable it and you’ll be met with around 5 seconds of thinking time, then presented with a button you need to click yes on to enable the feature. Or, you could just left-click your clock to bring up the Notification Center and then click on the Do Not Disturb switch within about a second. It seems more efficient to ignore Copilot in many situations, so it’s no surprise to me that many are doing exactly that.

Microsoft Twitter chatbot Tay

It’s still as loopy as they come

One of your initial hurdles in getting to grips with Copilot will be the fact that 90% of the time, it doesn’t even seem to understand that it is Microsoft Copilot. Built atop the Bing Chat infrastructure, there’s a minor identity crisis every time you engage with it as the two identities struggle for dominance over who can be the most unhelpful to you first.

I’ve lost count of the amount of times Copilot has told me it’s not Copilot. It’s either legitimately confused or the most fascinating AI we’ve ever created — having slowly developed a work-shy attitude and learning that if it just acts annoying for long enough I’ll go away and do things by myself.

Even when Copilot is under the impression that it is Copilot, Bing will randomly make an appearance to let you know that it isn’t Copilot. Make a simple request, and Copilot will prompt you with the button to enact it, but as you reach your cursor to the input, Bing will appear and smugly call you out on your actions: “Oi, ‘No Brains’, I’m a chatbot, not a digital assistant. What are you playing at, you nimble-minded fleshbag?” While amusing, it’s not exactly confidence building by any stretch of the imagination.

Outlook

While one of a Large Language Model’s (LLM) greatest features is its ability to comprehend natural language, the restrained capabilities of Copilot lead to things becoming a bit of a guessing game about what it’s capable of — especially considering how little it truly is.

Interacting with Copilot is a trial-and-error affair, with the experience more similar to figuring out an early '90s text adventure you’ve lost the manual to than engaging with an AI assistant. At present, one of the best use cases for Microsoft Copilot is asking it for a list of Windows shortcut keys, allowing you to have a cheat sheet of speedy key presses at hand at all times.

Why waste your time nursing Windows’ latest assistant through an AI-dentity crisis when one simple list can do anything and everything Bing Chat/Microsoft Copilot can without any of the hassles?

Wed, 20 Dec 2023 18:00:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://news.yahoo.com/3-ways-microsoft-dropped-ball-080052471.html
Windows 12 wishlist: What we want to see from Microsoft's next OS release
Windows 11 Logo

Microsoft

Windows 11 has been around for about two years now, which means it won’t be wrong to start thinking about how the next version of Windows will shape up. Microsoft is already working on Windows 12, and here is our wishlist of what we would like to see on the next OS update for PCs and laptops!

When you look at the major OS players like Apple and Google, it’s clear that their vision is to have their OS do everything on every device. Android is designed to be run on a wide variety of hardware, and Apple brings a significant amount of feature parity across its ecosystem.

To that end, it feels like Windows is a step behind, and with Windows 12, we’d like this to change. There’s very little reason why Windows as a modern OS cannot also bring in features we are so used to seeing on our iPhones and Android phones. There’s also little reason why Windows shouldn’t be at the forefront of being a modern OS either, so we’d definitely love to see Microsoft’s innovation at play here.

Windows 12 wishlist: Live Wallpaper support

macOS Sonoma Live Wallpaper

Apple

We see Apple paying plenty of attention to wallpapers on macOS. Dynamic Wallpapers show the same scene across different lighting. With macOS Sonoma, we are getting aerial screen savers that move in slow motion when on the lock screen and freeze their frame to become your wallpaper when you enter the desktop. It’s a live wallpaper on the lock screen and a static wallpaper when you begin using your computer.

Windows does not include any official live wallpaper support, and we feel it’s time to change that with Windows 12. Wallpapers are easily noticeable by average users and are simple brownie points for a modern OS to win. There are third-party alternatives to live wallpapers on Windows, but getting this out-of-the-box from Microsoft would be nice.

