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ASVAB Section 4 : Automotive & Shop Information
Military Information approach
Killexams : Military Information approach - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/ASVAB-Automotive-and-Shop Search results Killexams : Military Information approach - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/ASVAB-Automotive-and-Shop https://killexams.com/exam_list/Military Killexams : Military IoT Market Analysis Research Report, Challenges, Scopes, Market Share, Revenue, and Forecasts 2023 to 2028

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Dec 09, 2022 (The Expresswire) -- Final Report will add the analysis of the impact of Russia-Ukraine War and COVID-19 on this industry.

"Military IoT Market" Insights 2022 - By Applications (Training and Simulation, Health Monitoring), By Types (Wi-Fi, Cellular, Satellite Communication), By Segmentation analysis, Regions and Forecast to 2028. The Global Military IoT market Report provides In-depth analysis on the market status of the Military IoT Top manufacturers with best facts and figures, meaning, Definition, SWOT analysis, PESTAL analysis, expert opinions and the latest developments across the globe., the Military IoT Market Report contains Full TOC, Tables and Figures, and Chart with Key Analysis, Pre and Post COVID-19 Market Outbreak Impact Analysis and Situation by Regions.

Military IoT Market Size is projected to Reach Multimillion USD by 2028, In comparison to 2021, at unexpected CAGR during the forecast Period 2022-2028.

Browse Detailed TOC, Tables and Figures with Charts which is spread across 108 Pages that provides exclusive data, information, vital statistics, trends, and competitive landscape details in this niche sector.

Considering the economic change due to COVID-19 and Russia-Ukraine War Influence, Military IoT, which accounted for % of the global market of Military IoT in 2021

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Moreover, it helps new businesses perform a positive assessment of their business plans because it covers a range of syllabus market participants must be aware of to remain competitive.

Military IoT Market Report identifies various key players in the market and sheds light on their strategies and collaborations to combat competition. The comprehensive report provides a two-dimensional picture of the market. By knowing the global revenue of manufacturers, the global price of manufacturers, and the production by manufacturers during the forecast period of 2022 to 2028, the reader can identify the footprints of manufacturers in the Military IoT industry.

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Military IoT Market - Competitive and Segmentation Analysis:

Military IoT Market Reportproviding an overview of successful marketing strategies, market contributions, and accurate developments of leading companies, the report also offers a dashboard overview of leading companies' past and present performance. Several methodologies and analyses are used in the research report to provide in-depth and accurate information about the Military IoT Market.

The Major players covered in the Military IoT market report are:

● Honeywell International
● Northrop Grumman Corporation (US)
● AeroVironment
● FreeWave Technologies
● ATandT Inc. (US)
● General Atomics (US)
● FLIR Systems Inc. (US)
● Textron Systems (US)
● Reliance Industries Limited (India)
● IBM Corporation (US)
● Bombardier (Canada)
● SAP SE (Germany)
● Forescout Technologies Inc. (US)
● General Electric (US)

Short Description About Military IoT Market:

The Global Military IoT market is anticipated to rise at a considerable rate during the forecast period, between 2022 and 2028. In 2021, the market is growing at a steady rate and with the rising adoption of strategies by key players, the market is expected to rise over the projected horizon.

The Internet of Military/Battlefield Things is a network of sensors, wearables, and IoT devices that use cloud and edge computing to create a cohesive fighting force.

Market Analysis and Insights: Global Military IoT Market

The global Military IoT market size is projected to reach USD 17040 million by 2028, from USD 10980 million in 2021, at a CAGR of 6.0% during 2022-2028.

Fully considering the economic change by this health crisis, Wi-Fi accounting for % of the Military IoT global market in 2021, is projected to value USD million by 2028, growing at a revised % CAGR in the post-COVID-19 period. While Training and Simulation segment is altered to an % CAGR throughout this forecast period.

China Military IoT market size is valued at USD million in 2021, while the North America and Europe Military IoT are USD million and USD million, severally. The proportion of the North America is % in 2021, while China and Europe are % and % respectively, and it is predicted that China proportion will reach % in 2028, trailing a CAGR of % through the analysis period. Japan, South Korea, and Southeast Asia are noteworthy markets in Asia, with CAGR %, %, and % respectively for the next 6-year period. As for the Europe Military IoT landscape, Germany is projected to reach USD million by 2028 trailing a CAGR of % over the forecast period.

With industry-standard accuracy in analysis and high data integrity, the report makes a brilliant attempt to unveil key opportunities available in the global Military IoT market to help players in achieving a strong market position. Buyers of the report can access Verified and reliable market forecasts, including those for the overall size of the global Military IoT market in terms of revenue.

Overall, the report proves to be an effective tool that players can use to gain a competitive edge over their competitors and ensure lasting success in the global Military IoT market. All of the findings, data, and information provided in the report are validated and revalidated with the help of trustworthy sources. The analysts who have authored the report took a unique and industry-best research and analysis approach for an in-depth study of the global Military IoT market.

Global Military IoT Scope and Market Size

Military IoT market is segmented by players, region (country), by Type and by Application. Players, stakeholders, and other participants in the global Military IoT market will be able to gain the upper hand as they use the report as a powerful resource. The segmental analysis focuses on revenue and forecast by Type and by Application for the period 2017-20

Get a sample Copy of the Military IoT Report 2022

Military IoT Market is further classified on the basis of region as follows:

● North America (United States, Canada and Mexico) ● Europe (Germany, UK, France, Italy, Russia and Turkey etc.) ● Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India, Australia, Indonesia, Thailand, Philippines, Malaysia and Vietnam) ● South America (Brazil, Argentina, Columbia etc.) ● Middle East and Africa (Saudi Arabia, UAE, Egypt, Nigeria and South Africa)

This Military IoT Market Research/Analysis Report Contains Answers to your following Questions

● What are the global trends in the Military IoT market? Would the market witness an increase or decline in the demand in the coming years? ● What is the estimated demand for different types of products in Military IoT? What are the upcoming industry applications and trends for Military IoT market? ● What Are Projections of Global Military IoT Industry Considering Capacity, Production and Production Value? What Will Be the Estimation of Cost and Profit? What Will Be Market Share, Supply and Consumption? What about Import and Export? ● Where will the strategic developments take the industry in the mid to long-term? ● What are the factors contributing to the final price of Military IoT? What are the raw materials used for Military IoT manufacturing? ● How big is the opportunity for the Military IoT market? How will the increasing adoption of Military IoT for mining impact the growth rate of the overall market? ● How much is the global Military IoT market worth? What was the value of the market In 2020? ● Who are the major players operating in the Military IoT market? Which companies are the front runners? ● Which are the accurate industry trends that can be implemented to generate additional revenue streams? ● What Should Be Entry Strategies, Countermeasures to Economic Impact, and Marketing Channels for Military IoT Industry?

Customization of the Report

Our research analysts will help you to get customized details for your report, which can be modified in terms of a specific region, application or any statistical details. In addition, we are always willing to comply with the study, which triangulated with your own data to make the market research more comprehensive in your perspective.

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Detailed TOC of Global Military IoT Market Insights and Forecast to 2028

1 Military IoT Market Overview
1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Military IoT
1.2 Military IoT Segment by Type
1.2.1 Global Military IoT Market Size Growth Rate Analysis by Type 2022 VS 2028
1.3 Military IoT Segment by Application
1.3.1 Global Military IoT Consumption Comparison by Application: 2022 VS 2028
1.4 Global Market Growth Prospects
1.4.1 Global Military IoT Revenue Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)
1.4.2 Global Military IoT Production Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)
1.5 Global Market Size by Region
1.5.1 Global Military IoT Market Size Estimates and Forecasts by Region: 2017 VS 2021 VS 2028
1.5.2 North America Military IoT Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)
1.5.3 Europe Military IoT Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)
1.5.4 China Military IoT Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)
1.5.5 Japan Military IoT Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)
1.5.6 South Korea Military IoT Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)

2 Market Competition by Manufacturers
2.1 Global Military IoT Production Market Share by Manufacturers (2017-2022)
2.2 Global Military IoT Revenue Market Share by Manufacturers (2017-2022)
2.3 Military IoT Market Share by Company Type (Tier 1, Tier 2 and Tier 3)
2.4 Global Military IoT Average Price by Manufacturers (2017-2022)
2.5 Manufacturers Military IoT Production Sites, Area Served, Product Types
2.6 Military IoT Market Competitive Situation and Trends
2.6.1 Military IoT Market Concentration Rate
2.6.2 Global 5 and 10 Largest Military IoT Players Market Share by Revenue
2.6.3 Mergers and Acquisitions, Expansion

3 Production by Region
3.1 Global Production of Military IoT Market Share by Region (2017-2022)
3.2 Global Military IoT Revenue Market Share by Region (2017-2022)
3.3 Global Military IoT Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)
3.4 North America Military IoT Production
3.4.1 North America Military IoT Production Growth Rate (2017-2022)
3.4.2 North America Military IoT Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)
3.5 Europe Military IoT Production
3.5.1 Europe Military IoT Production Growth Rate (2017-2022)
3.5.2 Europe Military IoT Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)
3.6 China Military IoT Production
3.6.1 China Military IoT Production Growth Rate (2017-2022)
3.6.2 China Military IoT Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)
3.7 Japan Military IoT Production
3.7.1 Japan Military IoT Production Growth Rate (2017-2022)
3.7.2 Japan Military IoT Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)
3.8 South Korea Military IoT Production
3.8.1 South Korea Military IoT Production Growth Rate (2017-2022)
3.8.2 South Korea Military IoT Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)

4 Global Military IoT Consumption by Region
4.1 Global Military IoT Consumption by Region
4.1.1 Global Military IoT Consumption by Region
4.1.2 Global Military IoT Consumption Market Share by Region
4.2 North America
4.2.1 North America Military IoT Consumption by Country
4.2.2 United States
4.2.3 Canada
4.3 Europe
4.3.1 Europe Military IoT Consumption by Country
4.3.2 Germany
4.3.3 France
4.3.4 U.K.
4.3.5 Italy
4.3.6 Russia
4.4 Asia Pacific
4.4.1 Asia Pacific Military IoT Consumption by Region
4.4.2 China
4.4.3 Japan
4.4.4 South Korea
4.4.5 China Taiwan
4.4.6 Southeast Asia
4.4.7 India
4.4.8 Australia
4.5 Latin America
4.5.1 Latin America Military IoT Consumption by Country
4.5.2 Mexico
4.5.3 Brazil

5 Segment by Type
5.1 Global Military IoT Production Market Share by Type (2017-2022)
5.2 Global Military IoT Revenue Market Share by Type (2017-2022)
5.3 Global Military IoT Price by Type (2017-2022)

6 Segment by Application
6.1 Global Military IoT Production Market Share by Application (2017-2022)
6.2 Global Military IoT Revenue Market Share by Application (2017-2022)
6.3 Global Military IoT Price by Application (2017-2022)

7 Key Companies Profiled
7.1 Company 1
7.1.1 Company 1 Military IoT Corporation Information
7.1.2 Company 1 Military IoT Product Portfolio
7.1.3 Company 1 Military IoT Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)
7.1.4 Company 1 Main Business and Markets Served
7.1.5 Company 1 accurate Developments/Updates

Continued..

