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Killexams : Cisco Infrastructure test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/700-702 Search results Killexams : Cisco Infrastructure test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/700-702 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Cisco Killexams : Cisco updates SD-WAN to simplify provisioning, management

Cisco is set to unveil a new edition of its SD-WAN software that will extend the system’s reach and include new management capabilities.

Among the most significant enhancements to Cisco SD-WAN release 17.10, expected in December, is the ability to use Cisco SD-WAN Multi Region Fabric (MRF) support with existing Software Defined Cloud Interconnect (SDCI) systems to significantly expand the reach and control of the SD-WAN environment. 

MRF lets customers divide their SD-WAN environments into multiple regional networks that operate distinctly from one another, along with a central core-region network for managing inter-regional traffic, according to Cisco. 

SDCI technology is used to link enterprise resources to a variety of cloud, network, and internet service providers. Cisco customers could use SDCI with their SD-WAN deployments in the past but not MRF.

By combining the two technologies and using the Cloud OnRamp Multicloud Interconnect Gateway in Cisco SD-WAN software, customers can now set network, configuration and security policies across a wide variety of locations from a central site. Cisco’s SD-WAN Cloud OnRamp links branch offices or individual remote users to cloud applications such as Cisco’s Webex, Microsoft 365, AWS, Google, Oracle, Salesforce and more.

Customers can now assign regions and roles to SD-WAN edges deployed within SDCI infrastructure, and they can segment MRF regions into multiple sub-regions and share border routers between these sub-regions, allowing for better redundancy and failover-centric network designs, according to John Joyal, senior manager, product and solutions marketing with Cisco's enterprise SD-WAN and routing group. (Joyal wrote a blog about Cisco's SD-WAN MRF enhancements.)

Copyright © 2022 IDG Communications, Inc.

Mon, 05 Dec 2022 12:57:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.networkworld.com/article/3681657/cisco-updates-sd-wan-to-simplify-provisioning-management.html
Killexams : Ampere ‘Cloud Native Processors’ Can Help Achieve Sustainability Goals

Environmental sustainability is no longer just a corporate social responsibility but a business imperative. That was evident at the latest Open Compute Project (OCP) Global Summit, where sustainability was the theme in almost every booth.

We are all aware of the rising energy consumption of hyperscale data centers the comparisons to towns and even small countries. Of course, the solution is straightforward - more compute with less power. This opportunity has created a new wave of innovative startup chipset companies. I recently wrote an article about Groq, which focuses on discrete chips for specialized workloads such as artificial intelligence (AI).

Ampere is another rising star with the same goal but a different strategy. Ampere is designing purpose-built, multi-core processors optimized for multi-tenant cloud workloads.

Time for a new type of CPU

I am an avid chip guy who has been in the industry for many years. This story reminded me of the transition from mainframes to a client-server model a couple of decades ago. First, the usage model changed, followed by the adaptation of the software to become higher performance more and more efficient, and then finally, the hardware changed. We are going through a similar transition right now. Cloud-native has happened from an architectural perspective and also from a software perspective. It is time for a cloud-native processor to drive higher performance and improved sustainability.

Enterprise-class processors – the wrong tool for the cloud

CSPs must have profitable cloud infrastructure while delivering the performance customers expect. Enterprise-class processors are not the right tool for cloud-native workloads and can negatively impact customer SLAs and add unpredictability.

Enterprise-class processors support applications written as monolithic blocks of code executed in a dedicated environment. Enterprise-class processors have evolved with increasing power and large amounts of memory with innovations such as high-capacity cores, higher CPU frequencies, and larger caches.

Simultaneous multithreading (SMT) and Turbo Boost are enhancements that can be effective for the correct use case but not for latency-sensitive, scalable cloud-native workloads.

SMT enables each physical core to split into two logical threads simultaneously executing separate instruction sequences. Turbo Boost automatically runs cores faster than the rated operating frequencies.

SMT can cause problems in a multi-tenant cloud environment. Multiple applications must share execution resources when a CPU core has two SMT threads. A resource-intensive workload, known as a noisy neighbor, will cause workloads on the other SMT thread will slow from lack of execution resources. Similarly, Turbo Boost can cause unpredictable performance depending on the type of workload.

In summary, enterprise-class cores perform well with computationally intensive applications but not in a shared cloud infrastructure.

Ampere taking a clean-slate approach to CPU design

Cloud-native applications have distributed components, such as micro-services, that perform specific tasks and collaborate to achieve an objective. A benefit is that lightweight applications are faster to develop, test, and integrate, leading to practices like continuous integration/continuous delivery (CI/CD).

Ampere took a clean-slate approach to CPU design that caters to this new software paradigm in multi-tenant environments. CSPs want to host more end users per server with dedicated physical cores. Ampere responded with a processor design that offers near-linear scaling across a 128-core Altra processor.

Ampere's processors are immune to the "noisy neighbor" issues that plague enterprise-class processors with SMT. Ampere's processor cores are single-threaded, resulting in no resource contention and more predictable performance. With Ampere, each thread runs solo on a single core.

Changing the game in terms of sustainability

Ampere starts with single-threaded cores - one thread, one process - different from the enterprise-class processors with multiple threads competing for processor resources. Multiple threads create an unpredictable environment, whereas a single-threaded core provides the same performance with every core resulting in a high degree of predictability.

Ampere uses a constant operating frequency delivering predictability as opposed to x86 processors that employ frequency scaling. Ampere uses power-efficient cores, which allow the stacking of many cores into a processor. The highest core counts in the industry.

Ampere pipelines cores with a large private L2 cache located right next to the core. Loading data and instruction sets into the L2 cache results in a predictable performance profile for each core.

The high number of cores makes it cost-effective for CSPs to rent each core to a single customer. Customers get scalability and predictable performance. CSPs can run at the lowest possible power with fully populated racks with no stranded capacity. Running at the lowest power reduces the thermal load. The net result is a quantum leap in efficiency and maximum performance per rack.

