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Exam Code: 9L0-625 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
Mac OS X Security and Mobility 10.6
Apple Security history
Killexams : Apple Security history - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/9L0-625 Search results Killexams : Apple Security history - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/9L0-625 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Apple Killexams : Apple fixes zero-day security bug that was 'exploited' on most iPhones

Apple has fixed a zero-day security vulnerability that was actively exploited on most iPhones, in its latest iOS software update.

Available for iPhone 8 and later, Impact: Processing maliciously crafted web content may lead to arbitrary code execution.

Apple is aware of a report that this issue may have been actively exploited against versions of iOS released before iOS 15.1.

The update, iOS 16.1.2, has been rolled out to all supported iPhones with unspecified "important security updates."

In a security update, Apple said the update fixed a flaw in WebKit, the browser engine that powers Safari and other apps.

If exploited, it could allow malicious code to run on the user devices.

"A type confusion issue was addressed with improved state handling," said Apple.

According to the tech giant, security researchers at Google's Threat Analysis Group (TAG) first discovered and reported the WebKit bug to the company.

Apple said that the vulnerability was exploited "against versions of iOS released before iOS 15.1", which was released in October 2021.

The bug in WebKit's implementation of a JavaScript API called "IndexedDB" can reveal your exact browsing history and even your identity.

A zero-day vulnerability is a bug in a system or device that has been disclosed but is not yet patched.

Apple has released iOS 16.2, which includes end-to-end encryption for data backed up in iCloud and other new features.

--IANS

na/ksk/

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

Tue, 13 Dec 2022 18:41:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.business-standard.com/article/technology/apple-fixes-zero-day-security-bug-that-was-exploited-on-most-iphones-122121400500_1.html
Killexams : New Apple security measures concern the FBI but should reassure consumers

For years, Apple has protected users' health data, passwords, credit card, and other payment info on iCloud through end-to-end encryption, which prevents third parties from accessing data while it is being transferred from one end system or device to another. But users' photos, notes, and iCloud backup remained unencrypted and thus, vulnerable to anyone able to gain access to iCloud.

That changed last week, when Apple announced Advanced Data Protection for iCloud, which the company says will bring the highest level of security to more sensitive information and data stored on iCloud.

Matthew Green, a nationally recognized cryptography expert and associate professor at the Johns Hopkins University Information Security Institute and the Whiting School of Engineering's Department of Computer Science, hailed the move and sat down with the Hub to discuss its implications.

Why is it a big deal that Apple is introducing new data protection for users?

Apple has spent years building the infrastructure needed to enable end-to-end backup for iCloud. This means backup that ensures that you are the only one who can access your own data: not hackers, not law enforcement, not the government, and not even Apple.

The interesting thing is that even though Apple had the infrastructure to do this eight years ago, it didn't. It limited the use of end-to-end encryption to things like protecting your passwords and guarding your web history. But that left your photos, notes, etc., accessible to anyone who managed to get into iCloud. This new feature changes that.

"Apple sets the standard on what secure consumer cloud backup looks like. There is little question in my mind that competitors all over the industry will chase them."

Matt Green

Johns Hopkins University Information Security Institute

One thing to note is this new capability will require users to opt in. This means users will only receive the new encryption features if they activate the feature by turning on a switch in their phone's Settings menu. It also means that users who activate the feature will be at risk of losing their backups if they forget their phone password. To mitigate this risk, Apple is building in a new "social backup" feature that lets you appoint a friend to help you recover your backups if that ever happens. Apple is hoping that this combination will make encryption workable for most iPhone and Mac users. These features will help to stop an entire range of hacking attacks that criminals use to steal user data and extort vulnerable people.

If Apple had the capability to protect this data, why the wait to deploy it?

There is a lot of speculation about that. Two years ago, Reuters reported that the FBI pressured the company into dropping plans to enable that feature, saying it would harm investigations. This is because many police investigations have relied on access to phone backups that Apple was able to hand over when presented with a warrant. That won't be possible anymore. In fact, when Apple announced the new iCloud data protection measures last week, FBI sources told The Washington Post they were "deeply concerned" with the threat that user-controlled encryption poses and that it "hinders our ability to protect the American people from criminal acts ranging from cyber-attacks and violence against children to drug trafficking, organized crime, and terrorism."

