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Exam Code: 920-182 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
CallPilot RIs.5.0 Installation and Configuration
Nortel Configuration information hunger
Killexams : Nortel Configuration information hunger - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/920-182 Search results Killexams : Nortel Configuration information hunger - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/920-182 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Nortel Killexams : Configuration Management OK, so you mean source control :)

It can really depend a lot on your size of your projects and how much binary data you want to keep.

Note that you mentioned a Filemaker database- you usually don't get databases under control, just "code". Not sure if Filemaker separates data from code (e.g. Access databases mix data and code in the same file by default. Not a great thing).

But I'd start with your Synology's built in Git server, and research a Git client that you like. Git is a powerful tool, so creating a good GUI is difficult. IMHO, it's really worth it to learn to use it in the command-line; some day you'll want to reach for a powerful feature that is not in the GUI, or have a problem, and you'll have a steep learning curve. A bad GUI also has bad consequences.

The Git CLI is famously unintuitive, but they're making a reasonable effort at improving messages and providing commands with better names.

Mon, 21 Nov 2022 03:52:00 -0600 text/html https://arstechnica.com/civis/threads/configuration-management.1488075/
Killexams : Do This to Avoid 'Protein Hunger'

Photo: Timolina (Shutterstock)

Protein is great. Our bodies are largely made of protein, and if you lift weights, I bet you already know that eating enough protein is important for building muscle. But what if you just want to be healthy in general? What if you don’t even care that much about being healthy, but want to avoid overeating? Protein is important for you too.

A new study has put the spotlight on a lack of protein as a potential driver of overeating. Its findings give more support to an existing concept called the “protein leverage hypothesis.” This is the idea that we will eat until we get enough protein, and so if our diet is made of low-protein foods, we may end up eating a lot of food, and thus a lot of calories, just to get our fill of protein. Sometimes people call this “protein hunger.”

Why protein is important

Our bodies don’t just need protein to build new muscle tissue. We also need protein to heal and repair damage. Our bodies continually break tissues down and rebuild them, and we need protein for that task as well. Protein is also the building material for enzymes, which do everything from digesting food to detoxifying chemicals in our livers to helping our blood clot. Many hormones are made of protein; the receptors that receive hormonal messages are made of protein as well.

So we need a steady influx of protein just to keep our body functioning. And if we exercise—which is important for a healthy body—we need protein to support that as well. Without enough protein, we can actually lose muscle mass over time. Loss of muscle is one of the perils of aging, but we can reverse it with strength training and, yes, sufficient protein.

And if the protein leverage hypothesis is correct, we also need protein to keep us from overeating.

Put all that together, and it’s worth making sure to get enough protein in your diet. At an absolute minimum, we need 0.36 grams of protein per pound of body weight per day (so, 72 grams for a 200-pound person). We’ve run the numbers for various body sizes and activity levels here.

“Healthy” foods are often low in protein

If you’ve heard the average American eats “too much” protein, stay with me a minute. It’s true that, on average, we eat more than the minimum requirement of 0.36 grams per pound. But the minimum requirement is low; it’s meant to be the amount that will keep you from being protein-deficient. Athletes will eat more, up to a full 1 gram per pound of body weight. Most of us should be somewhere between those numbers, especially if we’re active. And protein isn’t something where “too much” is harmful, so it’s good to err on the side of getting more than the recommendation rather than less.

So what happens when we decide we want to eat healthy? Chances are, if you’re on a diet, some of the things you’ll cut out are good sources of protein: burgers, cheese, fatty red meat, processed meats like hot dogs and deli meat.

Maybe you’ll swap the burgers for chicken breast, which should be fine from a protein standpoint—but then you’re also eating smaller portions. A Big Mac has 26 grams of protein in those two little patties; this chicken-based American Heart Association certified Lean Cuisine meal only has 14 grams. If you’re going for plant-based meals instead, those tend to be even lower in protein. A salad with dressing usually has no protein unless you’re adding something like chicken, cheese, or nuts—and there usually isn’t much protein in a sprinkling of cheese or nuts.

The amount of protein you need when you’re eating in a calorie deficit is actually the same, or arguably more, than when you’re not trying to lose weight. It’s fine if you don’t want to eat a Big Mac, but a proper low-calorie replacement for that meal would be something that still gives you 26 grams of protein, but with fewer calories from fats and carbs.

