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ASWB education - Association of Social Work Boards Updated: 2024

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ASWB Association of Social Work Boards

There are 170 questions on the ASWB examination, but only 150 count toward your score.

The content outline for each ASWB examination defines the content that will be measured on the exam. The content outlines were developed through the practice analyses conducted with licensed social workers in a variety of practice settings across the United States and Canada.



Content areas are the broad areas of content knowledge that are measured by each exam. The content areas structure the content for exam construction and score reporting purposes. When receiving exam scores, failing candidates are given feedback on their performance on each content area of the exam.

Competencies describe meaningful sets of knowledge, skills, and abilities that are important to the job of a social worker within each content area.

Knowledge, skills, and abilities statements (KSAs) structure the content of the exam for item development purposes. The KSAs provide further details about the nature and range of exam content that is included in the competencies. Each KSA describes a discrete knowledge component that is the basis for individual exam questions that may be used to measure the competency.



Reduce exam anxiety by helping you understand exam construction as well as exam content areas and the structure of questions
Demystify this high-stakes exam with a reassuring inside look at how the exams are created—complete with an in-depth look at example questions, how they work, and how you can apply your knowledge to the exam

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Licensing exams are a crucial component in nearly every licensed profession, and social work is no exception.

The exams provided by the Association of Social Work Boards are used in every U.S. state, as well as the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the Canadian provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, and Manitoba.



ASWB administers five categories of social work licensure examinations:



Associate

Bachelors

Masters

Advanced Generalist

Clinical

Not every jurisdiction uses all five categories, so candidates must be sure to check with their individual boards to find out which examinations are appropriate for the jurisdiction in which they are seeking licensure.



Each examination contains 170 four-option, multiple-choice questions designed to measure minimum competencies at four categories of practice. Only 150 of the 170 items are scored; the remaining 20 questions are pretest items included to measure their effectiveness as items on future examinations. These pretest items are scattered randomly throughout the examination. Candidates have four hours to complete the test, which is administered electronically.



Examinations are administered by appointment at Pearson Professional Centers worldwide. There are no fixed administration dates. Instead, registered candidates can go to Pearson VUEs website to schedule a time to take the test.
Association of Social Work Boards
Social-Work-Board Association education

Other Social-Work-Board exams

ASWB Association of Social Work Boards
CFSW NAFC Certified Forensic Social Worker
PACE NFPA Paralegal Advanced Competency Exam
PCCE NFPA Paralegal CORE Competency Exam

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Social-Work-Board
ASWB
Association of Social Work Boards
https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/ASWB
D. hospitalize this patient until the suicidal ideation passes
Answer: B
Question: 18
A social worker is utilizing environmental manipulation as a technique when he/she:
A. represents the agency at a health and welfare council meeting
B. uses a psychosocial framework
C. suggests the use of psychoactive medications
D. helps the client find more satisfying employment in a supportive environment
Answer: D
Question: 19
A diagnosis of Schizophreniform Disorder is generally applied to clients whose psychotic
symptoms:
A. are related to substance abuse
B. are very long term
C. show a marked and continuing decline in functioning
D. are similar to those of schizophrenia and have existed more than one month, but less than six
months.
Answer: D
Question: 20
A 15 year old female patient at a mental health clinic complains that for the past three weeks she
has been uncharacteristically angry and irritable and has had difficulty concentrating on school
work. She says that she feels "down in the dumps". Her appetite has diminished and though
weighing 120 pounds a month earlier, she has lost 9 pounds. She has difficulty sleeping and has
withdrawn from after school activities that she had previously found interesting and enjoyable.
During the interview she seems constantly in motion, rising several times and walking around
the room before returning to her chair. It is most likely that she is suffering from:
A. a drug induced depression
B. a somatoform disorder
7
C. a depressive episode
D. an adolescent behavior disorder
Answer: C
8
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Editorial Note: We earn a commission from partner links on Forbes Advisor. Commissions do not affect our editors' opinions or evaluations.

If you’re interested in pursuing a profession that empowers communities, encourages social development and cohesion and helps people Boost or overcome difficult circumstances, you may want to consider becoming a social worker.

Social work offers a variety of challenging yet rewarding career paths, with opportunities to explore different specializations that align with your interests, skills and professional goals. This article provides an overview of the steps, including education, certification and professional experience, required to become a licensed social worker.

What Does a Social Worker Do?

A social worker is a professional who advocates for individuals, families, groups and communities and helps them Boost their overall quality of life. They work in a variety of contexts and environments, including mental health clinics, community centers, prisons, schools, hospitals and private practices, to help their clients cope with challenges such as divorce, illness, substance abuse and unemployment.

In addition to conducting assessments to determine the appropriate resources, they often also customize a treatment plan to support the needs and development of their clients.

Social Worker Job Outlook

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), employment opportunities for social workers are projected to grow 7% through 2032, which is faster than the average projection for all occupations. The median salary of a social worker is $26.61 per hour, or $55,350 per year.

Top Skills for a Social Worker

Social workers work closely with individuals from a wide range of cultural, socioeconomic and religious backgrounds and must be able to assist their clients with sensitivity, compassion and understanding. Key skills for social workers include:

  • Verbal and nonverbal communication
  • Emotional intelligence
  • Active listening
  • Critical thinking
  • Organization
  • Advocacy

Types of Social Work Degrees

If you’re contemplating pursuing a career as a social worker, it’s crucial that you familiarize yourself with the licensure requirements of the specific state you’re planning to work in to determine the appropriate degree programs and certifications you’ll need.

It’s important to obtain degrees from institutions accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) because it demonstrates that your program follows best practices and meets the field’s established standards in rigor and quality.

Bachelor of Social Work (BSW)

Holding a bachelor’s degree is the minimum requirement to work as a social worker, though most states require a master’s of social work (MSW). Obtaining a BSW typically takes four years to complete and qualifies you for nonclinical, entry-level positions as a licensed baccalaureate social worker (LBSW). LBSWs must work under a clinical supervisor.

The curriculum for bachelor’s programs in social work provides a comprehensive overview of the theory, practices and ethics of the field through a combination of lectures and field work. In addition to the general course requirements unique to each university, the coursework typically covers a variation of the following topics:

  • Social and human rights policies
  • Behavioral science
  • Psychology
  • Sociology
  • Statistical analysis, including biostatistics

Many undergraduate social work programs include an internship or practicum component. You must pass the bachelor’s licensing exam to become a LBSW.

Licensed Master of Social Work (LMSW)

Master’s degree programs in social work typically take two years to complete and allow graduates to work as a licensed master social worker (LMSW). The curriculum builds on the knowledge obtained during undergraduate programs, while also advancing practical skills.

Master’s programs in social work often offer specializations, such as mental health, child and family services, criminal justice, community and organization practice and school social work practice.

Coursework for master’s degree in social work typically includes Topics related to the following:

  • Social welfare policy
  • Human behavior and the social environment
  • Social work practice with groups and families
  • Psychopathology

Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW)

LCSWs hold a master’s degree in social work and have years of professional training and experience. In addition to fulfilling state-specific requirements, LCSWs must also successfully pass the national examination to obtain licensure. The LCSW designation makes you eligible to provide clinical services, such as diagnosing and counseling those dealing with mental, behavioral and emotional issues.

Requirements for a Social Work Certification

Becoming a licensed social worker requires licensure from your state licensing board. It’s essential to acquaint yourself with your state’s educational and professional licensing requirements.

After completing a master’s degree, applicants must pass the Association of Social Work Board (ASWB) exam to earn an LSW. Generally, social workers need to gain up to 4,000 hours of supervised work experience, which typically takes over two years. You must then pass an additional clinical or advanced specialist ASWB exam, which leads to an LCSW. An LCSW must be renewed periodically. Renewal requirements vary by state.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What qualifications do you need for social work?

The qualifications needed to work as a social worker depends on the level of licensure you want to obtain and the certification requirements of the state you want to work in. A bachelor’s degree in social work qualifies you for nonclinical, entry-level positions, while a master’s degree and licensure expand your professional opportunities.

How do I start a career in social work?

Familiarizing yourself with your state’s licensing requirements and researching social work programs from accredited institutions is crucial. Earning a bachelor’s and master’s degree in social work and gaining professional experience provides the necessary foundation to start a career as a social worker. Next, obtaining licensure is required if you want to work as an independent clinical social worker.

How much does a social worker make?

According to the BLS, the average salary of a social worker is $26.61 per hour, or $55,350 per year. Your level of experience, specialization and location can affect your salary.

What do social workers do on a daily basis?

The day-to-day duties of a social worker vary depending on your specialization and work environment. Generally, duties entail counseling, administrative tasks and designing personalized treatment and care plans.

Sun, 10 Dec 2023 21:20:00 -0600 Mariah St John en-US text/html https://www.forbes.com/advisor/education/become-a-social-worker/
What Do Social Workers Do?

Editorial Note: We earn a commission from partner links on Forbes Advisor. Commissions do not affect our editors' opinions or evaluations.

Social work extends across many industries and provides a wide array of services to local, national and global communities. Social workers promote the well-being and social welfare of their clients and communities. The broad field encompasses many specializations and areas of practice.

This article offers some insight on what you can expect from a career in social work. Here, we overview education and certification requirements, work environments and typical job responsibilities.

Social Worker Job Description

Social work entails helping vulnerable populations—including communities, organizations, families and individuals of all ages—meet their needs and overcome socioeconomic barriers. Social workers help their clients cope with personal and social issues such as divorce, grief, substance and behavioral addictions, domestic conflicts, child neglect, mental illness and unemployment.

These professionals often specialize in working with specific demographics, such as children, incarcerated individuals and their families, the elderly, immigrants and refugees.

Different types of social workers take on different responsibilities. Tasks often involve counseling, community organizing, advocacy, research and program development. Social workers might also analyze, develop and implement policy.

