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The military is a unique lifestyle, and one that comes with its own set of challenges. Joining the military is a big decision, and the vast amount of information about how to prepare can cause anyone to overthink the process.

Don't worry. Feeling a little overwhelmed with how you handle the unknown is normal. The first thing you should do before you talk to a recruiter is take a deep breath, find the official recruiting pages online, start your research and find a job or skill that interests you.

There is a saying: "It's not the lack of information that prevents us from succeeding, it is the lack of trying." The same can be said for military recruits. There is a wealth of information available to those who want to join the military, but often it is the lack of effort that prevents people from succeeding.

The following will streamline the information available and deliver you the most important things you need to know before joining the military. This will help sift through the overload of information and take each step at a time as a military recruit.

1. Do Your Research

There is a lot of information available on the internet, in libraries and from military recruiters. It is important that you take the time to research all your options before deciding.

There are six branches to consider: the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Space Force and Coast Guard. Each branch has its own set of requirements and hundreds of jobs and specialties to choose from. Make sure you do your research and choose the one that's right for you and understand the academic, physical, medical and other tests in your near future.

2. Be Prepared

The military is a very demanding environment. You need to be physically and mentally prepared for the challenges you will face. Do workouts to help you lose weight and gain the physical abilities you need to take fitness tests well and endure tough initial training at boot camp, Basic Military Training or Basic Combat Training.

You can start your preparation long before you visit a recruiting office. In fact, by having the required paperwork (Identification, birth certificate and Social Security card, medical record, etc.) and exceeding the physical standards on your first visit, the recruiter will take you more seriously. You want this relationship to be good, as the recruiter will be your point of contact for the entire enlistment process.

Once you've decided on a branch, it's time to start the application process. Take a few practice tests of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) test. This test will help determine your military occupational specialty (MOS) or Air Force Specialty Code (AFSC), which is the job you'll do in the military. If you do not score well enough on this test, you may not be eligible for the job within the branch of service you selected.

3. Stay Focused

The military selection process is very competitive. It is important that you stay focused on your goals and do not let anything distract you from your path. Once you have found what inspires you, you will find more motivation and eventually discipline as you work consistently to prepare for the future you are setting for yourself.

Building solid habits in this process is a requirement. This motivation phase is a great time to start, as eventually this motivation has to evolve to discipline.

4. Be Positive

The military is an incredibly rewarding experience. Keep your head up and stay positive throughout the process as a recruit, a student during basic training, throughout the early years as a follower and eventually as a leader of others.

5. Ask for Help

If you are having trouble with any step of the process, don't be afraid to ask for help. There are many people who are willing to help you succeed, from veterans in your friends and family network to recruiters in your region.

Make sure, though, that when you need to ask for help, you have taken the initiative and searched all over for the answer. When you find conflicting answers, those are perfect times to ask for specific assistance from people who may know the answers.

I take questions from recruits, active duty and veterans alike every day, and many become articles in my Ask Stew column. Please feel free to email me at stew@stewsmith.com.

By following these tips, you will increase your chances of success as a military recruit and beyond. Remember, there is plenty of information out there, but you still must search for it, validate it and then put it to use. So get out there and deliver it your best shot.

The last step in the process of being a recruit is attending basic training. This is where you will learn everything you need to know to be a successful military member. Basic training is tough, but if you prepare yourself mentally and physically, you will be just fine and thrive in an environment that you will be proud of being a member one day.

In the end, you get out of your military career what you put into it. These careers require discipline and sacrifice, but they can also be rewarding, educational and set you up for the rest of your life with valuable skills for any future career.

Stew Smith is a former Navy SEAL and fitness author certified as a Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) with the National Strength and Conditioning Association. Visit his Fitness eBook store if you're looking to start a workout program to create a healthy lifestyle. Send your fitness questions to stew@stewsmith.com.

Want to Learn More About Military Life?

Whether you're thinking of joining the military, looking for fitness and basic training tips, or keeping up with military life and benefits, Military.com has you covered. Subscribe to Military.com to have military news, updates and resources delivered directly to your inbox.

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Sun, 27 Nov 2022 19:28:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.military.com/military-fitness/how-new-recruits-can-handle-information-overload-of-joining-military
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Wed, 30 Nov 2022 00:16:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.military.com/discounts/safetycuttersnet-military-discount
Killexams : The Pentagon wants to hear from military families with special needs

The Department of Defense is asking military families with special needs to share how they are doing and what they need. The Pentagon is rolling out its first survey for people enrolled in the Exceptional Family Member Program, the military’s benefits and services assistance program for those service members. 