Which foods are high in protein?

To help you navigate this issue, let’s talk about which foods are high in protein, and which look like they should be, but aren’t.

Foods that are high in protein without being high in calories include:

  • Chicken breasts and thighs
  • Ground beef, especially leaner mixes like 90/10
  • Greek yogurt or Skyr
  • Whey powder and other protein powders
  • Fish (depending on how fatty it is)
  • Tofu and tempeh
  • Beans and lentils, although they come with a sizable helping of carbs—depending on the type of bean and the way it’s prepared, these could easily be on either of our two lists.

Foods that may not be as high in protein as you think they are:

  • Eggs have 6 grams of protein each; it adds up, sure, but an egg is not a protein bomb.
  • Foods that have the word “protein” on their label are usually still pretty low in protein. A protein muffin may have more protein than a regular muffin, but neither is actually that high in protein.
  • Quinoa has more complete proteins than other foods in its category, but it’s not high in protein by itself. Quinoa has more protein than rice but about the same amount as pasta or wheat bread.
  • Peanut butter has more protein than, say, genuine butter. But the thin smear you spread on toast will only add a few grams to your daily total.

These are all still good foods to eat, but don’t mistake a two-egg omelet for a meal that gets you ahead of your protein requirement for the day. The 12 grams of protein in that omelet are far less than the 27 grams in a smallish chicken breast.

Especially if you’re trying to eat healthy, it’s worth looking up the nutrition information for a typical day’s meals and seeing how your protein intake adds up. And if you need ideas, we have a collection of cheap, easy, high-protein meals here.

  

Thu, 10 Nov 2022 05:03:00 -0600 en text/html https://lifehacker.com/do-this-to-avoid-protein-hunger-1849768279
Killexams : Hunger, Nutrition, and Health: Stepping Up to the Plate

Cate Collings, MD

The historic White House Conference on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health was an invigorating experience full of innovative ideas and ambitious goals to end hunger in America by 2030. The White House unveiled a strategy and an impressive $8 billion in public-private commitments to help millions of people with food insecurity and diet-related chronic diseases.

Much hard work remains to translate these ideas and proposals into actions that Excellerate the health of individuals and families. But health professionals, primary care physicians in particular, may be wondering what this coordinated focus on nutrition will mean for their practices and how they can ensure that their patients experience the greatest benefits.

One recurring conference theme was the need to more effectively screen for food insecurity in medical encounters. Important food assistance programs like the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, Children (WIC), the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), and even school lunch programs were initially focused primarily on eliminating sheer calorie deficit. While some of these programs have implemented nutrition standards, there remains room for improvement to the nutritional content of the food that these programs provide to better supply the nourishment humans need to help prevent and treat chronic disease. In other words, as a practicing provider, begin to discern differences between food insecurity and nutritional insecurity. Your patient may be experiencing one, neither, or both of these conditions.

As a board-certified lifestyle medicine physician, I see this White House conference as an extremely promising sign that much-needed policy and regulatory changes are coming that will expand access to nutritional counseling and food as medicine. Some federal legislation has already been proposed that represents a first step. The Medical Nutrition Equity Act and the Medical Nutrition Therapy Act, for example, would significantly expand coverage of medical nutrition therapy services.

Expanded access to medically tailored meals or food packages and produce prescriptions, particularly in communities with high rates of diet-related disease, was also a Topic of conference discussion.

Changes won't happen overnight, but there are several ways that physicians can prepare to thrive in a health system that encourages and rewards the restoration of health through nutrition and food as medicine.

Seek Nutrition Education

Writing a prescription for a medically tailored meal without understanding the science behind it is no better than a cardiologist prescribing a medication without understanding the drug's properties or benefits. Food as medicine is best prescribed by a clinician knowledgeable about nutrition and chronic disease. But few physicians receive sufficient nutrition education in medical school. We now face an opportunity for physicians to marry food-as-medicine prescriptions with fundamental knowledge of the "what and why" of those prescriptions.

In partnership with the White House Conference on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health, the American College of Lifestyle Medicine (ACLM) made a $22 million in-kind commitment to provide 5.5 hours of complimentary CME coursework to 100,000 physicians and other medical professionals treating patients in areas with a high prevalence of diet-related disease. It's easy to take advantage of this opportunity by registering here for the Lifestyle Medicine and Food as Medicine Essentials education bundle.