Social Worker Education Requirements and Qualifications

If you’re considering a social work career, you should first familiarize yourself with the licensure requirements of the state in which you plan to work. Prospective social workers should pursue degrees from programs accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE). This accreditation verifies that a program adheres to best practices and meets the field’s established quality standards.

Holding a bachelor’s degree is the minimum requirement to work as a social worker, though many states also require a Master of Social Work (M.S.W.). Earning a bachelor’s in social work (B.S.W.) typically takes four years of full-time study and qualifies you for nonclinical, entry-level positions.

Earning an M.S.W. generally takes two years of full-time study. Many M.S.W. programs offer specializations in subjects like mental health, child and family services, criminal justice, community and organization practice and school social work practice.

Social Work Licensure

You can become a licensed social worker by meeting your state licensing board’s qualifications. Each state has its own educational and professional licensing requirements for social workers.

Earning licensure typically requires an M.S.W. from a CSWE-accredited program, years of professional training and experience and a passing score on the Association of Social Work Boards examination.

Social workers need up to 4,000 hours of supervised work experience to earn licensure, which takes approximately two years. Social workers must renew their licenses periodically. Renewal requirements vary by state.

Where Do Social Workers Work?

Social work extends to nearly every aspect of community life. As a result, the field comprises diverse work environments across multiple industries. Depending on specialization and area of practice, social workers can find roles and positions in a variety of settings, including:

  • Schools
  • Mental health clinics
  • Hospitals and medical centers
  • Crisis centers
  • Women’s shelters
  • Adoption agencies
  • Senior centers, nursing homes and assisted-living facilities
  • Prisons, correctional facilities and juvenile detention centers
  • Government agencies and elected offices
  • Public and private agencies
  • Police departments
  • Courts
  • Military facilities
  • Businesses and corporations
  • Research institutions

How Much Does a Social Worker Make?

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, social workers make a median annual salary of $55,350. Several factors affect salary, including education level, specialization and/or industry, professional working experience, licensure and location. The average social worker salary can change over time and fluctuate with the economy.

Frequently Asked Questions About Social Workers

What are the main duties of a social worker?

Social workers’ primary duties depend on position and specialization. Responsibilities can vary from counseling to advocating for community resources and developing social policies.

What are some pros and cons of becoming a social worker?

Social workers can make a meaningful, positive impact on local, national and global communities. On the other hand, social work can be emotionally demanding, as practitioners work closely with individuals dealing with difficult situations.

What field of social work pays the most?

Director-level positions for businesses and corporations are often the highest paying jobs in social work. Several factors can affect earning potential, including level of education, specialization, licensure, working experience and location.

Tue, 02 Jan 2024 02:06:00 -0600 Mariah St John en-US text/html https://www.forbes.com/advisor/education/what-do-social-workers-do/
Field Education

At the Saint Louis University School of Social Work, we emphasize hands-on, skills-based learning in the classroom, so that SLU students are ready to hit the ground running when its time for them to complete field work.

The Council on Social Work Education endorses "the role of field education as the 'signature pedagogy' in social work education by promoting, collaborating, recommending and distributing information to social work field educators and related membership organizations."

We collaborate with more than 400 local nonprofits, health care agencies, and community organizations to find the right fit for both the student and the field work supervisor.

Students work at a local school as part of the social work program.

Work With Us

Individuals interested in supervising field experience:

Agencies

SLU’s Office of Field Education works closely with students and agencies to ensure a positive and appropriate experience.

FAQ

What are the responsibilities of the field instructor?
  • Review the Field Instructor Handbook (PDF) for field education policies and procedures.
  • Complete the required Field Instruction Certification Program for new field instructors.
  • Attend Session One (of six sessions) before taking a student, and complete all six sessions within two years.
  • Complete ongoing training requirements to remain a field instructor.
  • Arrange for an agency orientation and training for the student.
  • Serve as a mentor and role model to the student.
  • Assist the student to select roles, tasks, and activities that can be performed at the practicum site that ensure new learning appropriate for the student's program level (B.S.S.W. or M.S.W.).
  • Assist the student to complete his/her Learning Agreement within the first three weeks of the semester.
  • Meet with the student individually for at least one hour weekly for supervision.
  • Guide the student in integrating practicum experiences and key social work concepts and methods.
  • Evaluate the student's progress regularly.
  • Meet with the student and practicum liaison for the mid-semester site visit.
  • Provide regular, constructive feedback to students about their performance.
  • Contact the assigned practicum liaison to discuss questions regarding the student's standing in the program, appropriateness for the setting, learning goals, needs and any other issues that may detract from a successful practicum experience.
  • Recommend a "Satisfactory" or "Unsatisfactory" grade with the final evaluation.
  • Complete organizational and field instructor application/renewal paperwork and provide updated information on a regular basis to the University and collaborative.
What are the benefits of being a field instructor?
  • Use of the University libraries; contact the Office of Field Education for access.
  • Apply for tuition remission to complete a graduate course. An application may be requested by calling the Office of Field Education. The deadlines for applying for tuition remission are July 1 for a fall course; Nov. 1 for a spring course; and April 1 for a summer course.
  • Receive free CEs for all Field Instructor Certification Program sessions and ongoing educational sessions.
  • Receive a certificate that attests to the field instruction provided to the student at the end of the semester that may be used for social work licensure requirements for continuing education. Three CEs are granted each semester that may apply to Missouri licensure.
  • Serve on various standing and ad-hoc committees and task forces within the School of Social Work.
I'd like more students. How can I market my agency to students?
  • Students select a practicum site through a structured self-selection process. Students meet with their assigned practicum liaison to generate ideas, interview with sites and select a site that has offered an opportunity to them.
  • Students learn about sites through flyers posted on our practicum board on the second floor of the School of Social Work, our internal Google practicum web page and the collaborative website. Agencies are welcome to send a one-page flyer that advertises their opportunities to the School for posting on the bulletin board and Google site.
  • Part-time M.S.W. students and some B.S.S.W. students need evening and weekend hours for their practica. If your agency can offer evening and weekend hours, please share the information with the Office of Field Education.
How is practicum structured?
  • Students complete 300 hours for each practicum. The practicum must be completed in a minimum of 10 weeks and a maximum of 20 weeks. Therefore, students must complete between 15 and 30 hours per week.
  • B.S.S.W. students complete two semesters at the same location for 480 total hours. M.S.W. students who do not have advanced standing must complete 900 hours over three semesters. These three 300-hour practica include one semester of generalist-level experience and two semesters at one site in the concentration level (600 hours total).
  • All students may start a practicum as early as two weeks prior to the start of a semester, and have between 10-20 weeks to complete a practicum. However, school social work settings typically require an all-day commitment three-to-five days per week for the entire school year. For all practica, student orientation and training can count toward the total required hours for the practicum.
Can students count any hours completed for practicum off-site from the agency?

With field instructor permission, students may count any hours off-site that are prearranged, such as teaching, home visits, outreach, working in a branch/affiliated facility, attending a conference or workshop or other activities for which accountability is structured into the activity. Students who wish to engage in unstructured activities off-site, such as conducting research on the Internet or in the library, working on a project at home, or other similar activities, should seek the permission of the field instructor prior to the activity. Further, accountability for such hours should be expected, such as a written or verbal report of accomplishments during that time. A maximum of 30 hours may be counted for unstructured, off-site activities unless pre-approved by the practicum liaison.

What should I do if I am experiencing problems with my student?

Ongoing constructive feedback to students about their progress is very important. If significant problems occur, field instructors can consider developing a written plan to Boost performance. If challenges continue after a written plan has been developed, field instructors are asked to consult with the practicum liaison. Practicum liaisons are available for consultation, to create special contracts for the student, and in extreme situations, can consider termination of students from sites. Communication between the site and the practicum liaison is important in challenging situations.

What are students not allowed to do?

Students should not dispense medication, physically restrain clients, or lobby as a representative of the University (students are encouraged to engage in advocacy as representatives of their practicum agency). Furthermore, students may not "take a break" from their practicum except for regular holidays and Spring Break, without practicum liaison approval. Students experiencing personal issues that prevent them from completing their practicum should consult their practicum liaison. Barring any significant, unforeseen circumstances, students should plan to complete their scheduled practicum in a continuous manner within the 10- to 20-week period allowed.

What is a task instructor? What do they do?

A task instructor is an agency-based instructor who does not possess an M.S.W. degree and/or has two years of post-M.S.W. experience or who has not been employed by their agency for one year. Task instructors either possess an M.S.W., but do not meet the requirements to be a qualified field instructor, or they possess a master's degree in a related field. Qualified task instructors are used when the agency is unable to offer a qualified M.S.W. employee for student supervision and an M.S.W. social worker who is affiliated, but not employed by, the agency, provides the field instruction and weekly supervision (M.S.W. concentration level only students).

Sun, 15 Oct 2023 16:36:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.slu.edu/social-work/field-education/index.php
Health Sciences & Social Work

Social Work

Welcome

Welcome to the Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) Program at Western Illinois University. The BSW is a specialized undergraduate professional degree that prepares graduates as generalist social workers for professional employment in social service agencies. The program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.

The social work profession is for individuals committed to the enhancement of human well-being and the alleviation of poverty and oppression through empowerment. Social workers seek to "make a difference" by helping individuals, groups, and communities restore and enhance their functioning through the development and implementation of social policies and programs to meet human needs, and through advocacy and social action which promotes social and economic justice. Social workers are concerned regarding any social situation that limits an individual's, group's or community's development, hampers effective functioning, or diminishes dignity and self-respect.

Program Mission

The mission of the social work program is to prepare competent generalist social workers who empower individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities, both locally and globally, and serve as advocates for a more socially just society. The program provides a supportive learning environment that fosters a respect for human diversity, a passion for human rights, a commitment to responsible and ethical professional practice, and a dedication to eliminating poverty and enhancing the lives of all people.