“By completing the survey, families can make sure DOD understands where its policies and programs are helping them and where improvements can be made. Leadership will take the results from this survey seriously,” Patricia Montes Barron, deputy assistant secretary of defense for Military Community and Family Policy, said in a department release

The military is seeking the feedback to help inform any policy changes. The survey will ask active-duty servicemembers about various aspects of the program, from enrollment to services provided, as well as transitions related to permanent changes of station. 

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Currently approximately 110,000 active-duty servicemembers are enrolled in the Exceptional Family Member Program. Those people will be receiving an email inviting them to participate in the survey; a link to it is also available on the program’s website. It’s only being sent to people directly in the military, although the Department of Defense is encouraging military families to weigh in as well. 

“When a family PCSs to the next location, they may be looking for particular medical services, specialists, therapies, behavioral health — those types of services — and we want to make sure that when they do PCS, they’ll have continuity of care,” according to Jennifer Wong, a program analyst within the Office of Special Needs. 

Wong said the results of the survey will be used by the department to both Strengthen the program and standardize delivery to all families across the services. The survey is not mandatory. It is, however, confidential. 

“Within the Office of Special Needs, we are committed to improving support for military families with special medical and/or educational needs,” Wong said in a release. “A vital part of that … is hearing from families who are enrolled in the program. It’s very important to hear from the families who are in the program so we have feedback that’s representative of the families we serve, and it’s based off their real-life experiences and their interactions with the program. That’s why it’s a great opportunity for families who are enrolled to participate in the survey.” 

Childcare and other military benefits have been ongoing issues for military families. A 2019 survey saw more than a third of families with special needs children report they didn’t have the support or services they need. On a wider level, the Department of Defense has announced new benefits to help servicemembers and families with costly items such as childcare and groceries.

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Sun, 20 Nov 2022 15:07:00 -0600 Nicholas Slayton en-US text/html https://taskandpurpose.com/military-life/pentagon-survey-military-families-special-needs/
Killexams : Maine veteran sues after learning military benefits won't cover daughter's gender transition

A U.S. military veteran and his daughter filed a lawsuit on Monday challenging a federal rule they said prevents the daughter from accessing medical coverage because she is transgender.

The veteran and daughter filed their lawsuit against the government anonymously via GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders, a Boston-based advocacy group. The group's court filing said the daughter has been denied treatments recommended by doctors due to a federal statute that dates to 1976 that mandates exclusion of surgical treatments for gender transition in the military's medical coverage for the dependents of service members.

The statute is an antiquated rule based on outdated views of transgender people, and striking it from the books would be significant for many people seeking to access care, said Ben Klein, an attorney with GLAD.

MICHIGAN GOP INTRODUCES BILL CLASSIFYING GENDER TRANSITION PROCEDURES AS FIRST-DEGREE CHILD ABUSE

"We can safely say this is the first time the statute has been challenged. It would affect a huge number of people," Klein said. "A victory in this case would ensure that all dependents of military personnel who are transgender would have access to the critical medical care they need, free of discrimination of exclusion."

The defendants in the lawsuit include the U.S. Department of Defense and Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin. The plaintiffs, who live in Maine, filed their lawsuit in U.S. District Court for the District of Maine in Portland. The lawsuit calls for the exclusion rule to be declared unconstitutional and also states that the plaintiffs want damages.

A veteran from Maine is suing after his transgender daughter was denied coverage for surgical reassignment procedures under his military health plan.

Representatives for the U.S. Department of Defense declined to comment on the lawsuit and deferred to the U.S. Department of Justice, which would represent the agency in the case. Justice Department representatives did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Associated Press.

The lawsuit states that the veteran served for 23 years in the Marine Corps and Air Force. His daughter is a 21-year-old transgender woman who has been diagnosed with gender dysphoria and sought gender transition surgery to address the condition, the lawsuit states.