Inventory Your Community's Resources

Become familiar with nonprofit or private organizations that may already be helping to meet hunger and nutrition needs in your community. The Teaching Kitchen Collaborative has an interactive map of teaching kitchens and medically tailored meal and produce prescription programs. The American Academy of Family Physicians has a good Neighborhood Navigator tool to identify resources by zip code.

Startup companies that deliver medically tailored meals to patients' homes are growing in number and attracting investor attention. By identifying and connecting with these organizations, physicians can form partnerships that synergize healthcare and nutritious food sources in the community. Saint Luke's Health System's REACHN (Resilience, Education, Activity, Community, Health, Nutrition) Program is an example of a dynamic community partnership. As you prescribe lifestyle modification and connect your patients to relevant resources, emphasize to them that a lifestyle medicine prescription delivers only positive side effects, focused on eradicating the root cause of disease with the goal of health restoration.

Locate Registered Dietitians in Your Area

As more diagnoses become eligible for nutritional counseling, physicians will have increasing opportunities to collaborate with registered dietitians to whom you refer patients. It is vital that perspectives on nutrition interventions are aligned between the referring physician and the receiving dietitian. Know the style and methods of dietitians in your region so that recommendations are united and can be reinforced by members of the care team.

To promote effective collaboration, physicians and dietitians may want to participate in nutrition-related CE/CME activities together, share relevant journal articles, and review patient resources and group class topics. A good first step is for physicians to encourage dietitians to register for the free ACLM Lifestyle Medicine and Food as Medicine Essentials education bundle.

Be an Instrument of Change

If you are passionate about nutrition, work within your health system to influence change. Highlight the national priorities around food as medicine as represented at the White House conference. Encourage the replication of successful, scalable nutrition and food-as-medicine delivery models, and educate fellow clinicians on the resources that already are available. Promote partnerships with organizations in the business of providing and delivering medically tailored meals, and organize activities that raise awareness in the community. Join the growing Health Systems Council, a collaborative learning community of almost 80 health systems that are integrating lifestyle medicine, and be on the lookout for opportunities to support advocacy efforts related to nutrition policy.

Clinicians who lead the integration of nutrition programming now will demonstrate their value as the US health system evolves into one that finally, at long last, recognizes the outsized role of poor nutrition in chronic disease.

Tue, 15 Nov 2022 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/983932
Killexams : Nortel Networks

Campaign to Create Tomorrow

Learn more about The Ottawa Hospital's $500-million fundraising campaign, the largest in our city’s history, which will transform the future of healthcare in Ottawa.

Tue, 22 Nov 2022 15:13:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://obj.ca/company/nortel-networks/
Killexams : Why hunger is rising in Minnesota and what can be done to help

More people in Minnesota are struggling to put food on the table.  

Food shelves across the state are seeing more people than last year and compared to the months before the COVID-19 pandemic. Schools also are reporting more students running up school lunch debt.  

Many families are having trouble making ends meet, some for the first time and even when adults are working. Inflation has pushed up the cost of groceries by 12 percent compared to a year ago. And, the extra money flowing to households from financial support programs that were in place during the COVID-19 pandemic has now dried up, including the child tax credit, universal free school meals and expanded SNAP benefits.

Allison O’Toole, is the CEO of Second Harvest Heartland, a food bank that distributes food to about 400 food shelves in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Deisy De Leon Esqueda, is the manager of the ECHO Food Shelf in Mankato. Rob Williams is the founder and president of Every Meal, a nonprofit organization based in Roseville which works in schools to distribute food directly to students.

MPR News host Angela Davis led a conversation about rising food insecurity in Minnesota and possible solutions. Here are some highlights:

Do you consider food insecurity to be getting worse both nationally and in Minnesota?

Allison O’Toole: Yes. Times are tougher than ever before right now. We know that grocery bills and everyday expenses are off the charts making them really hard, if not impossible, for families to afford. We're hearing about a 40 percent increase in food shelf visits across our state.

Before you keep reading, take a moment to donate to MPR News. Your financial support ensures that factual and trusted news and context remain accessible to all.

Deisy De Leon Esqueda: Yes. We are seeing people that are coming in for the first time. Our numbers have actually increased from 2019 to now from 85 average households per day to 110, 120. Some families are coming in for the first time and then some have not been to the food shelf in years and are now finding themselves in this predicament and coming back.

