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Welcome to our weekend Apple Breakfast column, which includes all of the Apple news you missed this week in a handy bite-sized roundup. We call it Apple Breakfast because we think it goes great with a morning cup of coffee or tea, but it’s cool if you want to give it a read during lunch or dinner hours too.

The price of free speech

I’ve been doing my best—and not always succeeding—to avoid writing about Elon Musk and Twitter 2.0. Part of the problem is that the “Chief Twit” so transparently wants to be the center of the conversation that even criticism of his behavior ends up playing into his hands. The best way of dealing with an attention-seeking child, in my experience, is to ignore them.

It’s difficult, however, for a website to ignore a man who publicly declares war on the company you write about. This week Musk has taken umbrage with Apple for censoring apps, taking a “secret” 30 percent cut of app revenue, and threatening to remove Twitter from the App Store (he later admitted that one was wrong). Most bizarrely, he claimed the company had reduced its ad spend on Twitter and wondered if it, therefore, “hate(s) free speech in America.”

There’s a fair bit of nonsense here. You can’t argue that Apple hates free speech because it declined to spend a sufficiently astronomical sum of money placing adverts next to white supremacists. That has nothing to do with free speech—it’s a business decision. (Incidentally, it might not have even been true, according to ad analytics.)

Furthermore, and despite apparent assurances that this won’t happen, it wouldn’t be unprecedented for Apple to remove Twitter from the App Store. Parler got booted for failing to offer rigorous content moderation and was only allowed back after it promised to do better. Fortnite was booted for trying to bypass App Store revenue cuts, and Musk reportedly wants to do the same thing for Twitter Blue subscriptions. In any case, Apple is allowed to kick people off its platform, just as Musk is free to peevishly cancel a critical blogger’s Tesla order. I sincerely doubt he believes that businesses should be obliged to work with people they don’t like.

Amongst the wrongness, however, there’s some fair criticism. The revenue cut, for example, certainly isn’t a secret, but it may be excessive and is arguably enforced by monopolistic behavior. Apple’s militantly wholesome approach to app censorship is weird and frustrating. (The company arbitrarily holds apps to a different moral standard than other forms of media. “If you want to criticize a religion,” the App Store guidelines famously stated, “write a book.”) And it has plenty of other blind spots when it comes to free speech.

Perhaps the most troubling example of this could be observed last month. Protesters in China had been communicating using AirDrop, but Apple obligingly added a restriction (in that country only) on sharing files with strangers, a decision believed to have been made in response to pressure from the state. Needless to say, Apple didn’t highlight this change in the iOS 16.1.1 release notes, nor did it comment on the matter publicly.

But this isn’t the first time Apple has helped the Chinese state to restrict free speech. The company has removed numerous apps from the App Store in China, including VPNs, RSS readers, the New York Times, podcast players, and apps related to the Dalai Lama. If there’s one thing Apple does without a fight, it’s bending over backward to limit the speech of citizens to accommodate the wishes of a repressive state.

That’s before we even get to Apple’s own employees, who as recently as last year were facing restrictions on their ability to discuss pay with colleagues. In Cupertino, censorship begins at home.

The mistake, perhaps, is to regard these decisions as political–which Musk would like them to be, because that helps him to paint Apple as a Marxist commune of woke snowflakes. But that’s exactly the opposite of the truth. Apple’s position on free speech is purely capitalist. It purges apps in China because China is an important market to see iPhones. It advertises on Twitter because that’s historically been a good place to reach customers and burnish its brand, and it will stop doing so when that’s no longer the case. These are cold business decisions. Musk thinks Apple is too political, but when it comes to free speech, I don’t think it’s political enough.

Anyway, hopefully, I never need to write about Elon Musk again, particularly as he and Tim Cook are apparently best mates now. After reading his Twitter feed I feel like I need a shower. Let us never speak of this again. Unless you insist… after all, I don’t want anyone to think I hate free speech in America.

Apple may miss many boats, but it’s only because they’re flimsy and taking on water.

If Apple is serious about sports, tvOS needs some serious upgrades. Apple TV isn’t ready for prime time.

Android’s Sunbird might actually be able to cure us of the green bubble iMessage scourge.

A judge has approved Apple’s massive MacBook keyboard lawsuit payout. Here’s how to claim your (up to) $395 check.