8 Military IoT Manufacturing Cost Analysis
8.1 Military IoT Key Raw Materials Analysis
8.1.1 Key Raw Materials
8.1.2 Key Suppliers of Raw Materials
8.2 Proportion of Manufacturing Cost Structure
8.3 Manufacturing Process Analysis of Military IoT
8.4 Military IoT Industrial Chain Analysis

9 Marketing Channel, Distributors and Customers
9.1 Marketing Channel
9.2 Military IoT Distributors List
9.3 Military IoT Customers

10 Market Dynamics
10.1 Military IoT Industry Trends
10.2 Military IoT Market Drivers
10.3 Military IoT Market Challenges
10.4 Military IoT Market Restraints

11 Production and Supply Forecast
11.1 Global Forecasted Production of Military IoT by Region (2023-2028)
11.2 North America Military IoT Production, Revenue Forecast (2023-2028)
11.3 Europe Military IoT Production, Revenue Forecast (2023-2028)
11.4 China Military IoT Production, Revenue Forecast (2023-2028)
11.5 Japan Military IoT Production, Revenue Forecast (2023-2028)
11.6 South Korea Military IoT Production, Revenue Forecast (2023-2028)

12 Consumption and Demand Forecast
12.1 Global Forecasted Demand Analysis of Military IoT
12.2 North America Forecasted Consumption of Military IoT by Country
12.3 Europe Market Forecasted Consumption of Military IoT by Country
12.4 Asia Pacific Market Forecasted Consumption of Military IoT by Region
12.5 Latin America Forecasted Consumption of Military IoT by Country

13 Forecast by Type and by Application (2023-2028)
13.1 Global Production, Revenue and Price Forecast by Type (2023-2028)
13.1.1 Global Forecasted Production of Military IoT by Type (2023-2028)
13.1.2 Global Forecasted Revenue of Military IoT by Type (2023-2028)
13.1.3 Global Forecasted Price of Military IoT by Type (2023-2028)
13.2 Global Forecasted Consumption of Military IoT by Application (2023-2028)
13.2.1 Global Forecasted Production of Military IoT by Application (2023-2028)
13.2.2 Global Forecasted Revenue of Military IoT by Application (2023-2028)
13.2.3 Global Forecasted Price of Military IoT by Application (2023-2028)

14 Research Finding and Conclusion

15 Methodology and Data Source
15.1 Methodology/Research Approach
15.1.1 Research Programs/Design
15.1.2 Market Size Estimation
15.1.3 Market Breakdown and Data Triangulation
15.2 Data Source
15.2.1 Secondary Sources
15.2.2 Primary Sources
15.3 Author List
15.4 Disclaimer

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Thu, 08 Dec 2022 22:33:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.marketwatch.com/press-release/military-iot-market-analysis-research-report-challenges-scopes-market-share-revenue-and-forecasts-2023-to-2028-2022-12-09
Killexams : Information superiority and the race for global AI leadership

The first offset strategy centered around nuclear capabilities, the second on stealth technology. Now, with competing powers once again approaching parity with the U.S. in critical military capabilities, the Department of Defense is pursuing a third offset strategy — one that puts Artificial Intelligence at the forefront of U.S. defense policy.

This new offset strategy aims to Strengthen the U.S.’s information management capabilities through the adoption of cutting-edge technologies, including AI systems. Because in a data-driven military landscape, the strategic advantage lies with entities that can collect, process, and respond to information faster and more accurately than their adversaries.

Speed and accuracy are often trade-offs with AI systems — particularly for complex, multi-faceted enterprises. DoD efforts to assimilate Joint Force networks for greater operational speed and reliability are underway. However, legacy AI technologies lack the computing power to process information effectively across domains and data sources, especially at scale.

So, how can the U.S. advance its AI capabilities and maintain a strategic edge? accurate developments in AI point to multimodal capability as a key differentiator.

Past limitations, future potential

Although there’s debate about whether the U.S. still boasts better AI capabilities than its peers and near-peers, it’s undeniable that competitors are closing the gap. And even if the DoD still holds the upper hand in AI, its advantage is no longer enough to rely on technological superiority as a peace-keeping measure.

The problem isn’t that the DoD lacks the personnel or computing power to outpace other nations. The problem is that U.S. AI networks struggle to convert massive amounts of data into usable insights with enough speed and accuracy to project superiority.

This challenge is difficult to overcome with conventional AI and machine learning systems, which lack the general-purpose capabilities to integrate unlike data types and seamlessly manage information across domains. The objectives of the U.S.’s third offset require the elimination of these barriers in support of more efficient data processing and, subsequently, more informed decision-making on the part of military personnel.

Up to now, the DOD has undertaken efforts to Strengthen information management capabilities through the Joint All-Domain Command and Control network, which addresses long-standing issues from data silos and stovepipe systems. However, a consolidated Joint Force network can only operate as fast and accurately as AI systems allow it to — hence the pursuit of superior AI capabilities.

A model for long-term AI leadership

The emergence of multimodal AI (also known as foundation models) represents a significant breakthrough in AI technology for both the private sector and the military.

While past generations of AI systems relied on task-centric infrastructure — where each use case required its own model and associated training — multimodal AI eliminates those rigidities through in-context learning. This learning structure gives multimodal AI the flexibility to process various data types with a combination of algorithms, accelerating information collection and processing across networks for more sophisticated data analysis and decision-making.

Put simply, this multimodal structure generates relevant insights from multiple data sources much faster — and on a much larger scale — than previously possible.

Multimodal AI as the first line of defense

The DoD’s ability to use AI to gain full situational awareness through a multi-domain defense strategy becomes much more robust with the versatility of multimodal AI. It’s more accurate than conventional models and capable of zero-shot and few-shot learning. For example, a Contrastive Language-Image Pre-Training model can classify images from a given set of language-expressed categories without needing fine-tuning.

The adaptability of multimodal models allows them to cut through the complexity of the data that’s generated and integrated across domain networks to help operators understand all available options and inform the best course of action. If an adversary launches an attack by sea, AI can rapidly determine if the proper response is to fire missiles, launch fighters, or execute a cyberattack.

Additionally, the development of greater AI functionality will feature an iterative process. Wide-ranging applications for multimodal AI promise to enhance human-machine collaboration across all fronts to support more vital mission capabilities — for personnel on the front lines and in the data centers.

It’s important to note, however, that multimodel systems need to have a large amount of processing power, sizeable on-chip memory, and enough attached memory to handle data efficiently. So, an integrated hardware-software systems approach is necessary to create the right balance of computing, memory, and communication for data-intensive dataflow operations. Ideally, these systems should be flexible to handle the inference and incremental training for superior model creation.

Taking outdated AI to task

Consider the value of multimodal for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance data collection in a Joint Force network. Satellite systems generate immense amounts of audio and visual data for ISR. While task-centric AI models struggle to interpret unlike data inputs or recognize meaningful patterns across various data sources, a foundation model functions as an overarching data processing hub. Within this hub, scalability and contextual learning capabilities mean multimodal AI can operate with the same computing productivity as hundreds of task-centric models.

In the case of ISR data, AI systems under a multimodal system can recognize patterns from audio and visual inputs to identify and flag if, for example, satellite video footage of an adversary’s tank movements matches radio frequencies, indicating a mass military mobilization. The AI will quickly and correctly make this connection and provide its operators with the relevant insight they need to craft the best response.

The U.S. has used rising military parity as an impetus to seek superior technological advantages since the Cold War. And in the era of the third offset strategy, where AI capabilities represent the latest proving ground for conventional military deterrence, multimodal AI is the cutting-edge innovation at the center of it all.

Col. Doug Drakeley (Ret.) is an advisory board member and industrial specialist at SambaNova Systems, a supplier of AI platforms and services based in Palo Alto, California.

Tue, 06 Dec 2022 05:28:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.c4isrnet.com/artificial-intelligence/2022/12/06/information-superiority-and-the-race-for-global-ai-leadership/
Killexams : CDS comment on election misrepresented, says Military

…Says security agencies not under pressure

The Military High Command has accused the media of twisting the comment of Chief of Defence Staff, General Lucky Irabor, to convey a “sinister meaning.”

Irabor was at the State House briefing where it was widely reported that the CDS said the military and other security agencies were under pressure to compromise the 2023 general elections.

But the Defence Headquarters in a statement on Friday by the Director, Defence Information, Major General Jimmy Akpor, said Irabor was misrepresented, stressing that neither the military nor other security agencies are under pressure to scuttle the election next year.

The statement partly read, “The attention of the Defence Headquarters has been drawn to several headlines and news purporting to suggest that the Chief of Defence Staff, General Lucky Irabor CFR, had alluded to the military (and other security agencies) being under pressure to compromise the 2023 elections.

“This impression was reportedly made during the 61st Session of the State House Briefing, which featured the Chief of Defence State on 8 December 2022. The Defence Headquarters however, wishes to say categorically that, this impression is not only erroneous, but false and a deliberate or inadvertent attempt to twist what was said, to convey a sinister meaning.

