Exam Code: 9L0-964 Practice test 2023 by Killexams.com team
Final Cut Pro 6 Level 1
Apple Final certification
Killexams : Apple Final certification - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/9L0-964 Search results Killexams : Apple Final certification - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/9L0-964 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Apple Killexams : Hey Siri, is Apple letting another AI opportunity pass by?

ChatGPT is all the tech world can talk about lately, and with good reason. The AI-powered tool is impressive, but there are plenty of worries too—copyright infringement, plagiarism, use in classrooms, even lost jobs, so it’s no wonder people who write for a living are stressing about AI that can seemingly write well. But there are also starry-eyed tech companies who see the future–the ability for computers to converse naturally and create content that businesses can actually use, at a scale, speed, and cost humans can’t possibly match.

But ChatGPT, Google Bard, and Microsoft’s Bing chat are just one small part of the generative AI revolution. The art world has been buzzing about new generative AI art tools for the past year and freaking out about the same issues–bias, copyright, lost jobs, etc. Deepfakes, where neural networks swap out people in videos with stunning realism, were the tip of the iceberg.

These tools aren’t just a flash in the pan. They’re in their infancy, and getting better very rapidly. Big tech companies like Google and Microsoft see this new generative AI as a massive part of all our futures. Staking a claim and building a leadership position is as important to them as dominating the web was in the 90s.

But there’s one player who isn’t in the game: Apple. The most valuable technology company on earth seems to be entirely missing out on a complete revolution in computing. Apple is no stranger to AI—it sparked an assistant revolution with Siri—but it’s also already squandered its lead by not investing heavily enough to fend off competitors.

Is history repeating itself with generative AI? Or does Apple have something amazing up its sleeve and is just being incredibly secretive, as it always is?

AI that analyses is old, AI creation is new

All the biggest tech companies have been crowing about AI for years. AI that isolates and parses your speech for dictation and voice assistants, and can distinguish between voices for personalized results. AI that pieces together recorded sounds to “talk” to you. AI that isolates parts of images to easily edit them. AI that identifies objects and people to power your searches. AI that lets you select the text in any image.

Apple does all this stuff. It’s so important to the company that they build a Neural Engine into all their chips, specialized hardware that accelerates machine learning tasks like these. Apple’s even working on the biggest AI challenge of all, self-driving cars.

But generative AI is something else. It’s a newer class of AI that creates something entirely new using almost no text input. Yes, training the models takes a ton of time and a mountain of data, but then those models that the users will run are comparatively small and can seemingly make an infinite amount of new stuff. The AI that can find all the potatoes in your photo library is a totally different thing from one that can draw a potato from scratch in a wide variety of artistic styles.

Bing.com home page
Microsoft got into the generative AI game with Bing chat.

Mark Hachman / IDG

ChatGPT, Bard, and Bing

The headline-making generative AI tech right now is ChatGPT from OpenAI. The advanced chatbot, and tools built upon it, are already being used in the business world to generate articles, emails, templates, and more, with some controversy. Students are using it to write entire papers from a small prompt, and the results are good enough that there’s a race to develop good tools for teachers to identify ChatGPT-written assignments.

Because it was trained with a ton of web data that, while dated, is still relevant for many things, it can almost be like a search engine you converse with. This freaks out Google so much that it announced its own rival conversational AI product, Bard, which is not quite ready for the world to try out yet but coming soon. A public demo provided wrong information about the James Webb Space Telescope, so Google clearly has work to do.

Microsoft also announced a new conversational search feature you can start using right now in Bing and the Edge browser. It’s built on ChatGPT with some enhancements and modifications.

These are more than just toys or curiosities. These are real tools that people are using to do real work and to power creative projects. It’s all early days, and sometimes feels like it’s not ready for the world at large, but the pace of improvement and innovation is staggering–the AI models are doubling in complexity and sophistication every six months.

Stable Diffusion, Midjourney, DALL-E

And it’s not just the written word. We all had a good laugh making silly prompts with DALL-E 2 last year, but with further training and enhancements, these generative AI art tools have become good for a lot more than just making images of anime-style cats scuba diving with fishbowls over their heads.

Midjourney and Stable Diffusion have gotten so good they’re creating art that could easily grace the cover of a magazine–and can turn out dozens in a few minutes.

These tools can do much more than just make completely new images in a wide range of styles. They can alter input images. The App Store is already awash with avatar- and profile-making apps that use this software to take a few photos of your face and modify them in stunning ways by changing physical features without anyone being the wiser. Such as putting on sunglasses that look completely real.

Last year it was a gimmick, but the technology is developing so rapidly that it’s already a tool. Adobe has already improved a lot of its apps with AI-powered image generation tools, for one-click photo restoration and vastly improved object deletion. But the company plans to add significant generative AI to its toolset soon, allowing you to literally insert images into existing photos and artwork that look like they fit right in.

DALL-E 2 art

Dall-E 2 is more than just a fun time-waster for creating wacky images.

Dalle2.app

A narrow window to act

And where is Apple in all this? The company has positioned itself as a technology leader, especially in the creative space. But with the exception of a few blog posts from an ML research site and some relatively low-effort optimizations to libraries for Apple silicon, Apple seems to be sitting this one out. I mean, I think Divam Gupta’s DiffusionBee is super cool, but it’s a little independent third-party app that hasn’t been updated in quite a while and is already behind the state-of-the-art in AI image generation.

This technology is going to be completely transformative. Don’t believe me? Check out OpenAI’s research into generating music. It creates new music in a variety of styles including some singing, completely out of nowhere. Microsoft’s VALL-E can generate shockingly realistic voices that sound very close to a real person, using just a tiny snippet of that person’s voice as input. It can even mimic various emotional states.