What do you mean when you say you meet the needs of culturally diverse clients?

Deisy De Leon Esqueda: Minnesota is becoming more diverse. Before we used to give food out and I would say, “Oh, you can make a hot dish out of this.” Well, not everybody likes hot dishes and that's not always their comfort food. We're trying to do the best that we can to be able to meet their needs by giving them food that they're actually going to consume. That way people feel excited and accepted.

Allison O’Toole: What also happened through the pandemic is the disparities and who is hungry has been revealed again. We call that the racial hunger divide, where communities of color experience at least twice the rates of food insecurity than their white neighbors. So we are investing millions of dollars in making sure people and communities have the food they know and love and will eat.

What can the state legislature do in terms of policy?

Allison O’Toole: We had the privilege of hosting the Governor and Lieutenant Governor on Monday this week at Second Harvest Heartland. So, we talked a lot about this, and the state has a more than $10 billion surplus sitting there. We need to put that to good use for Minnesota families: bolstering the funding for food shelves and food banks, making big bold changes, and investing in things like Universal School meals. Hungry kids cannot learn.

Deysi De Leon Esqueda: During the pandemic, we saw our numbers decrease by almost half and that was due to these programs being established and money going out as just checks. We saw those programs work and now about 39 percent of all our visits made to the Food Shelf are children under the age of 17.

What about these long holiday breaks when kids may be out of school for two weeks? Any change this year compared to years past?

Rob Williams: We have seen a huge increase, about a 34 to 35 percent increase in kids in our schools asking for food support. Thanksgiving, winter break and spring break are also significant food gaps, and we've actually had to eliminate our winter break program which typically involves about 120 different locations throughout the state where kids can go and access food, just due to the high demand in our weekend program.

Your stories:

Shayne from Plymouth

The first phone call was from a disabled veteran that struggled with food insecurity six years ago when he and his family were living in Oklahoma. “There were weeks when we'd have only 20 dollars for food. We basically would be living off of oatmeal, cabbage and potatoes because those are the cheapest things you could buy, and I was too proud to ever go into a food,” he said.

After his family started to receive boxes of food from a food shelter, he educated himself, found a work opportunity in Minnesota, and moved to the state with his entire family. In Minnesota, he found out about the benefits he was entitled to being a disabled veteran. “I think that the state can keep reaching out to people because some are too proud to go into the food shelf. And there's a lot of people entitled to benefits that don't know it,” he said.

Jessica from Fargo

The second phone call was from a divorced mom that wanted to share how it was to be hungry. She used to work at a grocery store, but her paychecks were not enough to afford meals for herself and her kids. Within a year of demanding physical work, she ended up weighing 112 pounds. “I would have loved to sit down to dinner with my kids and I couldn't because the smallest food alone was enough,” she said.

Jessica also mentioned that she didn’t have time to go to food shelters or welfare. “I just needed a paycheck that covered my bills,” she said.

Lane from Minneapolis

The final phone call was from a woman who recently moved from another state and highlighted the kindness of Minnesotans and how well caseworkers at SNAP and other benefits work compared to other states. “I was surprised by how much I qualified for here because I have been told in other states I did not,” she said.

Lane explained how her now adult kids couldn’t afford their own housing, or college and needed to stay home taking care of their younger siblings. “Not having the money for food or housing makes every bad situation imaginable work,” she said.  

If you need a food shelf or want to donate, search for organizations in your region of Minnesota at Hunger Solutions. You can also donate directly to Second Harvest Heartland, ECHO Food Shelf and Every Meal.

Subscribe to the MPR News with Angela Davis podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or RSS. 

Use the audio player above to listen to the full conversation. 

Wed, 23 Nov 2022 09:55:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.mprnews.org/episode/2022/11/22/why-hunger-is-rising-in-minnesota-and-what-can-be-done-to-help
Killexams : Once they wanted to destroy us with hunger, now with darkness and cold. It's not going to work Zelenskyy

Ukrainian authorities have reminded their fellow citizens that the Russians will be held responsible for the historical crime of the Holodomor, as well as for their current war crimes.

Source: President Volodymyr Zelenskyy; Andrii Yermak, the Head of the President’s Office of Ukraine; Prime Minister Denys Shmyhal; Ruslan Stefanchuk, Speaker of the Verkhovna Rada [Ukrainian Parliament]; video posted by the Ministry of Culture and Information Policy

Quote from Zelenskyy: "Ukrainians have been through some very terrible things. And despite everything, we have retained the ability not to obey and our love for freedom. Once they wanted to destroy us with hunger, now with darkness and cold.