“It is pertinent to mention that the referenced briefing was broadcast live on Nigeria Television Authority – NTA Channel 419 on DSTV and Channel 46 on GOTV. After the briefing by the Chief of Defence Staff, one of the correspondents asked, ‘You have spoken on military neutrality in times of elections. Specifically, based on what the Commander-in-Chief directed. Just this week, the President gave a directive to the Armed Forces to remain neutral during the 2023 elections. But my worry is that, politicians have a way of piling pressure on security forces and we are witnesses to some of the things that occurred in the past exercises. Now, given this kind of scenario, where politicians or political actors try to pile pressure on your men, how far have you prepared to go to ensure that neutrality as directed by the President is protected?’

“In response, the Chief of Defence Staff said, ‘I am glad you reiterated what the Commander-in-Chief said or his directive to the Armed Forces. I am afraid you said you had to worry. Rather than worry, I would think that trust in our cause (is paramount), why? Of course, in our training, there will always be pressure from all quarters, wanting to induce security forces, not just the military, security forces. That is what criminal enterprise is all about, that is what someone that is wrong is all about.

“But, what makes the difference is, the professional approach in dealing with the issues, and that is what the military intents on doing. That is the reason why we have ramped up our training in that regard. Sensitisation, a lot of engagements across formations and units are going on daily. And then, moreso, to articulate the Code of Conduct for all our personnel, which has been done and distributed. So, what, why we should act before, during and after the elections? These have been codified in SOPs (Standing Operating Procedures) issued to them. And so, it remains the duty of commanders to ensure the directive as indicated, that the content of SOPs is adhered to by every personnel of the Armed Forces.

“So, my good friend, please seize from worrying, rather trust and also engage others to trust that we will keep faith with these desires that we have.”

He, however, said the military would do everything necessary to ensure that the 2023 election is free, fair and credible.

“The Defence Headquarters chose to err on the side of verbosity by transcribing the entire response by the Chief of Defence Staff so that everyone can see the quantum misrepresentation of the Chief of Defence Staff’s comments during the briefing. The Armed Forces of Nigeria however, stands ready to aid civil authority in assuring free and fair 2023 elections.

“Already, ongoing military operations all over the country (in collaboration with the Nigeria Police and other security agencies), are creating enabling environment for electioneering campaigns to hold. These military operations would be escalated or re-calibrated when called upon to do so, to support the successful conduct of the 2023 elections.

“The Defence Headquarters therefore, seriously frowns on misrepresentation of the military leadership at any forum at this critical time of our nationhood.”

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 21:10:00 -0600 en-XL text/html https://www.msn.com/en-xl/africa/other/cds-comment-on-election-misrepresented-says-military/ar-AA155Qza
Killexams : Integrated deterrence: a coercive cold war approach

US interagency instruments, coercive strategies likely to cause more harm than good to international peace

The writer is a private professional and writes on geopolitical issues and regional conflicts


In the contemporary past, states involved in serious international crises or wars have used military power and undertaken coercive strategies to punish people to force other governments to do their bidding.

As policy recurrently led to “coercive failures”, they contemplated on effectiveness of military and non-military sanctions as instruments of coercion.

Debate on coercive strategies returned in America during 1990s.

A study at US Department of Defense (DOD) website offered strategic coercion — a military strategy encompassing “art of coercion”, intimidation and deterrence — as a solution to the quandary of shirking the “cyclical” dangers of brute force.

It underlined that strategic coercion might require a fusion of both coercive apparatuses: Denial (compel the target nation to concede to “coercer demands”) and Second Order Change (“impose the threat” of high-order costs).

A subsequent paper would further discussion of how best to exploit the military as a coercive tool and inserted “coercive diplomacy” into an “effective national coercion”.

Yet efforts to change behaviour of a target state or group through threat or limited use of force failed more often than not.

Diplomacy may be anything but non-coercive to reach a solution by peaceful means; US policymakers value it only on coercive footing, using such measures to impose sanctions and military overuse.

Coercive diplomacy is part and parcel of US foreign policy in modern era.

Jake Sullivan and William Burns, now Biden’s National Security Adviser and Director Central Intelligence Agency respectively, in May 2019 called Trump’s strategy “all coercion and no diplomacy”; they stressed on careful synchronisation of both elements of approach.

Of late, the US is practising coercion in guise of deterrence.

Through 2018 National Defense Strategy (NDS), America changed course from terrorism to long-term strategic competition to compete, deter and win, and accused China of “leveraging” military modernisation, influence operations and predatory economics to intimidate neighbours and seek Indo-Pacific hegemony.

Still, Pentagon insisted it wasn’t a strategy of confrontation — something that recognised the reality of competition.

A congressionally mandated commission used two terms interchangeably and found deterrent or “coercive value” of DOD’s unpredictability and creativity as limited.

Clearly, America’s officials understand what coercion or deterrence is and that two concepts are different in nature.

They deliberately muddle them to describe their coercive actions as deterrents to avoid the world looking at them as coercion.

NDS 2022 primary focus is again China and great power competition remains the “defining feature” for America.

New doctrine describes Beijing as Washington’s “most consequential strategic competitor” and DOD’s “pacing challenge” for Chinese economy and defense expansion and modernisation threatens “offsetting” US advantages.

In the new NDS, DOD astutely aims to achieve its objectives through integrated deterrence: a “coordinated, multifaceted” approach, backstopped by a safe, secure and effective nuclear deterrent.

Guam contributes to the “overall integrity” of integrated deterrence and builds a bedrock for US intervention in Indo-Pacific and Taiwan.

Integrated (across conventional, nuclear, cyber, space and informational domains and allies and partners) and deterrence (heart of US defense policy since cold war) is the cornerstone of 2022 NDS.

US Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin called it a new way of approaching deterrence and wanted weapons to play a unique role.

Another major NDS concern is the “scope and pace” of China’s nuclear expansion.

Washington seems not to believe Beijing’s “solemn” commitment to no preemptive nuclear strike but problem is that key Indo-Pacific players don’t see nuclear submarine cooperation (AUKUS) positively, fearing it will trigger an arms race in region.

What blows the whistle for Indo-Pacific is that NDS chooses their region as a cold war theater by accusing Beijing of trying to “refashion” Indo-Pacific and describing China as “the most comprehensive and serious challenge” to US national security.

Indonesia, a leading regional economy, deciphered the veiled nod and refused to be a “pawn” in the new cold war.

NDS reasoning fares poorly after Gen Mark Milley’s recently unfolded America’s ambitions to contain China for its emergence as only country — which because of large population and growth in economy, technology and information — had power and potential to challenge the US globally.

His statement and Pentagon official’s visit to Europe to promote China as a “pacing challenge” may raise concerns in Indo-Pacific about the US intent to play up the China threat for advancing its policy goals.

DOD sees integrated deterrence as a novel vision; it is an outdated grand strategy of coercion that on several instances hasn’t come off.

This overarching focus on great power competition draws resources as well as attention away from climate change, which DOD itself characterises as a national security risk.

A US intelligence estimate predicted climate change will exacerbate risks to America’s national security.

DOD Climate Risk Analysis (DCRA) also committed to “integrate” climate considerations into strategic documents and engagements with allies by working within whole-of-government and in concert with partners.

Both White House and DCRA acknowledged that climate change was “reshaping” the world and “geostrategic environment” and had some major security implications for the US national security.

NDS too frames climate change as a threat to homeland and a transboundary challenge but doesn’t analyse DOD’s own contributions to increasing temperature, changing precipitation patterns, rising sea levels and extreme weather conditions.

The status of US military as single largest consumer of energy in the US and world’s largest institutional consumer of petroleum is a worst-kept secret.

Citing this fact, two Congressmen in January 2021 urged Biden to uphold his climate goals by requiring DOD to commit reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

The US has taken initiatives to fight climate change; experts contest these are too late and it’s hard to align military expansion with climate goals.

The argument makes sense given that the US military over decades inherits an acrimonious legacy of harming environment and exposing their own people to contaminated drinking water and toxins.

Professor Neta Crawford in his latest groundbreaking research delved into human-caused climate change and found that the US economy and military had created a “deep and long-term cycle of economic growth, fossil fuel and dependency”.

She warned America faced more risk from climate change than military conflicts and saw a “lack of urgency and agency” from an institution believing it could do “almost anything”.

Almost every US president has boasted about America’s economic and military superiority.

The desire for world domination comes with a responsibility.

Interagency instruments such as economic sanctions, export controls, and diplomatic measures are neither the purview of DOD nor the right way to secure Americans, expand “economic prosperity” and defend homeland.

Integrated deterrence, the “centerpiece” of NDS, is even more dangerous for international peace considering that threats to US national security spring from climate change rather than potential foes.

Countries, including American allies, may not endorse such a lousy idea that bears resemblance to the US post-world war coercion and instills a new cold war approach.

Tue, 06 Dec 2022 15:38:00 -0600 text/html https://tribune.com.pk/story/2389851/integrated-deterrence-a-coercive-cold-war-approach
Killexams : Power Generator for Military Market Size In 2023 : Top Countries Data, SWOT Analysis, Share, Top Manufactures, Growth Insights and Forecasts to 2028

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Dec 08, 2022 (The Expresswire) -- "Power Generator for Military Market" Insights 2023 By Types, Applications, Regions and Forecast to 2028. The global Power Generator for Military market size is projected to reach multi million by 2028, in comparison to 2023, with unexpected CAGR during the forecast period, the Power Generator for Military Market Report Contains Many Pages Including Full TOC, Tables and Figures, and Chart with In-depth Analysis Pre and Post COVID-19 Market Outbreak Impact Analysis Situation by Region.

We have been following the straight impact of COVID-19 on this market, as well as the indirect impact from other industries. This report analyzes the impact of the pandemic on the Power Generator for Military market from a Global and Regional perspective. The report outlines the market size, market characteristics, and market growth for Power Generator for Military industry, categorized by type, application, and consumer sector. In addition, it provides a comprehensive analysis of aspects involved in market development before and after the Covid-19 pandemic. Report also conducted a PESTEL analysis in the industry to study key influencers and barriers to entry.