‘Cultural impact’ took center stage as Apple announced the 2022 App Store Awards winners.

Apple Watch Ultra users can now get the Oceanic+ app for deep-sea diving.

Video of the week

A “baffling” teardown of the 10th-gen iPad seems to have solved the Apple Pencil mystery. Enjoy:

The rumor mill

“Better speeds, better battery life, less heat.” The upcoming M2 MacBook Pro will reportedly be worth the wait.

Don’t fret, those leaked M2 Max Geekbench scores are exactly what we expect.

A new report says the iPhone 15 will get a ‘breakthrough’ camera sensor.

Apple’s upcoming xrOS may be the start of a whole new ecosystem of devices.

Jason Cross predicts everything coming from Apple in December. Are any holiday surprises on the way?

Podcast of the week

This episode is all about Macworld reader and listener hot takes. You have thoughts on Apple happenings and we’re going to share and respond to what you wrote.

You can catch every episode of the Macworld Podcast on SpotifySoundcloud, the Podcasts app, or our own site.

Software updates, bugs & problems

LastPass has warned users of a ‘security incident’ that may have exposed personal data.

Google has shipped an 8th emergency Chrome update for Mac to fix a ‘high-severity’ flaw.

Apple has released iOS 16.1.2 with improved crash detection and carrier upgrades.

This week iOS 16.2 beta 3 got a second Rapid Security Response update.

And with that, we’re done for this week. If you’d like to get regular roundups, sign up for our newsletters. You can also follow us on Twitter for breaking news stories. See you next Saturday, enjoy the rest of your weekend, and stay Appley.

Sat, 03 Dec 2022 14:38:00 -0600 Author: David Price en text/html https://www.macworld.com/article/1396801/apple-free-speech-twitter-elon-musk-china.html
Killexams : Is the GoodNotes App Worth Using on a Mac? © Provided by MUO

GoodNotes 5 is a popular iPad note-taking app. It allows you to write and draw on "digital paper" with your fingers or the Apple Pencil.

The app really focuses on creating handwritten, searchable notes and markups, so it's a little surprising there's a Mac version of it. How does an app seemingly designed for a tablet translate to a computer? And do the iPad and Mac versions work well together?

We decided to answer these questions ourselves and had some ultimately disappointing results. How bad was it? Read on to find out!

A Solid Start With GoodNotes 5 for Mac

We easily downloaded GoodNotes 5 for Mac from the App Store, and it opened without issues. We were off to a good start.

Learning that the free version of the app only came with three notebooks wasn't an immediate turn-off. The notebooks seem to have infinite pages, so being restricted to three of them impacts the organization between the notebooks but not the number of notes you can take.

Seeing the page templates available in the notebooks was also kind of exciting. There are many different line types and formats to choose from, and you can even control the paper color.

The user interface is pretty intuitive here too, and easy to figure out without a tutorial.

Download: GoodNotes 5 for Mac (Free, premium version available)

Where GoodNotes for Mac Started to Go Wrong

The problems began once we had a GoodNotes notebook open and were ready to use it. The default note-taking tool was set as the pen tool—a tool designed for writing notes out by hand.

How do you write out notes by hand on a MacBook? Your main options are to click and drag on the page with an external mouse or to click and drag on the page with the MacBook's trackpad. Neither of which went very well for us.

Pulling out a graphics tablet helped us utilize the pen tool better; the other writing/drawing features, like the eraser and the highlighter, worked better too. But writing on a graphics tablet is less intuitive than writing directly on an iPad's screen.

It's also a potentially cumbersome accessory to carry around if you want to take notes during a meeting or in a class while using the Mac app.

The GoodNotes Mac app does have a text box tool that lets you type in a notebook instead of attempting to write things out by hand. But the text boxes don't have any preset margins to fit onto a GoodNotes page, and it has some odd quirks we found ourselves correcting a lot rather than focusing on note-taking.

An example quirk is if you place a text box and accidentally adjust its size while trying to move it around, the text box will not expand from the size you set while you type—this can be one-word long, but GoodNotes doesn't care.

Meanwhile, if you don't set the text box size, GoodNotes will let you type right off the page, where it becomes difficult to readjust the size.

These issues with typing notes drove home that GoodNotes really wants to be a handwritten notes app, not a typed notes one. And honestly, if we're typing out notes, we'd rather do it in Microsoft Word or the arguably superior word processor Apple Pages. Even Notes or Text Edit offer better typing options!