We cannot be broken.

Our fire will not go out.

We will conquer death again."

Quote from Yermak: "We remember the Holodomor. We know who the architect of the genocide was. We also see who wants to create a ‘Coldomor’. ["Coldomor" is a paraphrase; Yermak is referring to Russia’s ongoing attempts to freeze Ukrainians to death during this war – ed.]

The Russians will pay for all the victims of the Holodomor and will be held responsible for today's crimes. It will be a historic time of retribution."

Quote from Shmyhal: "Once again, 90 years later, the Russian regime wants to break Ukrainians and our will through genocide. It will not happen. The invincible and brave Ukrainian people will stand and flourish again after victory. And Russia will definitely pay for its crimes. Step by step, we are bringing this day closer."

Details: Ruslan Stefanchuk, the speaker of the Ukrainian Parliament, stressed that Ukrainians will always stand up for historical justice.

"We will always appeal to the world to prevent such crimes from ever happening again!" Stefanchuk emphasised.

The Ministry of Information Policy reminds people to light a candle of remembrance to pay tribute to the victims of Holodomor at 16:00.

Journalists fight on their own frontline. Support Ukrainska Pravda or become our patron!

Fri, 25 Nov 2022 22:14:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://news.yahoo.com/once-wanted-destroy-us-hunger-092511943.html
Killexams : Nortel alum-turned-mystery novelist combines her tech and writing background with Fictionary

Fictionary co-founder and CEO Kristina Stanley has worked in a wide variety of different jobs, from manager of broadband planning at Nortel to the director of employee, safety, and guest services for an Eastern British Columbia ski resort, to author of mystery novels.

But one of Stanley’s most difficult jobs was figuring out how to edit her own manuscripts while writing The Stone Mountain Mystery Series. As she told BetaKit in an interview, “it’s really, really difficult to edit a book from a story level. You’ve got thousands and thousands of elements that you have to keep track of and make them work together.”

“We’re trying to help the average person who doesn’t have an ‘in’ in the publishing industry get a really good book out there, get an agent, or get a publisher.”
-Kristina Stanley, Fictionary
 

Initially, Stanley tackled this problem using a combination of Microsoft Excel spreadsheets and graphs. But she soon realized that other authors likely faced the exact same issue, and set out to build a better way by combining her tech and writing background.

Today, Stanley’s software startup Fictionary aims to offer an alternative. Amid a wide field of solutions that help writers and editors with specific parts of the process, like spelling, grammar, style, structure, and publishing, Fictionary hones in on perhaps the most important and challenging part: producing a good story.

Fuelled by $1.8 million CAD in seed funding, Fictionary aims to help writers and editors around the world produce quality stories more quickly and affordably. With this capital, the Inverary, Ontario startup, based just north of Kingston, plans to move into non-fiction and start selling to other publishers and agencies to expand its community of users.

The startup’s all-equity round, which closed in September, was co-led by StandUp Ventures and BDC Capital’s Thrive Venture Fund, with support from The51 and a group of angels that includes Women’s Equity Lab general partner Sally Morris. For newly launched Thrive, Fictionary marks the fund’s third investment to date, after investing in Acerta and Private AI.

Stanley founded Fictionary in 2016 alongside her husband, Mathew (COO), who also previously worked at Nortel and has a background in tech, and her brother, Michael Conn, Fictionary’s former CTO, who has since left the company.

Initially, Fictionary focused solely on writers, before expanding to meet demand for a similar offering from editors. Today, Fictionary offers three subscription software products for writers and editors that range in price from $19 to $49 monthly, sells online courses, and provides a community for writers and editors to connect.

Fictionary’s software helps writers visualize their story arc by analyzing key story elements with artificial intelligence (AI) and gauging how their manuscript compares to fundamental storytelling components.

RELATED: With new Thrive platform, BDC commits half a billion dollars to invest in Canadian women-led startups and funds

“We’re trying to help the average person who doesn’t have an ‘in’ in the publishing industry get a really good book out there, get an agent, or get a publisher,” said Stanley.

On the editor side of the equation, the company claims its offering enables editors to provide better, deeper story edits in less time, increasing the quality and profitability of editors’ services.