A strong endorsement from Microsoft Azure

Microsoft now offers Azure Virtual Machines with Ampere Altra Arm-based processors that can run Linux workloads such as web servers, open-source databases, in-memory applications, big data analytics, gaming, and media.

An Ampere Altra VM is a high-performance compute alternative that scales up linearly, delivers predictable performance at full utilization, and is power efficient, directly reducing users’ overall carbon footprint.

Wrapping up

Ampere has addressed the simple question posed at the beginning - more compute with less power. A cloud native processor with single-threaded cores, consistent operating frequencies, and the most power-efficient cores in the industry, topped by a large L2 cache close to the processor resulting in a cloud-native processor built for the sustainable cloud.

Microsoft has proven this isn't a fantasy - the solution exists today. Instead of building out data centers with compute using enterprise-class processors switching to Ampere's cloud-native processors could reduce power consumption by 20 percent and still meet the compute needs.

Other major players have also embraced the Ampere technology. Hewlett Packard Enterprise announced in it will offer a cloud-native server in later in 2022 using Ampere chips. Google Cloud has launched virtual machines using Ampere Altra Arm-based processors. Oracle, in addition to being a major investor, offers a comprehensive line of Ampere platforms on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI).

Moor Insights & Strategy, like all research and tech industry analyst firms, provides or has provided paid services to technology companies. These services include research, analysis, advising, consulting, benchmarking, acquisition matchmaking, and speaking sponsorships. The company has had or currently has paid business relationships with 8×8, Accenture, A10 Networks, Advanced Micro Devices, Amazon, Amazon Web Services, Ambient Scientific, Anuta Networks, Applied Brain Research, Applied Micro, Apstra, Arm, Aruba Networks (now HPE), Atom Computing, AT&T, Aura, Automation Anywhere, AWS, A-10 Strategies, Bitfusion, Blaize, Box, Broadcom, , C3.AI, Calix, Campfire, Cisco Systems, Clear Software, Cloudera, Clumio, Cognitive Systems, CompuCom, Cradlepoint, CyberArk, Dell, Dell EMC, Dell Technologies, Diablo Technologies, Dialogue Group, Digital Optics, Dreamium Labs, D-Wave, Echelon, Ericsson, Extreme Networks, Five9, Flex, Foundries.io, Foxconn, Frame (now VMware), Fujitsu, Gen Z Consortium, Glue Networks, GlobalFoundries, Revolve (now Google), Google Cloud, Graphcore, Groq, Hiregenics, Hotwire Global, HP Inc., Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Honeywell, Huawei Technologies, IBM, Infinidat, Infosys, Inseego, IonQ, IonVR, Inseego, Infosys, Infiot, Intel, Interdigital, Jabil Circuit, Keysight, Konica Minolta, Lattice Semiconductor, Lenovo, Linux Foundation, Lightbits Labs, LogicMonitor, Luminar, MapBox, Marvell Technology, Mavenir, Marseille Inc, Mayfair Equity, Meraki (Cisco), Merck KGaA, Mesophere, Micron Technology, Microsoft, MiTEL, Mojo Networks, MongoDB, National Instruments, Neat, NetApp, Nightwatch, NOKIA (Alcatel-Lucent), Nortek, Novumind, NVIDIA, Nutanix, Nuvia (now Qualcomm), onsemi, ONUG, OpenStack Foundation, Oracle, Palo Alto Networks, Panasas, Peraso, Pexip, Pixelworks, Plume Design, PlusAI, Poly (formerly Plantronics), Portworx, Pure Storage, Qualcomm, Quantinuum, Rackspace, Rambus, Rayvolt E-Bikes, Red Hat, Renesas, Residio, Samsung Electronics, Samsung Semi, SAP, SAS, Scale Computing, Schneider Electric, SiFive, Silver Peak (now Aruba-HPE), SkyWorks, SONY Optical Storage, Splunk, Springpath (now Cisco), Spirent, Splunk, Sprint (now T-Mobile), Stratus Technologies, Symantec, Synaptics, Syniverse, Synopsys, Tanium, Telesign,TE Connectivity, TensTorrent, Tobii Technology, Teradata,T-Mobile, Treasure Data, Twitter, Unity Technologies, UiPath, Verizon Communications, VAST Data, Ventana Micro Systems, Vidyo, VMware, Wave Computing, Wellsmith, Xilinx, Zayo, Zebra, Zededa, Zendesk, Zoho, Zoom, and Zscaler.

Moor Insights & Strategy founder, CEO, and Chief Analyst Patrick Moorhead is an investor in dMY Technology Group Inc. VI, Dreamium Labs, Groq, Luminar Technologies, MemryX, and Movandi.

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 07:55:00 -0600 Patrick Moorhead en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/patrickmoorhead/2022/12/08/ampere-cloud-native-processors-can-help-achieve-sustainability-goals/
Killexams : CyberRatings.org Announces Results from First-of-its-Kind Comparative Test on Cloud Network Firewall No result found, try new keyword!CyberRatings.org, the non-profit entity dedicated to providing transparency on cybersecurity product efficacy, has completed an independent test of eight market leading security vendors in its ... Thu, 01 Dec 2022 04:48:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://it.tmcnet.com/news/2022/12/01/9722740.htm Killexams : Cisco shares pop on earnings beat and increased 2023 forecast

A sign bearing the logo for communications and security tech giant Cisco Systems Inc is seen outside one of its offices in San Jose, California, August 11, 2022.

Paresh Dave | Reuters

Cisco reported fiscal first-quarter results on Wednesday that beat analysts' estimates and boosted its guidance for fiscal 2023.

The stock rose about 5% in extended trading.

Here's how the company did:

  • Earnings per share: 86 cents vs. 84 cents expected, according to Refinitiv
  • Revenue: $13.6 billion vs. $13.3 billion expected by analysts, according to Refinitiv

Revenue increased 6% year over year, while net income slid 10% to $2.7 billion. The company now expects sales growth in fiscal 2023 of 4.5% to 6.5%, up from a prior forecast that called for growth of 4% to 6%.