The main function of GoodNotes 5—being a digital notebook you can write in and more easily edit than paper—just doesn't make sense on Mac's interface. So as a Mac-only note-taking app, it's a hard pass for us.

What About Editing PDFs in GoodNotes for Mac?

Annotating PDFs went fairly well in GoodNotes for Mac. It was easy to upload a file, and highlighting text with a mouse or trackpad was as easy to do here as in Preview and while using the Markup feature on Mac.

Writing notes by hand onto the PDFs came with the same issues as trying to handwrite full notes, but at least the text box options were pretty easy to implement here.

The main downside to annotating a PDF was that the PDF file we uploaded took up space as a notebook in the app. Since we were using the free version of GoodNotes, we only had room for three notebooks, which meant we didn't have much room for annotating more PDFs or for note-taking.

The full version of GoodNotes is a one-time purchase of $11.99, and it comes with unlimited notebooks plus lots of folder options for organizing PDFs you highlight in the future.

But with free PDF editing options like Preview and Markup already built into Macs, it doesn't seem worth paying for GoodNotes just for that. Granted, paying for GoodNotes gets you the full app on your iPad, iPhone, and Mac. But we wouldn't recommend paying if you plan to only use the app on your Mac.

Using GoodNotes' Mac and iPad Apps Together

By now, we've reached the firm conclusion that GoodNotes isn't really an app designed for the Mac. It made a lot of sense for the iPad, though—would the Mac version of GoodNotes do better if used in tandem with the iPad version? Let's find out.

GoodNotes connected our MacBook and iPad via iCloud, meaning both devices were logged into the same Apple ID and on the same Wi-Fi network.

Within these conditions, we found that we could make a mark in a GoodNotes notebook on one device and see that pop up on the other in 10 to 30 seconds. The more writing or drawing, the longer the synchronization took.

This was pretty fast in our book, and it was nice to keep the same notebook open on both devices simultaneously without any issues. The notebook pages also keep the same formatting on both devices, so there aren't any surprises when you go between.

Despite this synchronicity, though, we found using the two apps at once wasn't particularly useful. In the end, it was easier just to use the iPad version for everything.

Since GoodNotes boasts that its software can read handwriting and make it searchable, something we thought could be useful was writing out notes on the iPad and then using the Mac GoodNotes app to find where in the notebook we'd written something.

This ended up not being possible. The Mac version could search typed text, but not handwritten text, whether the writing originated on the iPad or the MacBook.

GoodNotes does list on their site that handwriting recognition comes with the full version of the app, but we found the iPad version was able to do the handwriting search. So perhaps only the Mac app is limited.

We also found typing notes in the Mac app and then drawing figures with the iPad was easy enough to do, but it was also possible to type notes on the iPad and leave the Mac out entirely.

Certainly, we could imagine scenarios where we'd type a bunch of text boxes, and arrange them and make drawings and corrections later on the iPad. But for a lot of note-taking, it'd just be easier to use one device.

It also wasn't easy to rearrange drawn elements once they were on a page, no matter which device we used. Use of the selection tool moved drawn and written text alongside the typed text, so it wouldn't be easy to correct or reorganize any notes made on the iPad in the Mac version either.

GoodNotes 5: A Great iPad App That Doesn't Belong on Mac

Though we can definitely say that GoodNotes 5 is a great iPad app (particularly if you have an Apple Pencil), it is not an app that was in any way designed for use on a Mac. The Mac version of GoodNotes is just the iPad app slapped onto a computer. And it just doesn't work.

We're disappointed in this finding, as it's always great to find apps that work well on several devices and that can be used in tandem on those devices. But we'll comfort ourselves knowing better apps exist and continue using GoodNotes as it was intended to be—on a tablet!

Wed, 07 Dec 2022 21:15:16 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/is-the-goodnotes-app-worth-using-on-a-mac/ar-AA1538et
Killexams : Apple could have two non-China problems on its hands in 2023: analyst

Apple could have a few other problems on its hands in 2023 besides an uncertain manufacturing situation in China, according to one Apple bull on the Street.