But it appears that Apple has overcome these concerns.

Do you expect this move by Apple to spur competitors like Samsung or Google to offer similar levels of security?

Absolutely, because Apple sets the standard on what secure consumer cloud backup looks like. There is little question in my mind that competitors all over the industry will chase them.

I should say that Google and WhatsApp deserve credit for deploying some of this end-to-end backup tech on their own. But I think this move by Apple creates a dynamic where companies will continue to compete to offer consumers better privacy features, making it a challenge for any company not to step up and offer these protections themselves.

The positive side to this for consumers is that it will no doubt result in a better and more secure experience. And if things continue in this vein, my hope is that, in the future, end-to-end user controlled encryption will be turned on by default, or users will be strongly encouraged to turn it on for their own protection. Apple's two-factor authentication—a feature where attempts to log in to your iCloud account require a one-time passcode sent to your phone—provides a good example of this, because although this protection is optional right now, about 95% of Apple's customers use it.

What other security enhancements is Apple introducing?

One improves iMessage—Apple's end-to-end encrypted messaging service—by preventing someone from adding new devices to your account without permission. This makes it much harder for a hacker to read your encrypted text messages. Again, you have to opt in, but if you do, it puts into place a sort of "key transparency" that makes it harder for people to add new devices that can receive your iMessage chats. While the feature isn't something most people think about, it eliminates one of iMessage's big weaknesses: that Apple can be hacked or forced to bypass the iMessage encryption.

It is important to note that there is no reason to think this has ever happened, but some governments have argued that systems like Apple's iMessage are vulnerable to this type of attack.

Finally, Apple has made a bunch of nice improvements around account access—including providing support for hardware security keys to protect sensitive corporate accounts. These features are used widely by enterprises, who rely on these keys to prevent phishing attacks and other account takeovers. All of these protections are features that enterprises in particular will really like.

What else should consumers know about Apple's new security features?

The bottom line is that something important has happened in Cupertino. Whereas previously, Apple was obviously hesitant about deploying beefed up encryption features, it is clear that now they are putting the gas pedal down. It's not clear what changed, but whatever it is, I am glad to see it.

Tue, 13 Dec 2022 03:15:00 -0600 en text/html https://hub.jhu.edu/2022/12/13/apple-security-features-matt-green/
Killexams : FBI is 'deeply concerned' about Apple's new security protections, saying it will hurt the agency's ability to protect children, stop cyberattcks and prevent terrorism - while ...

FBI is 'deeply concerned' about Apple's new security protections, saying it will hurt the agency's ability to protect children, stop cyberattcks and prevent terrorism - while privacy advocates rejoice

  • The FBI is 'deeply concerned' about Apple's decision to add new security protections to its cloud storage system nationwide
  • The agency said the change would hurt its ability to protect against criminal acts including cyber-attacks, violence against children and drug trafficking
  • The encryption option will be available for all U.S. customers by the end of this year and for other countries starting next year
  • The total number of data breaches more than tripled between 2013 and 2021, exposing 1.1 billion personal records across the globe in 2021 alone, Apple said

The FBI is 'deeply concerned' about Apple's decision to add new security protections to its cloud storage system because it would hinder the agency's ability to prevent a range of crimes. 

The company already uses end to end encryption for iMessages between Apple devices - which means the messages can only be read on the smartphones, not by Apple or law enforcement. 

With this update announced Wednesday, the tech giant will allow users to protect the vast majority of the data they upload to iCloud. 

'This hinders our ability to protect the American people from criminal acts ranging from cyber-attacks and violence against children to drug trafficking, organized crime and terrorism,' an FBI spokesperson told the Washington Post.  