Many of these projects, and dozens more, are still in the research stage. It’s not hard to find some flaws with any of them. But the journey from research to the real world will be quick, and the flaws will get vanishingly hard to find.

Apple certainly has the tools to build its own generative AI chatbot. Every new Mac and iPhone has a Neural Engine that’s capable of up to 15.8 trillion operations per second, as well as powerful Core ML and machine learning APIs. But we haven’t seen any movement from inside Cupertino. Accuracy and speed are of paramount importance with AI chatbots—Google’s stock and credibility tumbled this week after an error in its Bard chatbot—so it’s possible that it’s doing work behind the scenes with Siri and in true Apple fashion won’t release anything until it’s perfected. But even with a wealth of tools at its disposal, the question remains: Is Apple even paying attention?

If it isn’t intently watching the AI space, Apple might not realize how fast it’s evolving. It took a year for generative AI to go from a “silly online research project toy” to “dueling announcements from Microsoft and Google.” In two more years, these tools will be ten times better and there will be a whole lot more of them. You’ll have a hard time telling what is real or completely AI-generated out of thin air. If you have big ideas but limited artistic skills, generative AI will make it a lot easier to realize your dreams.

m1 vs m2 chips

Apple’s M1 and M2 Mac chips have a dedicated Neural Engine capable of

many trillions of operations every second.

Apple

With Siri, Apple was at the forefront of bringing an AI voice assistant to the masses. As that technology evolved, Apple fell way behind, and now Siri is often viewed as a disappointment that can’t compare with Google Assistant or Alexa. When it comes to generative AI, Apple doesn’t even have a first-mover advantage as it did with Siri. Tech companies big and small are already shipping powerful tools. Without action, Apple will simply wind up making some of the hardware upon which our generative-AI-driven future will run.

Without realizing the power of this new technology in its own software and services, Apple will let everyone else define the state of the art for what could be the most important shift in computing in decades. Perhaps the company is okay with that, but as hardware sales flatten and the software and services side of Apple’s business grows, it really can’t afford not to be a leader in the generative AI revolution.

Of course, Apple is one of the most secretive companies in tech, especially when it comes to software. Apple could have big teams working hard to bring generative AI features to iMovie, Final Cut Pro, Logic Pro, Photos, Mail, Messages, and the whole iWork suite. All of these could be completely transformed by powerful generative AI tools. We know Apple bought at least one generative AI company, AI Music, about a year ago. It wouldn’t be unreasonable to see at least a “generate an original instant soundtrack for your video” tool in Apple’s products this year.

We might not hear anything at all about generative AI out of Apple, and then at WWDC, BAM! World-class generative AI all over Apple’s products!

I hope that’s the case, because if Apple’s late to the game on such a transformational technology, it’s going to doom its software to being years behind its competitors for years to come.

Wed, 08 Feb 2023 22:15:00 -0600 Author: Jason Cross en text/html https://www.macworld.com/article/1507282/generative-ai-chatgpt-midjourney-bard-bing-siri.html
Killexams : Apple is making a significant change to iPhone and iPad software betas null © iMore null

Not surprisingly, developer versions of iOS, iPadOS, and other Apple software, have been designed for developer use only. And yet, it's no secret non-developers use these versions on their primary devices for no other reason than to test new software goodies months before they are released to the public. 

One reason for this is Apple has allowed it. That's about to change. 

First, the good news. Beginning with iOS 16.4, iPadOS 16.4, etc., Apple's making it easier for developers to try the latest betas by adding a toggle on the Software Update tab. The bad news: If you don't pay Apple the $99/year developers license fee, you won't be able to install and use the latest developer beta. 

What Apple is saying

In the iOS 16.4 and iPadOS 16.4 beta release notes, Apple explains: 

"Beginning with iOS & iPadOS 16.4 beta, members of the Apple Developer Program will see a new option to enable developer betas directly from Software Update in Settings. This new option will be automatically enabled on devices already enrolled in the program that update to the latest beta release. Your iPhone or iPad must be signed in with the same Apple ID you used to enroll in the Apple Developer Program in order to see this option in Settings. In future iOS and iPadOS releases, this new setting will be the way to enable developer betas and configuration profiles will no longer grant access."

This doesn't mean it's the end of the line for beta testing for non-developers. Instead, the changes are intended so there's a clear separation on who's using developer betas instead of public betas. 

Key differences between developer and public betas

As we already noted, Apple's Developer Program is intended for genuine app developers who need access to the latest software for testing purposes. In the case of developer software, this means software that can be unstable and bug-prone and ideally suited to only run on non-primary devices. For this, developers are asked to pay a yearly membership fee. 

By contrast, any with an Apple device can become a free member of the public beta program. Public beta versions are typically released a few weeks after the developer beta software versions. Though these versions can also include bugs, they are much more stable than the developer versions. 

iOS 16.4: a significant change

As a long-time non-developer using developer software from Apple on my primary devices, I'm somewhat upset by the abovementioned change. And yet, it makes sense. 

Non-developers love trying beta software, especially after new versions are announced at the Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) each June. And yet, when doing so, many of these same non-developers run into problems that they ask Apple to address. By limiting developer beta use to developers (willing to pay for the opportunity), Apple can eliminate many of these headaches and concentrate on improving the beta program. 

Besides, it's not like non-developers are suddenly out of luck. They'll have to wait a few weeks longer before trying new features as part of the public beta program. 

You can sign up for the public betas by visiting beta.apple.com and clicking the Sign-Up link, or — if you're already a public beta member — logging in with your Apple ID and password.