Program Goals

The acronym CARES was created to describe the characteristics of a social worker that all students should aspire to be: Competent, Advocates, Responsible, Ethical, and Service-Oriented. Students will build on this caring attitude through course work, professional development, personal growth, community service, and the field practicum to become professional social workers.

  1. To educate students who are Competent to practice at the generalist BSW level, through a curriculum built on the nine core competencies.
  2. To instill in students their duty to be Advocates who challenge injustice and actively promote the dignity and worth of all people.
  3. To produce graduates who are Responsible professionals who act with integrity.
  4. To prepare graduates who behave in an Ethical manner, continuously conscious of the implications their actions have for their clients, coworkers, and profession.
  5. To develop Service-oriented citizens engaged in their community who contribute to finding solutions for local, regional, and global issues.

Program Accreditation

The Social Work Program has been continuously accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) since 1996. The program most recently received re-affirmation of accreditation in 2017, and is scheduled to complete the next re-affirmation of accreditation in 2024.

View Student Outcome Assessments.

BSW Handbook

The BSW Handbook contains a broad range of information about the major. Current and prospective students are encouraged to download and become familiar with information in the handbook.

Practicum

Getting a job after college requires experience. All social work students complete a 450-hour (15 week) practicum in a social service agency where they gain the skills to transition from student to social worker.

Admission to the Social Work Major

The Bachelor of Social Work degree is a professional degree designed to prepare graduates to work in direct practice with clients in a wide variety of social service agencies. The Council on Social Work Education, which accredits social work programs, charges each program with the responsibility of “gatekeeping” for the profession. Initially, all students entering the Social Work program are classified as Pre-Social Work majors. Enrollment in the Pre-Social Work Program does not certain acceptance as a candidate for the Bachelor of Social Work degree.

  • For more information about applying to the Social Work Major, see the BSW Student Handbook.
  • Update for 2021-2022 Academic Year: The Social Work Major application process will be completed through a Western Online "class" page. If you are eligible to apply to the major you will see this on your list of Fall 2021 classes in Western Online within the first 4 weeks of the semester.

Four-Year Curriculum

The curriculum for the Bachelor of Social Work degree offers liberal arts, as found in the university general education requirements, and the social work curriculum which includes a semester long practicum. This curriculum complies with the Curriculum Policy Statement of the Council on Social Work Education. Please see the University Catalog or BSW Student Handbook for more detailed information about the curriculum. As required by the Council on Social Work Education's Educational Policies and Accreditation Standards, the BSW Program does not grant course credit for life experience or previous work experience.

Social Work Courses
Foundation Courses (48 sh)

SW 100 (3sh) Introduction to Social Work
SW 212 (3sh) Human Behavior and the Social Environment I
SW 213 (3sh) Human Behavior and the Social Environment II
SW 312 (3sh) Social Work Research Methodology
SW 313 (3sh) Social Work Research Statistics
SW 315 (4sh) Generalist Social Work Practice I
SW 316 (3sh) Case Management
SW 325 (3sh) National Social Welfare Policy
SW 380 (3sh) Social Justice and Diversity
SW 415 (3sh) Generalist Social Work Practice II
SW 425 (3sh) Generalist Social Work Practice III
SW 440 (1sh) Pre-Practicum
SW 480 (13sh) Generalist Social Work Practicum

Electives (6 sh required)

SW 298 (3sh) Individual Studies
SW 331 (3sh) Social Work and Addictions
SW 332 (3sh) Social Work with Aging
SW 334 (3sh) Social Work, Disabilities, and Health
SW 335 (3sh) Domestic Violence and Social Work Intervention
SW 336 (3sh) Medical Social Work
SW 337 (3sh) Social Work in Rural Environments
SW 338 (3sh) Social Work and Mental Health
SW 340 (3sh) Topics in Social Work
SW 341 (3sh) Social Work in Child Welfare I
SW 342 (3sh)
Social Work in Child Welfare II
SW 345 (3sh) Investigations in Social Work
SW 496 (3-6sh) Senior Honors Thesis in Social Work
SW 498 (3sh) Individual Studies

1st Semester

SW 1003
SOC 100Y3
BIOL 1004
PHIL 1053
UNIV 1001
14

2nd Semester

SCIENCE/MATH3
POLS 1223
ENG 1803
HUM ELECTIVE3
MULTICUL3
15

3rd Semester

SW 2123
ENG 2803
PSY 1003
FINE ARTS3
F. LANG or MULTICUL.3
15

4th Semester

SW 2133
SCIENCE3
COMM 2413
S.S. ELECT3
Elective2
HWB2
16

5th Semester

SW 3123
SW 3253
SW Elective3
Elective3
Elective3
15

6th Semester

SW 3133
SW 3154
SW 3163
SW 3803
Elective3
16

7th Semester

SW 4153
SW 4253
SW ELECTIVE3
SW 4401
Elective3
Elective3
16

Student Organizations and Student Leadership

SWSA
Phi Alpha

Social Work and Pre-Social Work student epresentatives are elected by their peers. Both students represent all social work students. They attend the BSW program meetings and participate in discussions about the program, policies, curriculumn, and events. They provide student perspectives during discussions and share student questions and concerns.

SW Student Representatives: Kyle Lapp and Camille Husko

The NASW Student Liaison serves as our connection to the Illinois Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW). The NASW Liaison coordinates our involvement in Social Work Advocacy Day held every spring.

NASW Student Liaison: Maggie Hackbarth

Faculty

Debra Allwardt, M.S.W., Ph.D., Associate Professor, D-Allwardt@wiu.edu
Katherine Perone, M.S.W., D.S.W., L.S.W., Professor, Director of Field Education, KE-Perone@wiu.edu
Kaycee Peterman, M.S.W., L.C.S.W., Associate Professor, K-Peterman@wiu.edu
Lori Smith-Okon, M.S.W., L.C.S.W., Assistant Professor, L-smithokon@wiu.edu
Karen T. Zellmann, M.S.W., L.C.S.W., Professor, BSW Program Director, KT-Zellmann@wiu.edu
Mon, 19 Dec 2022 19:06:00 -0600 en text/html https://wiu.edu/coehs/health_sciences/social_work/
Resources for Students in the School of Social Work

The School of Social Work supports students throughout their time at Saint Louis University and beyond. These resources can help social work students navigate difficult times during their studies and career.

Affording a Degree in the School of Social Work

Financial aid is available for students of all majors and programs within Saint Louis University School of Social Work. In addition to financial aid available from Saint Louis University, there are opportunities available for students of social work, applied behavior analysis, criminal justice and criminology, and gerontology.

Learn More About Financial Aid for SLU Social Work Students

Admitted Student Next Steps

Students admitted to the School of Social Work must complete several steps before beginning their first semester of courses at Saint Louis University.

Learn More

Frequently Needed Forms

The Saint Louis University School of Social Work offers forms, field manuals and handbooks for students at all levels of study.

Learn More

Student Organizations

Master of Social Work Student Association

The purpose of the Saint Louis University Master of Social Work Student Association (MSWSA) is to provide a forum for student concerns about the M.S.W. program, foster community among current SLU M.S.W. students, and advocate for student needs in the program and profession. We have bi-monthly town halls, the occasional social event, and annual community service drives. As the semester goes on, we will have more information on this page including upcoming events and pictures of students at M.S.W.-related activities. Be sure to check out the School of Social Work calendar for upcoming MSWSA meetings and events, as well as great things happening around the college. We are always looking for student involvement. If you are interested in an open officer position, please contact one of the current officers:

Criminology and Criminal Justice Club

The goal of the Criminology and Criminal Justice Club is to form a bond uniting students and teachers of criminal justice, criminology, the law and social justice within a community.

Practicum Information for Students

Students in many programs in SLU’s School of Social Work must complete a practicum. This experience allows students to take their classroom knowledge into the field while remaining under the faculty supervision. Students gain a deeper understanding of how their coursework applies outside the classroom, while being able to hone their interests and specialties.

Get Complete Practicum Information

Graduation

Graduation is an important time in a student’s life. SLU's graduation and commencement resources will let you know how to apply for graduation, deadlines and forms.

Learn More About Graduating From SLU

Career Services

Career Services is well-known for their assistance in finding a job, however, the office has services for students at all levels of their academic journey. Career Services can help students identify a career path, develop their resume and more.

Visit Career Services

Licensure

SLU’s School of Social Work will prepare you for your career but graduation is not the end of your education. Most social work careers will require licensure. Requirements vary by state, organization and services provided. Some licensure organizations even offer different levels of certification depending on an applicant’s experience and education level.

Learn About Licensure in Missouri

Learn About Licensure in Illinois

For information on licensure in other states and nationally, visit the National Association of Social Workers and the Association of Social Work Boards.

Self-Care Resources

Learning to support yourself as you support others is a vital part of your development.

Learn More About Self-Care

School of Social Work Gear

Do you want to show your SSW pride? Need grad gear?

Browse Products

Volunteering

Students who perform volunteer work while studying at SLU’s School of Social Work provide valuable services to the community while also helping to develop their professional interests.

The St. Louis area is home to hundreds of organizations that offer volunteer opportunities, whether you want to work with youth or senior citizens, in health care or education, for justice or against racism. The resources below can assist you in finding opportunities that suit your interests and schedule:

STLVolunteer.org

VolunteerMatch.org

Idealist.org

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Bachelor of Arts in Social Work

The Social Work Program

The overriding goal of the Undergraduate Program is to prepare students for entry-level generalist social work practice. The Bachelor of Arts in Social Work Program is fully accredited by the Council on Social Work Education

The objectives of the Undergraduate Program are based upon the following sections of the CSWE Curriculum Policy Statement:

  • The purpose of undergraduate social work education is to prepare students for generalist social work
  • The Baccalaureate is the first level of the professional education for entry into the profession. The Baccalaureate level social worker should attain a beginning professional level of proficiency in the self-critical and accountable use of this social knowledge and integrate this knowledge with the liberal arts perspective and the professional foundation
  • Students who receive a Baccalaureate degree from an accredited social work program should possess the professional judgment and proficiency to apply, with supervision, the common professional foundation to direct service systems with client systems of various sizes and types.

