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ATM Advanced Test Manager study | http://babelouedstory.com/
Tue, 05 Dec 2023 10:00:00 -0600entext/htmlhttps://www.rit.edu/study/biomedical-sciences-bs Improving prediction of advanced breast cancer among women of different races and ethnicities No result found, try new keyword!The chances of being diagnosed with advanced breast cancer are higher among women who are Black or Hispanic/Latinx as well as women who are overweight and obese. In a study published in JAMA ... Thu, 07 Dec 2023 02:52:00 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/ Fuzhou FuYao Institute for Advanced Study No result found, try new keyword!I'd like to receive career advice, updates and information from Nature Careers and Nature Portfolio, part of Springer Nature Limited. I'd like to receive emails from carefully chosen third party ... Tue, 24 Oct 2023 23:01:00 -0500 en-GB text/html https://www.nature.com/naturecareers/employer/ec3cb408-9318-4dac-94cc-a88163744a91/fuzhou-fuyao-institute-for-advanced-study Exercise Enhances Quality of Life for Women with Advanced Breast Cancer, Study Finds
Exercise Enhances Quality of Life for Women with Advanced Breast Cancer, Study Finds

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A latest study presented at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium reveals that a structured nine-month exercise program significantly improves the quality of life for women battling advanced breast cancer. Led by researcher Anne May from the University Medical Center, Utrecht, the study emphasizes the importance of enhancing symptom management to help patients enjoy personal, social, and work life.

The study involved 357 participants with advanced breast cancer across Germany, Poland, Spain, Sweden, the Netherlands, and Australia. While all participants received a physical activity tracker and generic exercise advice, 178 patients underwent additional support with twice-weekly supervised exercise sessions incorporating balance, resistance, and aerobic activities.

Exercise Enhances Quality of Life for Women with Advanced Breast Cancer Study

Also Read: Faster Walking Speed Linked to Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes, New Study Reveals

Results showed that participants in the exercise group reported higher average quality-of-life scores compared to those without specialised attention. Benefits included increased social functioning and reductions in pain, shortness of breath, and fatigue. Additionally, patients engaging in regular physical exercise performed better on a "steep ramp test" using an exercise bike.

Exercise Enhances Quality of Life for Women with Advanced Breast Cancer Study

Researcher Anne May suggests that health professionals should routinely recommend supervised exercise for patients with advanced breast cancer, and insurance companies should cover the costs of exercise programs. The researchers advocate for longer programs, emphasizing that a nine-month duration helps patients incorporate exercise into their daily routines, making it a sustainable part of their lives and cancer treatment regimens.

Fri, 08 Dec 2023 08:15:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.onlymyhealth.com/exercise-enhances-quality-of-life-for-women-with-advanced-breast-cancer-study-1702033825

ATM study - Advanced Test Manager Updated: 2024

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Exam Code: ATM Advanced Test Manager study January 2024 by Killexams.com team

ATM Advanced Test Manager

The Advanced Level is comprised of three separate syllabi:

Test Manager

Test Analyst

Technical Test Analyst

The Advanced Level Overview document [ISTQB_AL_OVIEW] includes the following information:

Business Outcomes for each syllabus

Summary for each syllabus

Relationships between the syllabi

Description of cognitive levels (K-levels)

Appendices



Testing Process – 420 mins.

Keywords

exit criteria, test case, test closure, test condition, test control, test design, test execution, test
implementation, test log, test planning, test procedure, test script, test summary report

Learning Objectives for Testing Process

1.2 Test Planning, Monitoring and Control

TM-1.2.1 (K4) Analyze the test needs for a system in order to plan test activities and work products
that will achieve the test objectives

1.3 Test Analysis

TM-1.3.1 (K3) Use traceability to check completeness and consistency of defined test conditions
with respect to the test objectives, test strategy, and test plan

TM-1.3.2 (K2) Explain the factors that might affect the level of detail at which test conditions may be
specified and the advantages and disadvantages for specifying test conditions at a
detailed level

1.4 Test Design

TM-1.4.1 (K3) Use traceability to check completeness and consistency of designed test cases with
respect to the defined test conditions

1.5 Test Implementation

TM-1.5.1 (K3) Use risks, prioritization, test environment and data dependencies, and constraints to
develop a test execution schedule which is complete and consistent with respect to the
test objectives, test strategy, and test plan

1.6 Test Execution

TM-1.6.1 (K3) Use traceability to monitor test progress for completeness and consistency with the
test objectives, test strategy, and test plan

1.7 Evaluating Exit Criteria and Reporting
TM-1.7.1 (K2) Explain the importance of accurate and timely information collection during the test
process to support accurate reporting and evaluation against exit criteria

1.8 Test Closure Activities

TM-1.8.1 (K2) Summarize the four groups of test closure activities

TM-1.8.2 (K3) Implement a project retrospective to evaluate processes and discover areas to
improve



The ISTQB® Foundation Level syllabus describes a fundamental test process which includes the
following activities:

Planning and control

Analysis and design

Implementation and execution

Evaluating exit criteria and reporting

Test closure activities

The Foundation Level syllabus states that although logically sequential, the activities in the process
may overlap or take place concurrently. Tailoring these main activities within the context of the system
and the project is usually required.

For the Advanced Level syllabi some of these activities are considered separately in order to provide
additional refinement and optimization of the processes, better fit with the software development
lifecycle, and to facilitate effective test monitoring and control. The activities are now considered as
follows:

Planning, monitoring and control

Analysis

Design

Implementation

Execution

Evaluating exit criteria and reporting

Test closure activities
Advanced Test Manager
ASTQB Advanced study

Other ASTQB exams

ISTQB-Advanced-Level-1 ISTQB Advanced Level Test & manager Exam
ISTQB-Advanced-Level-2 ISTQB Advanced LevelTest Analyst Exam
ISTQB-Advanced-Level-3 ISTQB Advanced LevelTechnical Test
ISTQB-Level-1 American Software Testing Qualifications Board Level 1
TA12 ISTQB-BCS Certified Tester Advanced Level - Test Analyst
TM12 ISTQB-BCS Certified Tester Advanced Level - Test Manager
ATM Advanced Test Manager
ATTA Advanced Level Technical Test Analyst
TTA1 ISTQB-BCS Certified Tester Advanced Level- Technical Test Analyst
CTFL-2018 ISTQB Certified Tester Foundation Level (CTFL_2018) 2023
ASTQB-CMT ASTQB Certified Mobile Tester