CFO Scott Herren said in a company release that Cisco delivered "strong results" and attributed the company's guidance forecast in part to an "easing supply situation."

While Cisco's numbers topped estimates, the company is still struggling to grow as the technology world rapidly shifts to cloud and subscription software and away from buying physical boxes. Cisco's stock price is down 27% this year, while the Nasdaq has dropped 29%.

Cisco's top business segment, which includes data-center networking switches, delivered $6.68 billion in revenue, up 12% from a year earlier.

Internet for the Future, its second-largest unit, saw revenue drop 5% to $1.3 billion. The division contains routed optical networking hardware the company picked up through its 2021 Acacia Communications acquisition.

Sales in the Collaboration segment, which features Webex, contributed $1.1 billion in revenue, down 2% year over year.

Cisco will hold its quarterly call with investors at 4:30 p.m. ET.

Wed, 16 Nov 2022 07:33:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.cnbc.com/2022/11/16/cisco-csco-earnings-q1-2023.html
Killexams : Cisco Systems, Inc. (CSCO) Management Presents at Barclays 2022 Global Technology, Media and Telecommunications Conference Call Transcript

Cisco Systems, Inc. (NASDAQ:CSCO) Barclays 2022 Global Technology, Media and Telecommunications Conference Call December 7, 2022 3:10 PM ET

Company Participants

Bill Gartner - Senior Vice President, GM Optical Systems and Optics Group

Conference Call Participants

Tim Long - Barclays

Tim Long

Good. Yeah. Hello, everybody. Thank you for joining us here for this session with Cisco. Tim Long here, IT hardware com equipment analyst at Barclays. Very happy to have Bill Gartner with us, SVP, General Manager, Optical Systems, and Optics Business Unit. Looking forward to the discussion, pretty hot subject area for Cisco and for the industry.

So, I think Bill's going to read a safe harbor and then maybe after that if you wouldn't mind just kind of deliver us a little overview of your roles and responsibilities at the areas that you're covering …

Bill Gartner

Right. Thanks Tim. First of all, thank you for having me. And before I start, I will be making some forward-looking statements that are subject to risk and uncertainties as outlined in our disclosures. Have I got all that right, Marilyn? Good. Okay.

My name is Bill Gartner and I responsible for two businesses in Cisco that, that are related by the fact that they both rely on optical communications. One is the optics business and the other is the optical systems business. And you can think of the optics business as the trans receivers that we sell with routers and switches that find their home inside a data center or inside a central office or within a campus environment. Those receivers are used typically to send optical signals on a fiber over relatively short distance like 10 kilometers. That's the optics business. And we serve all markets with that, that that includes the campus environments, enterprise, commercial, public sector, service provider and web.

And then the other businesses. Once you have to leave the data center and now send an optical signal across a city or across a country or even between continents, now it's a much more difficult problem to send that optical signal and it requires much more sophisticated solution that is classically chassis based. It's a chassis that we have to sell for an optical system to carry these signals reliably over very long distances. And the other thing that's unique about that world is that in a data center, when you add a new router or switch, you pull new fiber to every port on that router or switch because you're inside. You can do that.

When you leave the data center, now you're talking about crossing the Mississippi or crossing the Rockies, and you basically have to use the fiber that's in the ground. And so we have to put lots and lots of signals on one fiber. So, optical systems are what we use outside the data center or central office and optics what we use inside. That's the two worlds that I have. They're very different businesses, very different business models, but they're related by common technologies.

Question-and-Answer Session

Q - Tim Long

Great. Great. Thank you for that. Good start. So, maybe across the two businesses talk to us a little bit about kind of your priorities, looking out the next few years, obviously you've done the Acacia deal and integrated, you got routed out optical networks. There's just a lot going on, right? So, maybe talk about two or three of your priorities, then we'll dig more into it.

Bill Gartner

So, on the optical system side, we've just introduced a new optical layer platform called the NCS 1010 that offers some very innovative capabilities for customers to simplify operations. It runs IOS XR, which is our routing operating system. So, it's common for customers that have deployed our routers and it supports CNL band. So, massive capacity. That's our -- you can think about as a layer zero solution. We've just launched that.

And the other key thing for the optical systems business that we have under development is leveraging something that Acacia announced, which is a new DSP supporting 1.2 terabytes on a single wavelength, 1.2 terabytes on a single wavelength. And we'll be trialing that in second half of next year and we'll have that available in fourth quarter of next year. Those are two key development areas for the optical systems business.

And then on the optics side, we're I think still early stage on 400 gig deployments. So, a lot of effort in terms of getting 400 gig out there to our customers. We are also very focused on selling Cisco Optics, not only for Cisco routers and switches, but for third-party solutions as well. So, when customers want to consider optics as a buying center and say they want to consolidate their optic spend, we want to be considered as an optic supplier.

And then I think the one thing that's crossing the systems world and the optics world is Acacia has a very significant innovation in something called a 400 gig ZR or ZR Plus, which is effectively taking what was classically delivered in a chassis as part of an optical system and putting that into a plugable form factor. And that is a 400 gig ZR or ZR Plus. And that's part of our routed optical networking architecture. So that's an important thrust for really the optical systems business and the optics business.

And if you deliver me a minute here, Tim, I actually brought some show and tell, I'm going to try to make that a little crisp for you because I know you guys don't live in this world. This is is a line card that goes into an optical system. We sell this to all the web players, service providers. This is -- this supports 1.2 terabytes of capacity and it goes plugs into a chassis with a bunch of other line cards that plug into a chassis. So, for 1.2 terabytes, the customer basically can put -- get two trunks, if you will, or wavelengths, and they can combine up to 1200 gig interfaces. So, this 1200 gig ports here, and out comes to 600 gig ports. That's where the 1.2 terabytes comes from. This is part of an optical system.