Final Report will add the analysis of the impact of COVID-19 on this industry.

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It also provides accurate information and cutting-edge analysis that is necessary to formulate an ideal business plan, and to define the right path for rapid growth for all involved industry players. With this information, stakeholders will be more capable of developing new strategies, which focus on market opportunities that will benefit them, making their business endeavors profitable in the process.

Who is the main manufacturer in the Global?

The major players covered in the Power Generator for Military market report are:

● Harrington Generators International
● Teknel
● GRUPEL
● VYVOJ Martin
● HITZINGER
● Fischer Panda
● Ascot Industrial
● GREEN POWER SYSTEMS
● Kohler
● Kirloskar Oil Engines
● Ausonia
● HIMOINSA
● Cummins

And More…

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What are Industry Insights?

The Global Power Generator for Military market is expected to rise at a significant rate during the forecast period, between 2023 and 2028. In 2023, the market is increasing at a steady rate and with the rising adoption of tactics by key players, the market is expected to rise over the projected horizon.

Market Analysis and Insights: Global Power Generator for Military Market

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the global Power Generator for Military market size is estimated to be worth USD million in 2023 and is forecast to a readjusted size of USD million by 2028 with a CAGR of % during the forecast period 2023-2028. Fully considering the economic change by this health crisis, Powder accounting for % of the Power Generator for Military global market in 2022, is projected to value USD million by 2028, growing at a revised % CAGR from 2023 to 2028. While Food and Oil Industry segment is altered to an % CAGR throughout this forecast period.

North America Power Generator for Military market is estimated at USD million in 2022, while Europe is forecast to reach USD million by 2028. The proportion of the North America is % in 2022, while Europe percentage is %, and it is predicted that Europe share will reach % in 2028, trailing a CAGR of % through the analysis period 2023-2028. As for the Asia, the notable markets are Japan and South Korea, CAGR is % and % respectively for the next 6-year period.

Global Power Generator for Military Market: Drivers and Restrains

The research report has incorporated the analysis of different factors that augment the market’s growth. It constitutes trends, restraints, and drivers that transform the market in either a positive or negative manner. This section also provides the scope of different segments and applications that can potentially influence the market in the future. The detailed information is based on current trends and historic milestones. This section also provides an analysis of the volume of production about the global market and about each type from 2017 to 2028. This section mentions the volume of production by region from 2017 to 2028. Pricing analysis is included in the report according to each type from the year 2017 to 2028, manufacturer from 2017 to 2023, region from 2017 to 2023, and global price from 2017 to 2028.

Global Power Generator for Military Market: Segment Analysis

The research report includes specific segments by region (country), by manufacturers, by Type and by Application. Each type provides information about the production during the forecast period of 2017 to 2028. by Application segment also provides consumption during the forecast period of 2017 to 2028. Understanding the segments helps in identifying the importance of different factors that aid the market growth.

Power Generator for Military Market - Competitive and Segmentation Analysis:

This Power Generator for Military Market report offers detailed analysis supported by reliable statistics on sale and revenue by players for the period 2015-2023. The report also includes company description, major business, Power Generator for Military product introduction, accurate developments and Power Generator for Military sales by region, type, application and by sales channel.

Report further studies the market development status and future Power Generator for Military Market trend across the world. Also, it splits Power Generator for Military market Segmentation by Type and by Applications to fully and deeply research and reveal market profile and prospects.

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On the basis of product typethis report displays the production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type, primarily split into:

● Diesel
● Natural Gas

On the basis of the end users/applicationsthis report focuses on the status and outlook for major applications/end users, consumption (sales), market share and growth rate for each application, including:

● Communication System
● Air Defence System
● Field Hospitals
● Others

Power Generator for Military Market - Regional Analysis:

Geographically, this report is segmented into several key regions, with sales, revenue, market share and growth Rate of Power Generator for Military in these regions, from 2015 to 2027, covering

● North America (United States, Canada and Mexico) ● Europe (Germany, UK, France, Italy, Russia and Turkey etc.) ● Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India, Australia, Indonesia, Thailand, Philippines, Malaysia and Vietnam) ● South America (Brazil, Argentina, Columbia etc.) ● Middle East and Africa (Saudi Arabia, UAE, Egypt, Nigeria and South Africa)

Some of the key questions answered in this report:

● What is the global (North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, South America, Middle East and Africa) sales value, production value, consumption value, import and export of Power Generator for Military? ● Who are the global key manufacturers of the Power Generator for Military Industry? How is their operating situation (capacity, production, sales, price, cost, gross, and revenue)? ● What are the Power Generator for Military market opportunities and threats faced by the vendors in the global Power Generator for Military Industry? ● Which application/end-user or product type may seek incremental growth prospects? What is the market share of each type and application? ● What focused approach and constraints are holding the Power Generator for Military market? ● What are the different sales, marketing, and distribution channels in the global industry? ● What are the upstream raw materials and manufacturing equipment of Power Generator for Military along with the manufacturing process of Power Generator for Military? ● What are the key market trends impacting the growth of the Power Generator for Military market? ● Economic impact on the Power Generator for Military industry and development trend of the Power Generator for Military industry. ● What are the market opportunities, market risk, and market overview of the Power Generator for Military market? ● What are the key drivers, restraints, opportunities, and challenges of the Power Generator for Military market, and how they are expected to impact the market? ● What is the Power Generator for Military market size at the regional and country-level?

Our research analysts will help you to get customized details for your report, which can be modified in terms of a specific region, application or any statistical details. In addition, we are always willing to comply with the study, which triangulated with your own data to make the market research more comprehensive in your perspective.

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Detailed TOC of Global Power Generator for Military Market Research Report 2023

1 Power Generator for Military Market Overview

1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Power Generator for Military
1.2 Power Generator for Military Segment by Type
1.2.1 Global Power Generator for Military Market Size Growth Rate Analysis by Type 2023 VS 2028
1.3 Power Generator for Military Segment by Application
1.3.1 Global Power Generator for Military Consumption Comparison by Application: 2023 VS 2028
1.4 Global Market Growth Prospects
1.4.1 Global Power Generator for Military Revenue Estimates and Forecasts (2015-2028)
1.4.2 Global Power Generator for Military Production Capacity Estimates and Forecasts (2015-2028)
1.4.3 Global Power Generator for Military Production Estimates and Forecasts (2015-2028)
1.5 Global Market Size by Region
1.5.1 Global Power Generator for Military Market Size Estimates and Forecasts by Region: 2015 VS 2022 VS 2028
1.5.2 North America Power Generator for Military Estimates and Forecasts (2015-2028)
1.5.3 Europe Power Generator for Military Estimates and Forecasts (2015-2028)
1.5.4 China Power Generator for Military Estimates and Forecasts (2015-2028)
1.5.5 Japan Power Generator for Military Estimates and Forecasts (2015-2028)

2 Market Competition by Manufacturers
2.1 Global Power Generator for Military Production Capacity Market Share by Manufacturers (2015-2023)
2.2 Global Power Generator for Military Revenue Market Share by Manufacturers (2015-2023)
2.3 Power Generator for Military Market Share by Company Type (Tier 1, Tier 2 and Tier 3)
2.4 Global Power Generator for Military Average Price by Manufacturers (2015-2023)
2.5 Manufacturers Power Generator for Military Production Sites, Area Served, Product Types
2.6 Power Generator for Military Market Competitive Situation and Trends
2.6.1 Power Generator for Military Market Concentration Rate
2.6.2 Global 5 and 10 Largest Power Generator for Military Players Market Share by Revenue
2.6.3 Mergers and Acquisitions, Expansion

3 Production Capacity by Region
3.1 Global Production Capacity of Power Generator for Military Market Share by Region (2015-2023)
3.2 Global Power Generator for Military Revenue Market Share by Region (2015-2023)
3.3 Global Power Generator for Military Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2023)
3.4 North America Power Generator for Military Production
3.4.1 North America Power Generator for Military Production Growth Rate (2015-2023)
3.4.2 North America Power Generator for Military Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2023)
3.5 Europe Power Generator for Military Production
3.5.1 Europe Power Generator for Military Production Growth Rate (2015-2023)
3.5.2 Europe Power Generator for Military Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2023)
3.6 China Power Generator for Military Production
3.6.1 China Power Generator for Military Production Growth Rate (2015-2023)
3.6.2 China Power Generator for Military Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2023)
3.7 Japan Power Generator for Military Production
3.7.1 Japan Power Generator for Military Production Growth Rate (2015-2023)
3.7.2 Japan Power Generator for Military Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2023)

4 Global Power Generator for Military Consumption by Region
4.1 Global Power Generator for Military Consumption by Region
4.1.1 Global Power Generator for Military Consumption by Region
4.1.2 Global Power Generator for Military Consumption Market Share by Region
4.2 North America
4.2.1 North America Power Generator for Military Consumption by Country
4.2.2 United States
4.2.3 Canada
4.3 Europe
4.3.1 Europe Power Generator for Military Consumption by Country
4.3.2 Germany
4.3.3 France
4.3.4 U.K.
4.3.5 Italy
4.3.6 Russia
4.4 Asia Pacific
4.4.1 Asia Pacific Power Generator for Military Consumption by Region
4.4.2 China
4.4.3 Japan
4.4.4 South Korea
4.4.5 China Taiwan
4.4.6 Southeast Asia
4.4.7 India
4.4.8 Australia
4.5 Latin America
4.5.1 Latin America Power Generator for Military Consumption by Country
4.5.2 Mexico
4.5.3 Brazil

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5 Segment by Type
5.1 Global Power Generator for Military Production Market Share by Type (2015-2023)
5.2 Global Power Generator for Military Revenue Market Share by Type (2015-2023)
5.3 Global Power Generator for Military Price by Type (2015-2023)
6 Segment by Application
6.1 Global Power Generator for Military Production Market Share by Application (2015-2023)
6.2 Global Power Generator for Military Revenue Market Share by Application (2015-2023)
6.3 Global Power Generator for Military Price by Application (2015-2023)

7 Key Companies Profiled
7.1 Company
7.1.1 Power Generator for Military Corporation Information
7.1.2 Power Generator for Military Product Portfolio
7.1. CPower Generator for Military Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2023)
7.1.4 Company’s Main Business and Markets Served
7.1.5 Company’s accurate Developments/Updates