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Question: 58
Consider the following skills assessment spreadsheet for your test team (consisting of
four team members): This spreadsheet has three sections: technical expertise, testing
skills and professionalism.
The skill levels for each skill area for both the technical expertise and testing skills
sections have been rated on a four-point scale:
- E (Expert): indicates that a person has expert knowledge and experience in the skill
area
- B (Beginner): indicates that a person has some knowledge and experience in the skill
area but he/she is not autonomous
- W (Wants to learn): indicates that a person has no knowledge or experience in the skill
area but he/she wants to learn that skill
- NI (Not Interested): indicates that a person has no knowledge or experience in the skill
area and he/she is not interested to learn that skill
The skill levels for each skill area of the professionalism section have been rated on a
three point scale (H=High, M=Medium, L=Low).
Consider the following analysis of testing skills performed on four peoplE. Alex,
Robert, John and Mark (all the skills have been rated on an ascending scalE. The higher
the score, the better the skill):
Which of these people, based on this analysis, would you expect to be most suitable to
work specifically as test designer? K4 3 credits
A. Alex
B. Roberta
C. John
D. Mark
Answer: B
Question: 59
Consider the following skills assessment spreadsheet for your test team (consisting of
four team members): This spreadsheet has three sections: technical expertise, testing
skills and professionalism. The skill levels for each skill area for both the technical
expertise and testing skills sections have been rated on a four-point scale:
- E (Expert): indicates that a person has expert knowledge and experience in the skill
area
- B (Beginner): indicates that a person has some knowledge and experience in the skill
area but he/she is not autonomous
- W (Wants to learn): indicates that a person has no knowledge or experience in the skill
area but he/she wants to learn that skill
- NI (Not Interested): indicates that a person has no knowledge or experience in the skill
area and he/she is not interested to learn that skill
The skill levels for each skill area of the professionalism section have been rated on a
three point scale (H=High, M=Medium, L=Low).
You are using this skills assessment spreadsheet in order to define a training
development plan for your test team.
Your objective is to fill the skill gaps by having at least a team member rated as an
expert
for each skill identified for the technical expertise and testing skills sections, and
with the ability to train the other team members.
Considering the budget constraints you can send only one person to a training course.
Based only on the given information, which of the following answers would you expect
to be the best option to achieve your objective?
K4 3 credits
A. Send Robert to a performance testing training course
B. Send Alex to a performance testing training course
C. Send John to a performance testing training course
D. Send Mark to a test automation training course
Answer: B
Question: 60
Assume you are managing the system testing execution phase of a project. The system
test execution period for that project is scheduled for eighteen weeks and the release date
is scheduled at the end of system testing. During the sixth week of system test execution,
at the staff meeting, the project manager informs you that the project deadlines are
changed and the release date that is only three weeks ahead.
This new release will not allow the completion of the system tests. Suppose also that you
have followed a risk-driven test approach for this project.
Which of the following statements represents the worst way to lead your test team in the
next three weeks? K2 1 credit
A. Neglect your management activities and work side-by-side with your test team
executing tests
B. Considering the executed tests, you should reduce the test coverage back on the risk
analysis and adjust downward the priority of the associated risk items
C. Convince all the people of your test team that each of them is an important and
needed member, and that their contribution is fundamental to the success of the team
D. Favor and encourage a proactive attitude where people ask for new tasks as soon as
they finish their current tasks
Answer: A
Question: 61
Which of the following would you expect to be most likely an example of a motivating
factor for testers? K2 1 credit
A. The resources allocated for the testing activities are not sufficient and dont allow the
testers to contribute to the quality of the product
B. The testers contribution to the quality of the software products developed from an
organization is recognized with increased responsibilities
C. The same regressions tests are executed manually by the same testers, for every
product release, without any progression in content
D. The testers are asked to perform, in parallel with their testing tasks, other tasks
unrelated to their testing responsibilities
Answer: B
Question: 62
An agile development team decides to hire a tester who has always workeD.
- in independent test teams, reporting the problems found in a defect tracking system
- in safety-critical projects, with a stronger focus on the quality of the product than on
time and budget. This agile team is focused on short-term goals to get the product
released on time and within budget. Which of the following answers would you expect
to be most likely true in this scenario? K2 1 credit
A. Agile teams like the presence of a tester in their teams and the tester will be able to
adapt to the new context without any issue
B. The developers will immediately follow the guidelines described by the tester
C. The tester can continue to report the problems found in a defect tracking system and
be more focused on the quality than on time and budget constraints
D. The testers mission could be to verify adherence to requirements, instead of
reporting formally the problems in a defect tracking system
Answer: D
Question: 63
Which of the following would you expect to be most likely an example of a
demotivating factor for testers? K2 1 credit
A. The management asks the testers to be kept informed about the intensity, quality and
results of testing
B. The testers recommendations to Improve the system or its testability are adopted by
the development team
C. The same regressions tests are manually executed by the same testers, for every
product release, without regression test tools
D. The testers are assessed on whether and how often they detect important and critical
failures
E. Test quality is measured by counting the number of customer/user reported problems.
Answer: C, E
Question: 64
Your test team consists of four members (Mary, Bob, Mark, Dave) with different
interpersonal skills. The following skills assessment spreadsheet shows the
characteristics of the team members with respect to a list of interpersonal-skills (for each
characteristic only the member with the highest level of that characteristic is indicated
and marked with X):
On the next project a member of your test team will have to perform some routine tasks
requiring collaboration with other teams. Who in your test team would you expect to be
most suitable at doing these tasks? K4 3 credits
A. Mary
B. Bob
C. Mark
D. Dave
Answer: A
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ASTQB Advanced study - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/ATM Search results ASTQB Advanced study - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/ATM https://killexams.com/exam_list/ASTQB Study paves way for development of advanced quantum networks

The ability to transmit information coherently in the band of the electromagnetic spectrum from microwave to infrared is vitally important to the development of the advanced quantum networks used in computing and communications.

A study conducted by researchers at the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP) in Brazil, in collaboration with colleagues at ETH Zurich in Switzerland and TU Delft in the Netherlands, focused on the use of nanometric optomechanical cavities for this purpose. These nanoscale resonators promote interaction between and at wavelengths used by the telecommunications industry.

An article on the study is published in the journal Nature Communications.

"Nanomechanical resonators act as bridges between and optical fibers. Superconducting circuits are currently among the most promising technologies for , while optical fibers are routinely used as long-distance transmitters of information with little noise and no signal loss," said Thiago Alegre, a professor at the Gleb Wataghin Institute of Physics (IFGW-UNICAMP) and last author of the article.

According to Alegre, one of the key innovations in the study was the introduction of dissipative optomechanics. Traditional optomechanical devices rely on purely dispersive interaction, where only photons confined in the cavity are efficiently dispersed. In dissipative optomechanics, photons can be scattered directly from the waveguide to the resonator. "Optoacoustic interaction can be controlled more tightly as a result," he said.

Prior to this study, dissipative optomechanical interaction had been demonstrated only at low mechanical frequencies, precluding important applications such as quantum state transfer between the photonic (optical) and phononic (mechanical) domains. The study demonstrated the first dissipative optomechanical system operating in a regime where the mechanical frequency exceeded the optical linewidth.

"We succeeded in raising mechanical frequency by two orders of magnitude and achieved a tenfold rise in the optomechanical coupling rate. This offers highly promising prospects for the development of even more effective devices," Alegre said.

Fabricated in collaboration with TU Delft, the devices were designed to use technologies that are well-established in the semiconductor industry. Nanometric silicon beams were suspended and free to vibrate so that infrared light and mechanical vibrations were confined simultaneously. A laterally placed waveguide positioned to permit the coupling of the optical fiber to the cavity gave rise to dissipative coupling, the key ingredient of the results presented by the researchers.

The study offers novel possibilities for the construction of quantum networks. In addition to this immediate application, it lays a basis for future fundamental research. "We expect to be able to manipulate mechanical modes individually and mitigate optical non-linearities in optomechanical devices," Alegre said.

More information: André G. Primo et al, Dissipative optomechanics in high-frequency nanomechanical resonators, Nature Communications (2023). DOI: 10.1038/s41467-023-41127-7

Citation: Study paves way for development of advanced quantum networks (2023, December 12) retrieved 5 January 2024 from https://phys.org/news/2023-12-paves-advanced-quantum-networks.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

Mon, 11 Dec 2023 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://phys.org/news/2023-12-paves-advanced-quantum-networks.html
Study reveals which style of drinking is the most likely to cause liver disease

A single night of binge-drinking is more likely to cause liver disease than a few drinks spread across the week, a study revealed.

According to a study done by the University College London, first reported by the London Standard, measuring the pattern of alcohol intake was more accurate than volume for predicting the risk of developing alcohol-related cirrhosis (ARC).

According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, ARC is a stage of liver disease where the liver has become significantly scarred and may cause the liver to stop working correctly.

The scientists analyzed data from 312,599 active alcoholic drinkers in the United Kingdom to assess the impact of the pattern of drinking, genetic predisposition and type-2 diabetes on the likelihood of developing ARC.

Dr Linda Ng Fat, a first author of the study from UCL Epidemiology and Public Health, said that the study’s approach was a “better indicator of liver disease risk than volume alone.”

“We took a different approach by focusing on the pattern of drinking and found that this was a better indicator of liver disease risk than volume alone,” Dr. Fat told the London newspaper. “The other key finding was that the more risk factors involved, the higher the ‘excess risk’ due to the interaction of these factors.”

Assortment of hard strong alcoholic drinks and spirits in glasses on bar counter
A new study indicates that your health is not only affected by how much you drink, but also by how you drink. Getty Images

Dr. Fat said the study revealed that those who engaged in heavy binge-drinking, which is defined as having 12 units of alcohol in a day, were three times as likely to develop ARC.

The risk for those with a high genetic predisposition was four times higher and the risk for type-2 diabetics was two times higher.

People who engaged in binge-drinking while also having a genetic predisposition were six times more likely to develop ARC, the study found.

Pamela Healy, Chief Executive of the British Liver Trust told the London Standard that this study revealed that the way people drink alcohol is important and that excessively drinking can have “servious consequences.”