The FBI is 'deeply concerned' about Apple's decision to add new security protections to its cloud storage system nationwide because it would hinder the agency's ability to prevent a range of crimes

The FBI added that it was 'deeply concerned with the threat end-to-end and user-only-access encryption pose.' 

'In this age of cybersecurity and demands for 'security by design,' the FBI and law enforcement partners need "lawful access by design."' 

The new encryption option will be available for public software testers immediately, for all U.S. customers by the end of this year and for other countries starting next year, Apple said in its announcement - adding that it may not reach every country by the end of 2023. 

'Advanced Data Protection is Apple’s highest level of cloud data security, giving users the choice to protect the vast majority of their most sensitive iCloud data with end-to-end encryption so that it can only be decrypted on their trusted devices,' Ivan Krstić, Apple’s head of Security Engineering and Architecture, said in a statement. 

WHAT IS END-TO-END ENCRYPTION?

End-to-end encryption ensures only the two participants of a chat can read messages, and no one in between – not even the company that owns the service.

End-to-end encryption is intended to prevent data being read or secretly modified when it is in transit between the two parties.

The cryptographic keys needed to access the service are automatically provided only to the two people in each conversation. 

In decrypted form, messages are accessible by a third party – which makes them interceptable by governments for law enforcement reasons.

Facebook-owned WhatsApp is already encrypted, and now Mark Zuckerberg is looking to do the same with Facebook Messenger and Instagram Direct. 

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According to security experts cited by Apple, the total number of data breaches more than tripled between 2013 and 2021, exposing 1.1 billion personal records across the globe in 2021 alone. 

This is not the first time that Apple has been in conflict with law enforcement over providing access to users' data. 

In 2020, Apple decided to scale back plans to further encrypt iCloud data after receiving significant pushback from the FBI, multiple sources said at that time.  

Still, the new privacy policy is likely to throw a wrench into an especially effective law enforcement tool. 

During a six-month period covered in Apple’s exact transparency report, the company said it had turned over users’ content for legal reasons 3,980 times, mostly in the United States and Brazil. 

Privacy experts were very pleased with Apple’s announcement.

'This is great,' Meredith Whittaker, president of Signal, an encrypted chat app, told the Post. 'There’s been enough pressure and enough narrative work that they see the side of history forming. It’s really incredible.'

The tech giant also said it was making iPhones compatible with physical security keys that connect to the phone so that users can require them to access their device. This would prevent attackers who steal passwords and user names from breaking into phones.  

'At Apple, we are unwavering in our commitment to provide our users with the best data security in the world. We constantly identify and mitigate emerging threats to their personal data on device and in the cloud,' said Craig Federighi, Apple’s senior vice president of Software Engineering. 

'Our security teams work tirelessly to keep users’ data safe, and with iMessage Contact Key Verification, Security Keys, and Advanced Data Protection for iCloud, users will have three powerful new tools to further protect their most sensitive data and communications.' 

Despite Apple's reputation for being pro-privacy, two developers recently put out a report that found the company is collecting data on its customers while they use pre-installed apps - such as App Store, Apple Music, Apple TV, Books and Stocks - even when they have turned off analytics sharing. 

These apps sent Apple requests that include what apps a user looked at, including those relating to sexual preference and religion, the stocks they are watching and what advertisements they saw.

The data collection also includes ID numbers and the type of device used, which is enough for device fingerprinting.

'In this age of cybersecurity and demands for 'security by design,' the FBI and law enforcement partners need "lawful access by design,"' the agency said

'This is great,' Meredith Whittaker, president of Signal, an encrypted chat app, told the Post. 'There’s been enough pressure and enough narrative work that they see the side of history forming. It’s really incredible'

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Thu, 08 Dec 2022 07:47:00 -0600 text/html https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-11517909/FBI-deeply-concerned-Apples-new-security-protections-saying-hurt-agencys-work.html
Killexams : This iOS Setting Ups Your Password Security Game This iOS trick will help keep your passwords secure. Stephen Shankland/CNET © Provided by CNET This iOS trick will help keep your passwords secure. Stephen Shankland/CNET

Password security is serious business. One compromised password -- especially if it's reused or easily guessed -- can spell trouble for multiple accounts. For example, if your Netflix account password winds up in a data leak, and you used the same password for your bank account, a lot more than your show binge history could be visible to bad actors online.