You can join Apple's Developer Program to become a part of the Apple development community and get the tools and training you need to develop apps for the App Store. With this membership, you'll get access to developer betas of iOS, iPadOS, macOS, tvOS, and watchOS. Again, Apple App Developer Program memberships cost $99 per year.

These betas can run on all the best iPhones and other devices, including the iPhone 14

Fri, 17 Feb 2023 04:29:00 -0600 en-GB text/html https://www.msn.com/en-gb/money/technology/apple-is-making-a-significant-change-to-iphone-and-ipad-software-betas/ar-AA17Cync
Killexams : How to Protect Your Apple ID With Security Keys

An Apple ID is a critical piece of information for anyone with an Apple device, be it a laptop, desktop, phone, or tablet. It grants access to the App Store, FaceTime, Find My, iCloud, and Messages. Given how much your Apple ID matters, it's important to keep it safe from account takeovers, and one of the best ways to do that is with a hardware security key.

We're here to show you how to use a security key to protect your Apple ID. But first, it's important to understand what multi-factor authentication is and why using a security key is one of the best ways to keep your accounts safe.


What Is Multi-Factor Authentication? 

The current thinking on authentication holds that there are three factors you can use to verify your identity: 

  • Something you know, like a password.
  • Something you are, like a biometric attribute such as your fingerprint.
  • Something you have, like a smart device or a hardware security key.

Typical username and password login schemes employ just one factor—something you know. The problem is that if a bad guy gets ahold of your username and password, they can log in as if they were you and take over your account. To prevent that, security experts now recommend mixing multiple factors. This used to be called two-factor authentication (2FA), but with new options emerging all the time, it has been dubbed multi-factor authentication (MFA). You might see both terms, but they effectively mean the same thing.

With MFA, even if someone has nabbed some or all of your login credentials—say, from a major data breach like the one that happened at LastPass—they won't be able to access any account secured with MFA. Even if the logins are accepted, they'll be prompted to enter the second-factor information and will be immediately stymied. This isn't theoretical, either. When Google required all employees to use MFA, account takeovers dropped to nearly zero.

There are several different ways to implement MFA. The most common—and, unfortunately, least secure—is to receive a special code sent via SMS. We recommend readers avoid this method if possible because those messages can potentially be intercepted.

A better option is to use a code-generating authenticator app, such as Authy or Google Authenticator. Once you enroll the app with an account you want to secure, the app will spit out new codes every 30 seconds. Most of the time, this means that you enter your username and password, and then you're prompted to enter the most latest code from the authenticator app.

Apple does in fact offer another form of multi-factor authentication: You can verify your identity using another Apple device where you're already logged in. In this scenario, you enter your Apple ID credentials and then a notification appears on all your devices along with a one-time use code. This isn't an SMS code, so it's a fairly good MFA option.


What Are Security Keys?

The big downside to all of the MFA options above is that they require a functional device or a data or cellular connection or both. That isn't always an option. Fortunately, there's another option: hardware security keys.

Security keys are small physical devices that are robust enough to live on your keychain. Many don't have batteries, nor do they require data connections of any kind. Some even include a biometric option. What's great about them is that they're easily kept on your person and hard to attack—although you do run the risk of losing or damaging them (more on that later).

Six Yubico Series 5 security keys of varrying size and connectors.
The Yubico YubiKey Series 5 has a variety of sizes and connectors.

When you use a security key as your MFA device, you just enter your username and password as usual and then present your key to your device when prompted. Security keys have a variety of connectors available, are compatible with adapters (such as USB-A to USB-C dongles), and many support wireless authentication for mobile devices with NFC.

Although we're stuck with passwords for the time being, security keys are helping get rid of this cumbersome and ineffective method of protection. Many devices and services are starting to support passwordless authentication, and some passwordless options rely on the latest hardware security keys.

The Kensington VeriMark Guard USB-C Fingerprint Key sitting on an open notebook
Security keys come in a variety of sizes and with different features. This tiny USB-C key from Kensington can read fingerprints, for example.

What Security Keys Should You Use With Apple ID?

When choosing a security key, you'll want to consider price and compatibility. For price, you should expect to pay around $20 to $80 for most security keys. Higher-price keys usually have more advanced features, like additional authentication options or biometrics. Advanced features are cool, but don't pay for features you won't use.

Price is an especially important point when securing your Apple ID because Apple requires that you enroll two security keys, which means you'll have to shell out for two. Fortunately, you can mix and match, perhaps purchasing a fancy key for daily use and a basic, cheaper key as a backup.

Compatibility is a trickier consideration. Most security keys come with one USB-C or USB-A connector. Consider the devices you have and what ports are available. If you're finding USB-A increasingly rare among your devices, go with USB-C.

Most Apple mobile devices don't support USB-C yet, but many support NFC. Apple users should be sure to select a security key that also supports NFC for easy authentication on iPhones and iPads. We prefer this wireless option to the YubiKey 5Ci—a security key with USB-C on one side and an Apple Lightning connector on the other—which is expensive compared with other keys and doesn't support NFC.

A security key with a Lightning connector on one end and a USB-C connector on the other
The Yubico YubiKey 5Ci is unusual in that it is one of the few security keys to offer a Lightning connector.

For its part, Apple recommends the YubiKey 5C NFC, the YubiKey 5Ci, and the Feitan ePass K9 NFC USB-A in its documentation. While we agree that the YubiKey 5C NFC is a great option, the YubiKey Security Key C NFC might be a better option for first-time users as it costs half as much as the 5C. Note that Yubico has discontinued its blue version of this key and a new black-clad key is forthcoming.