TRANSITION SURGERY STUDY RAISES QUESTIONS ABOUT LONG-TERM RESULTS ON QUALITY OF LIFE AFTER 'TOP SURGERY'

The suit states that the daughter, who is only referred to as Jane Doe, is entitled to receive health care benefits through the military's TRICARE health plan, which is a program of the Defense Department's Military Health System. It states that she "has been and continues to be unable to obtain coverage as a TRICARE beneficiary" for gender transition surgery because of the 1976 rule.

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The lawsuit states that the daughter has also incurred costs and sought alternative health insurance because of previous improper denials of coverage by the defendants. Her request for coverage of treatments including laser hair removal and electrolysis were previously denied, the lawsuit states.

Mon, 21 Nov 2022 21:17:00 -0600 Fox News en text/html https://www.foxnews.com/us/maine-veteran-sues-learning-military-benefits-wont-cover-daughters-gender-transition
Killexams : Politicization contributing to Americans’ low trust in the military

The American public’s historically low confidence in the military as a public institution is not due solely to the action of civil or uniformed military leaders, according to an annual survey from the Reagan Institute.

Instead, the Reagan National Defense Survey found that it’s the actions of commanders in chief ― presidents ― that have predominantly caused respondents to see the Defense Department as overly politicized. Likewise, Republicans and Democrats are split on the threats they perceive as threatening the military: About half of respondents singled out “woke” policies, most of them leaning Republican, while half pointed toward far-right or extremist service members, most of them leaning Democratic.

This is the first year that the survey’s been able to draw these distinctions. Previously, respondents were only asked about their trust and confidence in the military, with 70% saying they had “a great deal” in 2018′s inaugural go-round. That number has fallen precipitously since, down to 45% in 2021, which a small uptick to 48% in 2022.

In 2021, the survey asked an open-ended question about why that confidence was declining, and the main response was politicization, Rachel Hoff, the Reagan Institute’s policy director, told reporters Tuesday.

To examine why, the group added a new series of questions examining what has led to that decline in confidence, Hoff said.

They narrowed it down to eight questions, including three on the military’s different types of leadership, and two to capture more partisan concerns: the previously mentioned “wokeness” and extremism in the ranks.

Generally, 52% of respondents pointed to an overly politicized leadership contributing at least some to their level of trust.

Just under half of respondents noted that the military’s role in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars decreased their confidence in the armed forces, with 52% saying they had concerns about the military’s ability to win a future war.

“There was also a decrease in those confident in the military’s ability to act in a professional and nonpolitical manner, from 40% in 2021 to 35%,” according to the survey’s summary. “These trends seem to demonstrate a connection between Americans’ sense of the military’s ability to perform its core function and their perception of its leaders becoming overly politicized.”

This year’s survey included another first: asking respondents ages 18 to 29 how they felt about the idea of joining the military, This line of inquiry was inspired by a rash of headlines earlier this year about the services’ struggles to meet their recruiting goals.

Over a quarter of them indicated they were “not willing at all,” while 13% said they were “extremely” or “very” willing.

That response is not far from the Defense Department’s own data, most recently gathered in fall 2021, which found that just 9% of Americans aged 16 to 21 thought it likely that they would join the military in the next few years.

The survey asked questions on some other hot topics, including the war in Ukraine and the United States’ China strategy.

Respondents overall, 57%, said they believe the U.S. should continue to stand with Ukraine in fighting the Russian invasion, with 82% seeing Russia as an enemy, up from 65% in 2021.

“Regarding the assistance the United States has already sent to Ukraine, 39% say the United States has sent about the right amount, while a quarter (25%) say it has sent too little, and another quarter (24%) say it has sent too much,” according to the survey summary.

Concern over China is also up, with 75% of respondents seeing the country as an enemy, a 10-point jump over last year. However, 54% of respondents aid the U.S. doesn’t have a clear strategy for confronting China.

Meghann Myers is the Pentagon bureau chief at Military Times. She covers operations, policy, personnel, leadership and other issues affecting service members.

Thu, 01 Dec 2022 08:03:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.militarytimes.com/news/your-military/2022/12/01/politicization-contributing-to-americans-low-trust-in-the-military/
Killexams : Military Photo: Vigilant Storm

Posted: 11/14/2022

U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons assigned to the 51st Fighter Wing joined with Indo-Pacific Command B-1B Lancers and South Korea F-35A Lightning IIs in a combined training flight during exercise Vigilant Storm 23 over the Korean Peninsula, Nov. 5, 2022. Vigilant Storm is a recurring, re-planned training exercise that demonstrates the bilateral nations' interoperability and showcases deterrent capabilities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Dwane R. Young)

Sun, 13 Nov 2022 10:01:00 -0600 text/html https://strategypage.com/military_photos/military_photos_2022111420027.aspx
Killexams : SecDef tells Congress to get a military budget done already

Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin on Monday urged lawmakers to pass a full-year budget for his department as soon as possible, warning that another short-term spending extension could imperil military readiness and family support efforts.