© Provided by CNET

If you want added password protection, you can check out an iOS feature that will alert you to compromised passwords, passwords that need strengthening or passwords that have appeared in a data leak. Apple's Security Recommendations feature for passwords operates independently of Passkeys and third-party password managers. 

If you haven't set yourself up with a password manager, you really should. Check out our top picks for password managers in 2022

Here's how to get started on iPhone and iPad: 

1. Open the Settings app on your Apple device

2. Scroll down and tap Passwords

3. You'll be prompted to unlock with Touch ID or your device password

4. Tap Security Recommendations 

5. Toggle on Detect Compromised Passwords

After you've enabled that setting, Apple will supply you two lists: High Priority and Other Recommendations. High Priority will notify you if one of your passwords has appeared in a data leak, as well as the ability to change the password on the service's website or delete the password from your device. The Other Recommendations list suggests changing passwords that have been reused or are easily guessed. 

If your passwords are secure, you'll see a little green checkmark next to Security Recommendations. CNET reached out to Apple for further clarification and we'll update when we hear back. 

For more, check out data privacy tips experts want you to know and browser settings to change that will boost your privacy. 

Tue, 06 Dec 2022 22:00:11 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/this-ios-setting-ups-your-password-security-game/ar-AA150jp1
Killexams : Apple launches new Apple ID, iMessage, iCloud security protections

AppleInsider may earn an affiliate commission on purchases made through links on our site.

Apple has announced a series of three powerful new tools to protect users' most sensitive data, in new iCloud and iMessage features that will be rolling out between now and the end of 2023.

As far back as 2015, Apple was stepping up security with two-factor authentication on the App Store. For 2023, it's implementing a trio of further security options for all users.

"Apple makes the most secure mobile devices on the market," Ivan Krstic, Apple's head of Security Engineering and Architecture, said in a statement. "And now, we are building on that powerful foundation."

"Advanced Data Protection is Apple's highest level of cloud data security," continued Krstic, "giving users the choice to protect the vast majority of their most sensitive iCloud data with end-to-end encryption so that it can only be decrypted on their trusted devices."

Apple's three new or expanded data protections are:

  • iMessage Contact Key Verification (coming 2023)
  • Security Keys for Apple ID (coming early 2023)
  • Advanced Data Protection for iCloud (in beta now, US by end of 2022, globally in 2023)

"At Apple, we are unwavering in our commitment to provide our users with the best data security in the world," said Craig Federighi, Apple's senior vice president of Software Engineering. "We constantly identify and mitigate emerging threats to their personal data on device and in the cloud."

"Our security teams work tirelessly to keep users' data safe," he continued, "and with iMessage Contact Key Verification, Security Keys, and Advanced Data Protection for iCloud, users will have three powerful new tools to further protect their most sensitive data and communications."

With the optional iMessage Contact Key Verification, users who enable it will get alerted, says Apple, "if an exceptionally advanced adversary, such as a state-sponsored attacker, were ever to succeed breaching cloud servers and inserting their own device to eavesdrop on these encrypted communications."

The same feature also allows users to compare what Apple calls a Contact Verification Code, "in person, on FaceTime, or through another secure call."

Security Keys for Apple ID

This takes Apple's existing two-factor authentication and strengthens it. by require one of those two factors, to be a hardware security key. Users will have the option to use this, and if they choose to, will then also get a choice of third-party hardware security keys.

"This feature is designed for users who, often due to their public profile, face concerted threats to their online accounts, such as celebrities, journalists, and members of government," says Apple.

Advanced Data Protection for iCloud

Multiple categories of iCloud data, such as passwords in iCloud Keychain and health information, are already protected using end-to-end encryption. Once the new feature is available, users can choose to encrypt a further 9 categories.