One final wrinkle is that Apple's online support documentation says that you must use a key that has been certified by FIDO—the organization that manages the open standard on which security keys function. We haven't tested to see if this is really enforced by Apple or if it's simply a best practice.


How to Set Up Security Keys for Apple ID

There are a few things to do before you enroll security keys with your Apple ID. Most importantly, if you haven't already enabled MFA for your Apple ID, you'll have to wait a few weeks before you can add security keys. Presumably, this is to prevent someone from taking over your account and then locking you out by enrolling security keys. Not to worry: Having any form of MFA is better than none, and your account won't be a sitting duck while you wait.

You'll also, of course, need to have two hardware security keys. Remember that Apple requires you to enroll two keys, so have them both handy. If you've previously set a PIN for your security key, you'll be prompted to enter that as well.

You should also update all your Apple devices before you begin. Apple supports security key enrollment only on iOS 16.3, iPadOS 16.3, or macOS Ventura 13.2 or later.

Finally, be sure to have your password (which is ideally randomly generated and stored in a password manager) handy, and some means to verify your identity. Apple frequently uses other devices you've already logged into for verification purposes, so have another Apple mobile device or computer handy. In our testing, we only had one Apple device available and were able to verify our identity using a phone number previously enrolled with Apple.

Before you start, there are a few caveats that Apple notes in its online documentation. If you have an Apple Watch paired to a device where you're not logged in (say, your spouse's iPad), you'll want to pair your Apple Watch to a device where you are logged in. Apple also says that Managed Apple IDs and Apple IDs for children are not eligible for security keys. Finally, Apple warns that you will no longer be able to sign into iCloud for Windows. 


Enrolling Security Keys With an iPad or iPhone

On iOS or iPadOS, open the Settings app and tap your name at the top of the menu. On the next screen, tap Password & Security, then tap Add Security Keys. 

Three Settings screens from iOS, showing the steps to add a security key

You'll then be prompted to plug in or tap your first security key. If you're plugging it in, you'll also be prompted to tap the key to confirm. If you're enrolling the key with NFC, you should tap and hold the key to the top of the screen. It will ask you to do this twice. Sometimes, it will take the device a moment or two to read the key, so don't move it around unless you're told it failed to read. If you've previously set a PIN for your security key, you'll have to enter it now.

Three photos of an iPhone on a wooden desk; a YubiKey sits on the top of the screen

After you've enrolled the first key, you'll be prompted to repeat the process with your second security key.

Finally, you'll be presented with a list of devices already associated with your Apple ID. You'll now have the option to remain logged in or remotely log out of those devices. If you see old devices you no longer use or even own, be sure to log them out.


Enrolling Security Keys With macOS

To enroll a key in macOS, click the Apple menu, then System Preferences, click your name in the upper-left corner of the pane, and then click Password & Security. After that, click Security Keys, then select Add. You should be guided through a setup process similar to enrolling keys on a mobile device.

Keep in mind that to enroll keys on an Apple desktop or laptop, you'll be plugging them into the appropriate port when prompted—not relying on NFC.

Congratulations! You're now protecting your Apple ID with security keys.


How to Log in to Your Apple ID With a Security Key

The next time you go to log in to an Apple device, you enter your Apple ID username and password as usual. Once those are accepted, you'll then be prompted to plug in your security key or tap it if you're using a mobile device. Again, if you plug your key in, you'll be prompted to tap it and if you're tapping your key against a mobile device you'll want to aim for the top of the screen and wait a beat or two.

You'll also need your security key when you try to log in to Apple's online services through a browser. Again, you'll enter your username and password, then plug in your laptop or desktop and tap it, or tap the key against your mobile device.

In our testing, we were able to log in to appleid.apple.com without issue using Chrome, Opera, or Safari. However, we received an error message when trying to use Firefox.

Unfortunately, you won't be able to use a security key when you log in to certain Apple devices—specifically, Apple TVs and HomePods. For these devices, you'll need to authenticate your identity using another Apple device.


What Should You Do If You Lose Your Security Key?

The advantage of a security key is that it's a thing, and not an app or a service that delivers codes. The disadvantage is that a security key is a thing that you can lose or have stolen. Fortunately, Apple requires that you enroll a second security key with one serving as a backup to the first. 

If you've lost both your security keys you might want to spend a little time reorganizing your life, right after you've regained control of your account. If you've enabled another authentication option—such as receiving codes from Apple sent to your device or via SMS—you should try to use those to access your account. Apple notes in its documentation that as long as you are logged in to at least one of your devices, you should be able to regain control of your account. Once you're able to access account settings, you'll want to unenroll your security keys. If you find them again, you can simply reenroll them.

It's best to prepare for such eventualities by having numerous backup options at the ready. Apple provides two options for account recovery: Recovery Contact and Recovery Key. On iOS and iPadOS you find both by tapping Settings, then Apple ID (tap your name at the top of the menu), then Password & Security, and finally Account Recovery on an iPhone or iPad.

On macOS, you can find recovery contact options in the Password & Security settings of System Preferences. The recovery key options are in the Account Details area of macOS System Preferences.

A recovery contact is a person you nominate who can verify your request to regain access to an Apple ID. There are some limitations about who you can select for this role, however. An acceptable candidate must be more than 13 years old, have MFA activated for their Apple ID, have a fairly new OS running on their device, and use iMessage. In our testing, the person we nominated had a valid Apple ID but used Android mobile devices for messaging, so we weren't able to nominate the individual.