And what we're doing with ZR pluggable is effectively now using -- taking what's in there, largely speaking and putting it in here. Now it's not quite apples-to-apples. This is a 400 gig plugable, that's 1.2 terabytes. So, you'd need three of these to get to one of those. But from a cost, power, space perspective, this is way, way, way more efficient for customers than that. And so, if you think about it, I own this business, which is part of Acacia. I own this business, which is part of our optical systems. I'm going to cannibalize a part of this business in order to make this business successful. And we're okay with that because we own both businesses, but we think there's more potential for this business over time. Does that help?

Tim Long

Yeah. Yeah. I'm glad you didn't have to take an airplane to get here.

Bill Gartner

By the way, my supply chain lead always is terrified when he sees me walking around carrying his stuff in a shopping bag. But we're not going to plug it into any customer's network.

Tim Long

So, Maybe we'll start with this routed optical networks, ZR, ZR Plus. So, ZR, ZR Plus admittedly has been slow, right? Maybe talk to us a little bit about why it hasn't developed as quickly as most in the industry had expected. Why is that going to be different? And touch on the length power, some of the key issue -- technical issues that need to be tackled or tackled.

Bill Gartner

So, let me disagree with you on one point there, Tim. I think for the web players, ZR and ZR Plus not all the web players, but many of the web players are deploying it in massive volume. And that's characteristic, I think, of the web players. They are quick to adopt new technologies. They don't have a lot of overhead in terms of processes and operations to get in the way. They don't have a lot of legacy. So, when there's a new technology that offers significant benefits in terms of power, space, cost, they can jump on it very quickly. And so, we were at capacity for much of the last year trying to serve that segment of the market with ZR and ZR Plus.

For the service provider market, which is traditionally deploying like chassis-based solutions, there's -- we're on a journey that is not going to happen overnight in part because they've deployed these systems which have a lot of life left in them. And so, they're not going to jump to a new architecture overnight. There's also operations -- some operations differences that they have to accommodate in moving from a world of chassis-based solutions to a world where you plug this into a router. But we're seeing very good traction there. We've deployed to over 20 customers now. I'm very confident that over time -- this is going to be a five-year journey. This isn't going to happen overnight. But over time, this pluggable is going to replace that transponder in many, many applications and service provider markets. So, I don't think the journey has gone any slower than we expected. I think we anticipate that for service providers, it is always a much slower transition to a new architecture. And this is a new architecture. It's not just sort of a new technology. And -- but I think we're on pace with where we expect it to be.

Tim Long

Okay. And part of the architecture is to remove the full optical system from the network?

Bill Gartner

So -- yeah. Let me just outline kind of at a high level what routed optical networking architecture is about -- because there's a lot of [indiscernible] out there that my competitors love to throw out. There's some misinformation on that, too. Part of it is replacing this with this. That's part of routed, and it's a big part of routed optical networking. Some think that's all it is. It's not simply that although this is where a lot of the CapEx and OpEx and power savings arises from this, but routed optical networking really came about when we looked at the scale of routers, what's happening in ASICs that's allowing routers to scale so dramatically. It wasn't too long ago.

When I came to Cisco -- I've been with Cisco 14 years. And when I came to Cisco, we had a 40-gig line card on a router, and it had 14 ASICs. And now we've got one ASIC, one ASIC that does 19 terabits of capacity. And that’s not going to go to 25 to 50 over time, one ASIC instead of 14. Nominally, you can kind of think of it as the cost of an ASIC of the cost of an ASIC. So every time like I take 14 down to seven, down to three, down to two, down to one, I'm getting cost savings, but I'm also packing much more capacity now into that one. So that's driven down the cost per bit on a router very, very dramatically over the last 10 years. It's also driven down the power per bit, because now we have one ASIC rather than a whole bunch of ASICs. So, the cost per bit on a router has come down dramatically over the last 10 years.

When we started building networks with an IP layer and a DWDM layer and sometimes an OTN layer, the motivation for that was that the router was the most expensive resource in the network. It was by far the most expensive thing in the network 20 years ago. And what we did is we -- as an industry is we basically built layers of the network to bypass routers whenever you needed to. So, if you had to go from A to B to C to D to E and you had some demands from A to E, it was very expensive to go through B, C and D to get to E. So, we went around B, C and D with an optical layer using things like ROADMs. And that made sense economically. That really made sense from a technical and an economic perspective. But now the cost of the router has come down so dramatically that it's actually more expensive to go around those routers than it is to go through them.

So that was -- that's one key insight that drove routed optical networking is it's no longer more cost effective to go around the router than it is to go through it. And in fact, what we did as an industry is we built a lot of these bypass wavelengths that have very little capacity on them. So, we can now take advantage of the IP layer, aggregate a whole bunch of demands and basically go through routers rather than around them. And so that simplifies the network in a very significant way because you can simplify the DWDM layer. It doesn't go away. To be clear, the DWDM layer is still there, but it's simpler. It can be much simpler. You can take advantage of these pluggable optics. And if you can take private line services like a T1 service or an OTN service and now put it on the IP layer with something called private line emulation, you can take those private line services that were traditionally served with custom products, put that now on the IP layer. Now you can get down to one layer in the network. Instead of having IP, OTN, DWDM, you can have just the IP layer. And that simplifies operations, it simplifies planning, it simplifies life cycle management. So that all together, it's private line emulation. It's the idea of rethinking how traffic moves through the network. It's pluggable optics, and now it's automating all of that with an automation infrastructure. It's really those things that make up the routed optical networking architecture.

Tim Long

Okay. Great. Great. Maybe sticking on the system side for a little bit. I'd say if you look at Cisco's industry share or anything like that, it's not where it is in routing. Talk a little bit about owning a lot more of the IP and the optical layer. Does that help new products like the NCS 1010. It's real catchy name you got there, that one. Just talk a little bit about kind of that vertical integration and what that can do for you even outside of routed optical networks or the traditional systems business.