The curriculum of the Undergraduate Program is based upon these goals and reflects a commitment to impart the ethics and standards of professional practice as well as the skills which are essential for beginning level proficiency in professional practice. Curriculum is developed in accordance with standards of the Council on Social Work Education, the National Association of Social Workers, and the considered judgment of the faculty members of the Division of Social Work.

BSW Program Goals

  1. Leadership: Provide leadership in the development and delivery of services responsive to strengths and challenges within the context of human diversity, human rights, oppression and social justice with special attention to BASW practice
  2. Competencies: Prepare ethically-driven, critically thinking, competent beginning professional social workers with a generalist perspective and skills as applied to specific and emerging areas of
  3. Curriculum: Provide curriculum and teaching practices at the forefront of the new and changing knowledge base of the theory and research in social work and related disciplines as well as the changing needs of our diverse client
  4. Global Perspective: Analyze, formulate and influence social policies that develop and promote a global as well as local perspective within the context of the historical emergence of Social Work practice regarding human rights, oppression and social
  5. Accessibility: Structure and offer programs and curricula in a way that provides availability and accessibility (weekend, night classes) that meet the needs of our diverse student body as well as complies with CSWE accreditation
  6. Diversity: Recruit, develop and retain diverse students and faculty who will through multi-level practice contribute special strengths to our programs and profession

Undergraduate Degree Requirements

The curriculum plan of the Undergraduate Social Work Program of the Division of Social Work begins with the liberal arts (General Education) completed during the freshman and sophomore years. During the junior year, Social Work majors commence the professional foundation and beginning generalist curriculum.

General Education Requirements

Students complete courses as follows to satisfy General Education requirements:

  • Area A Basic Subjects - (9 units)
  • Area B Physical Universe and Its Life Forms (12 units)
  • Area C Arts and Humanities - (12 units)
  • Area D Individual and Society - (15 units)
  • Area E Undergraduate Personal Development - (3 units)

Social Work students should complete courses in Economics, Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology, Biology, Ethnic Studies, and Women’s Studies.

Graduation Requirements

  • American Institutions
  • English Composition
  • Foreign Language
  • Race & Ethnicity in American Society
  • Writing Intensive*

*All students must complete their GWAR requirement prior to enrolling in their Writing Intensive course. The GWAR can be completed in three different ways:

  1. Passing the Writing Placement for Juniors (WPJ) exam
  2. Submitting the GWAR Portfolio
  3. Successfully passing ENGL 109M/W

After successfully completing the GWAR requirement, students can enroll in their Writing Intensive Course. The School offers two writing intensive courses as part of our Social Welfare & Human Behavior courses (electives): SW 126 Theories of Criminal Behavior and SW 191 Exploration of Veterans Studies.

Pre-Major for the BASW Program

Students who want to declare Social Work as their major must complete the following Pre-Major requirements as part of their General Education requirements. To declare your major, you must earn a grade of a “B” or better (“B minus” is not acceptable) and must have at least 2.5 Sac State and Cumulative GPA. These requirements are effective for the Fall 2019 catalog year. To verify your pre major requirements, please contact the Division of Social Work advisor.

Area B2 Life Forms (at least 3 Units)

Select one of the followings:

  • BIO 1 Biodiversity, Evolution, and Ecology
  • BIO 10 Basic Biological Concept
  • BIO 20 Biology: A Human Perspective
  • ANTH 1 Introduction to Biological Anthropology

Area D Foundation in Social and Behavioral Sciences (at least 3 units)

Select at least one of the followings:

  • ECON 1A Introduction to Macroeconomic Analysis
  • ECON 1B Introduction to Microeconomic Analysis
  • PSYC 2 Introductory Psychology
  • SOC 1 Principles of Sociology

Area D Major Social Issues of the Contemporary Era (at least 3 units)

Select one of the followings:

  • CRJ 1 Introduction to Criminal Justice and Society
  • GERO 100 Aging Issues in Contemporary America
  • SOC 3 Social Problems
  • SOC 10 Issues in Crime and Social Control

Undergraduate Field Practicum

Social Work education provides students with a unique opportunity to apply what they are learning in the classroom to practice in the field. Working in a social work field agency allows students to leverage classroom theory and knowledge to develop their professional competence and identity, as well as begin their commitment to serving clients and communities.

Field Practicum is a core requirement of the BASW and MSW programs. It is an integrated course involving human service organizations, professional Social Work practitioners who are "teachers" in the field, and the faculty of the Division of Social Work. Field Education is the "heart of social work education." The profession of Social Work uses field education as the avenue through which it “professionalizes” its members. It is through a field placement that the student learns how to think and act like a professional social worker. For more information, visit our Field Practicum website.

Questions

  • Have questions about general education and graduation requirements? Visit the Academic Advising Center for more information.
  • Have questions about the Undergraduate Program? Contact Dr. Susanna Curry, Undergraduate Program Director

Resources

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The Ethics of Lean Case Note Documentation for Therapists

Recent licensing board requirement updates, ethical guidelines, and third-party regulations make it more challenging than ever for therapists to effectively document what happens in treatment.

In this 2-hour continuing education webinar for therapists, Dr. Rochelle Perper will review information about the 21st Century Cures Act and OpenNotes trends, the implications for mental health, and how this impacts case note documentation. Attendees will learn the fundamentals of lean case note documentation and how to balance transparency and patient autonomy with the need to protect patient privacy.

This introductory continuing education webinar is designed to help mental health professionals:

  1. Describe the practice of information blocking in health care.
  2. Identify the Cures Act rules that prohibit the practice of information blocking.
  3. List three benefits of maintaining a lean clinical record.
  4. List the key components of a lean clinical case note.
  5. Discuss the ethical considerations for maintaining a clinical record that does not include sensitive details about therapy.

Statement of program material's accuracy, utility, and risks: This course is based on information provided by the American Psychological Association (APA), the APA’s Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (2003, including 2010 and 2016 amendments) and APA’s Record Keeping Guidelines (2007). The information provided is not intended as legal advice and should not be considered as a substitution for sound legal consultation and representation.

Declaration identifying any potential conflict of interest and/or commercial support: There are no conflicts of interest.

If you have any questions or would like information regarding disability accommodations, please contact GoodTherapy here.

Continuing Education (CE) Information

2 CE contact hours will be provided by GoodTherapy for attending this web conference in its entirety. 

GoodTherapy is an NBCC-Approved Continuing Education Provider (ACEPTM) and may offer NBCC-approved clock hours for events that meet NBCC requirements.

GoodTherapy.org, provider #1352, is approved to offer social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. Organizations, not individual courses, are approved as ACE providers. State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credit. GoodTherapy.org maintains responsibility for this course. ACE provider approval period: 3/30/2022 – 3/30/2025. Social workers completing this course receive 2 ethics continuing education credits.

GoodTherapy is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. GoodTherapy maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

GoodTherapy, LLC is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #SW-0395. GoodTherapy, LLC is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed marriage and family therapists #MFT-0022 and for licensed mental health counselors #MHC-0031.

To receive CE credit hours for an archived event, you will need to complete a survey as well as a 12 or 15-question exam, verifying that you listened to or watched the event in its entirety. Archived CE events generally are considered "homestudy" by licensing boards.

Registration Information

Premium and Pro Membership with GoodTherapy includes access to this web conference at no additional cost, as well as other member benefits such as a profile listing in GoodTherapy's Therapist Directory. Not yet a member? Sign up for a Premium or Pro Membership, here.

Just want CE credits? Sign up for a monthly or annual CE Subscription with GoodTherapy to get unlimited access to our CE Program, including this event, other live CE web conferences, and hundreds of hours of homestudy courses.

Mental health professionals who are not members can attend this live web conference for $30.95 or access the homestudy recording for $15.50. Sign up here to purchase this CE course and earn a CE certificate.

If the event is canceled by GoodTherapy, registrants who purchased the event will be notified and the charge for the event will be refunded

If you have any questions or would like information regarding disability accommodations, please contact us.

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Master of Social Work student handbook

Academic integrity

The School of Social Work adheres to the University of Nevada, Reno Academic Standards Policy for Students concerning issues of academic integrity. Please see the UNR website for a complete description, definitions and policies regarding class conduct and academic dishonesty.

Accommodation for students with disabilities

Students who require additional support due to disabling conditions should discuss their needs with their instructors at the start of each semester. Accommodations for all reasonable requests will be made for documented disabling conditions. In addition, students are encouraged to contact the UNR Disability Resource Center at (775) 784-6000 to access a range of supportive services.

Attendance policy

The faculty of the School of Social Work believe that classroom attendance and participation are critical aspects of professional socialization. Students are responsible for assisting in the creation of a learning environment that promotes such socialization. To do so, students should assume responsibility for their own learning and be engaged within the course room. It is expected for students to log into the online classroom a minimum of three times a week to be successfully engaged. Attendance and participation will be part of grading, as determined by the course instructor. Opportunities for make-up assignments are determined at the discretion of individual instructors.

Confidentiality of case material outside of an agency

NASW Code of Ethics requirements regarding confidentiality of client information extend to the use of confidential information from field work in classes, seminars and in student assignments. Students may not divulge client, collateral or collegial information, disguising all names, demographic information and any case details that might identify a client or co-worker. Client files and records should never be removed from the agency for any purpose.

Nondiscrimination policy

The programs of the School of Social Work are conducted without discrimination on the basis of race, color, gender, creed, ethnic or national origin, disability, political orientation, or sexual orientation. This policy applies to the baccalaureate and master’s programs, the field education program, and all admission, employment, and financial aid decisions.

Retention

In its description of the Social Work major, the University of Nevada, Reno catalog states that:

“The admission and retention of students in the program is subject to the professional judgment of the social work faculty.”