The writing and editing software space features a ton of players, from Grammarly to Scrivener, Novel Factory, and Canada’s Wattpad. According to Stanley, Fictionary is unique within the sectors in terms of its focus on storytelling elements and its use of AI. “We’re it right now as far as, there’s an automated way to do this, and have software for it,” said Stanley.

“While there are other platforms endeavoring to address this gap in the market, there doesn’t appear to be a single player who is able to look at the writing and editing process in a comprehensive and meaningful way, which puts Fictionary at a sizeable advantage to lead the charge and expand into new markets and segments,” Michelle Scarborough, managing partner of BDC Capital’s Thrive Venture Fund, told BetaKit.

RELATED: StandUp Ventures reveals second fund dedicated to women-led startups with $30 million first close

Fictionary previously secured $100,000 in grant funding from Creative BC and raised $245,000 in pre-seed funding in 2019 from a group of angels that included Shopify co-founder Scott Lake, Stephanie Andrew of Women’s Equity Lab, and FirstEditing founder and CEO JoEllen Taylor.

According to Stanley, following that pre-seed round, Fictionary reached breakeven cash flow and had to decide whether to keep going on its current track or set its sights higher.

Following some discussions with StandUp Ventures, Fictionary decided to embark on a new chapter and raise more venture capital to tackle the opportunity it sees in this space amid the rise of self-publishing. “We have a great product, we’ve got product-market fit, we’ve got a market, so let’s just go for it,” said Stanley.

“The love for the product Fictionary users articulate so regularly is rare, and indicative of the power and impact the tool brings to its customers,” said StandUp Ventures senior associate Lucas Perlman, who is joining Fictionary’s board as part of the round. “The self-publishing world has exploded, and we believe Fictionary is poised to become a de-facto part of the story writing toolkit for writers and editors around the globe.”

RELATED: Wattpad’s new leader is focused on creator value

For her part, Scarborough said the Thrive Venture Fund sees “a sizeable opportunity [for Fictionary] in the fast-growing creator economy space—a market with many dimensions—within writing and editing, screenwriting, non-fiction, and beyond.”

To date, Fictionary has focused entirely on fiction but Stanley said the startup’s roadmap includes moving into non-fiction, where the CEO sees plenty of potential to apply its tech to helping people tell their own life stories. Fictionary also sees an opportunity to help agencies and publishers clear the slush pile of submitted manuscripts.

As it looks to build out its own community of writers and editors, Fictionary follows in the footsteps of Wattpad, which parlayed its vibrant self-publishing community of writers and readers—and the content produced by them—into a $754 million CAD acquisition last year.

After discussions with StandUp, Fictionary decided to embark on a new chapter.

“Wattpad is very inspirational for us,” said Stanley. “They are different in the sense that people write their stories in the community, where we help writers take those stories and turn them into powerful stories readers love. Their community is a great lead-in to Fictionary for writers needing to edit their stories.”

As the startup charts its growth strategy amid an uncertain economic environment, Stanley is confident that Fictionary is well-positioned to grow during this period, noting that people tend to write more when they are stressed. Back when COVID-19 first hit and everyone was cooped up, the CEO said people begin writing more, and demand for Fictionary rose. Heading into what could be a deep downturn, Stanley believes Fictionary is in a good spot given that it offers a tool to help people do their passion without spending a lot of money.

What Perlman finds most exciting is the appreciation Fictionary’s customers have for the startup’s product, noting that writers “pour countless hours into their stories and writing books is an emotional and very personal thing to take on.”

“Fictionary has removed a major hurdle that stopped these creators from bringing their stories into the world,” Perlman told BetaKit. “The impact of that really comes through when you speak to their customers and see feedback from their community.”

Feature image courtesy Fictionary.

Mon, 28 Nov 2022 21:00:00 -0600 Josh Scott en-CA text/html https://betakit.com/nortel-alum-turned-mystery-novelist-combines-her-tech-and-writing-background-with-fictionary/
Killexams : Opinion: Hunger doesn't take holidays off, so let's serve others all year long

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Sun, 20 Nov 2022 09:12:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.statesman.com/story/opinion/columns/guest/2022/11/20/opinion-hunger-doesnt-take-holidays-off/69654586007/
Killexams : Prominent Egyptian Political Prisoner Ends Hunger Strike, Family Says

CAIRO — Alaa Abd El Fattah, the imprisoned British-Egyptian dissident who has been on hunger strike for more than seven months in a bid to win his freedom, has broken his strike even though he remains behind bars, his family said on Tuesday.