Bill Gartner

So, let me say something you probably don't hear a lot out of somebody from Cisco is, I don't aspire to be number one in optical. That's not my goal, to be number one or number two in that market. The optical portfolio for Cisco is more of a portfolio play for Cisco. When customers want to buy optical and routing from one vendor and want basically an integrated solution, we're there for them. That's not to say we don't sell optical standalone because we do, but it's opportunistically that we go after those standalone plays. I don't have an objective to be number one in optical. In fact, as I mentioned earlier, when we do -- when we replace this with this, this is the profit pool in optical.

This is the most profitable part of the optical system. There's other elements like the ROADMs and things like that, that are really common infrastructure that don't go in with high margins. This is where the margins are, and we're going to replace it with this. And when we sell this, we're going to count it as part of our routing sale. So, effectively, I'm going to take down the optical business in support of routing. And we have strength in routing that we're going to leverage. So, this is very much a portfolio play where we're looking -- I'm wearing a Cisco hat and saying it's good for Cisco to leverage our relative market strength in routing. And I may have to cannibalize the optical business in order to do that, and we're willing to do that. And we think that's the right thing for our customers, we think it's the right thing for Cisco.

Tim Long

Okay. Maybe just last on this topic. The optical system vendors that are trying to add routing as a software layer or something, why does that not work as a solution?

Bill Gartner

I will never say never, and I don't discount our competitors. We've got 25 years of investment in routing with a couple of thousand people writing software. Hard won lessons and building very large-scale networks around the world, and it's a hard problem. So, I wish them luck if they're undertaking that.

Tim Long

Yeah. Okay. Good. The -- maybe back to kind of the optics side. You talked about still being relatively early in 400-gig deployments. Kind of talk to us about that evolution and how you see the next timing and scale for the next few versions.

Bill Gartner

Yeah. Well, first -- one thing I would want to be clear about is depending on which market segment we're talking about and even within market segments, different customers, the lifecycle for a given technology can be very, very long. But we're still selling -- we're still selling a ton of 10-gig optics, a ton of 10-gig optics. And 10-gig was around 20 years ago. And so, I think the tail for things like 100-gig and 400-gig is a very, very long tail. And without generalizing too much, what you see is web will adopt a technology like 100-gig very quickly and jump to 400-gig very quickly and then jump to 800-gig, and they'll jump to 1.6T. The service providers are going to be -- to have a much longer timeframe for deploying that technology, easily 10 years for something like 100-gig, easily. And they are going to generally be slower in jumping on a 400-gig bandwagon or an 800-gig bandwagon. They'll be slower jumping on it and then have a much longer time of deployment.

And then when you look at something like enterprise, it's much, much later and much, much longer. So like most of my 10-gig or 1-gig, we still sell a ton of 1-gig is going in enterprise applications. So these technologies have a very, very long tail. And if you ask like what's Google going to do or what's Facebook or Amazon are going to do, you get a very different answer than if you ask what Bank of America might be doing or what AT&T might be doing.

Tim Long

Okay. And then talking about the big hyperscalers what kind of trends are you seeing there? And I'm assuming as capacities go higher, there's got to be optical -- much more optics around -- we know each generation of switch has more optics. So, maybe talk about the trends there and what you think that means for the business.

Bill Gartner

So, let me talk both inside the data center and outside the data center. The -- inside the data center, 400-gig is pretty well being deployed right now by the web players. That's, I would say, entering maturity. It's still relatively early stage, but entering maturity. 800-gig is probably coming in the next couple of years. And 800-gig will be a little different than what we've seen in previous technology jumps in that 800-gig will be on a router port, it will support 800-gig, but the optic itself will likely be 200, 400-gig side-by-side, packaged into one optic. And we do that for technology reasons and cost reasons. So, it will be a longer time before we see 8000gig on the optics side.

It's also an issue of compatibility. If they've got a lot of 400-gig out in their data center and they put an 800-gig optic that has two 400-gig ports effectively on it, they can connect it to an existing 400-gig. So, there's a life cycle management issue there as well. Pretty mature inside the data center for 400-gig, but I'd still say, there's a lot of growth there still ahead of us.

Once you leave the data center, the web guys have metro networks and long-haul and subsea networks. So, those are three very different markets. I think the metro markets for the -- or data center interconnect market for the web players are largely going to go to this. For a couple, they're already there. Like this is exclusively what they're deploying. For others, I think they'll get there. Once you leave the metro area and get into long-haul or subsea, then I think this -- which has higher performance than the pluggable supporting -- this can support many thousand kilometer applications. This was maybe up to 1,000 kilometers today. They'll still deploy something like this, a chassis based solution.

The other thing I would say is we're -- for the last 20 years, the industry has been sort of a game of leapfrog of let's go from 2.5-gig to 10-gig to 25-gig to 40-gig to 100-gig. And every time you do that leapfrog, you get more capacity on the fiber. We are now approaching the point where we're just -- we're hitting what's known as Shannon's limit. We're just going to be out of gas on the fiber. So, we can't play that game anymore. Like our next-generation DSP coming out of Acacia will deliver 1.2-terabit on a wavelength, but the total fiber capacity that can be supported isn't moving that much. So, we can get a little bit better economics with a 1.2-terabit wavelength and maybe a 600 or 800-gig wavelength, but we're not really moving the needle in a significant way in terms of the total capacity. And then if you ask what's beyond that, it's very little incremental gain that we can get in terms of the total capacity you can put on a fiber. So, then we have to turn our attention to things like power or cost and say, look, the game is going to be who can drive to a lower power consumption on these things. It's not necessarily a game of capacity gain.

Tim Long

Interesting. Interesting. One of the priorities you talked about was third-party for optics. How do you go about that? How difficult is that to really start moving the needle on that business?

Bill Gartner

So, I think we've made good -- I think we're early stage in there. We've made very good progress with some very key logos. When a customer -- and now I'm talking primarily about service provider customers, because web is a little bit in a different category. But when a customer decides, for instance, that they want to consolidate their optics spend because the optic looks the same to them for whether they're plugging it into Cisco or Juniper or Nokia, we want to have a seat at the table for that conversation because we put optics through a certification and qualification process that is absolutely unparalleled in the industry. No provider of optic, no other vendor, whether it's Juniper or Arista or Nokia, does the level of certification on an optic that we do.