8 Power Generator for Military Manufacturing Cost Analysis
8.1 Power Generator for Military Key Raw Materials Analysis
8.1.1 Key Raw Materials
8.1.2 Key Suppliers of Raw Materials
8.2 Proportion of Manufacturing Cost Structure
8.3 Manufacturing Process Analysis of Power Generator for Military
8.4 Power Generator for Military Industrial Chain Analysis

9 Marketing Channel, Distributors and Customers
9.1 Marketing Channel
9.2 Power Generator for Military Distributors List
9.3 Power Generator for Military Customers

10 Market Dynamics
10.1 Power Generator for Military Industry Trends
10.2 Power Generator for Military Market Drivers
10.3 Power Generator for Military Market Challenges
10.4 Power Generator for Military Market Restraints

11 Production and Supply Forecast
11.1 Global Forecasted Production of Power Generator for Military by Region (2023-2028)
11.2 North America Power Generator for Military Production, Revenue Forecast (2023-2028)
11.3 Europe Power Generator for Military Production, Revenue Forecast (2023-2028)
11.4 China Power Generator for Military Production, Revenue Forecast (2023-2028)
11.5 Japan Power Generator for Military Production, Revenue Forecast (2023-2028)

12 Consumption and Demand Forecast
12.1 Global Forecasted Demand Analysis of Power Generator for Military
12.2 North America Forecasted Consumption of Power Generator for Military by Country
12.3 Europe Market Forecasted Consumption of Power Generator for Military by Country
12.4 Asia Pacific Market Forecasted Consumption of Power Generator for Military by Region
12.5 Latin America Forecasted Consumption of Power Generator for Military by Country

13 Forecast by Type and by Application (2023-2028)
13.1 Global Production, Revenue and Price Forecast by Type (2023-2028)
13.1.1 Global Forecasted Production of Power Generator for Military by Type (2023-2028)
13.1.2 Global Forecasted Revenue of Power Generator for Military by Type (2023-2028)
13.1.3 Global Forecasted Price of Power Generator for Military by Type (2023-2028)
13.2 Global Forecasted Consumption of Power Generator for Military by Application (2023-2028)
13.2.1 Global Forecasted Production of Power Generator for Military by Application (2023-2028)
13.2.2 Global Forecasted Revenue of Power Generator for Military by Application (2023-2028)
13.2.3 Global Forecasted Price of Power Generator for Military by Application (2023-2028)

14 Research Finding and Conclusion

15 Methodology and Data Source
15.1 Methodology/Research Approach
15.1.1 Research Programs/Design
15.1.2 Market Size Estimation
15.1.3 Market Breakdown and Data Triangulation
15.2 Data Source
15.2.1 Secondary Sources
15.2.2 Primary Sources
15.3 Author List
15.4 Disclaimer

Continued….

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Wed, 07 Dec 2022 19:59:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.marketwatch.com/press-release/power-generator-for-military-market-size-in-2023-top-countries-data-swot-analysis-share-top-manufactures-growth-insights-and-forecasts-to-2028-2022-12-08
Killexams : Visakhapatnam airport gets precision approach radar VISAKHAPATNAM: A Precision Approach Radar (PAR) was inaugurated at INS Dega, the Indian Navy’s airstrip in Visakhapatnam International Airport by Eastern Naval Command Chief of Staff Vice Admiral Sanjay Vatsayan on Wednesday.
The new radar facility would substantially enhance the capabilities of the Visakhapatnam Airport to recover civil and military aircraft in distress and emergency for a safe landing, particularly in inclement weather conditions.
The Precision Approach Radar is a medium power X - band radar used to guide aircraft from 25km to touchdown in adverse weather conditions. The radar provides ground interpreted approach through positional information of the aircraft to the GCA. It has an azimuth and elevation antenna for lateral and vertical guidance, respectively.
Wed, 07 Dec 2022 03:16:00 -0600 en text/html https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/visakhapatnam/visakhapatnam-airport-gets-precision-approach-radar/articleshow/96064867.cms
Killexams : 2023: Military Will Resist Pressure to Compromise Its Neutrality, Says Irabor

*Denies reports of soldiers conducting illegal abortions in north east

*Alleges external plot to destabilise nation
*Warns military saboteurs on possibility of facing firing squad
*Remain professional, Atiku/Okowa campaign pleads

Deji Elumoye and Chuks Okocha in Abuja

The Nigerian military, yesterday, previewed the 2023 general election scheduled for the first quarter of next year and reiterated its pledge never to succumb to pressure, both internal and external, to compromise the elections.


Denying some news reports doing the rounds that soldiers were conducting illegal abortions in north east, where they were prosecuting war against the Boko Haram sect, Irabor, who alleged external plot to destabilise nation, however, warned military saboteurs that there would be consequences for their actions, including the possibility of facing firing squad.


This is as the Atiku/Okowa presidential campaigns, has called on the military to shun lobbyists from the political class to compromise the 2023 elections, while at the same time, urged politicians involved in such acts to go out and campaign to the people.
The Chief of Defence Staff (CDS), General Lucky Irabor, who disclosed this while fielding questions from journalists at the State House, Abuja, further pledged to jealously guard its neutrality during the national assignments.


The CDS, who enjoined the citizenry to have trust in the security officers and men as they remained totally committed to their neutrality, said under no condition would the Nigerian Armed provide in to pressure to compromise the exercise.


Stressing that there would always be pressure, he, however, noted that necessary measures were being put in place to ensure that the military obeyed President Muhammadu Buhari’s directive to be apolitical during next year’s elections.
According to him, personnel were being trained to be more professional while Standard Operations Practice (SOP) before, during and after the elections have been codified and distributed to their men.


Explaining how prepared the military was to resisting pressure to compromise the elections, Irabor said, “I’m glad that you reiterated the commander-in-chief‘s directive to the armed forces. I’m afraid you say you have a worry. Rather than worry, I would rather think that trust should be anchored. Why?
“Of course, there will always be pressure from all quarters, wanting to induce security forces, not just the military – the security force and the police. And that’s what criminal enterprise is all about. That is what something that is wrong is all about. But what makes the difference is the professional approach to dealing with those issues. And that’s what we the military are committed to doing.


“Now, the reason why we have ramped up our training in that regard, sensitisation, a lot of engagement across, you know, the formations and units, is being undertaken. And then, more so to now articulate code of conduct for all our personnel, which has been done and distributed.


“So what, why, how should they act before, during and after the elections. These have been codified in the SOP that have been issued to them. So, it remains the duty of the commanders to ensure that the directive, as indicated, and the contents of the SOP is adhered to by every personnel in the armed forces. So, please, cease from worrying. Rather, trust and also engage others to trust that, we will keep faith to these desires.”
Responding to allegations that the military was engaged in clandestine programme of enforcing abortion for women in the North East since 2013, Irabor said, there was nothing like that.


He confirmed that he was actually requested to respond to the allegation by a foreign news medium but decided to ignore them, because there was no such programme in the military.
According to him, he carried the media along while he was in charge of the war theatre in the north east between 2016 and 2017, by taking them round the hospitals, where wounded solders were being treated, for them to have first hand information on the reality of the terror war.
He said there was no way the Nigerian Army would be involved in such programme, adding that, “We are not unaware of some extra-territorial interests, who do not want us to live in peace.


“I didn’t think I needed to dignify that report. That’s why I did not mention it. Why? I was informed by my officer, the director of Defence Information that he received a mail from Reuters, requesting to have an interview with me. And he gave me a letter written by one Alexandra Xavis, making  spurious allegations, many of which have now been published by the same Reuters.


“And when I went through, I asked myself, how could a man be so laden with evil, to contemplate the content of which he wants me to respond? I said, he should go back to the person and if he wants to, that he already knows the military, if he wants to answer he should go ahead.
“But I’m not going to dignify such, because you’re saying the military since 2013, has been engaged in a planned abortion programme. And that, it’s the military that is running that programme. And then, in that letter, he also indicated that it was, perhaps, part of government’s design.


“And in that letter, he indicated 12,000 abortions had been carried out. And then went on and on to say their sources, their sources. And I say which source and, of course, there are people, who have worked in the northeast. So, I think, I mean, the problems that we’re contending with, and I shouldn’t waste my energy for such things.


“Again, it falls within the realm of ‘My mind is made up, don’t confuse me with the facts.’So, since that is the position of Reuters, I didn’t think it was necessary for me to, you know, call them up, and then, to engage in, because that’s is outright nonsense.
“Now, on the report, my name was mentioned that at some stage, I was in charge of the operation. Yes, of course, I was. In 2013, I was not in charge, I took leadership of the operation in northeast in 2016. That I did till the later part  of 2017, that is close to two years. And so, let me even confine myself to the time of my leadership of the north-east itself. The allusions they made is news to me.


“It never occurred, I never saw anything like that both from the division of center from Giwa projects down to Malari cantonment, where I lived, where we have seven division hospital that was a major hospital for the treatment of our personnel and their families. And especially, the wounded?  
“That again, we had unfettered access by all the members of the media, I recall the engagement I had with the media all through and I take them there, to all the wards except, of course, the mortuary we were trying to build at a time. The whole essence of having to have that kind of engagement was to say, look, this war is real.


“The deaths, and the wounds inflicted on our troops are real. Please, go and see, because we need you to work with us to be able to make… and I’m glad that it paid off. And that is why today, in the north east, sanity, not only has it returned, we have continued to play our path.
“Now, of course, we’re not unaware that  there are extra-territorial elements, who really do not want to have us live in peace. Who really do not want us to move forward. I am also aware that, of course, the war economy has affected a good number of people. So, now that we’re making progress, they think we need to return to that status quo ante.”


On activities of some members of the Army, who were sabotaging their efforts, Irabor admitted that there would always be bad eggs in every human organisation.
Thus, while noting that some of the soldiers caught in such unwholesome practices had been arrested and disciplined for various offences, including divulging codified information to the adversaries and stealing of ammunitions, the defence chief said some of the saboteurs were yet to be executed, because the magnitude of their offences were considered minor.


