Free sample questions of 630-006 exam at killexams.com

All of us have been dedicated to providing up-to-date and valid C.P.M. Module 2: Supply Environment examination questions and solutions, along with details. Each 630-006 Questions plus Answers on killexams.com has already been verified by ISM specialists. We update plus add new 630-006 queries as soon as we observe that will there is a modification in real check. Which is important to our achievement and popularity.

Exam Code: 630-006 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
C.P.M. Module 2: Supply Environment
ISM Environment information search
Killexams : ISM Environment information search - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/630-006 Search results Killexams : ISM Environment information search - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/630-006 https://killexams.com/exam_list/ISM Killexams : Journal Information

Aims and scope
The Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology (JESEE) aims to be the premier and authoritative source of information on advances in exposure science for professionals in a wide range of environmental and public health disciplines.

JESEE welcomes high-quality, original research articles that further understanding of the relationship between environmental exposure and human health, describe evaluated exposure assessment tools and methods, and demonstrate application of exposure science to enable decisions and actions that promote and protect human health. JESEE also publishes perspectives, reviews and commentaries discussing major advances, trends and challenges in exposure science that highlight contributions of the field to environmental and public health.

JESEE publishes novel results and significant advances in exposure science, exposure analysis, and environmental epidemiology to understand human health impacts of the full range of environmental stressors (chemical, biological, physical, psychosocial). JESEE is particularly interested in publishing research that integrates exposure knowledge with information from across scientific disciplines to contribute solutions for the most pressing environmental and public health concerns.

Topics of interest include:

Research on understanding exposures to address critical environmental health challenges  

  • Climate related exposures, including impacts of exposures due to global environmental change 
  • Sustainable development
  • Healthy buildings and the built environment
  • Workplace and para-occupational exposures especially for occupational groups in the informal economy
  • Links between individual or multiple environmental stressors and human health
  • Early life exposure and latent disease
  • Environmental justice and highly impacted communities
  • Joint exposures: mixtures, co-exposures, interactions between social and environmental factors

Development and application of the latest tools and technologies for measuring and predicting exposures

  • Biomonitoring
  • Non-targeted analysis and suspect screening
  • Exposomics and environmental metabolomics
  • Sensors and Internet of Things (IoT) platforms
  • Remote sensing or imaging
  • Mechanistic and data-driven computer modeling
  • Geospatial analyses
  • Data science techniques

Approaches for integrating exposure information from different disciplines to enable decisions and actions

  • Understand the sources, pathways, and patterns of exposure to legacy and emerging environmental stressors
  • Evaluating and ensuring quality of water, air, and food
  • Considering lifecycle impacts of products and processes
  • Translating advances in exposure science for risk assessment
  • Preventing disproportionate exposures and reducing cumulative impacts of environmental stressors on vulnerable individuals and communities
  • Addressing understudied communities and regions
  • Involving impacted communities in exposure-related policies
  • Informing sustainability metrics

JESEE covers a range of subject areas. To read content across the scope of the journal view the journal's subjects page here.

Frequency
6 issues per year in print and online.

Journal Metrics
Article metrics such as number of downloads, citations and online attention are available from each article page, and provide an overview of the attention received by a paper.

The 2021 journal metrics* for Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology are as follows:

2-year Impact Factor* (2021): 6.371
5-year Impact Factor* (2021): 5.385
Immediacy index*: 1.461
Eigenfactor® score*: 0.0045
Article influence score*: 1.152
JCR Rank*: 14/93 Toxicology; 56/274 Environmental Sciences
Journal Citation Score*: 1.35
SNIP: 1.506
SJR: 1.155

The 2021 peer review performance metrics for the Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology are shown below:

Article page views - 457,612
Usage:
705,002 Downloads (in 2021)
4,161 Altmetric mentions (2021)

*2020 Journal Citation Reports® Science Edition (Clarivate Analytics, 2020)

Abstracted/Indexed in

Biology and Environmental Sciences
Current Contents
Current Contents/Agriculture Biology & Environmental Sciences
EMBASE/Excerpta Medica
SciSearch
Research Alert
SCIExpanded
Scopus

ISSN and eISSN

International standard serial number (ISSN): 1559-0631
Electronic international standard serial number (eISSN): 1559-064X.

Newsfeeds

Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology now provides its latest table of contents as an RSS web  feed. This allows users with an RSS reader to receive automatic updates whenever new content is added to these pages.