"I think there are two main issues laying ahead of Apple for 2023," Oppenheimer analyst Martin Yang said on Yahoo Finance Live. "Number one is we have seen two years of very strong iPhone upgrades. That may weaken into 2023 because of two factors. One is the majority of the installed base is most likely upgraded. And then continuing macroeconomic pressure will cause certain groups of consumers to delay their upgrade. Secondly, there are ongoing pressures on Apple's software revenues."

A customer looks at the Apple iPhone 14 range at the Apple Fifth Avenue store in Manhattan, New York City, U.S., September 16, 2022. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly © Provided by Yahoo Finance US A customer looks at the Apple iPhone 14 range at the Apple Fifth Avenue store in Manhattan, New York City, U.S., September 16, 2022. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

Apple's stock is already under pressure amid the COVID situation out of a key manufacturing hub in China.

China's COVID-19 cases are surging toward record highs just as the country was moving away from its Zero COVID policy. Violent protests erupted at the flagship plant of iPhone maker Foxconn last week, and have intensified across the country in accurate days.

"Apple is struggling to overcome a combination of shutdowns and worker protests at a key production facility in Zhengzhou, China, that resulted in Apple negatively pre announcing on Nov. 6," EvercoreISI analyst Amit Daryanani wrote in a note on Tuesday. "Since then the situation in Zhengzhou appears to have somewhat improved but not back to normal. We think the site has been operating at ~60 70% utilization for nearly a month. To reflect the continued headwinds we are adjusting our [quarterly] estimates lower as iPhone demand could get affected by 5-8 million units (mostly at high-end) and negatively impact revenues by ~$5-8 billion in [the current quarter, which ends after December]."

Daryanani isn't alone in his near-term concern on Apple's bottom line because of China.

"It has been a gut punch at the worst time possible for Apple," Wedbush Managing Director Dan Ives said on Yahoo Finance Live. "We're talking shortages in a lot of Apple stores of upwards of 30% of iPhones in terms of the iPhone 14."

Ives estimated that Apple now has "significant" iPhone shortages that could wipe off 5% to 10% of units in the current quarter.

Brian Sozzi is an editor-at-large and anchor at Yahoo Finance. Follow Sozzi on Twitter @BrianSozzi and on LinkedIn.

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Tue, 29 Nov 2022 06:22:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/apple-could-have-two-non-china-problems-on-its-hands-in-2023-analyst/ar-AA14HKsE
Killexams : Apple will pay up to $395 to people with broken MacBook butterfly keyboards [Updated]
The very first of the butterfly-switch keyboard designs, as introduced in the 12-inch MacBook from 2015.
Enlarge / The very first of the butterfly-switch keyboard designs, as introduced in the 12-inch MacBook from 2015.

Update, 5:20pm ET: Girard Sharp partner Simon Grille, one of the attorneys representing the plaintiffs in the lawsuit, contacted Ars to clarify that the payouts would cover affected MacBook buyers in any US state, not just the seven initially involved in the lawsuit as we originally stated.

The class definition in the approval order (PDF) covers "all persons and entities in the United States who purchased, other than for resale, one or more Class Computers."

Original story: If you bought a MacBook with one of Apple's low-profile butterfly-switch keyboards, and if you ever had that keyboard repaired, good news! A judge has approved a $50 million settlement to a class-action lawsuit that Apple agreed to in July, meaning that payouts to affected users (and the attorneys involved) can begin soon.

According to Macworld, there will be three tiers of payouts: $50 to people who had individual keycaps replaced, $125 to people who had one keyboard replacement, and $395 to people who had to go in for two or more replacements.

For those unfamiliar, MacBooks introduced between 2015 and 2019 used a new low-profile keyboard with a "butterfly" switch mechanism that saved space but also resulted in firmer keys that moved less than they did before. Early complaints were mostly subjective and centered on the keyboard's feel compared to previous scissor-switch designs. But as time passed, it became clear that butterfly-switch keyboards also failed at a higher rate than the scissor-switch designs. These problems persisted despite at least four major revisions to the butterfly-switch mechanism.

Although the company never admitted fault (and maintains, despite the class-action settlement, that it didn't do anything wrong), Apple launched a repair program in 2018 that offered four years of free repair coverage to owners of all MacBook models with butterfly keyboards. Tellingly, this program covered all butterfly-switch MacBook models, including those that were introduced after the repair program was started, suggesting that the design was flawed in ways Apple could not address with hardware revisions. Apple re-introduced a modified scissor-switch keyboard in the 16-inch MacBook Pro in late 2019, and all MacBooks introduced since then have continued to use scissor-switch designs.