Recovery keys have no such restrictions. Instead, you generate a 28-digit recovery key for your account. You can use this long jumble of text characters to unlock an account when all else has failed. Be sure to store your key in a secure place, perhaps writing it down somewhere safe. Other sites and services offer a feature similar to recovery keys (sometimes called backup codes or backup keys), and we encourage everyone to use them where available. Note that when you generate a recovery key with Apple, you'll be prompted to enter the whole thing to confirm it, so be prepared. If you lose your recovery key, you can generate a new one from a device where you're still logged in.

On a more somber note, Apple also lets you select a person who can take over your Apple ID should you die. This might seem tangential, but unless your family knows what MFA options you've employed and where to find your security keys they won't be able to access your Apple ID. On iOS, you can find this option under Legacy Contact in the Password & Security Settings menu, and the Password & Security settings in macOS System Preferences.


Should You Use Security Keys With Your Apple ID?

Security keys are perhaps the most secure MFA option, but that doesn't mean they work for everyone. Security keys cost money, they can be lost, and you have to have them handy in order to log in. If all that sounds like more than you can cope with, you should use a different MFA option. Ultimately, what's most important is that you take steps to secure all your accounts however you can.

Tue, 07 Feb 2023 01:59:00 -0600 en-au text/html https://au.pcmag.com/security/98644/how-to-protect-your-apple-id-with-a-security-key
Killexams : iPhone 15 Pro Leak Tips Trimmed Bezels And An Updated Charging Port Apple's iPhone 14 Pro © Kaspars Grinvalds/Shutterstock Apple's iPhone 14 Pro

The iPhone 15 series won't hurt your hands if fresh leaks are to be believed. Per case-based renders obtained by 9to5Mac, the iPhone 15 Pro will embrace slightly curved sides, unlike the sharp edges that Apple's iPhone 12 quartet introduced, a divisive design that has continued its hurtful run all the way up to the current-gen iPhone 14 series phones. The metallic side rails will still be flat, but at least the phone will be comfortable to hold.

Another notable change is that the bezels look slimmer compared to the iPhone 14 Pro, but the pill-shaped Dynamic Island is here to stay. On the flip side, the camera island appears to have grown even bigger, which is also a sign that the underlying imaging hardware has also been improved. Rumors suggest that the telephoto lens will get an upgrade, adopting the periscope engineering seen on the likes of Samsung Galaxy S23 Ultra to deliver a higher zoom output.

iphone 14 desk © Chris Davies/SlashGear iphone 14 desk

Apple also appears to have removed the clicky volume and power buttons and it looks like the rumored solid-state buttons have been locked for the iPhone 15 Pro duo -- at least based on the unofficial renders, of course. These buttons follow the same approach as the iPhone 8's Touch ID button, which doesn't actually move vertically on pressing, but recognizes the gesture and provides haptic feedback thanks to the vibration motor underneath. Apple has apparently reworked the mute switch, as well. The most notable change, however, is the port. 

The report claims that the renders depict a USB-C port instead of a Lightning port. That shift is happening due to an EU mandate, which seeks to standardize a USB-C port on consumer electronics, including smartphones. However, some rumors claim that the next-gen iPhones will only work with USB-C cables supplied by Apple or those carrying its M-Fi certified. The iPhone 15 series is still months away from its official arrival, and it is entirely plausible that Apple might make design changes and the final product might not look the same as the leaked renders.

Read this next: The Evolution Of The iPhone From 2007 To 2022

Thu, 16 Feb 2023 09:46:20 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/shopping/iphone-15-pro-leak-tips-trimmed-bezels-and-an-updated-charging-port/ar-AA17A771
Killexams : Geek Express’ new ‘Apple Specialist Degree’ empowers MENA youth to develop iOS apps and their future in technology

Geek Express, MENA’s first online technology school, launches in February 2023 the ‘Apple Specialist Degree’, a program accredited by Apple Inc. and exclusively designed for individuals aged 10 years and above. This comprehensive and pioneering coding program will prepare students for college or a career in app development using the Swift programming language. This language is a robust and intuitive programming language created by Apple. It’s easy to learn, simple to use, and very powerful which makes it a great language for first-time coders and full-time developers.

Students who successfully complete the program and pass the exam, will earn a digital certification accredited by Apple, allowing them to take the next step in their career. They also get to boost their resume with a digital badge to promote their Apple coding skills and stand out in professional networks.

Providing 100% attention and guidance for each student through private 1:1 virtual sessions, the limited seating program is divided into flexible 36 sessions offered online. In addition to the certification and a digital badge awarded by Apple, students will be able to unleash their creativity and connect with other like-minded coders from across the MENA region. To ensure success, Geek Express prioritizes every student’s needs and focuses on making them comfortable whilst providing the necessary tools, knowledge and motivation to prepare for the course's final certification exam.

Speaking of the program, Manal Hakim, CEO of Geek Express says, “The Apple Specialist Degree is an opportunity for tech enthusiasts to pave the way for their career. Geek Express is excited to launch a program focused on one of the most renowned companies and robust coding languages in the industry. With this program, we will continue to provide quality technology education for the youth of today and tomorrow”.

Apple has been a game changer in the technology industry since its inception. It has revolutionized the way people view and utilize technology. With its innovative apps, user-friendly products and unique designs, it is a global success story. The Apple Specialist Degree program by Geek Express helps young tech enthusiasts kick-start their career at an early age, and grow their skill-set while stepping into the professional world, especially technology-related roles.

Students can register in the program here to start or enhance their coding journey with the Apple Specialist Degree.

-End-

About Geek Express:

Geek Express is the first MENA-focused online technology school for children ages 5-17 with an accredited curriculum that prepares them for the future. The platform works with certified partners like Microsoft, Google CS First, MIT, and Minecraft to name a few with courses offered in three different languages - English, Arabic, and French.  Students learn to develop video games, websites, apps, and AI models. They walk away with an understanding of coding fundamentals, improved cognitive skills, and better preparation for the future job market.