Retention in the MSW Program is based on student performance in two general areas: academics and adherence to professional values and standards of behavior. Retention in the social work major requires students and maintain a 3.0 (B) overall grade point average—with a letter grade of “C” or higher in each of the graduate course, including the required 3 credits of electives. Additionally, students must adhere to the academic and professional standards outlined in UNR’s Student Handbook for Student Code of Conduct, the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics and the State Board of Examiners for Social Workers, Nevada Legislature’s Standards of Practice.

Dismissal policy

The School of Social Work adheres to the Dismissal Policy of the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) Code, Title 2, Chapter 11.

Academic standing and dismissal policy for master’s of social work graduate program

This policy is effective for the Spring 2024 Semester and beyond.

According to the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) Code, Title 2, Chapter 11, “a student may be dismissed from a program for academic reasons which may include but are not limited to inadequate grades or failure to remain in academic good standing as defined by the program, a lack of professionalism or unethical conduct, or failure to comply with other specific program requirements. Failure to comport with professional and/or ethical standards applicable to the particular discipline or program may be grounds for dismissal from a program.” The NSHE Code authorizes programs to establish their own written dismissal policies, procedures and sanctions for program dismissals. The School of Social Work (SSW) herein sets forth the Dismissal Policy for graduate students in SSW Graduate Social Work Program (MSW Program).

A. Definitions

The term “Academic Policies” is defined as those policies, procedures, and regulations of the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE), the University of Nevada, Reno, the University of Nevada, Reno Graduate School (“Graduate School”) and particular graduate departments or graduate programs.

The term “Recommending Party” shall refer to the person within the college or Interdisciplinary Graduate Program who shall make the recommendation to the Graduate School for a student to be placed on probation or be dismissed from the MSW Program. For purposes of this Policy, the Recommending Party shall be the dean of the SSW. 

The term “dismissed” shall mean removal from the student’s Graduate Program and removal from the Graduate School. If a student is dismissed, the student needs to reapply to the Graduate Program and the Graduate School. 

The term “discontinuation” shall mean the suspension of the student’s active status in the Graduate Program and Graduate School. If a student is discontinued, the student does not need to reapply to the Graduate Program and the Graduate School. A student can be reinstated at the discretion of the Graduate Program and the Graduate School.

B. General

A student may be placed on probation and/or dismissed from the MSW Program for numerous reasons, which may include, but are not limited to:

  1. Failure to maintain good academic standing as defined by this Dismissal Policy.
  2. Failure to make satisfactory progress as defined by the standards in this Dismissal Policy.
  3. Failure to meet the conditions of academic probation as described in the Academic Probation Notice.
  4. Unsatisfactory performance as a graduate teaching assistant, graduate research assistant, or graduate project assistant.
  5. Failure to comply with professional or ethical standards applicable to the MSW Program while the student is in a practicum or professional fieldwork setting.
  6. Violations of University Student Code of Conduct or the Academic Standards Policy for academic dishonesty (UAM 6,502) where the disciplinary sanction is expulsion.

All probation and dismissal recommendations shall be submitted by the SSW to the Graduate School. Only the Graduate School may officially place students on probation or dismiss students. SSW and the MSW Program may not place students on probation, nor dismiss students from graduate programs unless authorized to do so by the Graduate School.

C. Academic Standards

  1. Academic Good Standing

A student may be placed on probation and dismissed from the MSW Program for failure to maintain academic good standing. To be considered in good academic standing, graduate students shall:

  1. Maintain a University graduate cumulative grade-point average (GPA) of at least 3.0.
  2. Complete each MSW course with a grade of “C” or higher.
  3. Maintain a passing grade in the clinical or practicum course.
  4. Have not been placed on probation by the Graduate School for academic deficiencies or practicum or professional fieldwork placement deficiencies.

2. Failure to Make Satisfactory Progress

A student may be placed on probation and dismissed from the MSW Program for failure to make satisfactory progress in their course of study. Failure to make progress is indicated by one or more of the following academic progress standards (“Academic Progress Standards”):

  1. Failure to complete three (3) graduate credits per semester toward MSW Program; if an exception has been issued allowing a student to enroll for fewer than three (3) graduate credits, failure to complete the agreed-on number of graduate credits.
  2. Unsatisfactory grades (including grades below C or its numerical equivalent
  3. Repeated withdrawals from courses.
  4. Failure to consult with their advisor when requested.
  5. Failure to develop an official, approved program of study.
  6. Failure to comply with other specific MSW Program requirements or policies as stated in the MSW Program’s student handbook and website.
  7. Failure to meet the SSW’s milestone or benchmark within the timeframe specified by the MSW Program.
  8. Failure to correct or remediate an “out-of-status” course per the student’s Program of Study or the MSW Program.
  9. Failure to perform at a level commiserate with the training received from either the MSW Program or the practicum or professional fieldwork site while the student is in a practicum or professional fieldwork setting.
  10. Failure to maintain the standards of academic and professional integrity expected in for social workers, as described in the MSW Program’s student handbook and SSW website, while the student is in a practicum or professional fieldwork setting. 

The MSW Program competencies for the Academic Progress Standards are stated in the MSW Handbook and SSW website. The competencies or requirements for the Academic Progress Standards shall be consistent with MSW Program requirements, standards in the field and as specified in the MSW Program handbook and on the SSW website for the MSW Program. 

The MSW Program shall review the academic performance and progress of the graduate student at least once per year.

D. Probation and Dismissal.

A Recommending Party may request the Graduate School place the student on probation and/or dismissed for failure to maintain academic good standing as stated in Section (C)(1) and/or failure to make satisfactory progress as stated in Section (C)(2).

  1. Failure to Maintain Academic Good Standing.

If the student's cumulative grade-point total falls below a 3.0, the student shall be placed on probation following the process stated in Section (D)(2)(a). The student must then raise their cumulative graduate GPA to 3.0 by the end of the following semester during which the student is enrolled or the student shall be summarily dismissed from the Graduate School and the MSW Program with no further process or appeal. 

If the student receives a U grade of 83% or lower in a practicum or professional fieldwork course, the student shall not be placed on probation. The student shall be summarily dismissed from the MSW Program and the dismissal procedures described below in Section II(H), shall not apply.

GPA calculator

 The student’s only recourse to challenge a grade is to utilize the University’s grade appeal process. If the student’s grade appeal is successful, the student shall be reinstated in the MSW Program.

  1. Failure to Make Satisfactory Progress.

a. Probation

If the MSW Program determines that the student has failed to make satisfactory progress, the Recommending Party shall make a written request to the Director of Operations of the Graduate School (“Director of Operations”) to place the student on probation. In the request, the Recommending Party shall provide documentation of the student’s failure to meet the specific provisions(s) of this Dismissal Policy, where applicable, warranting probation. The Recommending Party also shall provide specific requirements and/or conditions, including deadlines, which the student shall complete in order for the Graduate School to remove the student from probation. If the student is placed on probation, the student shall not be allowed to participate in field work at a field or practicum setting or site while the student is on probation. 

If the Graduate School approves the request to place the student on probation, the Recommending Party shall notify the student in writing that the student has been placed on academic probation (the “Academic Probation Notice”). The Recommending Party shall forward the Academic Probation Notice to the Graduate School.

The Academic Probation Notice shall outline what the student must do and the dates by which the student must do so in order to return to good standing in the MSW Program. The Academic Probation Notice shall inform the student that while the student is on probation, they shall not be allowed to participate in field work at a field or practicum setting or site. The Academic Probation Notice also shall inform the student that if the student does not meet the conditions of probation, the student shall be dismissed from the MSW Program, contain information about the MSW Program dismissal appeal process that shall be used and provide the student with the contact information for the Director of Operations for any questions or concerns the student may have. The Academic Probation Notice also shall inform the student of the student’s right to participate in a review conference with MSW Program to discuss the terms and conditions of the probation and that the student must submit, within ten (10) Working Days from the date of the Academic Probation Notice, a written request to the SSW to have a review conference (“Review Conference Request”).

The student shall be afforded the opportunity for a review conference, which shall be administered by the Recommending Party or the Recommending Party’s designee who shall be a department chair, program director or associate dean (“Review Conference Administrator”). The student shall have ten (10) Working Days from the date of the Academic Probation Notice to submit a written request to the SSW for a review conference (“Review Conference Request”). The SSW shall direct the Review Conference Administrator to schedule the Review Conference to occur no later than ten (10) Working Days from receipt of the Review Conference Request.

b. Dismissal

If the student fails to meet the requirements and/or conditions of probation, violates the terms of the probation or is recommended for dismissal without probation under SectionE), the Recommending Party shall make a written request to the Graduate School to dismiss the student from the MSW Program and Graduate School. In the request, the Recommending Party shall provide documentation of the student’s failure to meet the terms of the probation, the student’s violation of the terms of the probation, or the grounds for dismissal without probation as stated in Section (E).

If the Graduate School approves the request to dismiss the student, the Recommending Party shall notify the student in writing that the student is being dismissed from the MSW Program and Graduate School (“Dismissal Notice”). The Dismissal Notice shall include a written statement of reasons for the dismissal action, information about the applicable appeal procedures and the time period by which the student shall file an appeal (set forth in Section (H) below).

E. Dismissal Without Prior Probation

In rare instances, a student may be recommended for dismissal from the Graduate School and the SSW without being placed on probation. These instances include the following circumstances:

  1. When a student receives a U grade of 83% or lower in a practicum or professional fieldwork course.
  2. When a student’s behaviors or actions while in a practicum or professional fieldwork setting endanger the life, health, well-being or safety of any person at the practicum or professional fieldwork setting.
  3. Failure to pass required courses in the number of attempts allowed by the MSW Program.
  4. Failure of comprehensive and/or qualifying exams in the allowable number of attempts specified by the MSW Program.
  5. Failure to pass the culminating experience in the allowable number of attempts specified by the MSW Program. The term culminating experience does not include: thesis, dissertation, comprehensive exam, clinical, practicum, fieldwork or internship.
  6. Failure to complete all degree requirements within a timeframe required by the MSW Program not shorter than 6 years for Masters students.
  7. When a sanction of expulsion is issued by the Office of Student Conduct resulting from a student conduct issue or a violation of the Academic Standards policy (UAM 6,502) for academic dishonesty.