The settlement that was approved today resulted from a lawsuit that was granted class-action status in March 2021. If you had a keyboard replaced through Apple, you should be contacted automatically about your payout, but you will be able to find more information at KeyboardSettlement.com when the site is live.

For users who are currently using a broken butterfly-switch keyboard, Apple's Keyboard Service Program is still active, though the number of models it covers is slowly dwindling as time passes. The program "covers eligible MacBook, MacBook Air, and MacBook Pro models for 4 years after the first retail sale of the unit," which at this point would mostly exclude the first wave of butterfly-keyboard Macs introduced between 2015 and 2017.

Wed, 30 Nov 2022 05:08:00 -0600 Andrew Cunningham en-us text/html https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2022/11/judge-approves-50-million-settlement-over-broken-macbook-butterfly-keyboards/
Killexams : Mark Zuckerberg and Elon Musk Both Have Problems With Apple's App Store Controls

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg has taken a stand against Apple's control of its App Store — echoing complaints made by newly-minted Twitter owner Elon Musk.

L: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds I Getty Images || R: Win McNamee | Getty Images

During an interview at the New York Times' DealBook Summit on Wednesday, Zuckerberg took issue with Apple's control over its App Store. "I do think Apple has sort of singled themselves out as the only company that is trying to control like unilaterally what what apps get on a device," he said, "and I don't think that's a sustainable or good place to be."

Zuckerberg continued, "I do think it is problematic for one company to be able to control what kind of app experiences get on the device."

His comments come in the wake of similar criticisms from Elon Musk. In a series of tweets that also addressed what he claimed was Apple's reduced Twitter ad buys, Musk called Apple's control over the App Store "a serious problem." The billionaire also said Twitter could be kicked out of the App Store without giving a reason.

Zuckerberg didn't address Musk's words about Apple, but his criticisms of the company's policies aren't new. Two years ago, he accused Apple of blocking competitors and charging "monopoly rents" in the App Store. Musk also blasted Apple's App Store fee—the company takes 15% to 30% of all iOS in-app purchases.

In 2021, Apple changed its privacy policy, preventing social apps like Meta's Facebook from targeting users with ads. As a result, companies relying on digital advertising profits have seen revenues fall, with Meta's profits plummeting by 50 percent.

Wed, 30 Nov 2022 15:58:00 -0600 Steve Huff en text/html https://www.entrepreneur.com/business-news/elon-musk-and-mark-zuckerberg-both-take-issue-with-apples/440175
Killexams : Musk asks if Apple “hates free speech” because it cut Twitter ad spending
An iPhone screen prompt asks a user to confirm if they want to remove the Twitter app from the device.
Getty Images | Samuel Corum

Twitter owner and CEO Elon Musk yesterday asked if Apple "hates free speech"—because the iPhone maker isn't spending as much on Twitter advertising as it used to. "Apple has mostly stopped advertising on Twitter. Do they hate free speech in America?" Musk wrote. "What's going on here @tim_cook?"

Musk didn't explain how Apple's Twitter ad spending is related to its stance on free speech. But he subsequently wrote a series of tweets criticizing Apple's policies and claimed that Apple threatened to pull Twitter off the iOS App Store.

"Apple has also threatened to withhold Twitter from its App Store, but won't tell us why," Musk wrote a bit later. Musk did not provide further details on Apple's demands or explain how Apple conveyed the message to Twitter.

"It's a real problem. Apple and Google effectively control access to most of the Internet via their app stores," Musk wrote today.

Twitter moderation laxer under Musk

Apple does pull apps from the iOS store for violating App Store policies, and many developers have complained about apps or app updates being rejected without a good explanation. For a social media company like Twitter, it's possible that Apple has concerns about content moderation.

Apple kicked Parler off its app store in January 2021 and allowed it back on in April 2021 after the self-described "free speech" social network made changes to its content moderation. Google booted Parler in January 2021 and allowed the company back in September 2022.

While Twitter apparently had no problems staying on Apple's App Store before Musk bought the company, mass layoffs and resignations have made it harder to enforce Twitter's content moderation rules. The Musk-led Twitter has also chosen to stop enforcing its policy on misleading information about COVID-19, and some of Musk's tweets yesterday suggest Musk isn't happy about Apple's stance on COVID misinformation.