He however, warned that the military would not hesitate to apply the rules of capital punishment of death by firing squad if the saboteurs continued in their evil ways, adding that the military had improved on the process of recruitment into the army in order to prevent the engagement of criminals and renegades into the service.


The CDS also seized the opportunity to deny reports that soldiers were targeting some people in parts of the country, particularly, the southeast, for rougher treatment, saying it was possible, because the military was composed of people from all parts of the federation.
His words: “The Armed Forces are peopled by people from 774 local government of this country. And there is no single unit or formation where you have only a group of soldiers coming from a particular part of the country.


“So, what will be the interest? Sometimes, the consciousness of the people is what has been transmitted to their consciousness. Perhaps, it might be necessary to interrogate them and see how we can reconscientise our people to know that. We are in this together.
“What do I stand to gain? Yes, I’m the CDS. I know the officers and men that I lead, I know what we have transmitted into them by the way of training, I know the fundamentals, our ethics. So, it’s what you don’t know that makes illusions.


“And I think I will also join to appeal to you, to reconscientise our people for them to know the apparatus of the state in terms of looking at the issue of security are for the good of the people and not against the people. We are not against the people. So, there’s no way the military will go and shoot people. It’s not possible. We won’t do that and it was not done during ENDSARS.”


Irabor spoke of the key achievements of the military in the effort to keep the country safe, including more recruitment into all branches of the security services, routing of insurgency and banditry as well as the action to curtail oil theft leading to increase in crude oil production.
He also said over 300,000 people had been freed from the hands of abductors since 2014,while refugees who fled the north east due to insurgency had started to return to their homes.


The defence boss added that former insurgents now being de-radicalised would graduate in February next year before their reintegration into the society.
On the fight against banditry, he said the armed forces had strangulated the bandits’ supply chain and destroyed several hideouts, adding that, the military efforts had averted several communal clashes and restored socio-economic activities in troubled areas, while several criminal elements were arrested including drug dealers, weapon suppliers, kidnappers, cultists and religious extremist.


On crude oil theft, he noted Nigeria’s  colossal loses of oil revenue as at 2014 that was about N1.92 Trillion, was because piracy and kidnapping were unprecedented, just as several illegal pipeline connections were used to steal crude oil and illegal entry of unauthorized vessels undetected.
He stressed that between January and July 2022, Nigeria lost about 437, 000 barrels of oil per day to criminal entities, but that, as part of the solution, Falcon Eye Maritime intelligence facility was commissioned in July 2021, offshore Patrol Vessels were purchased, and  operational deployments and capabilities were rejigged.


“The President directed the CDS to coordinate the kinetic and non-kinetic interventions to curb oil thefts. Through several joint operations, security operatives destroyed 959 metal tanks, 737 ovens, 452 dug-out pits, 355 cooking pots, 179 wooden boats, recovered 35.8 million litres of crude, 22 million litres of diesel, 25,000 litres of PMS, 207 pumping machine and 12 welding machines,” the CDS explained.


Meanwhile, the Atiku/Okowa campaigns, reacting to Irabor’s comments, said, the military should operate within the rules and ensure a credible election.
According to one of the spokesmen of the campaign, Kola Ologbodiyan, “Our campaign urged the military hierarchy to ensure that the rank and file operate within the confines of the rules of carrying out the responsibility of internal security.
“What is important is for the military to certain a credible poll to our nation. They have the duty of protecting the territorial integrity of our nation and a duty of conformity with the laws.


“The politicians, who are putting pressure on the military should go and engage the people, who will vote; they should go and sell their promises if they will be bought by them, they should stop mounting pressure on the military, they should face the electorate, who should govern them.
“If you look at the political climate of our nation today, you will agree with me that the presidential candidate of our party, Atiku Abubakar, who is campaigning and also talking to Nigerians are marketing policies, promises that he plans into his government, when he is sworn in as president on May 29, as such, we counsel other politicians to stop mounting pressure on the military,” Ologbodiyan stated.

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 15:12:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.thisdaylive.com/index.php/2022/12/09/2023-military-will-resist-pressure-to-compromise-its-neutrality-says-irabor/
Killexams : Biden’s private approach with Bibi may not cut it

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With help from Connor O’Brien and Nahal Toosi

The likely return of BENJAMIN NETANYAHU to power in Israel will test President JOE BIDEN’s personalist approach to foreign policy.

Biden believes the best way to resolve bilateral issues is to level with his counterpart through copious private discussions. That play worked to shorten a war between a Netanyahu-led Israel and Palestinian militants in the Gaza Strip last year, as Biden placed increased pressure on Bibi to end the violence. Biden also chose not to wade deeply into the comatose Israeli-Palestinian peace process because it’s a time suck with little chance of success.

The situation is vastly different this time around. Netanyahu is returning to the premiership with far-right coalition partners — namely ITAMAR BEN GVIR and BEZALEL SMOTRICH — who critics fear want to control more of the West Bank and favor Israelis over Palestinians in general.

What’s not changing is U.S. policy toward Israel and the Middle East, per a Sunday speech by Secretary of State ANTONY BLINKEN to the left-leaning pro-Israel J Street advocacy group. Blinken said the administration believes in a two-state solution based on 1967 lines and a return to the Iran nuclear deal, among other things, all likely to roil Netanyahu and his leadership team.

Pursuing those goals was hard enough the last time Biden and Netanyahu were colleagues. It’ll be harder this time around as Bibi must keep his ultranationalist flank happy to remain in control and possibly avoid prison. That will push Biden’s personal diplomacy abilities to the max.

“The privately-expressing-discontent approach is not really going to work with this new Israeli government because they’re so in your face. They’re going to be very bold and they’re going to deliberately test the administration in how far it’s willing to go,” said KHALED ELGINDY, a senior fellow at the Middle East Institute.

“If the new government crosses the Biden administration’s red lines, they’ll need to take meaningful action — or else risk letting an already incendiary situation grow far, far worse,” J Street President JEREMY BEN-AMI added on. Blinken, after all, made no threats to reprimand Israel, such as cutting military aid, for trampling on Palestinian rights.

The president’s aides stress that Blinken simply laid out policies that will help move the U.S.-Israeli relationship forward and that Washington will be able to work with whoever is in charge in Jerusalem. Any disagreements will be handled as friends do.

“The ability to speak frankly and to hear different perspectives on issues, that's what marks the strength of a strong relationship,” National Security Council spokesperson JOHN KIRBY told NatSec Daily during a Monday news briefing.

Elgindy and others aren’t confident Biden or his aides will speak forcefully on the peace process. For one, the president didn’t use the word “occupation” once during his trip to Israel and the West Bank this year, and the secretary didn’t include it in his speech. That word, used to describe the presence of Israeli authorities in Palestinian territories, was pretty standard language during previous most modern Republican and Democratic administrations.

Chances are, then, that any friction will likely stay behind closed doors, said GUY ZIV, a professor at American University. “Neither leader is looking for a public fight.”

The Inbox

U.S. MODIFIED UKRAINE ROCKETS: The U.S. military secretly altered HIMARS rocket launchers sent to Ukraine to prevent the country from firing long-range into Russian territory, The Wall Street Journal’s MICHAEL GORDON and GORDON LUBOLD report.

Since June, the Pentagon has given Kyiv 20 HIMARS and many satellite-guided rockets, which were equipped with software modified to prevent them from being used to strike Russia. The alteration underscores the Biden administration’s efforts to balance its support for Ukraine and its risks of escalation as the war continues.

The Biden administration’s “perception is that high-end U.S. weapons being used against targets on Russian territory would be an unacceptable risk and might be potentially crossing some kind of Russian red line,” DMITRY GORENBURG, a senior research scientist at CNA, told NatSec Daily. “This is an unusual situation to start with, because usually when the U.S. provides weapons to allies, it's not in the context of an ongoing conflict with a major nuclear adversary.”

REPLENISHING THE STOCKPILE: Efforts are finally ramping up to replace the weapons that the United States and its allies have shipped to Ukraine, according to top Pentagon and industry officials, our own BRYAN BENDER and LARA SELIGMAN reported Sunday.

“There’s a lot of urgency,” Army Secretary CHRISTINE WORMUTH told reporters at the Reagan National Defense Forum. “Congress is sending billions of dollars to the Department of Defense, and we are turning that around and getting that on contract — I would say two to three times faster than we normally do.”

She said that Ukrainians are using up tens of thousands of 155mm artillery rounds provided by the U.S. and other partners almost as soon as they arrive. By the spring, “we will be able to do 20,000 rounds a month,” she said, adding that the U.S. will get that rate up to 40,000 rounds a month in the spring of 2025.

Restarting plants that make artillery, rockets, missiles and air defenses that were tailored for peacetime efficiency — rather than war-time production — is proving a massive task. Globally, arms sales increased by nearly 2 percent in 2021, international arms sales watchdog SIPRI announced Monday, citing the war in Ukraine as one of the driving factors.

MISSILES BOMBARD UKRAINE: Moscow targeted multiple Ukrainian cities with missiles, including Kyiv, on Monday as Russia attempts to weaken the country’s energy supplies and infrastructure, the Associated Press’ JAMEY KEATEN reports.

Explosions were reported in several parts of the country, including the cities of Odesa, Cherkasy and Kryvyi Rih. In Odesa, a missile caused power to be cut from pumping stations at a local water supply company, leaving the whole city without water.

Earlier in the day, Russian media reported that a drone strike and a fuel tanker explosion occurred at two air bases in its territory, including one that houses nuclear-capable strategic bombers that have been used in strikes against Ukraine. Three people were killed in the fuel tanker explosion.

IT’S MONDAY: Thanks for tuning in to NatSec Daily. This space is reserved for the top U.S. and foreign officials, the lawmakers, the lobbyists, the experts and the people like you who care about how the natsec sausage gets made. Aim your tips and comments at [email protected] and [email protected], and follow us on Twitter at @alexbward and @mattberg33.