Those new categories include iCloud Backup, Notes and Photos. Apple notes that only iCloud Mail, Contacts, and Calendar remain without end to end encryption, and says it's because of "the need to interoperate with the global email, contacts, and calendar systems."

Craig Federighi

Craig Federighi

The Wall Street Journal's Joanna Stern asked Federighi why Apple has chosen now to do this, when security experts have been calling for it for years. He replied that Apple has been consistently working on the issue.

"Some of the steps we took over a decade ago and designing iCloud and the way we encrypted were necessary precursors to build toward this moment," he said, "and using end to encryption for the other types of data like passwords and browser history and so forth, help [improve] that technology."

Wed, 07 Dec 2022 21:31:00 -0600 en text/html https://appleinsider.com/articles/22/12/07/apple-launches-new-apple-id-imessage-icloud-security-protections
Killexams : Apple Announces End-to-End Encryption Option for iCloud Photos, Notes, Backups, and More

Apple today announced it is expanding end-to-end encryption to many additional iCloud data categories on an opt-in basis for enhanced security.

Apple advanced security Advanced Data Protection screen Feature
iCloud already protects 14 data categories using end-to-end encryption by default, including the Messages app when backups are disabled, passwords stored in iCloud Keychain, Health data, Apple Maps search history, Apple Card transactions, and more, as outlined in this Apple support document. With the optional Advanced Data Protection feature, the number of iCloud data categories that use end-to-end encryption rises to 23.

Advanced Data Protection will be available on the iPhone, iPad, and Mac starting with iOS 16.2, iPadOS 16.2, and macOS 13.1 later this month and provides end-to-end encryption for the following additional iCloud categories:

  • Device Backups and Messages Backups
  • iCloud Drive
  • Notes
  • Photos
  • Reminders
  • Voice Memos
  • Safari Bookmarks
  • Siri Shortcuts
  • Wallet Passes

Apple says the only major iCloud data categories that are still not protected by end-to-end encryption are Mail, Contacts, and Calendar because of the "need to interoperate with the global email, contacts, and calendar systems" that use legacy technologies.

Advanced Data Protection for iCloud is available to test starting with the latest iOS 16.2, iPadOS 16.2, and macOS 13.1 beta versions being released today. Apple says the optional security feature will be available to U.S. users by the end of the year and will start rolling out to the rest of the world in early 2023.

End-to-end encrypted iCloud data can only be decrypted on your trusted Apple devices where you're signed in with your Apple ID account, ensuring that the data remains secure even in the case of a data breach in the cloud. Not even Apple has access to the encryption keys, so if you lose access to your account, you can only recover the data using your device passcode or password, recovery contact, or recovery key. Users will be guided to set up at least one recovery contact or recovery key before they turn on Advanced Data Protection.

"Advanced Data Protection is Apple's highest level of cloud data security, giving users the choice to protect the vast majority of their most sensitive iCloud data with end-to-end encryption so that it can only be decrypted on their trusted devices," said Ivan Krstić, Apple's head of Security Engineering and Architecture. "For users who opt in, Advanced Data Protection keeps most iCloud data protected even in the case of a data breach in the cloud."

You can turn off Advanced Data Protection at any time. Upon doing so, your device will securely upload the required encryption keys to Apple servers, and your account will revert to a standard level of protection, according to Apple.

When Advanced Data Protection is enabled, access to your data via iCloud.com is disabled by default. Users have the option to turn on data access on iCloud.com, which allows the web browser and Apple to have temporary access to data-specific encryption keys.

Advanced Data Protection is designed to maintain end-to-end encryption for most shared iCloud content as long as all participants have Advanced Data Protection enabled, including iCloud Shared Photo Library, iCloud Drive shared folders, and shared Notes. However, Apple says iWork collaboration, the Shared Albums feature in Photos, and sharing content with "anyone with a link" do not support Advanced Data Protection.

For a more technical overview of Advanced Data Protection, read the iCloud security overview and the Apple Platform Security guide.