For those instances involving a disciplinary sanction of expulsion by the Office of Student Conduct, the student is subject to the procedures as outlined in Section II(F).

For the other instances described above the student is subject to the same procedures as outlined in Section (D)(2) for MSW Program dismissal. The student shall be provided with a Dismissal Notice which shall include information about the appeal procedures, the appeal conference and the time period by which the student shall file an appeal (set forth in Section II(H) below).

F. Dismissal for Violation of UNR’s Student Code Conduct or University’s Academic Standards Policy (UAM 6,502)

All disciplinary issues relating to a student’s alleged violations of the Student Code of Conduct and the Academic Standards Policy are processed through the Office of Student Conduct and not the SSW or the Graduate School. The SSW and the Graduate School and the SSW do not dismiss students from the MSW Program or the Graduate School as a result of a finding of responsibility of violations of the Student Code of Conduct or the Academic Standards Policy. The Graduate School does dismiss a student from the student’s MSW Program and Graduate School upon direction from the Office of Student Conduct after all conduct hearings and appeals have been completed and the Office of Student Conduct notifies the Graduate School that the sanction imposed against the student is expulsion from the University and therefore, dismissal from the student’s MSW Program.

G. Probation or Dismissal/ for Lack of Professionalism or Professional Misconduct in a Practicum or Field Placement Setting

Probation and/or dismissal from the MSW Program for lack of professionalism or professional misconduct while in a practicum or professional fieldwork setting shall be allowed for the MSW Program. The SSW has established its own benchmarks or requirements for professionalism, consistent with its MSW Program requirements, licensing, accreditation and national standards. These benchmarks and requirements are stated in the MSW Program student handbook and the MSW Program website.

All probation and/or dismissal recommendations based upon lack of professionalism or professional misconduct in a practicum or professional fieldwork settling shall be submitted to the Graduate School and only the Graduate School may officially place students on probation or dismiss students. The SSW and the MSW Program may not place students on probation, nor dismiss students from the MSW Program unless authorized to do so by the Graduate School.

A recommendation for probation and/or dismissal due to lack of professionalism or professional misconduct shall follow the procedures stated in this Dismissal Policy for dismissals based upon failure to make adequate progress as stated in Section D(2) or dismissal without probation as stated in Section E, whichever section is applicable. 

H: Appeal Process

  1. Student’s Appeal Request.

The student shall have ten (10) Working Days from the date of the Dismissal Notice to submit an appeal to the SSW. The SSW then shall have ten (10) Working Days to submit the student’s appeal to the Graduate School. Within ten (10) Working Days of receipt of the student’s written request for appeal, the dean of the Graduate School (“Graduate Dean”) shall review the student’s appeal and provide the student with written notification of the opportunity for a review conference on the appeal (“Appeal Conference”). 

  1. Appeal Conference.

The Appeal Conference shall be administered by the Graduate Dean. The Appeal Conference is a meeting that is not intended to be adversarial in nature. The student may be accompanied by an advisor during the Appeal Conference, who may serve in a support role to the student during the Appeal Conference. In this process, the advisor has no right to speak during the Appeal Conference except to the student.

If a student, who has been given notice does not appear for the Appeal Conference with the Graduate Dean, then the review conference shall proceed in the absence of the student.

The Appeal Conference is the time for presentation of the information, documents or witnesses in support of the dismissal. The Appeal Conference is the time at which the student is afforded the opportunity to present information, documents or witnesses on the student’s behalf. Witnesses may present a statement to the Graduate Dean; however, only the Graduate Dean is allowed to ask questions of any witnesses. Furthermore, the Recommending Party has the opportunity to participate in the Appeal Conference and may present information, documents or witnesses in support of the dismissal recommendation. The Graduate Dean also may include representatives from the MSW Program in the Appeal Conference.

The Appeal Conference shall occur within thirty-five (35) Working Days but no earlier than ten (10) Working Days after the date the Dismissal Notice was sent to the student by email or by personal delivery. The student can make a written request to the Graduate Dean asking that the 10-day period be waived if the student wants the Appeal Conference to occur sooner. If necessary, the student can make a written request to the Graduate Dean for an extension of time for the Appeal Conference and the Graduate Dean in their sole discretion, may grant the extension with regard to the Appeal Conference. If an extension of time for the Appeal Conference has been granted by the Graduate Dean, the Appeal Conference shall take place no later than forty-five (45) Working Days from the date of the Dismissal Notice.

  1. Written Decision.

After a review of all the materials, statements and relevant circumstances, the Graduate Dean shall issue a written decision setting forth the reasons upon which the final decision is based. The Graduate Dean’s determination shall be made on the basis of whether it is more likely than not that the student engaged in behavior or actions related to the MSW Program that warrant dismissal.

If the Graduate Dean does not uphold the recommendation for dismissal, the student shall be reinstated in the MSW Program. The Graduate Dean shall provide the written decision to the student and the MSW Program within five (5) Working Days after the Appeal Conference.

  1. Decision Final.

The decision of the Graduate Dean is final and is not subject to appeal.

I: Discontinuation for Non-Enrollment

Pursuant to the Academic Policies of the Graduate School, a student is required to be enrolled in either: (1) three (3) graduate-level credits per semester; or (2) the minimum number of credits agreed to by the Graduate School and the student prior to the beginning of the semester (the “Continuous Enrollment Policy”). Any student in violation of the Continuous Enrollment Policy is subject to discontinuation from the MSW Program and the student’s academic record shall be closed.

The Graduate School shall notify a student prior to the beginning of the next semester if they are in danger of violating the Continuous Enrollment Policy (“Discontinuation Notice”). The Discontinuation Notice shall be issued by the Graduate School within 10 (ten) business days prior to the beginning of the semester. The Discontinuation Notice shall inform the student that failure to register for the minimum number of credits violates the Continuous Enrollment Policy and will result in their discontinuation. If thereafter, the student fails to register for the minimum number of required credits, the student is discontinued from the MSW Program.

If a student is unable to enroll in the minimum number of credits the next semester, the student shall submit a Leave of Absence Form signed by the MSW Program and the Graduate School prior to the start of that next semester. 

Failure to timely submit the Leave of Absence form or failure to return to the MSW Program after the leave of absence has expired shall result in discontinuation from the MSW Program and the student’s academic record shall be closed.

J: Reinstatement Following Discontinuation

Students who were discontinued due to non-enrollment and whose academic record was previously closed may request reinstatement to the MSW Program. A Notice of Reinstatement to Graduate Standing form must be received by the Graduate School no later than the last day of enrollment for the semester in which the reinstatement is to begin.

The decision to reinstate occurs at the discretion of the MSW Program and the Graduate School. The MSW Program may deny the request for reinstatement and require the student to reapply to the MSW Program.

Students whose request for reinstatement is approved by the MSW Program and the Graduate School must pay a reinstatement fee which is equivalent to the application fee.

In some instance, there will have been changes in the MSW Program’s curricular requirements between the time at which the student was enrolled last, and the time when the student is being reinstated. A reinstated student is required to follow the curriculum that was applicable when the student was last enrolled in the program unless the MSW Program agrees in writing to allow the student to follow the most recent curriculum.

A student who has been dismissed from the MSW Program is not permitted to request reinstatement to the MSW Program from which they were dismissed.

Professionalism and professional conduct in field practicum

This policy is effective for the Spring 2024 Semester and beyond.

Introduction about these policies set the tone for professionalism and professional conduct for the student while in practicum setting. These policies comprise the benchmarks or criteria for professionalism and professional conduct as stated in Section G of Article III (Dismissal Policy) and can form the basis for a recommendation for probation or dismissal.

A. Field Practicum Setting

  1. Absence Policy

In the event a student misses practicum for any reason, the Student must do the following: (1) Notify their field instructor and/or task supervisor prior to their absence; and (2) follow up with the faculty liaison regarding their absence within 24 hours.

Students are responsible to make up absences(s) with their field instructor and/or task supervisor before the semester deadline. Failure to complete 225 field hours by the end of the semester deadline may result in failing their field seminar course.

Students who falsify their recorded field hours in their time log may be charged with academic dishonesty and sanctioned pursuant to UAM 6,502 (Academic Standards).

  1. Dress Code

The University of Nevada, Reno, School of Social Work expects students to reflect professionalism and maintain standards of professional appearance and grooming in all field practicum settings. Students who do not adhere to this policy will not be permitted to participate in field practicum.

Standard Attire: Student’s attire must be neat, clean and odor-free for all field practicum activities. Students must adhere to practicum site’s dress code.

  1. Field Practicum Settings Requiring Professional Attire: Business casual is expected in most field practicum sites. This means dress slacks, khakis, dress shirt or blouse, open-collar or polo shirt, optional tie or seasonal sport coat, a dress or skirt at knee-length or below, a tailored blazer, knit shirt or sweater.

The following attire is not acceptable for a professional attire setting:

  • Jeans/western cut pants
  • Leggings, athletics pants (i.e. sweats, yoga pants)
  • Shirts and/or sweatshirts with logos
  • Sleeveless shirts (or shirts of underwear type)
  • See-through clothing
  • Clothing exposing a bare midriff, back, or chest
  • Clothing exposing undergarments

Shoes: Footwear must provide safe, secure footing and offer protection against hazards. Footwear should be closed toed, closed heel uniform or shoes with no openings, clean and in good repair.