Mr. Abd El Fattah, who his family says had consumed 100 daily calories of milk and honey in his tea for nearly seven months before going on full hunger strike on Nov. 1, stopped drinking water on Nov. 6, the day a two-week United Nations-sponsored climate conference began in the Egyptian Red Sea resort of Sharm el Sheikh.

That guaranteed his name would cloud the proceedings. For days, Egyptian officials who had seen hosting the summit as a chance at long-sought prestige found themselves instead besieged by questions about their best-known political prisoner. The leaders of the United States, France, Germany and Britain, where Mr. Abd El Fattah holds dual citizenship, all raised the issue in private meetings with Egypt’s president, Abdel Fattah el-Sisi.

Despite the mounting pressure on the Egyptian authorities to free Mr. Abd El Fattah, there has been no indication so far that his hunger strike will lead to his release.

In a brief handwritten note dated 4 p.m. Monday, Mr. Abd El Fattah asked his mother, Laila Soueif, to bring food when she visits him at Wadi el-Natroun prison on Thursday, his birthday, according to his family, which received the letter on Tuesday. But he did not say why he had decided to resume eating. He also began drinking water again on Saturday, he told his family in a previous letter they received on Monday.

“I want to celebrate my birthday with you on Thursday, I haven’t celebrated for a long time, and want to celebrate with my cellmates, so bring a cake, normal provisions, I’ve broken my strike,” he wrote to Ms. Soueif in the most recent letter, which his family said was in his handwriting. “I’ll explain everything on Thursday.”

While his family expressed relief that he was alive and apparently well, they — and the activists, celebrities and Nobel laureates around the world who had lent their support to his campaign for release — were not sure what to make of the developments.

Family members said they had no further information about what was driving Mr. Abd El Fattah’s decision, but that they hoped to learn more on Thursday, the date of his monthly 20-minute family visit, when relatives are allowed to bring food and other supplies.

His family said last Thursday that they had learned prison authorities had begun a “medical intervention” on Mr. Abd El Fattah. Without further information, they feared he was being force-fed. No one has been able to see him since he began refusing water, with his lawyer, Khaled Ali, denied access three times despite having received official permits to visit.

Mr. Abd El Fattah and his supporters had hoped to make the most of the global attention trained on Egypt during the climate summit to pile on the pressure for his freedom. With the conference ending later this week, it is not clear where the campaign goes next.

“I feel cautiously relieved now knowing that at least he’s not on hunger strike,” Mona Seif, one of his sisters, said in a statement on Tuesday, “but my heart won’t really be settled until Thursday when my mother and sister see him with their own eyes.”

Egypt, which has repeatedly cast doubt on whether Mr. Abd El Fattah was actually on hunger strike or really holds British citizenship, has only hardened its stance in response to the international pressure for his release.

Pro-government media outlets and government supporters began saying that Mr. Abd El Fattah, who was found guilty in 2019 of spreading false news over a social media post detailing human rights abuses in prison, was a convicted criminal who deserved no special treatment.

An Egyptian lawmaker and other Egyptians repeating the government line confronted his sister Sanaa Seif at public events during the summit.

Some government supporters have twisted previous social media posts by Mr. Abd El Fattah, who was heavily involved in Egypt’s 2011 Arab Spring revolution, to suggest that he had incited violence against the Egyptian military and police.

Tue, 15 Nov 2022 01:35:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.nytimes.com/2022/11/15/world/middleeast/egypt-alaa-abd-el-fattah-hunger-strike.html
Killexams : Rachel Zegler’s Hunger Games Prequel Has Wrapped, See How She Celebrated

The odds are in our favor. The Hunger Games: The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes has wrapped production in Europe after a four-month shoot. One of its stars, Rachel Zegler, shared the news along with a heartfelt message about her time working on the upcoming 2023 movie

Rachel Zegler, who will play District 12 tribute Lucy Gray Baird in The Hunger Games prequel, took to Twitter to share that it’s a wrap! Check out her heartfelt post: 

Sat, 05 Nov 2022 06:09:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.cinemablend.com/movies/rachel-zeglers-hunger-games-prequel-has-wrapped-see-how-she-celebrated
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