We contacted Apple about Musk's claims and will update this article if we get a response. Musk wrote on Friday that he would "make an alternative phone" if Apple and Google kick Twitter off their app stores.

Musk: “Who else has Apple censored?”

After one app maker told Musk yesterday that "During Covid, Apple demanded our apps filter some search terms from being returned," Musk shared the tweet and wrote, "Who else has Apple censored?"

In another tweet about the search-term filtering, Musk wrote, "Secret suppression of free speech by Apple. Customers were never told. What the hell is going on here?" The app developer Musk was responding to had claimed that "Apple disallowed almost anything related to Covid, especially vaccines or human origins of the virus."

In response to other people's tweets saying that "Apple should support free speech" and that "Monopolies should be subject to the same limits we placed on our government in the Bill of Rights," Musk replied, "Absolutely, especially if done in collusion with the government."

Musk also polled users, asking whether "Apple should publish all censorship actions it has taken that affect its customers."

Musk further criticized what he called Apple's "secret 30% tax on everything you buy through their App Store." Apple's App Store commission is far from a secret and is the subject of a well-publicized lawsuit between Apple and Epic Games in which dozens of state attorneys general sided with Epic. Apple's commission is 15 percent for developers with less than $1 million of annual App Store revenue under a rule change made in 2020.

After his flurry of Apple-related tweets, Musk wrote, "This is a battle for the future of civilization. If free speech is lost even in America, tyranny is all that lies ahead."

Wed, 30 Nov 2022 02:37:00 -0600 Jon Brodkin en-us text/html https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2022/11/musk-asks-if-apple-hates-free-speech-because-it-cut-twitter-ad-spending/
Killexams : Apple @ Work Podcast: Sharpen seeks to offer a free and fast way to learn

Apple @ Work is brought to you by Mosyle, the only Apple Unified Platform. Mosyle is the only solution that fully integrates 5 different applications on a single Apple-only platform, allowing Businesses and Schools to easily and automatically deploy, manage & protect all their Apple devices . Over 32,000 organizations leverage Mosyle solutions to automate the deployment, management and security of millions of Apple devices daily. Request a FREE account today and discover how you can put your Apple fleet on auto-pilot at a price point that is hard to believe.

In this episode of Apple @ Work, Justin Singh from McGraw-Hill joins the show to talk about the Sharpen app. Sharpen is designed as a fast and free way to learn about anything.

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Mon, 28 Nov 2022 20:30:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://9to5mac.com/2022/11/29/sharpen/
Killexams : Musk asks if Apple hates ‘free speech in America’ after Twitter advertising drop-off

Twitter owner Elon Musk publicly slammed Apple on Monday for suspending some of its advertising on the social media platform, asking if leaders of the tech company “hate free speech.”

“Apple has mostly stopped advertising on Twitter,” Musk announced.

“Do they hate free speech in America?”

Musk called out Apple CEO Tim Cook in a second tweet, writing: “What’s going on here @tim_cook?”

The Tesla and SpaceX CEO, who acquired Twitter in a $44 billion deal closed last month, has described himself as a “free speech absolutist” and promised to advocate for it using his ownership of the platform.

Racist language and misinformation have reportedly surged on Twitter since Musk’s acquisition, and left-leaning watchdog Media Matters for America found that 50 of Twitter’s leading 100 advertisers appear to have halted their work with the site.

Those 50 companies made up $750 million in spending on Twitter over the course of 2022, according to the analysis.

Musk claimed that Apple “has also threatened to withhold Twitter from its App Store, but won’t tell us why.”

The Hill has reached out to Apple for comment on the alleged threats.

Musk posted a parade of tweets criticizing Apple for its “monopoly” on tech products and its censorship of some language.

Content sharing and publishing platform LBRY posted over its official Twitter account that “Apple may make good products, but they have been opposed to free speech for some time.”

“During Covid, Apple demanded our apps filter some search terms from being returned. If we did not filter the terms, our apps would not be allowed in the store,” the account wrote in response to Musk’s question about Apple and free speech.

“Who else has Apple censored?” responded Musk.