“This research is important because it reveals that it’s not just how much you drink overall but the way that you drink matters,” Healy said. “Drinking a lot, quickly, or drinking to get drunk can have serious consequences for your liver health.”

Sat, 16 Dec 2023 04:51:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://nypost.com/2023/12/16/lifestyle/study-findings-about-binge-drinking/
Study underscores need for primary prevention in advanced breast cancer

While regular screenings may decrease the chance of diagnosis of advanced breast cancer in some women and lead to a 20% reduction in breast cancer mortality, other women will be diagnosed with advanced breast cancer despite screening at regular intervals. The chances of being diagnosed with advanced breast cancer are higher among women who are Black or Hispanic/Latinx as well as women who are overweight and obese.

In a study publishing December 7, 2023 in JAMA Oncology, UC San Francisco researchers found that regular screening is not always sufficient to prevent an advanced breast cancer diagnosis. To reduce the number of advanced cancer diagnoses, primary prevention is also necessary and should focus on assisting women who are overweight or obese attain normal weight, particularly women of color.

Advanced breast cancer is defined as American Joint Committee on Cancer prognostic pathologic stage II or higher. Advanced breast cancers are tumors that are large and/or have spread to lymph nodes or have other characteristics associated with poorer prognosis such as being high grade and estrogen receptor negative. They require surgery and systemic treatment and detecting breast cancers through screening before they become advanced may avert deaths from breast cancer.

Advanced breast cancer risk calculation for women who are screened regularly can guide screening frequency and supplemental imaging. Clinical risk factors associated with advanced breast cancer include high breast density, high body mass index, increasing age, family history in a first-degree relative with breast cancer, history of previous breast biopsies, and postmenopausal status. Black women have a two-fold higher rate for advanced breast cancer than White women among regular screeners.

To evaluate the population attributable risk proportions (PARPs) for advanced breast cancer – the proportion of advanced cancer incidence in the population attributed to a risk factor – the researchers conducted a cohort study using data collected prospectively from Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) community-based imaging facilities from January 2005 to June 2018.

The participants followed were 904,615 women aged 40 to 74 (with a median age of 57) undergoing 3,331,740 annual or biennial screening mammograms. Among them, 1815 advanced breast cancers were diagnosed within two years of screening examinations. The risk factors that were examined included heterogeneously or extremely dense breasts, first degree family history of breast cancer, overweight/obesity (body mass index greater than 25), history of benign breast biopsy, and screening interval (biennial versus annual) stratified by menopausal status and race and ethnicity (Asian or Pacific Islander, Black, Hispanic/Latinx, White, other/multiracial).

Body mass index PARPs were larger for post-menopausal than for pre-menopausal women (30% vs 22%) and highest for post-menopausal Black women (38.6%) and Hispanic/Latinx women (31.8%) as well as for pre-menopausal Black women (30.3%). In addition, the overall prevalence of being overweight/obese was highest in pre-menopausal Black (84.4%) and postmenopausal Black (85.1%), and Hispanic/Latinx women (72.4%).

Black and Hispanic/Latinx women are at higher risk of being diagnosed with advanced cancer than White, Asian, or Pacific Islander women, and this difference is only partially accounted for by screening. Identifying risk factors that account for the largest proportion of advanced breast cancers among regular screeners and understanding the differences in factors associated with risk of advanced cancer by race and ethnicity is important for developing personalized, equitable screening strategies and primary preventions."

Karla Kerlikowske, MD, first author, UCSF professor of Medicine and Epidemiology & Biostatistics and Co-PI of the BCSC

Breast density PARPs were larger for pre-menopausal than for post-menopausal women (37% vs 24%, respectively) and premenopausal White women (39.8%) whose prevalence of dense breasts was high (62%). For both premenopausal and postmenopausal women, PARPs were small for family history of breast cancer (5% to 8%), history of breast biopsy (7% to 12%) and screening interval (2.1% to 2.3%).

Among routinely screened women, the researchers found that screening frequency was a weak risk factor for advanced cancer and screening biennially vs annually accounted for only a small proportion of advanced cancer diagnoses in this study population. Being overweight or obese accounted for the largest proportion of advanced cancers in postmenopausal women (30%), while dense breasts accounted for the largest proportion of advanced cancers in pre-menopausal women (37%).

"This is the first study, to our knowledge, to calculate PARPs for advanced breast cancer," said Kerlikowske. "We found that being overweight or obese accounts for the largest proportion of advanced breast cancers among postmenopausal Black and Hispanic/Latinx women. This contrasts with prior studies, reporting that overweight/obesity accounted for the largest proportions of invasive breast cancers for postmenopausal Black women, but not Hispanic /Latinx women."

Family history of breast cancer accounted for a small proportion of advanced breast cancer in pre-menopausal (8%) and postmenopausal women (5%) in the study. Prior studies have shown that women perceive family history of breast cancer as the primary breast cancer risk factor, with others such as being overweight or obese or having dense breasts, as less important predictors. Kerlikowske adds that patients need to be educated on factors that contribute most to development of advanced breast cancer, and on primary prevention interventions that can modify these risk factors. Offering supplemental imaging with MRI or ultrasonography to women at high advanced cancer risk could also reduce the chance of being diagnosed with advanced cancer.

Source:

Journal reference:

Kerlikowske, K., et al. (2023). Population Attributable Risk of Advanced-Stage Breast Cancer by Race and Ethnicity. JAMA Oncology. doi.org/10.1001/jamaoncol.2023.5242.

Wed, 06 Dec 2023 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.news-medical.net/news/20231207/Study-underscores-need-for-primary-prevention-in-advanced-breast-cancer.aspx
Study shows advanced footwear technology positively impacts elite sprint performances

image: 

Image: Nicolas Hoizey

view more 

Credit: Nicolas Hoizey

A scientific study published in PeerJ Life & Environment sheds light on the potential game-changing impact of advanced footwear technology (AFT) on elite sprint performances in track and field. The research, titled "The Potential Impact of Advanced Footwear Technology on the Recent Evolution of Elite Sprint Performances," reveals the significant strides made in sprint performance and suggests that AFT has played a pivotal role in these improvements. 

Elite track and field sprint performances have long been viewed as reaching a plateau as the boundaries of human physiology are tested. To further enhance sprinting capabilities, researchers have turned their attention to technological interventions, specifically the application of advanced footwear technology in sprint spikes. The study aimed to determine whether the use of AFT has led to notable improvements in sprint performances and the extent of these enhancements. 

The research, authored by Dr. Joel Mason of Friedrich Schiller University Jena and colleagues, analyzed performance data from the years 2016-2019 and 2021-2022, focusing on the top 100 athletes in each sprint event as listed by World Athletics. Key findings from the study include: 

1. No significant year-to-year differences in sprint performances were observed in any event before the introduction of AFT (2016-2019). 

2. Following the release of AFT (in 2021 and 2022), there were significant improvements in eight out of ten sprint events, with enhancements ranging from 0.40% (men's 100m) to 1.52% (women's 400m hurdles). 

3. The use of AFT was associated with performance improvements in six out of ten events, including men's and women's 100m, women's 200m, men's 110m hurdles, women's 100m hurdles, and women's 400m hurdles. 

The study also noted that improvements were more pronounced in women's sprint events compared to men's sprint events, indicating that AFT may have a greater impact on female athletes. 

In conclusion, this research offers compelling evidence that the recent evolution of elite sprint performances can be partially attributed to advances in footwear technology. These improvements are influenced by factors such as the specific sprint event, athlete gender, and potentially the level of the athlete offering athletes an exciting opportunity to further enhance their performances, and providing a challenge for World Athletics to preserve the integrity of the sport while still embracing developments in technology.

For media inquiries or additional information about this research, please contact euan@peerj.com


Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.

Sun, 03 Dec 2023 23:59:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/1009942
Biomedical Sciences Bachelor of Science Degree
Course
BHNS-311

Diagnosing the Criminal Mind

This course will introduce students within the biomedical sciences, physician assistant, psychology and criminal justice fields to understand basic clinical diagnostic terms, symptoms and behaviors that pertain to clients who commit crime. The course will introduce students to the relationship between mental health, drug addiction, crime and violence. Students will be involved in mock trials, debates and case write ups. Lecture 3 (Fall).