  1. General Appearance Guidelines
  1. Hair
    1. Hair is to be clean and well groomed. Student should adhere to practicum site’s policy about hair grooming.
  2. Tattoos: 
    1. Visible tattoos are permitted, with the exception of those that may be prohibited by the practicum site or facility. The clinical placement site or facility may require students to cover their tattoos at all times while in the clinical setting.
  3. Other appearance
    1. Good hygiene is expected at all times.
  1. Technology
  1. Students must consider pedagogical theory and research on the use of technology, to make decisions about whether and how to use technology for educational purposes.
  2. Students must adhere to practicum site’s policies and procedures about technology use.
  3. Students must comply with relevant laws, regulations, and ethical standards to ensure protection of confidential information.
  4. Students must consider relevant needs, risks and challenges to use of technology at their practicum setting.
  5. Students must not utilize practicum site’s technology and/or database for personal purposes.
  1. Social Media

The School of Social Work adheres to NASW Standards for Technology in Social Work Practice. All students must comply with school policies and regulations related to academic and field/clinical performance.

The term social media defines activities that integrate technology, social interaction and construction of words, symbols and pictures. Internet-based electronic application and person website sites that allow the creation and exchange of user-generation content such as but not limited to: profiles, opinions, insights, pictures, videos, experiences, perspectives and media itself. All social media sites are trackable, traceable, and once posted on the internet things can live forever. The following is the School of Social Work, media guidelines for when the student is in a clinical setting:

  • The student shall abide the law and respect copy rights.
  • The student shall be compliant with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and will not use or disclose any patient identifiable information or any patient scenarios of any kind on any social media.
  • Logos from practicum sites may not be utilized by students without written consent from that site.
  • The student is obligated to report suspected violation of this policy to the Field Office.
  • Students utilizing approved video or audio recording through the University of Nevada, Reno, Disability Resource Center, will comply with the alternative media service agreement.
  • It is not appropriate to establish relationships on social media with clients, families, or any practicum site contacts.

Inappropriate use of the internet and social media may result in program probation and/or dismissal.

  1. Informed Consent, Dual Relationships and Conflict of Interest in Field Education
  • For the purpose of this policy, dual relationship is defined when a student relates to clients and/or supervisor in more than one relationship, whether personal, professional, social, or business. Dual or multiple relationships can occur simultaneously or consecutively. Students must comply to relevant laws, regulations and ethical standards related to , dual relationships and conflicts of interest.
  • Students shall adhere to practicum setting’s policies and procedures relating to professional standards and dual relationships.
  • Students shall not, under any circumstance engage in sexual activities, inappropriate sexual communication through the use of technology or in person, or sexual contact with current clients, whether such contact is consensual or forced.
  • Students should not provide services to individuals with whom they have a prior sexual relationship.
  • Students must notify practicum site of any dual relationship with a client to ensure there are no disruption of service delivery to client.
  • Students should not engage in any dual or multiple relationships with field instructors, task supervisors and/or off-site supervisors during field education to reduce potential harm to student and/or clients.
  • Students must disclose any dual relationship(s) with practicum setting and the Field Office.

Failure to notify practicum site and the Field Office may result in in program probation and/or dismissal.

  1. Unsafe Conduct or Practices

Any of the following behaviors by the student while in the field practicum are sufficient grounds for the Field Office to determine that a student is clinically unsafe and cannot continue in field practicum or not competent to continue in the field practicum, either of, which may lead to the student being removed from the field practicum, placed on probation and/or dismissed from the Program.

  • Failure to meet social work professional standards in field education.
  • Refusal/failure to follow School of Social Work regulations and agency protocols.
  • Violating federal, state and practicum confidentiality and privacy laws/policies.
  • Failure to execute critical elements of procedures/protocols/social work practice.
  • Inability to articulate rationale utilizing NASW Code of Ethics for not providing services to diverse and marginalized individuals, families, communities and/or organizations.
  • Failure to disclose dual relationships.
  • Failure to comply with Academic Probation Notice.

When a student’s behaviors or actions while in practicum setting endanger the life, health, well-being or safety or any person at the practicum setting, the student may be removed from the practicum and summarily dismissed from the Program, without probation.

Foundation competencies & associated practice behaviors

Competency 1: Demonstrate ethical and professional behavior

Social workers understand the value base of the profession and its ethical standards, as well as relevant laws and regulations that may impact practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. Social workers understand frameworks of ethical decision-making and how to apply principles of critical thinking to those frameworks in practice, research, and policy arenas. Social workers recognize personal values and the distinction between personal and professional values. They also understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions influence their professional judgment and behavior. Social workers understand the profession’s history, its mission, and the roles and responsibilities of the profession. Social Workers also understand the role of other professions when engaged in inter-professional teams. Social workers recognize the importance of life-long learning and are committed to continually updating their skills to ensure they are relevant and effective. Social workers also understand emerging forms of technology and the ethical use of technology in social work practice.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Make ethical decisions by applying the standards of the NASW Code of Ethics, relevant laws and regulations, models for ethical decision-making, ethical conduct of research, and additional codes of ethics as appropriate to context.
  • Use reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations.
  • Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior; appearance; and oral, written, and electronic communication.
  • Use technology ethically and appropriately to facilitate practice outcomes.
  • Use supervision and consultation to guide professional judgment and behavior.

Competency 2: Engage diversity and difference in practice

Social workers understand how diversity and difference characterize and shape the human experience and are critical to the formation of identity. The dimensions of diversity are understood as the intersectionality of multiple factors including but not limited to age, class, color, culture, disability and ability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, immigration status, marital status, political ideology, race, religion/spirituality, sex, sexual orientation, and tribal sovereign status. Social workers understand that, as a consequence of difference, a person’s life experiences may include oppression, poverty, marginalization, and alienation as well as privilege, power, and acclaim. Social workers also understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination and recognize the extent to which a culture’s structures and values, including social, economic, political, and cultural exclusions, may oppress, marginalize, alienate, or create privilege and power.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Apply and communicate understanding of the importance of diversity and difference in shaping life experiences in practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels.
  • Present themselves as learners and engage clients and constituencies as experts of their own experiences.
  • Apply self-awareness and self-regulation to manage the influence of personal biases and values in working with diverse clients and constituencies.

Competency 3: Advance human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice

Social workers understand that every person regardless of position in society has fundamental human rights such as freedom, safety, privacy, an adequate standard of living, health care, and education. Social workers understand the global interconnections of oppression and human rights violations, and are knowledgeable about theories of human need and social justice and strategies to promote social and economic justice and human rights. Social workers understand strategies designed to eliminate oppressive structural barriers to ensure that social goods, rights, and responsibilities are distributed equitably and that civil, political, environmental, economic, social, and cultural human rights are protected.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Apply their understanding of social, economic, and environmental justice to advocate for human rights at the individual and system levels.
  • Engage in practices that advance social, economic, and environmental justice.

Competency 4: Engage in practice-informed research and research-informed practice

Social workers understand quantitative and qualitative research methods and their respective roles in advancing a science of social work and in evaluating their practice. Social workers know the principles of logic, scientific inquiry, and culturally informed and ethical approaches to building knowledge. Social workers understand that evidence that informs practice derives from multi- disciplinary sources and multiple ways of knowing. They also understand the processes for translating research findings into effective practice.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Use practice experience and theory to inform scientific inquiry and research.
  • Apply critical thinking to engage in analysis of quantitative and qualitative research methods and research findings.
  • Use and translate research evidence to inform and Boost practice, policy, and service delivery.

Competency 5: Engage in policy practice

Social workers understand that human rights and social justice, as well as social welfare and services, are mediated by policy and its implementation at the federal, state, and local levels. Social workers understand the history and current structures of social policies and services, the role of policy in service delivery, and the role of practice in policy development. Social workers understand their role in policy development and implementation within their practice settings at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels and they actively engage in policy practice to effect change within those settings. Social workers recognize and understand the historical, social, cultural, economic, organizational, environmental, and global influences that affect social policy. They are also knowledgeable about policy formulation, analysis, implementation, and evaluation.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Identify social policy at the local, state, and federal level that impacts well-being, service delivery, and access to social services.
  • Assess how social welfare and economic policies impact the delivery of and access to social services.
  • Apply critical thinking to analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice.

Competency 6: Engage with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities

Social workers understand that engagement is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers value the importance of human relationships. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge to facilitate engagement with clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand strategies to engage diverse clients and constituencies to advance practice effectiveness.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks to engage with clients and constituencies.
  • Use empathy, reflection, and interpersonal skills to effectively engage diverse clients and constituencies.

Competency 7: Assess individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities

Social workers understand that assessment is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in the assessment of diverse clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand methods of assessment with diverse clients and constituencies to advance practice effectiveness. Social workers recognize the implications of the larger practice context in the assessment process and value the importance of inter-professional collaboration in this process. Social workers understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions may affect their assessment and decision-making.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Collect and organize data, and apply critical thinking to interpret information from clients and constituencies.
  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the analysis of assessment data from clients and constituencies.
  • Develop mutually agreed-on intervention goals and objectives based on the critical assessment of strengths, needs, and challenges within clients and constituencies.
  • Select appropriate intervention strategies based on the assessment, research knowledge, and values and preferences of clients and constituencies.

Competency 8: Intervene with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities

Social workers understand that intervention is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers are knowledgeable about evidence-informed interventions to achieve the goals of clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge to effectively intervene with clients and constituencies. Social workers understand methods of identifying, analyzing and implementing evidence-informed interventions to achieve client and constituency goals. Social workers value the importance of interprofessional teamwork and communication in interventions, recognizing that beneficial outcomes may require interdisciplinary, interprofessional, and inter-organizational collaboration.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Critically choose and implement interventions to achieve practice goals and enhance capacities of clients and constituencies.
  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in interventions with clients and constituencies.
  • Use inter-professional collaboration as appropriate to achieve beneficial practice outcomes.
  • Negotiate, mediate, and advocate with and on behalf of diverse clients and constituencies.
  • Facilitate effective transitions and endings that advance mutually agreed-on goals.