So, we can deliver our customers very high confidence that when they buy the optic, it will work in any host and it will work under all operating conditions. That means temperature variation, humidity variation, voltage variation, all these different permutations we test for, and we have a diverse supply chain. We make sure that even when we're sourcing the optic ourselves, even when we design and build the optic ourselves, we still have second sources for either all the technologies that go into that or the optic itself. So, we can take that supply chain management issue away from our customer and say, look, we will ensure you that there's diversity in the supply chain. We'll ensure that when there's typhoon in Thailand or an earthquake in Japan that takes down a good part of the optics supply chain, that we've already thought about that. And that gives our customers comfort. So, it's more than just does the optic work because the optics are fundamentally commodity. We make sure that we can ensure it's going to work under all operating conditions and that we can diversify the supply chain on behalf of the customer. So, with that value, I think we have a good selling proposition to customers.

Tim Long

Okay. You mentioned supply chain, I didn't, but now I have a follow-up.

Bill Gartner

Sure.

Tim Long

So, maybe talk a little bit -- it's challenging, it's whack-a-mole and golden screws and all that stuff. So, where are you guys now looking on your business? How are you feeling about supply chain and volumes?

Bill Gartner

So, I would separate -- optics, I think, is in pretty good shape. We're heading down to back to like four-week sort of lead times. There are hot spots. So, we're not there yet, but we're heading there. And for many optics, we are -- we're within four-week lead time right now. Optics has not suffered in general from some of the other areas like the high capacity ASICs, the semiconductor industry has not hit as much in the optics area, and things like power supplies have not been a real constraint for the optics themselves. The optical systems are still on pretty long lead times, like 35, 37 week lead times, but we are seeing those come down as well.

I would characterize it as, I think there's daylight. We see daylight, we see improvement ahead. We're not out of the woods. This is not a mission accomplished statement yet. There is a whack-a-mole issue going on where there are some trouble spots we're still dealing with, and then there are some just pop up randomly that we still have to deal with. So, we're not out of the woods yet, but we're in a far better situation now than we were a year ago.

Tim Long

Okay. Just curious, obviously, you have Acacia and some real base level technology and IP. Could you talk a little bit about the broader Cisco-Silicon One and having silicon capabilities in addition to the optics? How does that better position you relative to maybe some optical or optics pure-play companies?

Bill Gartner

So, one thing, I think from an Acacia perspective, we worked really hard to vertically integrate as much as possible on the design and development side and really own all the key technologies there. And I think we're at a point where we can say that for all the key technologies that go into that optic, we've got ownership of that technology. That gives us control over the design, the performance, ultimately, the cost and it gives us comfort that we can manage those trade-offs between the various pieces in the optic.

I think it was December of 2019 that we made a pretty big announcement that we were going to shift our business model to support a component business model. So, in addition to doing our traditional systems business of selling fully integrated routers and switches with software and hardware and services, we were going to meet our customers where they want to be met. If they want to buy just the optic from us, not buy any of our systems, we'd sell them the optic. They want to buy just the silicon from us, like Silicon One, none of our systems, none of our software, we'd sell Silicon One. If they want to buy just our software or just our hardware platform and put their own software in it, we would do that. Very different business model for Cisco, has supply chain implications, has inventory implications, cash cycle implications. And it's fundamentally a different way we think about managing a business.

I think that, that opened up business for us with the web players, in particular, who were the main target for that whole announcement to say, look, if you want to go build your own, we want to be part of that solution with you. We don't want to be on the outside looking in. So, if you want to use our silicon, we'll be happy to work with you. And we now have customers buying only our silicon, only our optics, only our hardware platform with no software, putting their own software on or putting something like SONiC on it. Every combination you can possibly imagine, we are now to some customer offering. And I think it's opened up a lot of possibilities for us that we don't see many of our competitors being able to match with both silicon and optics.

End of Q&A

Tim Long

Okay. Great. Perfect. End time here, so thank you, everybody. Bill, thank you so much very much. Really appreciate it. Thank you.

Bill Gartner

Tim, thank you very much. Appreciate it. Appreciate you having me. Thanks, everybody.

Wed, 07 Dec 2022 12:06:00 -0600 en text/html https://seekingalpha.com/article/4563107-cisco-systems-inc-csco-management-presents-barclays-2022-global-technology-media-and
Killexams : Cisco identifies vulnerabilities in Identity Services Engine

Cisco Systems’ network access control solution has five vulnerabilities rated High that could allow an authenticated, remote attacker to inject arbitrary operating system commands, bypass security protections, and conduct cross-site scripting attacks.

Four of the five problems in Cisco Identity Services Engine were identified earlier this month. However, network and security administrators will have to wait until Cisco releases software fixes for four of them. There is no workaround available for these holes, CVE-2022-20964. CVE-2022-20965, CVE-2022-20966 and CVE-2022-20967

Fortunately, they can be exploited only by valid and authorized ISE users, the company says. For protection, until the fixes are released, ISE administrators have to take extra care to restrict console access and admin web access.

Software updates have been released for the fifth vulnerability, CVE-2022-20961, described as a hole in ISE’s web-based management interface that could allow an unauthenticated, remote attacker to conduct a cross-site request forgery (CSRF) attack and perform arbitrary actions on an affected device,

This vulnerability, Cisco says, is due to insufficient CSRF protections for the web-based management interface of an affected device. An attacker could exploit this vulnerability by persuading a user of the interface to follow a crafted link. A successful exploit could allow the attacker to perform arbitrary actions on the affected device with the privileges of the target user.

In listing four vulnerabilities in one advisory, Cisco noted they aren’t dependent on one another for exploitation. In addition, a software release that is affected by one of the vulnerabilities may not be affected by the other vulnerabilities.