“If the [current budget extension] extends beyond December, we may be forced to reduce accessions or permanent change of station moves, impairing our ability to meet our missions and causing unnecessary disruption to our families and our ability to recruit personnel,” Austin wrote in a letter to House and Senate leaders.

“It is impairing our ability to hire the people we need to accelerate our efforts to eradicate sexual assault and prevent suicide. [It] is delaying needed investments in military infrastructure, including barracks and child care centers.”

Congress approved a short-term budget extension in September after lawmakers failed to agree upon a full-year spending plan by the start of the new fiscal year, Oct. 1. That temporary extension is set to run out on Dec. 16.

Negotiations for a full-year budget have been ongoing for the past few months, but Democratic and Republican leaders have yet to announce a deal. Some Republican House members have pushed for a final plan to be postponed until early next year, when they will have control of the chamber and stronger negotiating power.

While another budget extension would prevent a partial government shutdown, department leaders like Austin have been warning that such a move solves only a few of the appropriations problems facing the department.

The defense secretary in his letter said that military leaders are operating with nearly $3 billion less a month in funding than they expected under the new fiscal 2023 budget. That has delayed new program starts, new contract agreements and a host of other spending decisions.

“The [budget extension] costs us time as well as money, and money can’t buy back time, especially for lost training events,” Austin wrote.

“We must break this pattern of extensive inaction. We can’t outcompete China with our hands tied behind our back three, four, five or six months of every fiscal year.”

White House officials have asked for a military appropriation of about $800 billion for fiscal 2023, which would be around 2.5% above the fiscal 2022 level. House and Senate lawmakers have proposed a range of spending above that mark, as high as an 8% increase.

The short-term budget extensions become more complicated at the end of the fiscal year due to the annual military pay raise. Troops are in line for a 4.6% raise starting in January, money that is not included in the fiscal 2022 budget extension levels. Paying for those higher wages without new extra money could mean cutting into training and readiness initiatives.

Austin’s plea for Congress to return to meeting its annual budget deadlines is not unique to the current administration. That same message has been echoed for more than a decade through both Republican- and Democratic-controlled White Houses, as partisan gridlock on Capitol Hill has made routine business increasingly more complicated.

Leaders from both parties have expressed optimism that they will reach an appropriations deal in the coming weeks.

Leo covers Congress, Veterans Affairs and the White House for Military Times. He has covered Washington, D.C. since 2004, focusing on military personnel and veterans policies. His work has earned numerous honors, including a 2009 Polk award, a 2010 National Headliner Award, the IAVA Leadership in Journalism award and the VFW News Media award.

Mon, 28 Nov 2022 07:54:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.militarytimes.com/news/pentagon-congress/2022/11/28/secdef-tells-congress-to-get-a-military-budget-done-already/
Killexams : China's military has been spending a lot more time working on how to forcefully capture an island, Pentagon says
  • China's military has been increasingly practicing seizing islands, the Pentagon says. 
  • In a new report, the Pentagon assessed Beijing's island-capture training is becoming more realistic.
  • The US has accused China of engaging in aggressive behavior around Taiwan and in the South China Sea.

China's military is spending an increasing amount of time executing drills focused on taking islands by force, according to a new Department of Defense report. 

The report, which was made public by the Pentagon on Tuesday, outlines the latest Chinese military and security developments and aims to provide Congress with insight into Beijing's intentions and goals. As an extensive assessment of China's military might, the report outlines the threat that China poses to the self-ruled democratic island of Taiwan.

The Pentagon reported that China's People's Liberation Army (PLA) "intensified diplomatic, political, and military pressure" against Taiwan during 2021, increasing "provocative and destabilizing actions" around the region.

These actions included "island-seizure exercises" and flights that cross into Taiwan's Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) — moves which Beijing has continued well into 2022.