Wed, 07 Dec 2022 03:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.macrumors.com/2022/12/07/apple-advanced-data-protection/
Killexams : Apple is bringing end-to-end encryption to iCloud backups. Here's what it means
Image: June Wan/ZDNET

Apple has unveiled plans to let users choose to encrypt their iCloud backups in a move that will thwart hackers – and also put limits on law enforcement requests for user data.   

The new feature, known as Advanced Data Protection for iCloud, will allow users to encrypt data on Apple's servers and thus prevent Apple itself from accessing a user's content. The new content types that support end-to-end encryption (E2EE) include iCloud backups, Notes, and Photos. 

This approach extends the 14 data categories that by default are protected by E2EE, such as iCloud Keychain, Health data, Messages in iCloud, Maps, and Safari history. Now, with the new approach, the categories have expanded to 23

As Apple notes, with Advanced Data Protection, only a user's trusted devices have access to those categories of data. It will protect user content even in the event attackers compromise iCloud servers.

Also: This mind-blowing iPhone headset gave me a glimpse of Apple's AR future

Advanced Data Protection for iCloud will be available to US users by the end of the year. It will start rolling out to the rest of the world in early 2023. The option will be available in the soon-to-be released iOS 16.2, iPadOS 16.2, and macOS 13.1.

"Apple makes the most secure mobile devices on the market. And now, we are building on that powerful foundation," Ivan Krstić, Apple's head of security engineering and architecture, said in an announcement.

"Advanced Data Protection is Apple's highest level of cloud data security, giving users the choice to protect the vast majority of their most sensitive iCloud data with end-to-end encryption so that it can only be decrypted on their trusted devices."

Digital rights group Electronic Frontiers Foundation (EFF) welcomed E2EE iCloud backups – something it's long campaigned for. Apple chief Tim Cook previously explained Apple hadn't encrypted iCloud backups because users sometimes lose their private key and then seek help from Apple to regain access to their data.

"Encryption is one of the most important tools we have for maintaining privacy and security online," said EFF's Joe Mullin. "Apple's on-device encryption is strong, but some especially sensitive iCloud data, such as photos and backups, has continued to be vulnerable to government demands and hackers."

Also: Ransomware: Why it's still a big threat, and where the gangs are going next

Categories that remain not protected by E2EE include iCloud Mail, Contacts, and Calendar because of the need to interoperate with global email, contacts, and calendar systems, according to Apple. 

"For users who opt in, Advanced Data Protection keeps most iCloud data protected even in the case of a data breach in the cloud," Apple said.

Not everyone is happy, though. According to The Washington Post, the FBI has said it is "deeply concerned" with the threat end-to-end and user-only-access encryption poses, saying that it hinders the agency's ability to protect against criminal acts. Many governments and law enforcement agencies are thinking that the increasing use of end-to-end encryption will make it harder for them to gain access to information. 

For security conscious individuals and at-risk public personalities, Apple is also introducing support for third-party hardware security keys with two-factor authentication for Apple ID. The security key becomes one of two factors and is required to access the account, and does prevent phishing attacks that compromise the second factor. 

Another security enhancement for public personalities and others who might be targeted by advanced attackers is iMessage Contact Key Verification. This feature lets users verify that they are only messaging with the people they intend. 

Once a user enables iMessage Contact Key Verification, they'll receive automatic alerts if an attacker succeeds in breaching Apple's servers, inserts their own device in there, and eavesdrops on encrypted communications. iMessage Contact Key Verification users can also compare a Contact Verification Code in person, on FaceTime, or through another secure call, according to Apple.

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 06:27:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.zdnet.com/article/apple-is-bringing-end-to-end-encryption-to-icloud-backups-heres-what-it-means/
Killexams : Apple's Craig Federighi Discusses Expanded iCloud End-to-End Encryption

Apple today announced the launch of an Advanced Data Protection feature that expands end-to-end encryption to additional data stored in iCloud, including ‌iCloud‌ Backup, iCloud Drive, Reminders, Notes, and more. With the launch of the feature, Apple's Craig Federighi did a quick interview with The Wall Street Journal's Joanna Stern to discuss the change, and other new security features that are coming in the future.