Mon, 28 Nov 2022 06:52:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://thehill.com/policy/technology/3753233-elon-musk-asks-if-apple-hates-free-speech-in-america-after-twitter-advertising-drop-off/
Killexams : Elon Musk says Apple stopped advertising and threatened to boot Twitter from app store

A month into Elon Musk's reign at Twitter, the chaos at the social network continues.

Musk started off the week by calling out Apple, saying the iPhone maker had threatened to block Twitter from its app store and had mostly stopped advertising on Twitter.

Twitter's billionaire owner asked in a series of tweets whether Apple hated free speech and if it would go after Tesla, his electric-car company. 

"Apple has mostly stopped advertising on Twitter. Do they hate free speech in America?" asked Musk. 

"Apple has also threatened to withhold Twitter from its App Store, but won't tell us why," he added.

He also lashed out at Apple's app store fees, posting a meme suggesting he'd prefer to "go to war" then pay the 30% cut the company takes from most purchases made through its store.

Apple did not respond to a request for comment. 

If the company has pulled back on its Twitter ads it would not be alone, with a accurate report finding Twitter had lost half of its top advertisers since Musk acquired the platform at the end of October.

Longtime Apple executive Phil Schiller deleted his Twitter account earlier this month, shortly after Musk reinstated the account of former President Donald Trump. Schiller oversees the app store. 

Trump's reinstatement prompted civil rights organizations including the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the Anti-Defamation League to urge an ad boycott of Twitter

In taking on Apple, Musk risks further ruffling the feathers of a company that had been one of Twitter's top advertisers. Apple spends well over $100 million to advertise on the social network annually, according to Bloomberg News, which cited people familiar with the matter. 

In the first quarter of this year, Apple spent $48 million on ads on Twitter, according to the Washington Post, which reviewed a document compiled from internal Twitter data. 

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 18:47:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.cbsnews.com/news/elon-musk-apple-twitter-app-store/
Killexams : Apple could have 2 non-China problems on its hands in 2023: Analyst

Apple (AAPL) could have a few other problems on its hands in 2023 besides an uncertain manufacturing situation in China, according to one Apple bull on the Street.

"I think there are two main issues lying ahead of Apple for 2023," Oppenheimer analyst Martin Yang said on Yahoo Finance Live (video above). "Number one is we've seen two years of very strong upgrade and replacement cycle for iPhone, ... and that replacement cycle strength may weaken into '23 by two factors. One is the majority of the installed base is most likely upgraded, and then continuing macroeconomic pressure will cause certain groups of consumers to delay their upgrade. Secondly, there are ongoing pressures on Apple's services software revenues."

A customer looks at the Apple iPhone 14 range at the Apple Fifth Avenue store in Manhattan, New York City, U.S., September 16, 2022. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

Apple's stock is already under pressure amid the COVID situation out of a key manufacturing hub in China.

China's COVID-19 cases are surging toward record highs just as the country was moving away from its zero-COVID policy. Violent protests erupted at the flagship plant of iPhone maker Foxconn last week and have intensified across the country in accurate days.

"Apple is struggling to overcome a combination of shutdowns and worker protests at a key production facility in Zhengzhou, China, that resulted in Apple negatively pre announcing on Nov. 6," EvercoreISI analyst Amit Daryanani wrote in a note on Tuesday. "Since then the situation in Zhengzhou appears to have somewhat improved but not back to normal. We think the site has been operating at ~60-70% utilization for nearly a month. To reflect the continued headwinds we are adjusting our [quarterly] estimates lower as iPhone demand could get affected by 5-8 million units (mostly at high-end) and negatively impact revenues by ~$5-8 billion in [the current quarter, which ends after December]."

Daryanani isn't alone in his near-term concern over Apple's bottom line because of China.

"It has been a gut punch at the worst time possible for Apple," Wedbush Managing Director Dan Ives said on Yahoo Finance Live. "We're talking shortages in a lot of Apple stores of upwards of 30% of iPhones in terms of the iPhone 14."

Ives estimated that Apple now has "significant" iPhone shortages that could wipe off 5% to 10% of units in the current quarter.

Brian Sozzi is an editor-at-large and anchor at Yahoo Finance. Follow Sozzi on Twitter @BrianSozzi and on LinkedIn.

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Tue, 29 Nov 2022 06:37:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://news.yahoo.com/apple-could-have-2-non-china-problems-on-its-hands-in-2023-analyst-201205949.html
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