As for last year, island-seizure exercises "became more frequent and realistic," the Department of Defense said, explaining that the PLA carried out more than 20 naval exercises that had some island-seizure element, compared to just 13 such exercises the previous year. These exercises and drills — some of which were carried out by the Chinese military in waters near Taiwan — have been previously touted on Chinese state media.  

"Many of these exercises focused on combat realism and featured night missions, training in adverse weather conditions, and simultaneous multi-domain operations," the Pentagon said in its report. Combat realism in training has been a focus of Chinese leader Xi Jinping's military modernization efforts, which are aimed at building a world-class force that can fight and win wars.

And Chinese leadership has never renounced the use of force as an option for achieving its unification goals with Taiwan, which China regards as part of its sovereign territory.

In specifically assessing potential military action that China could take against Taiwan, the Pentagon concluded that a massive amphibious invasion would be a tough feat for Beijing. Such an operation, which is among the more complicated to carry out, would require significant support, air and sea control, and enough supplies. Such an undertaking would significantly strain PLA forces, and there are substantial risks.

"Combined with inevitable force attrition, complexity of urban warfare, and potential insurgency, these factors make an amphibious invasion of Taiwan a significant political and military risk for Xi Jinping and the Chinese Communist Party, even assuming a successful landing and breakout," the Pentagon said.

The Department of Defense noted, however, that while China may struggle with a full-scale invasion of Taiwan, it is capable of seizing smaller Taiwan-controlled islands, such as Pratas or Itu Aba in the South China Sea. The Pentagon also said that an "invasion of a medium-sized, better-defended island such as Matsu or Kinmen is within the PLA's capabilities."

Such a move would demonstrate capability and resolve while showing restraint, the Pentagon said, but there are still political risks, such as strong international condemnation.

In addition to Beijing's longstanding focus on Taiwan, China also holds competing claims to islands and reefs in the South China Sea, where China has been building military outposts and strengthening its position.

The US has accused China of increasingly aggressive behavior around the South China Sea, with US officials previously warning that China's "irresponsible behavior" could trigger a "major incident or accident." The most recent warnings came amid a period of heightened tensions between China and the US over House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's trip to Taiwan.  

Earlier this month, Vice President Kamala Harris made a rare trip to a South China Sea hotspot, specifically the Philippine island of Palawan, which overlooks contested areas in the strategic waterway. China's response was more restrained though than it was when Pelosi visited Taiwan.

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 09:41:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.businessinsider.com/chinas-military-spending-time-learning-forcefully-capture-an-island-pentagon-2022-11
Killexams : Military Diplomacy Killexams : Military Diplomacy - Daily Times Wed, 30 Nov 2022 14:23:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://dailytimes.com.pk/1034004/military-diplomacy/ Killexams : Military veterans honored with savings

Nov. 11 is Veterans Day and an opportunity to honor those that have served our country. Several companies are taking the opportunity to help veterans save.Academy Sports + Outdoors: 10% off entire purchase through Nov. 13.Applebee's: Free full-size entrée from a select menu; receive a $5 Bounce Back Card to use later.Casey's: Free coffee to both veterans and active service members.Chili's: Free meal from a select menu.Cicis Pizza: Free adult buffet for veterans and active-duty military.Colton's Steak House & Grill: Free entrée from a select menu until 4 p.m.Cracker Barrel: Free slice of Double Chocolate Fudge Coca-Cola Cake with purchase. If purchasing online, use code VETSDAY22.Denny's: Free Grand Slam between 5 a.m. and noon.Dickey's Barbecue Pit: Free Pulled Pork Sandwich; if ordering online or in-app, use code VETFREE.Dollar General: 20% off through November 13; must sign up for a Dollar General account and verify your military credentials.Dunkin' Donuts: Free donutFreddy's Frozen Custard & Steakburgers: Free Freddy's Original Double with Cheese combo meal card to be redeemed by Nov. 30, 2022.Great Clips: Free haircut or a free haircut card for a future visit through Dec. 9, 2022.IHOP: Free stack of pancakes between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m.Just Tires: Free car care checks; 10% savings on tires and services; an appointment must be scheduled by Nov. 14, 2022, and completed by Nov. 17, 2022.Krispy Kreme: Free doughnut and small hot or iced coffee.Little Caesars: Free lunch combo for veterans or active military members between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. The meal includes a 4-slice Detroit-Style Deep Dish pizza with pepperoni and a 20 oz. PEPSI-COLA product.National Park Service: Free entry for all visitors.Office Depot and OfficeMax: Get 25% off your purchase in store Nov. 11-13, 2022; click here to access the coupon.Outback Steakhouse: Free Bloomin' Onion and Coca-Cola to veterans and active service members and their spouses when dining in.Paramount+: Free 30 days for new subscribers when using the promo code BRAVO.Red Lobster: Free Walt's Favorite Shrimp, Fries, and Coleslaw between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m.Red Robin: Free Red's Tavern Double and Steak Fries.Sleep Number: 20% discount on most smart beds, bases, and bedding through Nov. 14, 2022.Smashburger: Free burger or sandwich.Sport Clips: Free Haircuts for HeroesStarbucks: Free coffee ordered in-store or drive-thru.TCBY: First 6 oz. free.Torchy's Tacos: Free taco and fountain drink.Tractor Supply: 15% discount in stores for active and former military members and dependents with proper military ID or proof of service.Walgreens: 20% off eligible regular-price items when shopping in-store Nov. 11-14, 2022.Wendy's: Free breakfast combo between 6:30 and 10:30 a.m.This is not a complete list of deals and savings for Veterans Day, honoring our military service members.