For more information, visit https://geekexpress.com/en

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Thu, 16 Feb 2023 22:04:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.zawya.com/en/press-release/companies-news/geek-express-new-apple-specialist-degree-empowers-mena-youth-to-develop-ios-apps-and-their-future-in-technology-eg0a5d0i
Killexams : Apple in February: Will there be more surprises before the big March event?

Apple almost never releases major new hardware in January, and yet last month it released the Mac mini with M2 and M2 Pro, MacBook Pro with M2 Pro and M2 Max, and a new full-size HomePod, which began shipping on Friday, February 3, and is already back-ordered.

Apple also released significant OS updates: Apple released iOS 16.3 (and iPadOS, tvOS, watchOS…all the OSes that stay in sync with iOS) and macOS Ventura 13.2. That sort of thing is not at all unusual for January, but it’s odd that the beta releases for the very next OS updates did not begin right away. In fact, as we begin February there is still no sign of the iOS 16.4 or macOS 13.3 beta.

The latest rumors about Apple’s “Reality Pro” AR/VR headset suggest a possible unveiling at a spring event, with availability later in the year. Given that Apple’s spring events are almost always in March, and February is a shorter month anyway, we really don’t expect much to release in February. There will be a handful of new Apple TV+ shows and Apple Arcade games, and maybe a small bugfix OS point release, but nothing big is likely to happen until March.

Rumored new hardware

The new Mac mini and MacBook Pros came in January without much warning or fanfare. So, while we don’t actually expect Apple to release anything in February, we could always be surprised.

There are still plenty of products we expect Apple to release in 2023, but only a few stand a chance of possibly releasing before WWDC in June. Those include an iMac updated with the M2 processor or a second-gen AirPods Max with the H2 chip and improved sound quality. The Mac Studio is due to make the jump from the M1 Max and Ultra to the M2 (along with Wi-Fi 6E and HDMI 2.1). We really don’t think any of these are coming in February—and a new rumor suggests that the Mac Studio might stick with an M1 for another year—but Apple could surprise us again as it looks to clear out smaller updates ahead of what could be its biggest event in years.

Almost everything else coming from Apple this year, including an Apple silicon Mac Pro, second-gen Pro Display XDR, the iPhone 15, Apple Watch Series 9, maybe a new iPad, and more, are almost certainly destined to be released in the second half of 2023.

Apps and software updates

Apple released iOS 16.3 and macOS 13.2 (and their contemporaries: iPadOS 16.3, tvOS 16.3, and watchOS 9.3) on January 23. Usually, we would see the first developer betas of iOS 16.4 and macOS 13.3 on the very next day, but we didn’t. In fact, two weeks on, there’s still no sign of them.

So while beta testing for the next major updates will probably begin, the final releases are almost certainly going to come in March, possibly to coincide with the spring event.

iOS 16.3.1: With the iOS 16.4 beta seemingly coming late, Apple might push out a small “point release” to address bugs and security updates. Some sites have claimed to see an iOS 16.3.1 in their server logs, suggesting that Apple may be testing just such a thing.

macOS 13.2.1: To go along with the iOS 16.3.1 security update release (if it happens), Apple will probably release a similar macOS release that contains a lot of the same security updates.

Services

Apple TV+

Here are the shows, series, and movies we expect to release on Apple TV+ in TK. If you want to know what’s coming later, check our full guide to upcoming Apple TV+ content.

Pinecone and Pony (season 2): Kate Beaton’s beloved book comes to life in this animated series. As a warrior in training, Pinecone fears no challenge. Thankfully, Pony always makes sure Pinecone never gets in over her head. Released February 3

Dear Edward: A 12-year-old boy becomes the lone survivor of a plane crash. As he and others affected by the tragedy try to make sense of what happened, unexpected friendships, romances, and communities are formed. Released February 3

Hello Tomorrow!: Set in a retro-future world, “Hello Tomorrow!” centers around a group of traveling salesmen hawking lunar timeshares. February 17

Sharper: No one is who they seem in Sharper, a neo-noir thriller of secrets and lies, set amongst New York City’s bedrooms, barrooms, and boardrooms. Characters compete for riches and power in a high-stakes game of ambition, greed, lust, and jealousy that will keep audiences guessing until the final moment. February 17

The Reluctant Traveler: The eight-episode series follows Eugene Levy as he visits some of the world’s most beautiful and intriguing destinations February 23

Liaison: A thriller exploring how the mistakes of our past have the potential to destroy our future, combining action with an unpredictable, multilayered plot where “espionage and political intrigue play out against a story of passionate and enduring love.” February 24

Apple Arcade

Apple releases new games to Apple Arcade on Fridays, but not every Friday is marked by a new game or significant update. Check our Apple Arcade FAQ for a full list of Apple Arcade games and more details on the service. Some games are released with no forewarning, but you’ll often see several projects listed in the Coming Soon section.

Castle Crumble: Destroy the castles in this physics-based puzzler. Released February 3

Riptide GP: Renegade+: A rocket-boat racer originally released in the App Store in 2016. February 10

Farmside: A new farming sim. Build your dream farm with no in-app purchases or ads! February 17

Lifeline+: This text-based adventure took the mobile gaming world by storm for a minute, when it was originally released in 2015. February 24

Sun, 05 Feb 2023 22:31:23 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/apple-in-february-will-there-be-more-surprises-before-the-big-march-event/ar-AA179UeH
Killexams : The 15 best Apple TV Plus shows to watch right now

The best shows on Apple TV Plus are easy to find, because there are just so many top tier series available to watch on the streamer. In fact, the hard part is narrowing your watchlist down to just one show to start with – but that's where we come in. 