Separately, Cisco said it had released security fixes for a vulnerability in ISE that is rated Medium. CVE-2022-20963 is a vulnerability in the web-based management interface of ISE could allow an authenticated, remote attacker to conduct a cross-site scripting (XSS) attack against a user of the interface on an affected device.

Sun, 27 Nov 2022 21:46:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.itworldcanada.com/article/cisco-identifies-vulnerabilities-in-identity-services-engine/515793
Killexams : Cisco’s Chuck Robbins On XaaS: We ‘Realized We Weren’t As Operationally Ready’

Networking News

Gina Narcisi

‘Cisco’s got some ground to cover, but it’s really about the long game. While you can argue they are late to market, we believe that they’re going to be able to learn from the lessons of all their competitors and come out with even stronger products,’ one Cisco partner tells CRN about the company’s as-a-service drive.

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Customers are looking for different ways to acquire the IT they need, including buying in an as-a-service model to save some capital, but Cisco has faced a few latest hindrances to as a service, according to the company’s executives.

For the San Jose, Calif.-based tech giant, supply chain constraints have been an ongoing obstacle to the Everything-as-a-Service (XaaS) trend because Cisco and its partners couldn’t deliver the equipment that’s part of as-a-service offers, specifically, its Cisco Plus strategy.

“And then we also realized we weren’t as operationally ready,” Cisco CEO Chuck Robbins told analysts regarding the company’s XaaS push at Cisco Partner Summit 2022 earlier this month.

Many customers interpreted the launch of Cisco Plus as just a different way to finance IT — a “fancy lease” — versus a true XaaS model, said Neil Anderson, area vice president of cloud and infrastructure solutions for Maryland Heights, Mo.-based Cisco Gold partner World Wide Technology (WWT).

But channel partners want to put vendor XaaS offerings “under the hood” and built their own services on top of the stack to create a turnkey offering for their end customers. Customers, on the other hand, often want to have the option to manage some of their own IT, Anderson said.

“Part of the problem in getting to a true as-a-service model, as a utility, is that most customers still want some form of co-management. They don’t want somebody to just do everything for them and they have no visibility into it. They want a portal where they can see how things are going, maybe touch a few things. So, this idea of co-management, I think, is going to be really important for network as a service,” he said.

[Related: Cisco’s X Factor: How Chuck Robbins Is Taking Partners Into The Future ]

WWT is seeing this prerequisite across the board — not just in networking, but also in the collaboration space. The firm is seeing more RFPs with a requirement for managed services. “That allows the partner to add an additional layer of value to it so it’s not just a resell lead, it’s [giving] the partner some skin in the game long term,” said Joe Berger, area vice president of Digital Experiences for WWT.

Cisco Channel Chief Oliver Tuszik told CRN in an interview that the company is focused on enabling customers to buy and consume the Cisco portfolio in an as a service motion if that’s how they’d like to buy, and for more partners to sell in an as a service model.

“Our strategy must be that we allow our customers, wherever they are in the world, to buy whatever Cisco has in his portfolio in an as a service or managed motion,” Tuszik said.

But the as-a-service effort goes beyond products. It’s about building out Cisco’s Provider partner role the company introduced in 2021 within its Global Partner Program, he said, a role built with the MSP partner in mind and recognizes partners based on their investment in managed services and as-a-service solutions. As the managed services business has taken off, Cisco has since upped its investments in Provider partners with predictable pricing, deal registration for managed services, more flexible consumption options, dedicated investment and business development funds, technical support enablement, and co-marketing, the company said.

Cisco is also building more modular programs and new incentive schemes, Tuszik said. “We are incentivizing our people to sell partner-managed services,” he told CRN. “We’re paying our sales team more if they sell a partner-managed service — 50 percent more,” he added.

At Partner Summit 2022, the tech giant revealed it had tripled the number of staff working on service creation motions with partners, as well as a 1.5x payout multiplier to support the growth of partner-managed SD-WAN, Secure Access Service Edge (SASE), and full-stack observability offers.

Companies like HPE and Cisco are turning to partners during this time of resource constraints and talent shortages to learn more about what the channel can offer by way of managed services and what they can take off the vendors’ hands. Customers are looking for “cloud-like” IT experiences that are more automated and that also encompass on-premises tech environments for customers grappling with requirements that prevent them from going all-in on cloud, like data sovereignty. There’s where Cisco Plus fits in, said CJ Metz, vice president of Modern Infrastructure for Irvine, Calif.-based Cisco Gold Partner Trace3.

Trace3 also partners with HPE. Metz said that the major differentiator for HPE GreenLake has been in how the company shifted its entire focus to support its as a service strategy, including executive compensation, sales compensation and the support structures that underpin it. “[HPE] just has had more time to take more risks, to learn the hard lessons,” he said.

Cisco, he added, has been forthcoming to partners about its need to catch up. “Cisco’s got some ground to cover, but it’s really about the long game. While you can argue they are late to market, we believe that they’re going to be able to learn from the lessons of all their competitors and come out with even stronger products.”

For Cisco’s part in becoming more operationally ready for XaaS, Robbins told analysts: “I think over the next 6 to 12 months, you’ll see a lot of progress on this front.”

In the meantime, Cisco already has many as-a-service offers on the market today by way of their channel partners, the CEO added.

“We’ve got stuff going in the cloud marketplaces that we didn’t have before, we’ve got partners delivering as a service today and we’ve got the SASE [Cisco Plus Secure Connect Now] offer out there,” Robbins said. “There’s a few things we need to do, but there’s an awful lot offers that are out there today for customers.”

Cisco doesn’t specifically break out revenue related to its Cisco Plus strategy, but the company’s most latest fiscal quarter that ended Oct. 29 saw software subscription revenue climb 11 percent year over year.  

Gina Narcisi

Gina Narcisi is a senior editor covering the networking and telecom markets for CRN.com. Prior to joining CRN, she covered the networking, unified communications and cloud space for TechTarget. She can be reached at gnarcisi@thechannelcompany.com.