BIOL-265

Evolutionary Biology

This course investigates the historical framework of evolutionary biology and the meaning/nature of evidence pertinent to biological evolution. syllabus will include: earth history, the evolution of proteins and the genetic code, molecular evolution, neutral theory vs. selection, genetic variation, natural selection, migration, mutation, genetic drift, fitness, population dynamics and genetics, speciation, systematics and classification systems, molecular phylogenetics, the evolution of eukaryotic organisms, behavioral evolution, historical biogeography, and human evolution and variation. (Prerequisites: (BIOL-101 and BIOL-102 and BIOL-103 and BIOL-104) or (BIOL-121 and BIOL-122) or (BIOL-123 and BIOL-124 and BIOL-125 and BIOL-126) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3, Recitation 2 (Fall).

BIOL-302

Cell Biology

This course will address the fundamental concepts of cell biology. Class discussions, assignments, and laboratory projects will 1) Explore the structure-function relationships that drive cellular processes at the molecular, cellular and tissue level. 2) Investigate the mechanisms of cellular signaling and the transmission of genetic information. 3) Examine energy transformation strategies and the biochemical pathways used for synthesis and breakdown of ATP and other important biomolecules. 4) Investigate the organizational strategies used by cells to form functional tissue and organ systems. (Prerequisites: (BIOL-206 and BIOL-216) or BIOL-201 or BIOL-202 or BIOG-240 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Spring).

BIOL-303

Cell Physiology

This course is a study of functional eukaryotic cellular physiology with an emphasis on the role of global gene expression in cellular function and disease. Nuclear and cytoplasmic regulation of macromolecular synthesis, regulation of cellular metabolism, control of cell growth, and the changes in cell physiology in disease are covered. This course also covers the technology used for studying changes in gene expression associated with cell differentiation and disease. The associated laboratory covers microarray techniques. This includes design and implementation of an experiment to acquire gene expression data, analyzing the acquired data using simple computer programs, such as MAGIC, and writing a research paper explaining findings. (Prerequisites: BIOL-201 or BIOL-302 or BIOG-240 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall).

BIOL-306

Food Microbiology

This course presents the microbiology of foods. syllabus include microbial food spoilage, foodborne pathogens, food preservation techniques, and environmental parameters found in foods important in the survival of food spoilage microbes and foodborne pathogens. The lab will include exercises on isolating heterotrophs from all kinds of food, isolation of fungi from various foods, and the survival of various pathogens in food and beverages. (Prerequisites: BIOL-204 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 3 (Spring).

BIOL-314

Tissue Culture

This course will present the techniques and applications of culturing eukaryotic cells, tissues, and organs in vitro. Emphasis will be placed on mammalian systems. Lectures will cover the historical background of tissue culture, how to authenticate cell lines, basic cell culture techniques; as well as stem cells, tissue engineering, and the role of cell culture in regenerative medicine. In the laboratory, students will be introduced to growth curves, cloning techniques, primary cell culture, and making a cell line; as well as detecting mycoplasma and other cell culture contaminants. (Prerequisites: BIOL-201 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 3 (Fall).

BIOL-321

Genetics

Introduction to the principles of inheritance; the study of genes and chromosomes at molecular, cellular, organismal, and population levels. (Prerequisites: (BIOL-206 and BIOL-216) or BIOL-201 or BIOL-202 or BIOG-240 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

BIOL-322

Developmental Biology

This course is a study of the processes of growth, differentiation and development that lead to the mature form of an organism. The course will also address how developmental biology is integrated with other aspects of biology including disease, ecology, and evolution. (Prerequisites: (BIOL-206 and BIOL-216) or BIOL-201 or BIOL-202 or BIOG-240 or equivalent courses.) Lab 3, Lecture 3 (Fall).

BIOL-340

Genomics

The overall goal of this course is to familiarize students with the theory and analysis of genomics data. Students will survey syllabus including the structure, organization, and expression of the genome in a diverse array of organisms ranging from microbes to humans. Students will also become familiar with the analysis of next generation ‘omics-type data through a series of computational activities and problem sets. A hands-on laboratory component will guide students through a rigorous investigation of genomes. (Prerequisites: BIOL-321 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 3 (Fall).

BIOL-365

Introduction to Population Genetics

This course consists of a study of DNA, genes, inheritance, genetic variation, genetic architecture, and change within and among populations. Fundamental genetics syllabus include DNA, gene, and chromosomal structure and function along with, transmission genetics, Mendelian inheritance patterns, sex-linked inheritance, genetic linkage, and the Hardy-Weinberg Principle. Population based syllabus will include genetic variation, its importance, how it originates and is maintained as well as inbreeding, random mating, mutation, migration, selection, genetic drift, the effects of small population size, fitness, population subdivision, the shifting balance theory, inter-deme selection, kin selection, neutral theory, molecular evolution, molecular clocks, multi-gene families, gene conversion, artificial selection, the genetic basis of quantitative traits and the fundamental theorem of natural selection. (Prerequisites: BIOL-265 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).

BIOL-375

Advanced Immunology

This course is an in-depth treatment of the molecular and cellular events associated with innate and adaptive immune responses. The response of the host to the environment of microbes and pathogens will be emphasized. Recognition and response of the host to the infectious agents and the resolution of the disease state will be examined at the cellular and molecular levels. The immune response to tumors will be treated and medical advances in treating neoplastic disease using immunological therapy will be presented. The laboratories will focus on the cellular and molecular techniques employed in the modern immunology laboratory. A laboratory module employing hybridoma techniques will provide an intensive experience with monoclonal antibodies and their use in diagnostics and disease treatment. (Prerequisites: BIOL-201 or BIOL-302 or BIOG-240 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 3 (Spring).

BIOL-408

Biology of Cancer

What are the differences between cancer and normal cells? What cellular pathways and molecular mechanisms do cancer cells exploit to gain proliferative advantage, circumvent programmed cell death pathways and evade the host surveillance system? In this course, students will answer these fundamental questions through activities, class discussion, readings and other assignments. Students will explore how the products of tumor suppressor genes, proto-oncogenes and oncogenes help or hinder the process of tumorigenesis in mammalian cells. Students will gain an understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern cancer cell growth, communication and organization. Students will become familiar with landmark findings and current research in the area of Cancer Biology and will use experimental data to formulate scientific conclusions. Students will participate in several writing assignments to practice scientific writing and learn how to clearly communicate ideas related to Cancer Biology. (Prerequisites: BIOL-201 or BIOL-302 or BIOG-240 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).

BIOL-412

Human Genetics

The course provides an overview of concepts and applications in human genetics. syllabus include classical and complex mechanisms of inheritance, the human genome, human origins & evolution, forensic applications, personalized medicine, and ethical issues. (Prerequisites: BIOL-321 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).

BIOL-415

Virology

This course is an introduction to virology with specific emphasis on the molecular mechanisms of virus infection of eukaryotic cells and virus-cell interactions. Virus structure, genetics, the infectious cycle, replication strategies, pathogenesis, persistence, effects on host macromolecular synthesis, viral oncogenesis, viral vectors, emerging viral diseases, and strategies to protect against and combat viral infection will be discussed. (Prerequisites: BIOL-201 or BIOL-302 or BIOG-240 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).

BIOL-420

Bacterial-Host Interactions: Microbiomes of the World

This course focuses on the bacterial and host (human, insect, plant, animals and fungi) mechanisms used in interactions with hosts during both pathogenesis and symbiosis. We will explore molecular, microbiome and genomic levels, drawing on the disciplines of genomics, biochemistry, molecular biology and cell biology. Several of the agonistic and antagonistic interactions will illustrate broader principles and contribute to our fundamental understanding of biological processes. The results of these interactions have a strong impact on biological productivity, and so are also ever increasing important in human health. An emphasis will be on the roles of molecules and cell structures in determining the outcome of an interaction. Course is intended to allow students to develop knowledge of host-bacterial interactions at the molecular to organismal level, with an emphasis on several model symbiotic- and patho-systems. Knowledge about bacterial mechanisms use to associate with host organisms and the different strategies bacteria employ to gain entry, damage host tissue and obtain nutrients for growth will be explored. We will also illustrate several mutualistic relationships between eukaryotic hosts with partner symbiotic bacteria. Genomic approaches to describe microbiomes (microbial communities) on host organisms and in environments will also be explored. (Prerequisites: BIOL-204 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring, Summer).