Competency 9: Evaluate practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities

Social workers understand that evaluation is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. Social workers recognize the importance of evaluating processes and outcomes to advance practice, policy, and service delivery effectiveness. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in evaluating outcomes. Social workers understand qualitative and quantitative methods for evaluating outcomes and practice effectiveness.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Select and use appropriate methods for evaluation of outcomes.
  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the evaluation of outcomes.
  • Critically analyze, monitor, and evaluate intervention and program processes and outcomes.
  • Apply evaluation findings to Boost practice effectiveness at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels.

Grievance procedure

Under the remediation policy, there are 4 points at which a student can initiate a grievance: 

  1. If the student believes that the behavior cited in the original concern is unfounded; 
  2. If the student believes that the Remediation Committee's identification of a relevant competency, practice behavior, code of conduct, ethical standard is inaccurate;
  3. If the student believes that the remediation decision or Action Plan does not address the original concern; or
  4. If the student believes they are being held to a higher standard of performance than other students completing the same program of study.

The written grievance should be submitted to the Director of The School of Social Work no later than 10 working days following the decision point in question (see 1-4 above). The burden of proof during the grievance process rests with the student. If the Director determines that the student has provided adequate evidence to support his or her grievance, the Director may dismiss the issue with no further action required. Alternatively, if the Director determines that there is not adequate evidence to support the student’s grievance, he or she will redirect the student to the Remediation Team for further steps/action. The Director will provide his or her decision to the student and Remediation Team in writing within 10 working days of receipt of the student’s written grievance.

Grade appeal policy

The School of Social Work adheres to the University’s policy by which students may appeal a grade. This policy states “…a grade assigned by an instructor is only subject to the appeals procedure if:

  • There was a clerical/administrative error in the calculation and/or assignment of the grade;
  • The grade assignment was based on factors other than the student's performance in the course and/or completion of course requirements; or
  • The grade assignment meant that the student was held to more demanding standards than other students in the same section of the course.

The burden of proof of these conditions rests on the student.” The policy advises students to begin the process by consulting with the course Instructor. If the issue is not resolved at that level students may proceed with filing a Grade Appeal Form. The full policy and procedures for filing a Grade Appeal can be found at under section 3,510 of the University Administrative Manual.

Wed, 23 Dec 2020 09:15:00 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.unr.edu/social-work/degrees-and-programs/master-of-social-work/program-handbook
School of Social Work

Overview

The School of Social Work focuses on leading-edge research and innovative, internationally recognised qualifications in social work, social policy, and social service supervision.

We work closely with non-government organisations, Te Whatu Ora – Health New Zealand and Oranga Tamariki Ministry for Children. Our students are placed in these organisations for their practical field education and our graduates have careers with them.

Te Tiriti o Waitangi at Massey

We are deeply committed to being a Tiriti-led university, demonstrating authentic leadership in contemporary Aotearoa New Zealand as we uphold te Tiriti o Waitangi, the founding document of our nation, and its principles through our practice. We embrace this not just as an obligation but as a real opportunity for the nation and its people.

Te Tiriti o Waitangi ki Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa – The Treaty of Waitangi at Massey

Study with us

From addiction support to child protection, aged care to mental health services, Massey prepares you for a rewarding lifelong career in social work. Our Bachelor of Social Work and Master of Applied Social Work both lead to registration as a social worker in New Zealand.

Explore by area of interest

Explore a selection of qualifications relating to your interests.

Useful forms for students and graduates

To study at the School of Social Work, you may be asked to fill out a form. We’ve gathered all forms here.

Entry into the Bachelor of Social Work Part Two, Three or Four

Thesis planning for social work and social policy

Field education planning – BSW and MASW Auckland

Field education planning – BSW distance

Field education planning – MASW distance

For Massey graduates applying for registration in another country, the School of Social Work will provide a transcript – the academic certification for your overseas registration process. There is an administration fee.

Request an overseas registration transcript

Meet our graduates

“Completing a Master of Social Work has taught me how to do research. It has enabled me to explore what I am passionate about: Whānau Ora, whānau-centred practice, kaupapa Māori practice and going beyond crisis intervention by focussing on the moemoeā (dreams and aspirations) of whānau. ”

James Martin Cherrington

Ko Ngapuhi te Iwi, Ko Ngati Hine te hapu. Māori, Niuean, Samoan, Irish and English.

“I heard from other Pasifika people that achieving is the norm at Massey. The Pasifika values at Massey I have seen and experienced are reciprocity and relationships, service and inclusion, respect, spirituality, leadership, family (aiga, famili) and the talanoa (korero, discussion) sessions.”
“Completing my Master of Social Work with Massey was a life changing journey for both me and my family. It was challenging but allowed me to explore and discover issues within my community, which has enhanced my social work practice and experiences.”

Jasmin Marie Albert

Ngā Puhi, Ngāti Whātua, Te-Whānau-ā-Apanui

Meet our graduates

“Studying at Massey University has provided me a broad and sound knowledge of what social work is all about. The day of a social worker is never the same, encountering different situations and people impacted by social and personal issues.”

Kaysha Whakarau

Ngāti Raukawa rāua ko Ngāti Ruanui

“I had thought about getting a qualification in youth work, but then someone suggested social work as it provided greater scope in terms of areas I could work in.”
“I chose social work without fully understanding the concept, but I knew it was about people and I knew that people mattered.”

Who we are

Our people make us who we are.

Research

The school's researchers work on significant issues facing society and social work practice today, spanning the areas of human rights and social justice, social work practice, and social work profession. We engage in international research and consultations across many countries.

Here's an example of how our academics create and share new knowledge.

Relational resources for change: New futures for youth with complex needs

Professor Jackie Sanders, Professor Robyn Munford

A major programme to create culturally responsive resources for practitioners working with vulnerable youth. Researchers will work alongside practitioners and youth, using state-of-the-art methods to design and test resources. The resources will then be integrated into new and existing services.

News article – New research funding will help to address future needs of New Zealand

New Zealand Social Workers Registration Board

Our professional qualifications are accredited by the Social Workers Registration Board. Students who complete the Bachelor of Social Work or Master of Applied Social Work can immediately apply for provisional registration as a registered social worker.

Learn more

Paper people around globe

International Association of Schools of Social Work

Massey’s School of Social Work is a member of the International Association of Schools of Social Work (IASSW). We also have staff members on the Asia Pacific Association for Social Work Education (APASWE) committee.

Learn more

Social media

Connect with the College of Health on:

Looking for a staff member? Visit our staff directory or use Expertise search.

Mon, 21 Mar 2022 09:03:00 -0500 en-NZ text/html https://www.massey.ac.nz/about/colleges-schools-and-institutes/college-of-health/school-of-social-work/
Wayne-Westland school board votes down employee layoffs, budget shortfall remains a threat
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WESTLAND, Mich. (WXYZ) — In a heated special school board meeting Thursday night, the Wayne-Westland school board voted to not lay off approximately 20 staff members just days before Christmas in a unanimous vote.

Last month, 7 Action News reported that the district budget is in a serious deficit and on the border of state takeover. A $17.6 million discrepancy was found in the budget.

A possible solution was to privatize school bus drivers, which was turned down this week. Another solution was to lay off custodians, social workers, secretaries and other staff.

"If not resolved in a timely manner, this condition may lead to the state treasurer declaring that the potential for fiscal distress exists at Wayne-Westland Community Schools district," board trustee Mark Neal said at Thursday's meeting.

It was a packed auditorium filled with a sea of red T-shirts at John Glenn High School, representing support for Michigan educators and teacher unions.

Tonya Karpinkski is the executive director of the Michigan Education Association 2-C and 2-F coordinating councils. She says the decision to consider resorting to layoffs to fix the budget was not well thought out. She says laying off staff puts blame on educators rather than the board for the district's financial woes.

"We just keep seeing these piecemeal reactions," Karpinkski sad. "They overspent their budget by 30% in one fiscal year."

The heated and, at times, unorganized meeting began with a change in leadership and a change in board presidents from David Cox to Bradley Gray.

The Wayne-Westland Community Schools board voted down laying off approximately 20 employees. (Dec. 21, 2023)

WXYZ

The Wayne-Westland Community Schools board voted down laying off approximately 20 employees. (Dec. 21, 2023)

The board also voted to take a take a cut from their yearly stipend to help with budget shortfalls. They considered a cut to the superintendent's yearly salary, and resorted to consulting legal council before a decision on that was made.

During public comment, current and retired educators, concerned parents and city leaders made their voices clear on their disapproval of the layoffs.

"I am asking for you to vote no to the layoffs for those people who are in the trenches, specifically those who work with mental health, the social workers," district employee Michelle Tackett said during public comment.

"The district is falling apart," Westland City Councilmember Melissa Sampey said during public comment said. "Really at this point right now, the fix is on your shoulders. We have to make tough decisions, but what I'm asking you tonight is to not proceed with the layoffs."

The board voted unanimously to not lay off staff at this time. Some board members, like Board Secretary Melandie Hines, stated that they did not have enough information to move forward with the rash decision.

“We are not clear of the fund balance, we don't have a plan, there’s no vision. I don’t feel comfortable laying people off until we have a plan in place," she said.

While educators and community members celebrated the decision, they know it is still a long road ahead for the district to fix its financial problems.

“I consider this a great start. Obviously, this is going to continue to need additional work," Karpinkski said.

Newly-elected Board President Bradley Gray says the board will recuperate to discuss other financial options for the district.

“I think we need to slow down, regroup and so that we can move forward. We’ve known about this issue for a few months now and it’s time for us to come up with a plan that is acceptable to the community, to the impacted people and, most importantly, to the impacted students that this is going to affect," Gray said.

Copyright 2023 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Thu, 21 Dec 2023 17:26:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.wxyz.com/news/wayne-westland-school-board-votes-down-employee-layoffs-budget-shortfall-remains-a-threat




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