While you’re at it, follow the rest of POLITICO’s national security team: @nahaltoosi, @woodruffbets, @politicoryan, @PhelimKine, @BryanDBender, @laraseligman, @connorobrienNH, @paulmcleary, @leehudson, @AndrewDesiderio, @magmill95, @ericgeller, @johnnysaks130, @ErinBanco and @Lawrence_Ukenye.

Flashpoints

TURM-OIL OVER PRICE CAP: Russia will prohibit the sale of its oil below the $60 cap enacted by the European Union, indicating Moscow’s intent to defy the new sanctions that began today, our own AMERICA HERNANDEZ reported Sunday.

Russian Deputy Prime Minister ALEXANDER NOVAK told state media Sunday that the Kremlin is willing to dial down its oil production to compensate for lost exports and only sell to countries that do not abide by the price cap.

Novak’s comments came as OPEC+ announced it would lock its current oil production levels, which would allow the group of producers to assess the market impact caused by the price cap on Russian oil, The Wall Street Journal’s MATTHEW LUXMOORE reports. The move is intended to deplete Moscow’s revenue heading into the winter.

Keystrokes

$20 MILLION STOLEN: Hackers with links to the Chinese government stole $20 million in Covid-relief benefits from the United States, NBC News’ SARAH FITZPATRICK and KIT RAMGOPAL report.

The theft of money by APT41, a the Chengdu-based hacking group, “is the first instance of pandemic fraud tied to foreign, state-sponsored cybercriminals that the U.S. government has acknowledged publicly,” they wrote.

“It would be crazy to think this group didn’t target all 50 states,” ROY DOTSON, national pandemic fraud recovery coordinator for the Secret Service, told NBC News.

It’s unclear if the Chinese government directed the theft of the funds or just didn’t crack down on the behavior. Still, APT41’s actions indicate a new era in cybersecurity, where even federal monies aren’t safe.

Read: ”NATO prepares for cyber war” — a dispatch from Estonia by our own MAGGIE MILLER

The Complex

GENERALS TRIED TO CASH IN: Two U.S. Air Force generals levied connections made with Azerbaijan during the height of the Afghanistan war to attempt to cash in on consulting contracts upon retirement, The Washington Post’s CRAIG WHITLOCK and NATE JONES report.

During the war, the Pentagon persuaded Azerbaijani President ILHAM ALIYEV to open his country’s border and airspace to U.S. and NATO supply routes in exchange for a closer diplomatic relationship and $369 million in defense contracts to Silk Way Airlines, an Azerbaijan cargo carrier controlled by the government.

Four-star generals DUNCAN McNABB and WILLIAM FRASER III oversaw those supply routes and negotiated consulting deals with Silk Way Airlines, with one of the men potentially making up to $5,000 a day, according to documents obtained under the Freedom of Information Act. Between 2016 and 2021, the newspaper submitted requests that should’ve turned up the documents, but Air Force officials repeatedly said they couldn’t find them or did not reply.

In the vast majority of cases, the Pentagon and State Department approve requests made by former military personnel to work for foreign powers. But the requests made by McNabb and Fraser were flagged as a threat to national security and a potential embarrassment, ultimately blocking them, according to the documents.

COUNTERFEIT PARTS: After a series of F-35 fighter jets deliveries were suspended because a Chinese alloy was discovered in the aircraft, military officials are prioritizing reinforcing supply chains as the U.S. prepares for long-term competition with Beijing, Defense News' STEPHEN LOSEY and JOE GOULD report.

Steps have included developing new tests, reporting when concerning components are discovered and encouraging the military and defense firms to communicate about counterfeit parts they find.

“The good news is there are tools coming out using artificial intelligence and open source, that we can dive in and maybe find some of these things,” said BILL LaPLANTE, undersecretary of defense for acquisition and sustainment. “But I think it’s going to be a constant issue for us … understanding our supply chain.”

On the Hill

FIRST IN NATSEC DAILY –– UNFUNDED AND UNHAPPY: The Pentagon’s $24 billion budget request for “unfunded priorities” has rankled Sen. ELIZABETH WARREN (D-Mass.), a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee.

“This latest wish list the Department provided to Congress appears to be an end-of-year money grab, designed to short circuit the administration’s budget and the congressional appropriations process,” Warren wrote to Defense Secretary LLOYD AUSTIN Monday in a letter seen first by NatSec Daily.

The lawmaker is particularly upset since Austin in April said during congressional testimony that DoD’s $773 billion request was “a robust budget” that “allows us to get the capabilities that we need.”

In the letter, Warren asks Austin to “significantly curtail the use and size of these lists in next year’s budget submission.”

IRAN DRONES BILL OUT OF NDAA: A bill aimed at stopping Iran or Tehran-linked militias from engaging in purchases of lethal unmanned aerial vehicles won’t make it into this year’s version of the National Defense Authorization Act, a senior Republican congressional aide told NatSec Daily.

The Stop Iranian Drones Act didn’t make it after talks late last week between congressional negotiators. The aide said a major sticking point was an amendment in the bill from Sen. TED CRUZ (R-Texas) that places any Iranian group — including the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps — on the Foreign Terrorist Organizations list for 10 years for using a drone to kill an American citizen.

The House Ways and Means Committee had balked on accepting the Cruz amendment as the Senate prepared its defense bill in October because of a “blue slip” issue about revenue. Bills that affect federal revenue must start in the House under the Constitution, and the lower chamber lodges the blue slip objection when the Senate runs afoul of that provision. Ultimately the Senate abandoned a push to pass its own defense bill and went directly to negotiations with the House on the NDAA.

Related: Sen. ROGER WICKER (R-Miss.) said this weekend at the Reagan National Defense Forum that a version of a semiconductor bill by Sens. CHUCK SCHUMER (D-N.Y.) and JOHN CORNYN (R-Texas) will make it in the NDAA.

NO REPEAL: Biden and his Pentagon chief oppose any effort to repeal the vaccine mandate for troops, the White House said Monday, setting up a fight with lawmakers who want to roll back the policy as part of the upcoming defense policy bill, Lara reports.

“The president agrees with Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin that the Pentagon should continue to require all service members be vaccinated and boosted against Covid-19,” NSC spokesperson Kirby said at a briefing Monday in response to a question from NatSec Daily. "He continues to believe that all Americans, including those in the armed forces, should be vaccinated and boosted for Covid-19.”

Kirby’s comments come as members of Congress consider repealing the controversial policy as part of the defense policy bill, which is set to be unveiled this week. Another possibility is that lawmakers keep the requirement to get the shot but undo the Pentagon’s policy of kicking out service members who refuse the vaccine.

Rep. ADAM SMITH (D-Wash.), the House Armed Services Committee chair, said a rollback of the policy is on the table for a compromise version of the NDAA, but hasn’t been decided yet.

“I was a very strong supporter of the vaccine mandate when we did it, a very strong supporter of the Covid restrictions put in place by DoD and others,” he told Bryan andCONNOR O’BRIEN Saturday during the Reagan Forum. “But at this point in time, does it make sense to have that policy from August 2021? That is a discussion that I am open to and that we’re having.”

Broadsides

NO GUARANTEES: Ukraine is unhappy with French President EMMANUEL MACRON for suggesting Russia must be given security guarantees in exchange for peace talks for an end to the war.

“One of the essential points we must address — as President Putin has always said — is the fear that NATO comes right up to its doors, and the deployment of weapons that could threaten Russia,” Macron said during a televised interview Saturday.

Those comments led OLEKSIY DANILOV, secretary of the Ukrainian National Security and Defense Council, to blast the French leader. There can’t be diplomacy as usual since there’s “Ukrainian blood on Putin’s hands,” he tweeted.

Danilov said he believes that a “denuclearized and demilitarized” Russia is “the best certain of peace for Europe and the world.”

Transitions

— ROOSEVELT HOLMES is joining the White House as senior adviser for stakeholder engagement to the national cyber director. He most recently was deputy director for the Commerce Department’s Office of Business Liaison.

What to Read

— OLAF SCHOLZ, Foreign Affairs: The Global Zeitenwende

— JEFFREY SONNENFELD and STEVEN TIAN, Fortune: Biden crowned world energy czar as diplomacy triumphs over Putin’s tantrums

— ROULA KHALAF, CHRISTOPHER MILLER and BEN HALL: FT Person of the Year: VOLODYMYR ZELENSKYY. ‘I am more responsible than brave’

Tomorrow Today

— The Brookings Institution, 8:30 a.m.: "The arc of insecurity in the Horn of Africa and new breakthroughs"

— International Anti-Corruption Conference, 9 a.m.:Uprooting Corruption, Defending Democratic Values” featuring SecState Blinken and national security adviser JAKE SULLIVAN

— The Wilson Center, 9:00 a.m.:"Arms Control and Regional Security Oral History Project"

— The International Institute for Strategic Studies, 10 a.m.: "ASEAN's role in the Indo-Pacific: Rethinking consensus and hedging"

— House Foreign Affairs Committee, 10 a.m.:“Confronting Yemen's Humanitarian and Political Crises Without a Ceasefire”

— The United States Institute of Peace, 10 a.m.:"Filling the Security Gap: International Approaches to Policing in Conflict"

— The Atlantic Council, 11 a.m.:"2022 Central Europe Week: Partners and allies in a time of war"

— The Hudson Institute, 12:30 p.m.: "Australia’s Role in the China Struggle: A Conversation with SCOTT MORRISON"

— The Atlantic Council, 2 p.m.:"Securing space: Preparing for future space contingencies"

Have a natsec-centric event coming up? Transitioning to a new defense-adjacent or foreign policy-focused gig? Shoot me an email at [email protected] to be featured in the next edition of the newsletter.

Thanks to our editor, Heidi Vogt, who has no problem telling us off in public.

And we thank our producer, Jeffrey Horst, about whom people only say nice things.

Mon, 05 Dec 2022 06:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.politico.com/newsletters/national-security-daily/2022/12/05/bidens-private-approach-with-bibi-may-not-cut-it-00072168
Killexams : Editorial: Why we choose to publish stories about misconduct in Ukrainian military

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© Kyiv Independent

Editor’s note: Editorials are articles that present the opinion of the editorial team of the Kyiv Independent.

On Nov. 30, we ran a story that was, in a way, unique.