BIOL-427

Microbial and Viral Genetics

The goal of this course is to gain an understanding of the genetic systems of prokaryotes and their viruses. There are two major foci: (1) the mechanisms bacteria and their viruses employ to preserve the integrity of their genomes and regulate gene expression, and (2) the mechanisms by which these entities acquire new genetic material. The relevance of these processes to evolution and the development of new traits that facilitate survival under new environmental conditions (e.g., antibiotic resistance) is highlighted, especially with regard to clinically, industrially and agriculturally important microbes. Molecular processes whose discovery led to the formation of important research and/or biotechnological tools will also be discussed. Students will participate in laboratory projects which highlight important mechanisms, such as transformation, transduction, lysogeny, conjugation and CRIPSR-Cas acquired adaptive immunity. (Prerequisites: (BIOL-206 and BIOL-216) or BIOL-201 or BIOL-202 or BIOG-240 or equivalent courses.) Lab 3, Lecture 3 (Fall).

BIOL-428

Eukaryotic Gene Regulation and Disease

This course presents an overview of gene expression in eukaryotic systems, with an emphasis on how disease can result when gene regulation is disrupted. Points of control that are examined include: chromatin structure, transcription initiation, transcript processing, stability and modification, RNA transport, translation initiation, post-translational events, and protein stability. The mechanisms involved in regulating these control points are discussed by exploring specific well studied cases. The significance of these processes is highlighted by a discussion of several diseases that have been shown to be due to defects in gene regulation. (Prerequisites: BIOL-201 or BIOL-302 or BIOG-240 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).

BIOL-450

Genetic Engineering

This course is a laboratory-intensive introduction to the theoretical basis, laboratory techniques, and applications of gene manipulation. (Prerequisites: BIOL-201 or equivalent course.) Lab 8, Lecture 2 (Spring).

BIOL-601

Genetic Diseases and Disorders

The identification of genetic causes of disease has been one of the major modern scientific breakthroughs. This course examines a range of inherited diseases, how causative genetic variations were or are being identified, and what this means for the treatment of the diseases. Scientific literature will be utilized, both current and historical. (Prerequisites: BIOL-321 or equivalent course or graduate student standing.) Lecture 3 (Spring).

CHMA-261

Instrumental Analysis

CHMB-240

Biochemistry for Health Sciences

This course will focus on the application of biochemical knowledge to the field of medicine. Students will learn the basic functions of water, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids in humans, then explore implications of this knowledge in nutrition and metabolism and its relationship to health and disease. (Prerequisites: CHMG-142 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).

CHMB-402

Biochemistry I

This course introduces the structure and function of biological macromolecules and their metabolic pathways. The relationship between the three-dimensional structure of proteins and their function in enzymatic catalysis will be examined. Membrane structure and the physical laws that apply to metabolic processes will also be discussed. (Prerequisite: CHMO-231 or CHMO-331 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

CHMB-405

Biochemistry Lab

An introduction to the theory and practice of modern experimental biochemical laboratory techniques and concepts. The weekly two-hour lecture provides a theoretical framework for the course and includes a discussion of the properties of biomolecules and how those properties are exploited in the separation and characterization of the molecules. Practical laboratory techniques include the preparation of buffers, centrifugation, chromatography, electrophoretic methods, and UV-visible spectrophotometry as applied to the isolation and characterization of proteins and nucleic acids. The manipulation of genetic material in E. coli will also be executed. This course will be offered in a writing intensive format where the students will write and submit the different sections found in scientific papers (abstract, introduction, materials and methods, results, discussion, conclusions, references, figures, tables) in an iterative fashion that will include regular feedback from the instructor. (Prerequisites: CHMB-402 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 5 (Fall, Spring).

CHMO-231

Organic Chemistry l

This course is a study of the structure, nomenclature, reactions and synthesis of the following functional groups: alkanes, alkenes, alkynes. This course also introduces chemical bonding, IR and NMR spectroscopy, acid and base reactions, stereochemistry, nucleophilic substitution reactions, and alkene and alkyne reactions. In addition, the course provides an introduction to the use of mechanisms in describing and predicting organic reactions. (Prerequisites: CHMG-142 or CHMG-131 or equivalent course. Corequisites: CHMO-235 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

CHMO-232

Organic Chemistry II

This course is a continuation of the study of the structure, nomenclature, reactions and synthesis of the following functional groups: aromatic systems, alcohols, ethers, epoxides, and carbonyls. This course will introduce the use of mechanisms in describing and predicting organic reactions. (Prerequisites: CHMO-231 or CHMO-331 or equivalent course. Corequisites: CHMO-236 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

CHMO-235

Organic Chemistry Lab I

This course trains students to perform techniques important in an organic chemistry lab. The course also covers reactions from the accompanying lecture CHMO-231. (Corequisite: CHMO-231 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

CHMO-236

Organic Chemistry Lab II

This course teaches students to apply basic lab techniques to organic synthetic experiments reactions covered in the accompanying lecture COS-CHMO-232. This course will also help students to solidify the concepts taught in lecture. The course will continue to instruct students in maintaining a professional lab notebook. (Prerequisites: CHMO-235 or equivalent course. Corequisites: CHMO-232 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).

DCHP-333

Patient Care

Students will be introduced to key elements of integrated, high-quality patient care. Through lectures, videos, demonstrations, and discussions essential aspects of team-based patient care will be explored. Vital skills and behaviors such as professionalism, communication, documentation, workplace safety, patient assessment, patient positioning and transfers will be presented. Infection control, global health issues, and medications will also be examined. Students will be encouraged to share their personal experiences and thoughts about class topics. (Prerequisites: (BIOL-123 and BIOL-125 and BIOL-124 and BIOL-126) or (BIOL-101 and BIOL-102 and BIOL-103 and BIOL-104) or (BIOL-121 and BIOL-122) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 2 (Spring).

DCHP-411

Researching the Criminal Mind

DCHP-415

Pathophysiology of Organ Systems I

This course is designed to provide the students with the necessary foundation of the physiologic and pathologic processes that underlie the spectrum of human disease entities and is taught in the context of clinical scenarios that demonstrate the basic science principles in a real-world context of health care. Emphasis is placed on the fundamental principles of cell injury and repair, infection, neoplasia, and inflammation as well as hemodynamic disorders, thromboembolic disease and shock. Additional emphasis is placed on organ systems and their disorders such as the circulatory, liver, gallbladder and biliary systems. Material is presented in the context of case studies, utilizing clinical findings and addressing underlying basic physiologic, biochemical and immunologic processes as they relate to patient care and individual patient problem cases. (Prerequisites: Restricted to students in the College of Health Sciences and Technology with at least 3rd year standing who have completed MEDS-250 and MEDS-251 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).

DCHP-416

Pathophysiology of Organ Systems II

This course is second in a sequence designed to provide the students with the necessary foundation of knowledge and under-standing of the physiologic and pathologic processes that underlie the spectrum of human disease entities and is taught in the context of clinical scenarios that demonstrate the basic science principles in a real-world context of health care. Emphasis is placed on the pathophysiology of the central nervous system, lower urinary tract, male and female reproductive organs, gastrointestinal tract, spleen, pancreas, kidneys and endocrine system. Material is presented in the context of case studies, utilizing clinical findings and addressing underlying basic physiologic, biochemical and immunologic processes as they relate to patient care and individual patient problem cases. (Prerequisites: DCHP-415 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).

DCHP-426

Addiction Pharmacology

EXSC-205

Sports Physiology & Life Fitness

This course goes inside the science of physical fitness providing the student with an in depth physiological understanding of how the body adapts and improves through exercise activity. Students actively perform a series of self-assessments which they must analyze in order to determine their current state of fitness. With this data students develop exercise programs tailored to their needs and interests. Stress management and nutrition are examined allowing students to incorporate these two important areas into their plans to be fit for life. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

EXSC-206

Fitness Prescription

This course is designed to provide instruction to prepare students for certification as a Personal Trainer. It examines the role exercise plays in both the enhancement of health and fitness as well as the improvement of athletic performance. Students will develop a basic understanding of how the human body functions while physically active. Case studies are utilized to assist in the development of practical skills. (Prerequisites: (MEDG-101 and MEDG-103) or (MEDG-102 and MEDG-104) or BIOL-101 or BIOL-121 or (BIOL-123 and BIOL-125) or (BIOL-124 and BIOL-126) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).