Wed, 30 Nov 2022 08:56:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.crn.com/news/networking/cisco-s-chuck-robbins-on-xaas-we-realized-we-weren-t-as-operationally-ready-
Killexams : NCCU, Cisco Systems partner with 'Hybrid Learning' to increase access for students on and off campus

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, the NC Central campus buzzed with activity and classrooms were full. "I’d say things have changed alot," said NC Central senior Maurice McKellar, who spent much of his college experience in a virtual learning mode.

He remembers how schools and universities had to quickly adapt to learning online with hopes of returning to the classic classroom model. Now, McKellar prefers both models.

He said, "It definitely gave us like a lot of opportunities to change the way we do things and still get an education."

"The world has changed and hybrid work is going to be the way of the future," says Scott McGregor, with Cisco Systems, an IT and networking company. They have partnered with NC Central as the school has embrace that hybrid model.

Cisco’s Webex app allows people to meet with anyone, anywhere and in real time. "The video and audio capabilities of our technology makes it easy for that student to really feel like they are much more present than it was in the past," said McGregor.

It wasn’t as smooth of a transition for other "sister institutions" according to NCCU’s chief information officer, Leah Kraus. She said, "Because we had prepared with a strong infrastructure, a strong network infrastructure and a strong partnership with CISCO, we were able to really pivot."

Jessica Ganao, chair of NCCU’s Department of Criminal Justice says the new Hybrid-Learning model meets the needs of many of her students who work other jobs. "Where our students will come into the classroom physically, come through Webex or we will record the sessions and allow them to view them after the class has taken place for that day.

School leaders say on-campus learning will always be an important part of the college experience for most students and faculty, however, now they have more options.

"I’ve been calling it moving from hybrid school or hybrid learning. We are really hybrid-living. I don’t really see us going backwards," said Kraus.

NC Central leaders say the flexibility of the hybrid-learning approach will make classes more accessible to students who may not be able to participate on campus.

Mon, 21 Nov 2022 06:28:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.wral.com/nccu-and-cisco-systems-partner-with-hybrid-learning-to-increase-access-for-students-on-and-off-campus/20590579/
Killexams : Cisco Stock Gains on Earnings. Layoffs Are Coming.

Cisco Systems shares are trading higher after the networking-infrastructure company posted better-than-expected revenue and profit growth for its fiscal first quarter, ended Oct. 29. The company also raised its guidance for the year.

Cisco CEO Chuck Robbins also disclosed that the company was “right-sizing certain businesses,” reducing head count in some areas. Cisco Chief Financial Officer Scott Herren said in an interview that the cuts could affect up to 5% of the workforce. Cisco had 83,300 employees as of the end of July. Despite the planned cuts, Cisco expects to end the current fiscal year with head count about flat with the start of the year.

Wed, 16 Nov 2022 10:01:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.barrons.com/articles/cisco-earnings-stock-price-51668548274
Killexams : Lake Superior cisco population may be rebounding

DULUTH — The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Lake Superior fisheries team got some good news when they were out trawling on the big lake in October: The number of small cisco — commonly called herring by folks along the North Shore — were way up.

“It was a very welcome sight for us. We haven’t had even a decent year class since 2014-15,” said Cory Goldsworthy, the DNR’s Lake Superior fisheries manager. “And you have to go back to the 80s to have a really great year for them.”

The DNR crew landed 115 of the small, young cisco this year where none had been netted in any of the past four assessments. Just two were netted in 2016 and 43 in 2015, which coincides with that last decent year class for cisco.

Goldsworthy said he hopes spring test netting by the U.S. Geological Survey will echo the same results. That survey hasn’t found many young cisco since 2003 and hasn’t seen a bumper crop for more than 30 years.

The big crop of little cisco may signal good news not just for the commercial netters who harvest them to sell, but also for the lake’s entire ecosystem and for sport anglers. This year’s little fish should be big enough to harvest in about four years. Cisco also can be a major food source for native lake trout and introduced salmon species and, when they reach full size of about 16 inches, can even become a target species for ice anglers on the big lake.

Cisco and similar species from Lake Superior
Minnesota DNR fisheries biologists in October landed an unexpected haul while night trawling on the big lake — namely lots of very young cisco and related species, including bloater and kiyi, where for the last several years they have found none. They are hoping the big haul means there was a big year class in 2022 that will lead to lots of adult fish down the line.

Contributed / Minnesota DNR

Cisco have been in decline for several decades on the big lake, with poor reproduction and dwindling numbers in general. The fish can live for decades, if they aren’t gobbled up by bigger fish, and some of the adult cisco now being caught are still from phenomenal reproduction years in the 1980s.

Scientists looking back found that years with large swaths of Lake Superior covered in ice were the best years for cisco reproduction. But, as the lake’s water temperatures have warmed in latest decades, there have been far fewer years with major ice cover. And there have been far fewer good years for cisco.

“Ice cover makes a difference for cisco. The more ice, the better the year class,” Goldsworthy noted.

It’s less clear what impact invasive species like rainbow smelt and spiny water fleas may have on the cisco population.

There are 25 state-licensed commercial cisco netters along the North Shore who harvest the fish both for food (they are tasty table fare and taste nothing like pickled ocean herring) and, in November as they spawn, for their eggs. The cisco roe, or caviar, is sold overseas at a premium price.

DNR crews were out on Lake Superior in October at night when the cisco come up to hang out closer to the surface. Fisheries crews use electronic acoustic (scientific-grade fish-finders) readings but also drag a big net at least once to verify what the electronics tell them.

The DNR does the work from the deck of the Blue Heron, the University of Minnesota Duluth’s Large Lakes Observatory research boat.

John Myers reports on the outdoors, natural resources and the environment for the Duluth News Tribune. You can reach him at jmyers@duluthnews.com.

Mon, 05 Dec 2022 18:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.duluthnewstribune.com/sports/northland-outdoors/lake-superior-cisco-population-may-be-rebounding
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