It was an investigative piece focusing on alleged misconduct in the International Legion, a special military unit created for foreigners who volunteer to fight for Ukraine. You can read it here.

It was the follow-up to an investigation into the Legion we ran in August. This time, there were new allegations: apart from endemic abuse, they included the misappropriation of weapons.

Publishing the first story made us one of the only media outlets in Ukraine to run a critical story about the Ukrainian military during Russia’s full-scale invasion. But after publishing this follow-up story we became, to the best of our knowledge, the first Ukrainian media outlet to write about Western arms allegedly going missing in Ukraine.

Stories like this don’t appear in the Ukrainian press for a reason.

There is a popular view that Ukrainian media shouldn’t write about contentious syllabus like corruption or misconduct in the army during the war, as it can undermine the West’s trust in Ukraine, or Ukrainians’ trust in their army and government. Proponents of this approach advocate for self-censorship and postponement of all criticism until “after the war.”

We want to explain to our readers why we’re taking a different approach.

We believe that war is not a reason or an excuse to compromise on one’s principles and values. If anything, a time of great sacrifice and hardship is the time to prove the strength of one’s core beliefs.

Journalists serve the public interest. The public deserves to know the uncensored truth and people have the right to draw their own conclusions.

It is our responsibility to provide information that is, to the best of our knowledge, truthful. It is also our responsibility to provide context, and to make sure that people know the nuances so that they can make informed judgments.

The Kyiv Independent runs – true to its name – on the principle of editorial independence. This means that every decision about the content we publish is made inside the newsroom of the Kyiv Independent, based on our values and journalistic expertise, without any external influence.

These decisions are made by the people whose names and faces are on the Team section of our website, and by no one else. Our readers know who is responsible for every word the Kyiv Independent publishes, and we firmly believe that this is how good journalism is done.

When we learned of the serious allegations against the commanders of the International Legion, we decided that pursuing an investigation to uncover the truth of these accusations would serve the public interest.

We believe that shedding light on the alleged theft in the military doesn’t hurt Ukraine, stealing does. We also believe that exposing misconduct in the military or government helps Ukraine, not hurts it.

We also don’t think that Ukrainian journalists should sweep important stories under the rug to make sure Ukraine looks great in the eyes of the world. That’s not what good journalists do or should be doing. We work to be the honest voice of Ukraine, not to sugar-coat Ukraine’s reality.

We also believe that airing these allegations gives Ukraine the chance for positive change. If officials address the issues we raised in the story, reform the Legion and oust bad actors, it will become stronger and more effective. It can lead to better conditions for the people serving in the Legion, and even save their lives.

While there was no public reaction from Ukrainian officials to the first story we ran, our reporting for the second one prompted at least one state agency to start an internal investigation into the allegations.

We also had a special duty to our readers. In the early days of the invasion, we ran a story about the launch of the Legion, adding instructions on how to apply to serve in it. This story was read by more than 120,000 people. We helped popularize the Legion and get people to join it. We had a responsibility to tell the public if things went awry.

Importantly, we knew that before talking to journalists, the soldiers who accused their commanders of abuse had first filed written complaints to the higher command and government offices. It is only after what they perceived as inaction on behalf of the authorities that they decided to make the accusations public.

We also want our audience to know that we approached this story very responsibly. Instead of just publishing the allegations that were brought to us, we spent months cross-checking the testimonies and verifying our findings. When we finally published the story, only the most solid allegations made the cut – the ones that were backed up by at least two independent sources and were supported by other indirect evidence.

We were careful to leave out the details that weren’t essential to the story and could potentially be used by Russian forces to gather intelligence about the Legion, such as the exact locations where weapons were allegedly going missing, or names of the commanders who aren’t public figures.

At the end of the day, publishing this story was also a test of our editorial independence and devotion to the public interest. We believe that we passed it with dignity.

But there is another reason to publish stories like these.

In this war, Ukraine is fighting for its future. It is fighting for the right to live by the values of the free world – values antithetical to those ruling today’s Russia.

Freedom of speech is one of these values. And when so many Ukrainians are dying to defend it, we would be ashamed of ourselves if we weren’t exercising this right.

This story originally appeared in The Kyiv Independent

Wed, 07 Dec 2022 09:49:19 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/editorial-why-we-choose-to-publish-stories-about-misconduct-in-ukrainian-military/ar-AA1522zS
Killexams : Monday, December 5. Russia’s War On Ukraine: Daily News And Information From Ukraine

Dispatches from Ukraine. Day 285.

As Russia’s attack on Ukraine continues and the war rages on, reliable sources of information are critical. Forbes gathers information and provides updates on the situation.

By Daria Dzysiuk.

Russia launched a massive attack on Ukrainian cities, including capital Kyiv. Ukraine’s air force said it shot down more than 60 of about 70 missiles that Russia fired on in its latest barrage against multiple regions in Ukraine. The attacks follow explosions on two military bases in Russia, ‘Engels-2’ and ‘Dyagilevo’ airbases.

More than 9,400 Ukrainian civilians have been killed during the Russian invasion and at least 6800 injured, according to the National Police of Ukraine. Furthermore, 461 children are reported to have lost their lives. The casualty toll is growing every day amid Russia’s continues attacks on Ukrainian infrastructure. ‘Since Russians left Kherson, the city is under severe daily attack. National Police Investigation Units have documented about 600 war crimes in the liberated areas of the Kherson region, and 3400 war crimes in Kharkiv area,’ said Evheniy Enin, the First Deputy of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Serhii Zhadan, a contemporary Ukrainian writer and musical artist from Kharkiv, is ranked second in the German influential newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung’s annual cultural figures rating (after Iranian women who protest despite arrests and death sentences). “Prior to February 24, Zhadan definitely was the most famous Ukrainian writer of his generation, but since then he became the face of the whole Ukraine which is now standing against Russian aggression. While reporting Russia war crimes and crimes against humanity he speaks to both the world and his own people,” the publication says about Zhadan.

Carol of the Bells or Ukrainian “Shchedryk,” an iconic Christmas song composed by Mykola Leontovych, returned to Carnegie Hall, New York, after 100 years. Hosted by celebrity actors Vera Farmiga and Martin Scorsese, the concert was organized by the Ukrainian Institute, together with Ukraine’s Embassy in the US, Razom for Ukraine, and it was completely sold out. Among other music peaces featured at the concert, Carol of the Bells was performed by the Kyiv children’s choir, the New York based chorus Dumka, and The Choir of Trinity Wall Street, in both Ukrainian and English languages. 100 years ago the iconic carol was played for the first time to help Ukraine during Russian invasion. Leontovych was killed in his parents home in Ukraine by the Soviet secret police shortly after finishing the piece in 1921.

Relatives of Mariupol defenders have arranged a car race through Lviv city streets to show support for Ukrainian prisoners of war on December 3rd, The Azovstal Families Association reported. The aim is to bring the attention of world leaders and international organizations to the urgent necessity to force Russia to follow international humanitarian law and stop murdering and torturing Ukrainian POWs. The defenders of Mariupol have been in Russian captivity for 201 days now.

Ukraine celebrates International Volunteers Day. Ukrainians express special gratitude to individual volunteers and volunteer organizations for the tremendous work they bring to the table. In a daily appeal to the Ukrainian nation, Volodymyr Zelenskyy said: “This year, the whole world saw the incredible power of volunteers, their huge contribution to the approach of our victory. How they can raise funds for drones, ambulance vehicles, optics, thermal imagers in a matter of hours. How to get everything. Buy everything. Bring everything. And then get, buy and bring again, because that wasn't everything. Ukraine appreciates the efforts of each of you. Thank you for your kind hearts and tireless work!”

Sunday, December 4. Day 284

Russian forces have used prohibited chemical weapons––K-51 aerosol grenades––in Donbas, Military Naval Forces of the Armed Forces of Ukraine reported on 4 December. Chlorpicrine grenades are dropped from Russian drones. To protect themselves from the irritant agent, Ukrainian marines are wearing chemical protection suits while holding their positions.

Russian forces have publicly executed Ukrainian civilians in the Luhansk region for “betraying the Luhansk people,” Ukrainian activist Serhii Sternenko reports on his social media, sharing photos that earlier circulated through the Russian propaganda Telegram-channels. At least 5 men are seen hung with bags on their heads and signs saying “He reported to the enemy” and “СМЕРШ” (referring to Death to Spies, a counterintelligence unit created by Joseph Stalin in the USSR).

Kherson region has been shelled 46 times in the last 24 hours, Yaroslav Yanyshevych, the Governor of the Kherson region, reports. Kherson's residential areas and civilian infrastructure were fired upon by Russian artillery, tanks, and mortars. One civilian was killed and two others were injured.

The first vessel carrying 25,000 tons of Ukrainian wheat successfully arrived in Ethiopia in the late evening of December 3 within the Grain From Ukraine initiative, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said. “On November 15, we launched humanitarian program #GrainFromUkraine to help people who are most vulnerable to acute food crises. Today, the first vessel arrived to Doraleh Port carrying a humanitarian cargo of 25 thousand tons of wheat for Ethiopia,” he added.

Ukrainian troops training in the UK have completed their final round of intense training under the guidance of Operation UNIFIER Armed Forces of Canada instructors, the General Staff of Ukraine said on December 4. Since mid-summer, Ukrainian servicemen and volunteers have undergone a series of essential military skill training activities coordinated by both the Armed Forces of Canada and Britain. On returning home to join their brother-in-arms, Ukrainians are issued special kits containing cold weather clothing purchased by the British authorities. Furthermore, it is reported that the Armed Forces of Canada intend to renew training programs in January 2023.

Austria has delivered 21 powerful generators to Lviv, Ukraine, amid attacks on civilian infrastructure by Russian forces, Ukraine’s Embassy in Austria announced today. Generators were shipped by Austria Red Cross with the support of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Austria and the #NachbarInNot (#NeignbourInNeed) humanitarian campaign.

Mon, 05 Dec 2022 05:41:31 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/monday-december-5-russia-e2-80-99s-war-on-ukraine-daily-news-and-information-from-ukraine/ar-AA14XLcl
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