EXSC-207

Exercise for Special Populations

This course is designed for those who are interested in the science of exercise and fitness for individuals with diagnosed disease states, or high performance requirements. The theoretical and diagnostic value of exercise testing will be reviewed. This information will then be used to create exercise prescriptions and understand the therapeutic benefit that exercise will have on specific conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, and obesity. High performance individuals functioning in challenging environments such as, astronauts, high altitude climbers, and ultramarathoners will also be considered. (Prerequisites: EXSC-205 or EXSC-206 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).

EXSC-280

Strength Training for Performance

Stronger athletes make better athletes no matter what the sport and this course teaches techniques of optimal training to enhance the muscular fitness of all manner of athletes. Physiological principles of strength development and basic musculoskeletal anatomy are reviewed and general program design is discussed. Utilizing case studies, students develop sport specific programs which will be presented to the class. Students will also produce strength training manuals outlining appropriate guidelines for improved performance. (Prerequisites: (MEDG-101 and MEDG-103) or (MEDG-102 and MEDG-104) or BIOL-101 or BIOL-121 or (BIOL-123 and BIOL-125) or (BIOL-124 and BIOL-126) or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall).

EXSC-320

Coaching Healthy Behavior

This course will teach students to encourage those with long standing lifestyle habits that contribute to their chronic illness to change is a very challenging proposition. It addresses this problem by incorporating psychological, sociological and counseling principles, along with coaching skills, into an intervention technique that emphasizes the positive and leads people to choose and adhere to a wellness lifestyle. Students will review case studies and meet with professionals in the field. (Prerequisites: (MEDG-101 and MEDG-103) or (MEDG-102 and MEDG-104) or BIOL-101 or BIOL-121 or (BIOL-123 and BIOL-125) or (BIOL-124 and BIOL-126) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Spring).

EXSC-410

Kinesiology

As a study of human movement this course will cover syllabus that begin with a review of the functional anatomy of the musculoskeletal system including both the upper and lower extremity as well as the spinal column and thorax. Factors of linear and rotary motion are reviewed along with postural analysis and movement elements associated with pushing, pulling and throwing objects. There is no separate Lab for this class and laboratory experiences will be incorporated into specifically designated lecture times. At the conclusion of this course students will have a functional capability to assess the intricacies of human movement. (Prerequisites: MEDS-250 or equivalent courses.) Lab 3, Lecture 3 (Fall).

EXSC-430

Theory of Athletic Injury

Even the very best athletes experience injury and being able to recognize and respond to those conditions is a crucial skill for those who will work with athletes. Students will learn the signs and symptoms of injury and the process of first response as well as how to support athletes through rehab. Successful students will learn how to incorporate injury reduction techniques into the training programs they develop for the athletes they serve. (Prerequisites: (MEDG-101 and MEDG-103) or (MEDG-102 and MEDG-104) or BIOL-101 or BIOL-121 or (BIOL-123 and BIOL-125) or (BIOL-124 and BIOL-126) or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall).

EXSC-480

Training High Performance Athletes

Aerobic capacity, strength, flexibility, speed, power, agility, nutrition, and rest are all crucial to the success of athletes and for trainers the need to appropriately coordinate all these factors is a significant challenge. This course explores the interrelationship of the multifactorial principles of athletic performance. Using case studies, modeling, flow sheets and scheduling plans students develop techniques that will lead athletes to success in their training routines. (Prerequisites: (MEDG-101 and MEDG-103) or (MEDG-102 and MEDG-104) or BIOL-101 or BIOL-121 or (BIOL-123 and BIOL-125) or (BIOL-124 and BIOL-126) or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).

EXSC-550

Exercise Physiology

Exercise Physiology is the scientific basis for the field of exercise science. This course provides students with an opportunity to deepen their understanding of the body’s responses and adaptations to exercise. Neuromuscular physiology is reviewed along with energy systems and mechanisms of fatigue. The cardiorespiratory system is examined with a focus on control and regulation during activity and there is a look at the physiological components of exercise training. Environmental factors that impact sport activities as well as training techniques which optimize performance will be reviewed. The differences in performance and adaptation that exist between children, adolescents, and adults as well as between males and females will be compared and contrasted. Exercises influence on long term health and fitness will conclude the course. Laboratory experiences will allow students to integrate and apply the concepts of exercise physiology through investigative experiments. (Prerequisites: (MEDS-250 and MEDS-251) or (1026-350 and 1026-360) or equivalent courses.) Lab 3, Lecture 3 (Fall).

MEDS-201

Language of Medicine

Language is a systematic means or method of communicating ideas, events, or feelings. It is a combination of words or symbols used to encode and decode information. Medicine has a language to communicate information regarding the human body, its functions, diseases, tests, and procedures. This course explores the language of medicine, the rules of “language,” language mechanics that apply how to create words, define terms, and identify abbreviations. In addition to learning the fundamentals, the student will gain experience in writing, using the language of medicine, as well as interpreting that language into everyday English. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

MEDS-240

History of Medicine

This course explores various discoveries in the history of medicine and the individuals credited with the discoveries. The course begins in ancient Greece and ends with modern times. Individuals such as Hippocrates, Vesalius, Harvey, Jenner, Leeuwenhoek and Roentgen will be discussed. (Prerequisites: (BIOL-101 and BIOL-102 and BIOL-103 and BIOL-104) or (BIOL-121 and BIOL-122) or (MEDG-101 and MEDG-102 and MEDG-103 and MEDG-104) or (BIOL-123 and BIOL-124 and BIOL-125 and BIOL-126) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Spring).

MEDS-245

Medical Genetics

This course will serve as an introduction to the field of medical genetics. Throughout the course we will survey several human variations and diseases of medical importance. Clinical case reports will be incorporated to illustrate the underlying genetic principles. (Prerequisites: (BIOL-123 and BIOL-125 and BIOL-124 and BIOL-126) or (BIOL-101 and BIOL-102 and BIOL-103 and BIOL-104) or (BIOL-121 and BIOL-122) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

MEDS-290

Biomedical Research

This course provides an opportunity for in-depth experiential learning through collaborative work on an independent research project. Ind Study (Fall, Spring, Summer).

MEDS-310

Introduction to Pharmacology

This course provides an overview of the pharmacy profession (educational requirements, professional responsibilities and opportunities, role of the pharmacist in the health care team) and a detailed look into basic pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetic, and pharmaceutical principles. The pharmacodynamics principles covered include mechanisms of drug action, drug-receptor interaction theory, dose-response relationships, structure-activity relationships, and principles of drug metabolism. Pharmaceutical syllabus include formulations, drug product design, excipients, dosage forms, and elimination rate. Lastly, specific disease states will be covered that will clearly, and effectively demonstrate many of the syllabus taught. The diseases will be approached by presenting the etiology followed by the pharmacotherapy, including the details of the multiple drug classes that are used for any one-disease state. (Prerequisites: (MEDS-250 and MEDS-251) or (1026-350 and 1026-360) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).

MEDS-313

Introduction to Infectious Diseases

This is an advanced course in the mechanisms by which bacteria and fungi cause disease in humans. The course syllabus include the clinical signs of each disease, diagnosis of each disease, pathogenic mechanisms used by the organisms to cause disease, treatment of the disease, and prevention of the disease. The laboratory component of this course will consist of a mixture of methodologies used in the identification of the infectious agents, evaluation of the host response to the infection, case studies, student presentations of articles related to infectious disease and other assignments aimed at deepening the understanding the infectious disease process. (Prerequisites: (BIOL-123 and BIOL-125 and BIOL-124 and BIOL-126) or (BIOL-101 and BIOL-102 and BIOL-103 and BIOL-104) or (BIOL-121 and BIOL-122) or (MEDG-101 and MEDG-102 and MEDG-103 and MEDG-104) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).

MEDS-345

Care-Based Genetic Counseling

This course will provide students with an inside look at the profession of genetic counseling and its patients through in-depth case studies of actual patient scenarios, role playing and lectures focused on realistic challenges faced by genetic counselors. This course will focus on combining scientific information about genetic disorders with the psychosocial aspects of counseling sessions that will give provide an accurate perspective of the profession. Students will participate in role playing exercises, keep detailed journals and participate in mock patient interviews. (Prerequisites: MEDS-245 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).