Nov. 11 is Veterans Day and an opportunity to honor those that have served our country. Several companies are taking the opportunity to help veterans save.

Academy Sports + Outdoors: 10% off entire purchase through Nov. 13.

Applebee's: Free full-size entrée from a select menu; receive a $5 Bounce Back Card to use later.

Casey's: Free coffee to both veterans and active service members.

Chili's: Free meal from a select menu.

Cicis Pizza: Free adult buffet for veterans and active-duty military.

Colton's Steak House & Grill: Free entrée from a select menu until 4 p.m.

Cracker Barrel: Free slice of Double Chocolate Fudge Coca-Cola Cake with purchase. If purchasing online, use code VETSDAY22.

Denny's: Free Grand Slam between 5 a.m. and noon.

Dickey's Barbecue Pit: Free Pulled Pork Sandwich; if ordering online or in-app, use code VETFREE.

Dollar General: 20% off through November 13; must sign up for a Dollar General account and verify your military credentials.

Dunkin' Donuts: Free donut

Freddy's Frozen Custard & Steakburgers: Free Freddy's Original Double with Cheese combo meal card to be redeemed by Nov. 30, 2022.

Great Clips: Free haircut or a free haircut card for a future visit through Dec. 9, 2022.

IHOP: Free stack of pancakes between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m.

Just Tires: Free car care checks; 10% savings on tires and services; an appointment must be scheduled by Nov. 14, 2022, and completed by Nov. 17, 2022.

Krispy Kreme: Free doughnut and small hot or iced coffee.

Little Caesars: Free lunch combo for veterans or active military members between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. The meal includes a 4-slice Detroit-Style Deep Dish pizza with pepperoni and a 20 oz. PEPSI-COLA product.

National Park Service: Free entry for all visitors.

Office Depot and OfficeMax: Get 25% off your purchase in store Nov. 11-13, 2022; click here to access the coupon.

Outback Steakhouse: Free Bloomin' Onion and Coca-Cola to veterans and active service members and their spouses when dining in.

Paramount+: Free 30 days for new subscribers when using the promo code BRAVO.

Red Lobster: Free Walt's Favorite Shrimp, Fries, and Coleslaw between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m.

Red Robin: Free Red's Tavern Double and Steak Fries.

Sleep Number: 20% discount on most smart beds, bases, and bedding through Nov. 14, 2022.

Smashburger: Free burger or sandwich.

Sport Clips: Free Haircuts for Heroes

Starbucks: Free coffee ordered in-store or drive-thru.

TCBY: First 6 oz. free.

Torchy's Tacos: Free taco and fountain drink.

Tractor Supply: 15% discount in stores for active and former military members and dependents with proper military ID or proof of service.

Walgreens: 20% off eligible regular-price items when shopping in-store Nov. 11-14, 2022.

Wendy's: Free breakfast combo between 6:30 and 10:30 a.m.

This is not a complete list of deals and savings for Veterans Day, honoring our military service members.

Thu, 10 Nov 2022 22:37:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.4029tv.com/article/military-veterans-honored-with-savings/41933742
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