Federighi said that expanding ‌iCloud‌ end-to-end encryption took a long time to implement because Apple needed to "build toward the moment" and prove the technology.

Some of the steps we took over a decade ago designing iCloud and the way we encrypted were necessary precursors to build toward this moment, and using end-to-end encryption for the other types of data like passwords and browser history helped prove out that technology.

With end-to-end encryption expanding to most ‌iCloud‌ services, should an attacker get access to ‌iCloud‌ data, there would be no way to decrypt it. As a downside, it will prevent information from being accessible on iCloud.com, which is why it is an opt-in feature that can be enabled or disabled dependent on the level of security and convenience each iPhone user desires.

As for data recovery, Federighi explains that a person who has Advanced Data Protection enabled that loses access to their device and forgets their ‌iCloud‌ password would need to have established a recovery key or a Data Recovery Contact to get access to their content.

A user activating this feature is taking on an additional responsibility. They're taking on responsibility for their data recovery, from setting up a Data Recovery Contact or securing a recovery key. All users might not be ready or willing to do that.

Advanced Data Protection will not allow law enforcement officials to access data like ‌iCloud‌ backups or photos, something that is possible now with unencrypted ‌iCloud‌ backups. When asked if Apple considered this when implementing Advanced Data Protection, Federighi basically said that the benefits outweigh the negatives as it provides protection to government officials who might be targeted by foreign adversaries.

We deeply appreciate the work of law enforcement and support the work of law enforcement. We view that we really have the same mission at heart, which is to keep people safe. Ultimately keeping customers' data safe has big implications on our safety more broadly. There's sensitive information that were an ill-intentioned attacker, whether that be a foreign adversary or organized crime, to get access to information of our political leaders or others who have particular secrets, or access to systems, would be a disaster for us all.

We see this as important to accomplishing the mission we share, which is to keep users safe.

Federighi said that rumors that ‌iCloud‌ backups were once scrapped because it would harm law enforcement investigations were untrue, and that the impact on law enforcement was not a consideration when implementing Advanced Data Protection. Federighi said the only way to keep customer data safe is to stay "one step ahead" of the attackers with features like Advanced Data Protection.

Federighi's full interview can be watched up above, and more information on Advanced Data Protection can be found in our dedicated article on the feature. Apple today also announced new iMessage and Apple ID security enhancements, and said that it had scrapped plans to detect known Child Sexual Abuse Material stored in iCloud Photos.

Wed, 07 Dec 2022 04:16:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.macrumors.com/2022/12/07/apple-federighi-discusses-icloud-encryption/
Killexams : Apple TV Announces Premiere Date For ‘The Reluctant Traveler’ Hosted By Eugene Levy

Eugene Levy is ready to hit the road. Apple TV+ announced today that its Levy-hosted show The Reluctant Traveler will premiere globally on February 24, 2023.

The eight-episode series follows the Schitt’s Creek star as he visits destinations in Costa Rica, Finland, Italy, Japan, Maldives, Portugal, South Africa and the United States.

Levy is a self-confessed, non-adventurous type, but apparently agreed to broaden his horizons for the show. The Reluctant Traveler is produced for Apple TV+ by Twofour. In addition to starring, Levy executive produces alongside David Brindley.

Levy won an Emmy in 2020 for his role as Johnny Rose in Schitt’s Creek.

The Reluctant Traveler joins a growing lineup of docuseries on Apple TV+, including The Big Conn about the biggest social security fraud in history; Prehistoric Planet featuring Oscar-nominated narrator Sir David Attenborough; and Make or Break, which is the World Surf League docuseries.

Tue, 13 Dec 2022 05:20:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://deadline.com/2022/12/apple-tv-the-reluctant-traveler-premiere-date-eugene-levy-1235198104/
Killexams : How to turn off an Apple Watch? Troubleshoot your device by restarting if all else fails.

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Tue, 06 Dec 2022 20:00:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/tips/2022/12/07/how-to-turn-off-an-apple-watch/10371359002/
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