MEDS-355

Introduction to Global Health

This introductory course will evaluate the modern challenges of global health from a multidisciplinary perspective. The key concepts of global health will be discussed, including various health determinants, human rights, healthcare systems, culture’s impact on health, environmental concerns, nutrition, communicable and noncommunicable diseases, women’s health issues, child and adolescent health, injuries, natural disasters and complex humanitarian emergencies, poverty’s impact on health and more. Students will be expected to be active learners, lead classroom activities on certain days as part of group research project presentations, and actively participate in discussions. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

MEDS-356

Field Studies in Molecular Epidemiology

This is a study abroad course for students interested in a pre-medical, pre-health or global health experience in sub-Saharan Africa. It is designed for those interested in medical or graduate school, tropical infectious diseases or a public health career, that provides opportunity for foreign travel. The focus is on molecular epidemiology of tropical diseases of interest (malaria, schistosomiasis, soil-transmitted helminthiasis), for which opportunities to study are not available in the United States. Such opportunities include but are not limited to simple to complex molecular diagnostic methods and related laboratory hands on experience. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to students with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 3 (Spring).

MEDS-360

Placebo, Suggestion, Research and Health

This course provides a foundation for understanding the history and science of placebo effects with a focus on how these effects influence research design, therapeutics and health. A model of placebo effects – comprised of conditioning, expectation, social influence, and paradigm – is developed and applied to both health and common diseases in order to recognize that all health interventions are at least placebos. The question is whether they are anything more. The course structure and process include assigned readings, quizzes, creative class projects, studying advertisements, hearing from pharmaceutical company representatives, and class discussion designed to provoke critical thinking. (Prerequisites: (BIOL-123 and BIOL-125 and BIOL-124 and BIOL-126) or (BIOL-101 and BIOL-102 and BIOL-103 and BIOL-104) or (BIOL-121 and BIOL-122) or (MEDG-101 and MEDG-102 and MEDG-103 and MEDG-104) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Spring).

MEDS-361

Applied Psychophysiology and Self-Regulation

Learn how to change your mind. This course explores the evolving field of psychophysiology and its applications for therapeutic self-regulation in health care as well as its implications for the related fields of psychology, biomedical engineering, computer science, and medical economics. By focusing on the mind as an emergent phenomenon of bidirectional brain and body interaction, we realize how much of our own physiology we can and do self-regulate. We will review research on hypnosis, biofeedback, meditative strategies, and psychophysiological monitoring. The course structure integrates lecture, demonstration, discussion and individual self-monitoring projects. Weekly quizzes provide feedback on learning. (Prerequisites: (BIOL-123 and BIOL-125 and BIOL-124 and BIOL-126) or (BIOL-101 and BIOL-102 and BIOL-103 and BIOL-104) or (BIOL-121 and BIOL-122) or (MEDG-101 and MEDG-102 and MEDG-103 and MEDG-104) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Biannual).

MEDS-370

Community Healthcare

This seminar course is a unique opportunity for students who are serious about pursuing a career in healthcare. The course will focus on the study of key issues concerning community health care and developing practical approaches to supporting patients. Students consider obstacles to effective health care as well as strategies for enabling at-risk patients to play a more active role in promoting their health and well-being. syllabus covered include: challenges of delivering adequate healthcare in the community; population health; the concept of “underinsurance”; the business of healthcare; health literacy and measuring outcomes. Students in the course will be expected to undertake at least one subsequent internship (MEDS 475 Health Coach Practicum) with Rochester Regional Health and the Greater Rochester Independent Practice Association (GRIPA). Students complete an application before registering for this course. Acceptance into the course is contingent upon passing a screening and interview process. Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).

MEDS-402

Biomedical Ethics

This course will explore key ethical principles, guidelines and regulations that inform decision making and best practices in biomedical research, public health and clinical medicine including issues of informed consent, experimental design, acceptable risk, research integrity, medical errors, for-profit medicine, refusal of care, end-of-life decisions, physician assisted death, substance abuse and ethical use of animals in research. Students will also have multiple opportunities to further develop critical thinking and effective professional communication skills in a seminar format. (Prerequisites: (BIOL-123 and BIOL-125 and BIOL-124 and BIOL-126) or (BIOL-101 and BIOL-102) or (BIOL-121 and BIOL-122) or (MEDG-101 and MEDG-102) and (UWRT-150 or ENGL-150 or ISTE-110) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).

MEDS-403

US Healthcare

The course will explore the beginnings of the healthcare delivery in America, and the economics of the healthcare enterprise. It will also explore the role of government in providing and regulating the delivery of healthcare services as well as ethical issues that affect the doctor-patient relationship. Finally, the course will examine the healthcare systems of other industrialized nations and compare and contrast those systems with that of the U.S. Lecture 3 (Spring).

MEDS-417

Clinical Microbiology

Clinical microbiology is a detailed study of the bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites relevant to human infectious diseases, including their historical significance and impact on society. This course will also focus on giving the student an appreciation and clear understanding of emerging/re-emerging infectious disease agents particularly those infectious disease agents commonly encountered in a hospital setting. (Prerequisites: (BIOL-123 and BIOL-125 and BIOL-124 and BIOL-126) or (BIOL-101 and BIOL-102 and BIOL-103 and BIOL-104) or (BIOL-121 and BIOL-122) or (MEDG-101 and MEDG-102 and MEDG-103 and MEDG-104) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Spring).

MEDS-418

Clinical Microbiology Lab

Clinical microbiology is a detailed study of the bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites relevant to human infectious diseases, including their historical significance and impact on society. This course provides a hands-on experience in identifying these types of agents. The course will also focus on giving the student an appreciation and clear understanding of emerging/re-emerging infectious disease agents particularly those infectious disease agents commonly encountered in a hospital setting. (Prerequisites: (BIOL-123 and BIOL-125 and BIOL-124 and BIOL-126) or (BIOL-101 and BIOL-102 and BIOL-103 and BIOL-104) or (BIOL-121 and BIOL-122) or (MEDG-101 and MEDG-102 and MEDG-103 and MEDG-104) or equivalent. Co-requisite: MEDS-417 or equivalent.) Lab 2 (Spring).

MEDS-421

Parasitology

Introduction to parasites of medical importance and the diseases they cause. It includes study of a variety of parasites classified by diseases such as blood and intestinal protozoan parasites, nematodes, trematodes, and cestodes. Examples of important parasitic diseases to be covered include malaria, sleeping sickness, elephantiasis, river blindness, leishmaniasis, amebic dysentery, and babesiosis. Coursework includes an examination of the distribution and transmission, pathogenesis, clinical signs and symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and control. Contribution of parasitic infections to economic and health inequities between developed and developing countries will be analyzed. (Prerequisites: (MEDG-101 or MEDG-102 or BIOL-101 or BIOL-102 or BIOL-121 or BIOL-122 or BIOL-123 or BIOL-124) or equivalent course and at least 3rd year student standing.) Lecture 3 (Spring).

MEDS-422

Endocrinology

This course will combine lecture, literature review, and small group discussions/presentations to introduce students to the fundamental concepts of human endocrinology. syllabus covered will include: digestion and metabolism; growth and aging; arousal/mood; sexual dimorphism and reproduction; and neuroendocrinology. Discussion of relevant human diseases/disorders will be used to illustrate related biochemical/anatomical pathways and mechanisms. (Prerequisites: MEDS-250 and (MEDS-242 or BIOL-201 or BIOL-302) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).

MEDS-425

Introduction to Neuroscience

This course will focus on the human nervous system, and its regulation of behavior and complex function. Background information on neuroanatomy, cellular physiology, neurotransmission, and signaling mechanisms will pave the way for an in-depth analysis of specialization at the systems level. Our goal will be to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying normal human behaviors and pathogenic states. (Prerequisites: MEDS-250 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Spring).

MEDS-430

Epidemiology

The course covers applications of epidemiology to the study of the distribution and determinants of health and diseases, morbidity, injuries, disability, and mortality in populations. Epidemiologic methods for the control of conditions such as infectious and chronic diseases, community and environmental health hazards, and unintentional injuries are discussed. Other syllabus include quantitative aspects of epidemiology, including data sources; measures of morbidity and mortality; evaluation of association and causality; and various study design methods. Contemporary syllabus in public health (e.g. swine flu, HIV/AIDS, SARS), outbreak investigation, and containment strategies will be examined, analyzed, and thoroughly discussed. (Prerequisites: (MEDG-101 or MEDG-102 or BIOL-101 or BIOL-102 or BIOL-121 or BIOL-122 or BIOL-123 or BIOL-124) or equivalent course and at least 3rd year student standing.) Lecture 3 (Spring).