We've rounded up the very best of the best shows on Apple TV Plus below, so you can settle in for a night streaming some quality television. We've got the obvious picks like Severance and Ted Lasso, along with more hidden gems like Calls, Trying, and Little America. Whether you're in the mood for a dark comedy like Bad Sisters, a spy drama like Slow Horses, or a twisty thriller like Defending Jacob, there's something for you available to watch now.

Tue, 14 Feb 2023 01:29:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.gamesradar.com/best-apple-tv-plus-shows/
Killexams : Is Apple paying any attention to the ChatGPT AI arms race?

ChatGPT is all the tech world can talk about lately, and with good reason. The AI-powered tool is impressive, but there are plenty of worries too—copyright infringement, plagiarism, use in classrooms, even lost jobs, so it’s no wonder people who write for a living are stressing about AI that can seemingly write well. But there are also starry-eyed tech companies who see the future–the ability for computers to converse naturally and create content that businesses can actually use, at a scale, speed, and cost humans can’t possibly match.

But ChatGPT, Google Bard, and Microsoft’s Bing chat are just one small part of the generative AI revolution. The art world has been buzzing about new generative AI art tools for the past year and freaking out about the same issues–bias, copyright, lost jobs, etc. Deepfakes, where neural networks swap out people in videos with stunning realism, were the tip of the iceberg.

These tools aren’t just a flash in the pan. They’re in their infancy, and getting better very rapidly. Big tech companies like Google and Microsoft see this new generative AI as a massive part of all our futures. Staking a claim and building a leadership position is as important to them as dominating the web was in the 90s.

But there’s one player who isn’t in the game: Apple. The most valuable technology company on earth seems to be entirely missing out on a complete revolution in computing. Apple is no stranger to AI—it sparked an assistant revolution with Siri—but it’s also already squandered its lead by not investing heavily enough to fend off competitors.

Is history repeating itself with generative AI? Or does Apple have something amazing up its sleeve and is just being incredibly secretive, as it always is?

AI that analyses is old, AI creation is new

All the biggest tech companies have been crowing about AI for years. AI that isolates and parses your speech for dictation and voice assistants, and can distinguish between voices for personalized results. AI that pieces together recorded sounds to “talk” to you. AI that isolates parts of images to easily edit them. AI that identifies objects and people to power your searches. AI that lets you select the text in any image.

Apple does all this stuff. It’s so important to the company that they build a Neural Engine into all their chips, specialized hardware that accelerates machine learning tasks like these. Apple’s even working on the biggest AI challenge of all, self-driving cars.

But generative AI is something else. It’s a newer class of AI that creates something entirely new using almost no text input. Yes, training the models takes a ton of time and a mountain of data, but then those models that the users will run are comparatively small and can seemingly make an infinite amount of new stuff. The AI that can find all the potatoes in your photo library is a totally different thing from one that can draw a potato from scratch in a wide variety of artistic styles.

Microsoft got into the generative AI game with Bing chat. © Mac World Microsoft got into the generative AI game with Bing chat.

Mark Hachman / IDG

ChatGPT, Bard, and Bing

The headline-making generative AI tech right now is ChatGPT from OpenAI. The advanced chatbot, and tools built upon it, are already being used in the business world to generate articles, emails, templates, and more, with some controversy. Students are using it to write entire papers from a small prompt, and the results are good enough that there’s a race to develop good tools for teachers to identify ChatGPT-written assignments.

Because it was trained with a ton of web data that, while dated, is still relevant for many things, it can almost be like a search engine you converse with. This freaks out Google so much that it announced its own rival conversational AI product, Bard, which is not quite ready for the world to try out yet but coming soon. A public demo provided wrong information about the James Webb Space Telescope, so Google clearly has work to do.

Microsoft also announced a new conversational search feature you can start using right now in Bing and the Edge browser. It’s built on ChatGPT with some enhancements and modifications.

These are more than just toys or curiosities. These are real tools that people are using to do real work and to power creative projects. It’s all early days, and sometimes feels like it’s not ready for the world at large, but the pace of improvement and innovation is staggering–the AI models are doubling in complexity and sophistication every six months.

Stable Diffusion, Midjourney, DALL-E

And it’s not just the written word. We all had a good laugh making silly prompts with DALL-E 2 last year, but with further training and enhancements, these generative AI art tools have become good for a lot more than just making images of anime-style cats scuba diving with fishbowls over their heads.

Midjourney and Stable Diffusion have gotten so good they’re creating art that could easily grace the cover of a magazine–and can turn out dozens in a few minutes.

These tools can do much more than just make completely new images in a wide range of styles. They can alter input images. The App Store is already awash with avatar- and profile-making apps that use this software to take a few photos of your face and modify them in stunning ways by changing physical features without anyone being the wiser. Such as putting on sunglasses that look completely real.

Last year it was a gimmick, but the technology is developing so rapidly that it’s already a tool. Adobe has already improved a lot of its apps with AI-powered image generation tools, for one-click photo restoration and vastly improved object deletion. But the company plans to add significant generative AI to its toolset soon, allowing you to literally insert images into existing photos and artwork that look like they fit right in.

Dall-E 2 is more than just a fun time-waster for creating wacky images. © Mac World Dall-E 2 is more than just a fun time-waster for creating wacky images.