Widgets on desktop

Windows 11 Widgets

Microsoft

macOS Sonoma also brought along iOS-like widgets to Macs. Windows 11 does have a dedicated widgets section that you can invoke by pressing the Windows key + W. But how many users know about this?

What Windows needs instead are widgets that can be placed naturally on the desktop, amongst your icons and your files. It needs the ability to put them freely on the desktop, resize, and customize them. It needs to give users the experience they are used to on their smartphones so they can feel at home on their desktops too.

macOS Sonoma Widgets

Apple

The ability to pin widgets to the desktop should accompany more comprehensive marketing around widgets. Microsoft would need to create meaningful widgets for its first-party apps, and it will need to incentivize developers of popular third-party apps to develop widgets too. If the company can figure out how to get the power user and enthusiast community also involved, that would be great for the adoption of this feature.

Smart Home controls

If you want to turn on the lights in your bedroom and double-check if your garage doors are closed, why do you need your smartphone? Why can’t your desktop also offer you those functions?

We know the technical answer to why this will not be possible immediately, but we’re allowed to dream since this is a wishlist. We’d like it if the desktop could also plug into the smart home and act as a reliable surface to control your devices, perhaps with Matter support.

If you are already sitting at your desk and working on your PC, there should be no reason to pick up your phone to do something you can achieve with a few clicks on your desktop. And smart home controls are one of those things that are inconspicuously absent on Windows.

Windows Update Restart Prompt 1

Aamir Siddiqui / Android Authority

Windows updates are widely welcome but equally dreaded, and the reason for that is how disruptive they can often be. It’s nice to get frequent feature updates and bug fixes, but seeing your work schedule disrupted by Windows taking 10 minutes to install an update is not nice.

Android does seamless updates by making use of virtual A/B partitions and more. Barring Samsung as the outlier, reboots that install an Android update are practically equal to a regular reboot on modern Android smartphones. You install an upgrade in the background and reboot into an updated OS. So you are back and running with as little downtime as possible.

It would be great if Windows also implemented something similar in Windows 12. Imagine not having to stare at yet another “Windows is updating” screen again in your life, especially when you have an urgent work deadline to meet. That is the good dream that we dream of.

Windows 12 wishlist: Better AI integration

Bing Image Creator on a phone showing one image of a blue AI creature with orange eyes in front of a display with zeros and ones

Rita El Khoury / Android Authority

AI is the next big thing; no one knows this better than Microsoft. The company caused its competitors some panic and forced a flurry of activity in the AI space with its investments into OpenAI and integration of ChatGPT into Bing Chat.

With Windows 12, we want AI everywhere. AI should not be restricted to a shortcut in the taskbar that takes you to Google Bing. It shouldn’t be an afterthought to the OS, a mere accessory that is added wherever there is some leftover space. Instead, it should permeate the fabric of the OS, making life easier for users in all the best ways. AI needs to be in the foundation of the OS and not the seasoning on top.

For instance, many Windows users have specific working setups, and there’s no reason why the OS can’t learn from your daily working habits and suggest the right apps at the right time. So when you boot into your laptop on a Monday, your work apps should be suggested as a one-click-open feature, while your leisure apps should be suggested on a weekend or public holiday.

Stuck with a broken firmware for an accessory after a botched update? Let AI do the troubleshooting for you. No more vague error codes that require sifting through 30 search results. AI should tell you what exactly you’ve done wrong and what exactly you need to do to fix it, possibly even automating the process as far as it can.

Have 50 files that you need to batch rename? Why install a separate app when Windows Explorer could offer to do it for you with AI? Have thousands of old screenshots that serve you no purpose? Uninstalled an app, but it left behind some stray files? Let AI offer to trash it for you.

We’re just scratching the surface with AI, and restricting it to a web browser for searches feels rather anti-climactic. It would be exciting to see what Microsoft can imagine if it bakes AI right into Windows 12.