MEDS-440H

Cardiac Imaging

MEDS-470

Examining the Clinical Experience

This course builds off of the clinical experiences of students currently working or volunteering in a clinical setting. The course will include informal and formal writing assignments. syllabus addressed include the following: the roles of the various healthcare professionals; understanding sensitivity and diversity; logistics of the health care system – in-patient and out-patient; privacy and safety issues associated with patients and care providers; documentation methods. (Currently volunteering or working in a healthcare setting) (Prerequisites: Students with at least 2nd year standing who has completed First-Year Writing and is currently working or volunteering in a healthcare position.) Lecture 1 (Fall).

MEDS-475

Health Coach Practicum

This course is a continuation of MEDS 370 and provides an opportunity for students to apply key concepts in health coaching to assist members of the community. Students will cover such syllabus as self-management, motivational interviewing, cultural competency and goal setting. Students will have the opportunity to collaborate with health care professionals in identifying barriers to healthcare as well as creating ways to Improve patient outcomes. Journaling and progress notes are writing formats that will be covered and provide the student with a way to express their experiences in both a reflective and a professional manner. (Prerequisites: MEDS-370 or equivalent course.) Clinical 3, Lecture 1.5 (Fall, Spring).

MEDS-490

Human Gross Anatomy

This course exposes students to details of human anatomy through cadaver dissection. Lecture material stresses functional and clinical correlates corresponding to laboratory exercises. (Prerequisites: (MEDS-250 and MEDS-251) or (1026-350 and 1026-360) or equivalent courses.) Lab 6, Lecture 3 (Spring).

MEDS-499

Biomedical Sciences Co-op

One semester of paid work experience in a healthcare related field. CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).

MEDS-501

Human Development

This course will provide a survey of the primary biological events, mechanisms and underpinnings of human development from conception through aging. It will use case studies, human clinical and laboratory research papers to enrich and illustrate key points related to human developmental milestones. A significant emphasis will be placed on understanding developmental disabilities and adult-onset degenerative disorders, and also in relating biological events to an individual’s larger psychosocial functioning. Students will also Improve professional communication skills through discussions, writing and revision. (Prerequisites: MEDS-422 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Spring).

MEDS-510

Biomedical Research

This course provides an opportunity for in-depth experiential learning through collaborative work on an independent research project. Ind Study (Fall, Spring, Summer).

MEDS-511

Interdisciplinary Research

This course will provide an independent, interdisciplinary research opportunity to enhance the experiential learning component of the Biomedical Sciences Program. Students will engage in preparatory studying and original research in an academic discipline or environment outside of their immediate major. Proposed work may span a broad variety of disciplines within a unifying theme of project goals and potential outcomes with strong application to human health and development. Examples may include mechanical, electrical or biomedical engineering: imaging science and optics; entrepreneurship and biotechnology; epidemiology, community health, and public policy. Ind Study (Fall, Spring, Summer).

MEDS-515

Medical Pathophysiology

This course is designed as an introductory course in pathophysiology, the study of disease and its consequences. It covers the basic mechanisms of disease, concentrating on the diseases that are most frequently encountered in clinical practice. The major syllabus of discussion will emphasize the general pathologic processes; this will provide a basis for understanding diseases affecting specific organ systems. Clinical correlations will be made as examples of how physiological processes can go awry in the generation of a particular disease. (Prerequisites: (MEDS-250 and MEDS-251) or (1026-350 and 1026-360) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

MEDS-518

Oral Microbiology

This course is designed to deliver an understanding of the microbial population of the oral cavity as it relates to health and disease. Throughout the course, the presence, absence, influence and consequences of various microbial species will be presented relative to the anatomy of the oral cavity and subsequent disease. The course will also illuminate the connection between the oral cavity, inflammation and surprising conditions chronic and acute conditions that seemingly are unrelated to the oral cavity. (Prerequisites: MEDS-417 or BIOL-204 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).

MEDS-520

Histology & Histopathology

This foundational course in the study of human biology and medicine provides students with a detailed exploration of the microscopic and structural anatomy of normal human tissues and organs, with special emphasis given to the relationships between the cellular architecture of human organs and organ systems and their functions. The course also examines human pathologies as a manifestation of the loss of cellular integrity leading to alterations in the histological features of diseased organs. (Prerequisites: MEDS-250 and MEDS-251 and MEDS-242 or equivalent courses.) Lab 3, Lecture 3 (Fall).

MEDS-525

Advanced Clinical Neuroanatomy

This is an integrated course encompassing lectures, laboratory exercises and clinical case discussions. Laboratory exercises will focus on detailed examination of the human brain as well as the internal circuitry of myelin-stained sections through the spinal cord, brainstem, and forebrain. The exercises will reinforce concepts stressed in lectures and clinical case discussions. (Prerequisites: MEDS-425 or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 4 (Fall).

MEDS-530

Human Immunology

Introduction to the fundamental facts and concepts on immunology to include: innate and adaptive immunity; cells, molecules, tissues and organs of the immune "system"; cell communication and interaction; antibody structure and function; and the application of these concepts to infectious diseases, vaccine design, autoimmune diseases, cancer, transplantation, regulation of the immune response, allergic reactions and immunosuppression. Students will gain an understanding of immunological principles and techniques, and their application to contemporary research, with results from instructor’s research laboratory (Prerequisites: (BIOL-101 and BIOL-102) or (BIOL-121 and BIOL-122) or (BIOL-123 and BIOL-125 and BIOL-124 and BIOL-126) or (MEDS-250 and MEDS-251) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).

MEDS-599

Independent Study

This course will provide students the opportunity for independent study in a course of strong interest. Ind Study (Fall, Spring, Summer).

NUTR-215

Foundations of Nutrition Sciences

This is an introductory course in nutritional science concepts and application to current nutrition issues. This course covers the study of specific nutrients and their functions, the development of dietary standards and guides and how these standards are applied throughout the lifecycle. Students learn to analyze their own diets and develop strategies to make any necessary dietary changes for a lifetime of good health. Current health and nutrition problems and nutrition misinformation will be discussed. Online sections are asynchronous. Students are assessed by learning activities such as: weekly quizzes and discussion boards, homework assignments, and a final diet analysis project. In person sections are synchronous lectures and class discussions. Students are assessed by learning activities such as: exams, homework, assignments and final project analysis. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

NUTR-300

Sports Nutrition

This course will provide an introduction to the integration between exercise and nutrition-related syllabus by exploring the intimate link among nutrition, energy metabolism, and human exercise response. The course content will sort fact from fiction and help students and practitioners obtain the knowledge they need to give sound advice to athletes and active individuals. (Prerequisite: College level science course preferred.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

PMED-300

Premedical Studies Seminar

This course provides students with an exploration of careers in health care, development of a sequential plan to prepare for entrance exams and applications, self-assessment of strengths and weaknesses in the application portfolio, and individualized advising towards goals. This course should be taken in the year immediately preceding the target application date. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to students with 3rd year standing.) Lecture 1 (Spring).

PHYS-111

College Physics I

This is an introductory course in algebra-based physics focusing on mechanics and waves. syllabus include kinematics, planar motion, Newton’s laws, gravitation; rotational kinematics and dynamics; work and energy; momentum and impulse; conservation laws; simple harmonic motion; waves; data presentation/analysis and error propagation. The course is taught using both traditional lectures and a workshop format that integrates material traditionally found in separate lecture, recitation, and laboratory settings. Lab 4, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

PHYS112

College Physics II

This course is an introduction to algebra-based physics focusing on thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and elementary syllabus in modern physics. syllabus include heat and temperature, laws of thermodynamics, fluids, electric and magnetic forces and fields, DC electrical circuits, electromagnetic induction, opyics, the concept of the photon, and the Bohr model of the atom. The course is taught using both traditional lectures and a workshop format that integrates material traditionally found in separate lecture, recitation, and laboratory settings. (Prerequisites: PHYS-111 or 1017-211 or equivalent course.) Lab 4, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).





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