Dalle2.app

A narrow window to act

And where is Apple in all this? The company has positioned itself as a technology leader, especially in the creative space. But with the exception of a few blog posts from an ML research site and some relatively low-effort optimizations to libraries for Apple silicon, Apple seems to be sitting this one out. I mean, I think Divam Gupta’s DiffusionBee is super cool, but it’s a little independent third-party app that hasn’t been updated in quite a while and is already behind the state-of-the-art in AI image generation.

This technology is going to be completely transformative. Don’t believe me? Check out OpenAI’s research into generating music. It creates new music in a variety of styles including some singing, completely out of nowhere. Microsoft’s VALL-E can generate shockingly realistic voices that sound very close to a real person, using just a tiny snippet of that person’s voice as input. It can even mimic various emotional states.

Many of these projects, and dozens more, are still in the research stage. It’s not hard to find some flaws with any of them. But the journey from research to the real world will be quick, and the flaws will get vanishingly hard to find.

Apple has the tools to build its own generative AI chatbot with the Neural Engine built into its iPhone and Mac chips that’s capable of up to 15.8 trillion operations per second, along with Core ML and machine learning APIs. But we haven’t seen any movement from inside Cupertino. Accuracy and speed are of paramount importance with AI chatbots—Google’s stock and credibility tumbled this week after an error in its Bard chatbot—so it’s possible that it’s doing work behind the scenes with Siri. But with a wealth of tools at its disposal, the question remains: Is Apple even paying attention?

If it isn’t intently watching the AI space, Apple might not realize how fast it’s evolving. It took a year for generative AI to go from a “silly online research project toy” to “dueling announcements from Microsoft and Google.” In two more years, these tools will be ten times better and there will be a whole lot more of them. You’ll have a hard time telling what is real or completely AI-generated out of thin air. If you have big ideas but limited artistic skills, generative AI will make it a lot easier to realize your dreams.

Apple’s M1 and M2 Mac chips have a dedicated Neural Engine capable of many trillions of operations every second. © Mac World Apple’s M1 and M2 Mac chips have a dedicated Neural Engine capable of many trillions of operations every second.

Apple

With Siri, Apple was at the forefront of bringing an AI voice assistant to the masses. As that technology evolved, Apple fell way behind, and now Siri is often viewed as a disappointment that can’t compare with Google Assistant or Alexa. When it comes to generative AI, Apple doesn’t even have a first-mover advantage as it did with Siri. Tech companies big and small are already shipping powerful tools. Without action, Apple will simply wind up making some of the hardware upon which our generative-AI-driven future will run.

Without realizing the power of this new technology in its own software and services, Apple will let everyone else define the state of the art for what could be the most important shift in computing in decades. Perhaps the company is okay with that, but as hardware sales flatten and the software and services side of Apple’s business grows, it really can’t afford not to be a leader in the generative AI revolution.

Of course, Apple is one of the most secretive companies in tech, especially when it comes to software. Apple could have big teams working hard to bring generative AI features to iMovie, Final Cut Pro, Logic Pro, Photos, Mail, Messages, and the whole iWork suite. All of these could be completely transformed by powerful generative AI tools. We know Apple bought at least one generative AI company, AI Music, about a year ago. It wouldn’t be unreasonable to see at least a “generate an original instant soundtrack for your video” tool in Apple’s products this year.

We might not hear anything at all about generative AI out of Apple, and then at WWDC, BAM! World-class generative AI all over Apple’s products!

I hope that’s the case, because if Apple’s late to the game on such a transformational technology, it’s going to doom its software to being years behind its competitors for years to come.

Wed, 08 Feb 2023 23:03:34 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/is-apple-paying-any-attention-to-the-chatgpt-ai-arms-race/ar-AA17hFOL
Killexams : The 7 best new movies and shows to stream this weekend

The weekend is finally here, and we've got another fresh batch of streaming recommendations to keep you entertained from Friday night through to Sunday evening. If you're planning a movie night, there's Sharper, a new thriller on Apple TV Plus starring Julianne Moore and Sebastian Stan, while US audiences can catch The Woman King, the critically acclaimed Viola Davis-led drama, on Netflix and George Miller's Three Thousand Years of Longing on Prime Video.

As for TV shows, Star Trek: Picard season 3, the final installment of the sci-fi series, is now streaming on Paramount Plus, while Carnival Row season 2 has arrived on Prime Video. Billy Crudup plays a lunar timeshare salesman in Hello Tomorrow! on Apple TV Plus, and Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur provides animated family fun on Disney Plus.

Sharper – Apple TV Plus

Sebastian Stan in Sharper trailer

(Image credit: Apple TV Plus/A24)

Available: Worldwide
Watch now: Apple TV Plus (opens in new tab)

Fri, 17 Feb 2023 03:21:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.gamesradar.com/new-netflix-amazon-disney-movies-shows-sharper-picard/
Killexams : 7 new movies and TV shows on Netflix, Prime Video, Apple TV Plus and more this weekend (February 17)
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For all the talk of Netflix, Disney Plus and HBO Max being the ‘big three’ of the streaming world, this week’s crop of TV recommendations is dominated by shows from Prime Video, Apple TV Plus and Paramount Plus.  

Original Apple drama series Hello Tomorrow! arrives alongside new seasons of Star Trek: Picard and Carnival Row on Paramount Plus and Prime Video, respectively, while Apple TV Plus also gets a star-studded new movie in the form of Sharper. Surprisingly – and for the first time since we’ve been running these weekly lists – there are no new headline-grabbing titles worth highlighting on Disney Plus or HBO Max.

Fri, 17 Feb 2023 00:59:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.techradar.com/news/7-new-movies-and-tv-shows-on-netflix-prime-video-apple-tv-plus-and-more-this-weekend-february-17-2023
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