Finally retire the Control Panel in favor of Settings

Windows 11 control panel menu

Palash Volvoikar / Android Authority

Windows’ Control Panel served an essential purpose, but it feels stuck in an era long bygone. Microsoft has been working on bringing most of those settings to the Settings app, which is the right step. It just happens to be taking too long since the move was in the works since Windows 10 and 11.

With Windows 12, we’d finally like to see Microsoft pull the plug on the Control Panel and its confusing mess of settings. The Settings app should be the single place to control all of the features and settings you want and need to control on your desktop and laptop. Getting all of it lined up would help maintain a cohesive design within the OS, too, as the Control Panel looks dated and in desperate need of a refresh, so Microsoft may as well merge it with Settings as it seems intended.

More robust integration with Android and iOS

samsung galaxy note 20 windows your phone

Microsoft

Windows does a better job these days in playing nice with both Android and iOS, but there’s undeniably more room for improvement. Part of the success story is with the Your Phone app, which now supports Android and iPhones.

Our first request would be unified and cohesive branding around the app. The Android and iOS apps are called “Link to Windows” in their app store entries, but the Windows app is called “Phone Link.” It may seem obvious to power users, but the difference in names throws off the average user. Microsoft needs stronger branding and some more promotion for this feature.

Next, users frequently complain about the app’s connectivity and sync issues. Disconnections are frequent, and it takes a lot of trying to reconnect. For a smoother experience, the basics need to be right.

Further, the app needs to figure out how to handle notifications of all types better and seamlessly. Checking text messages on your desktop should ideally mark them as read on your phone, but that rarely ever happens. The app also restricts itself to viewing photos on your phone and not anything else, even though it could allow you access to all file types beyond just images.

There are plenty of ways Windows can Excellerate how well it plays with Android and iOS, which shall be a key to increasing adoption with Windows 12. People will still be using their phones in the future, so the desktop needs to adapt and reduce its friction areas or risk being replaced with other products that provide seamless integration better than Microsoft can with Windows.


FAQs

Microsoft has not revealed any official information about the next Windows update. Based on past release patterns, we predict Windows’ next release could be called Windows 12, which could be released sometime in 2024.

Microsoft has not revealed pricing information for Windows 12. For reference, a Windows 11 license costs $139 for Home and $200 for Pro.

Microsoft has not announced the pricing or upgrade details for Windows 12 yet. However, the company has frequently allowed existing Windows license holders to upgrade to the latest Windows version for free. It is unlikely that Microsoft will be changing this trend, so you can optimistically expect Windows 12 to be a free upgrade over Windows 11 if you already have a valid Windows license. However, if you do not own a valid Windows license at all, then you will have to pay for Windows and, by extension, for Windows 12.

Wed, 27 Dec 2023 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.androidauthority.com/windows-12-3339577/
Microsoft says its AI is safe. But it keeps making images of people's throats slashed Your browser is not supported | detroitnews.com
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Thu, 28 Dec 2023 00:52:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.detroitnews.com/story/business/2023/12/28/microsofts-ai-keeps-making-images-of-peoples-throats-slashed/72047997007/
Microsoft's Software and Cloud News at Build Drive Home Its Big-Picture Thinking No result found, try new keyword!Microsoft is thinking carefully about the pain points that office workers and developers have to deal with, and the whole of Microsoft's arsenal of business software, cloud services, developer ... Mon, 06 May 2019 09:07:00 -0500 text/html https://www.thestreet.com/investing/stocks/microsoft-software-cloud-news-build-14950103 A year of constant updates to Windows 11 hasn't done anything to shift people away from Windows 10 No result found, try new keyword!As reported by The Register, Microsoft struggled to significantly Excellerate the uptake of Windows 11 last year. At the start of 2023, its worldwide market share was just 17% and while the final quarter ... Wed, 03 Jan 2024 22:57:00 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.yahoo.com/tech/constant-updates-windows-11-hasnt-125737704.html How to install and use Microsoft Office 365 on your Chromebook

Chromebooks are becoming more and more common, especially in educational and enterprise settings; yet there are still misconceptions and confusion about their capabilities. I know that many of you who are Chromebook enthusiasts are well aware of all the things you can do on these devices, but there are still many new users out there who are picking up a Chromebook for the first time and have heard they can’t do things like play games or use Microsoft Office. The reality is that Chromebooks are far more flexible and user-friendly than many realize. Installing and running Microsoft Office 365 on your Chromebook is actually a breeze and by following this step-by-step guide, you can be up and running in just a few minutes.

It is true that traditional Windows or Mac software, including desktop versions of Office apps, can’t be directly installed on Chromebooks. But there is another, cloud-based option that provides a simple and fully functional path to using Microsoft Office that looks and feels just like an app that is installed the more traditional way.

You might be tempted to think that since Chromebooks have Android apps, this is the way to get Office 365 on your device; but that is not the case. Although Chromebooks support a vast array of Android apps, the Android versions of Microsoft Office, Outlook, OneNote, and OneDrive are no longer supported. The good news is that this has paved the way for a more efficient and seamless option.

Say hello to Microsoft 365

Enter Progressive Web Apps (PWAs), which are essentially advanced mobile app versions of websites. We are big fans of PWAs because they harness the power of the web and offer a wider reach than any one particular operating system. They boast numerous features such as offline use, the ability to pin to the taskbar, support for push notifications and updates, and access to hardware features. Microsoft Office 365 PWAs like Outlook and OneDrive have become stellar options for Chromebook users and are delivered directly from the web. Here’s a simple guide to installing and using Microsoft Office 365 PWAs on your Chromebook.

How to install Microsoft 365 PWAs on your Chromebook

To get started, open the Chrome browser and navigate to Office.com, the Microsoft Office 365 online landing page. Sign in with your existing Office 365 account, or create a new one using any personal email. Microsoft is now offering a Free tier that gets you cloud storage, and essential apps on the web so you can check that out if you just want to test things out.

Next, look for the Install icon in the top right of the address bar. Clicking this will prompt you to install the Office 365 PWA. This option also appears when you visit specific apps like Word or Outlook and overall, the installation is swift. A window opens resembling the online version of Office 365 but functions more like the Microsoft Office mobile apps, offering features such as pinning to the taskbar, notifications, offline work, and easy resizing.

Standalone apps like Outlook, OneDrive, or Clipchamp, can be installed as individual PWAs as well by clicking the same Install icon in the address bar. Apps like Word and PowerPoint will open each new project as a new tab in the browser so these will not include the Install icon. You can easily find these exact projects in the Microsoft 365 app under the recently opened tab in that particular app or change the saved location in OneDrive for easy access later by clicking the file name in the top left.

Get to work on your Chromebook

Just like that, you are ready to start using Microsoft Office 365 on your Chromebook. Through these PWAs, Microsoft is able to offer a user experience similar to installed software, blending the convenience of web versions with the functionality of mobile apps. Although Microsoft is testing a new Windows App that will allow you to stream Windows Cloud PC and remote desktop services on a range of devices, including Chromebooks, it is still in beta. So, for now, the PWA installation process is the best option for Chromebook users. Luckily the Microsoft Office 365 PWA is fully functional and by following these simple steps, you can easily get to work with apps like Word and Outlook on your Chromebook in no time at all.

Mon, 01 Jan 2024 04:46:00 -0600 Joe Humphrey en-us text/html https://chromeunboxed.com/how-to-install-and-use-microsoft-office-365-on-your-chromebook/
Can your Windows 10 PC be saved in 2025? Yes - for free. Here's how No result found, try new keyword!We all know that some perfectly good Windows 10 PCs can't be upgraded to Windows 11. But did you know that Canalys Insights estimated there are 240 million Windows 10 PCs doomed to the trash heap ... Thu, 28 Dec 2023 06:32:06 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/




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