Receive Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology's current issue table of contents.

Receive Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology's AOP table of contents.

Mon, 22 Nov 2021 01:26:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.nature.com/jes/journal-information
Killexams : The Environment

Since pre-colonial times, Americans' relationship to the natural world has shaped politics, policy, commerce, entertainment and culture. In this collection, delve into our complicated history with the environment through American Experience films exploring wide-ranging topics, from our struggles to exert dominion over nature to our attempts to understand and protect it.

Sun, 22 Apr 2018 15:42:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/collections/environment/
Killexams : News tagged with environmental information

Your Privacy

This site uses cookies to assist with navigation, analyse your use of our services, collect data for ads personalisation and provide content from third parties. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Tue, 15 Nov 2022 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://phys.org/tags/environmental+information/
Killexams : Climate and Environment No result found, try new keyword!The record is credited by many scientists as the most important evidence that the climate is changing because of human activity. By Elena Shao The Texas Public Policy Foundation is shaping laws ... Sun, 04 Dec 2022 01:39:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.nytimes.com/section/climate Killexams : ISM Resources Corp.

Stocks: Real-time U.S. stock quotes reflect trades reported through Nasdaq only; comprehensive quotes and volume reflect trading in all markets and are delayed at least 15 minutes. International stock quotes are delayed as per exchange requirements. Fundamental company data and analyst estimates provided by FactSet. Copyright 2019© FactSet Research Systems Inc. All rights reserved. Source: FactSet

Indexes: Index quotes may be real-time or delayed as per exchange requirements; refer to time stamps for information on any delays. Source: FactSet

Markets Diary: Data on U.S. Overview page represent trading in all U.S. markets and updates until 8 p.m. See Closing Diaries table for 4 p.m. closing data. Sources: FactSet, Dow Jones

Stock Movers: Gainers, decliners and most actives market activity tables are a combination of NYSE, Nasdaq, NYSE American and NYSE Arca listings. Sources: FactSet, Dow Jones

ETF Movers: Includes ETFs & ETNs with volume of at least 50,000. Sources: FactSet, Dow Jones

Bonds: Bond quotes are updated in real-time. Sources: FactSet, Tullett Prebon

Currencies: Currency quotes are updated in real-time. Sources: FactSet, Tullett Prebon

Commodities & Futures: Futures prices are delayed at least 10 minutes as per exchange requirements. Change value during the period between open outcry settle and the commencement of the next day's trading is calculated as the difference between the last trade and the prior day's settle. Change value during other periods is calculated as the difference between the last trade and the most recent settle. Source: FactSet

Data are provided 'as is' for informational purposes only and are not intended for trading purposes. FactSet (a) does not make any express or implied warranties of any kind regarding the data, including, without limitation, any warranty of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose or use; and (b) shall not be liable for any errors, incompleteness, interruption or delay, action taken in reliance on any data, or for any damages resulting therefrom. Data may be intentionally delayed pursuant to supplier requirements.

Mutual Funds & ETFs: All of the mutual fund and ETF information contained in this display, with the exception of the current price and price history, was supplied by Lipper, A Refinitiv Company, subject to the following: Copyright 2019© Refinitiv. All rights reserved. Any copying, republication or redistribution of Lipper content, including by caching, framing or similar means, is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Lipper. Lipper shall not be liable for any errors or delays in the content, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon.

Cryptocurrencies: Cryptocurrency quotes are updated in real-time. Sources: CoinDesk (Bitcoin), Kraken (all other cryptocurrencies)

Calendars and Economy: 'Actual' numbers are added to the table after economic reports are released. Source: Kantar Media

Thu, 01 Dec 2022 07:38:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.wsj.com/market-data/quotes/CA/XCNQ/ISM
Killexams : What would you like to know about Environmental Science: Nano?

There are no submission specifics regarding formatting; use of Royal Society of Chemistry template is not required. Bibliographies should be formatted according to the following Endnote and Zotero style files to include the cited article’s title.

Authors are encouraged to include line numbering in submitted manuscripts. Although there is no page limit for Full papers, appropriateness of length to content of new science will be taken into consideration by reviewers.

All submitted manuscripts must include an Environmental Significance Statement (120 words maximum) that should categorically state how the work is significant to environmental science in the context of understanding the nanoscale behaviour/application. This statement should be different from the abstract and set the work in broader context with regards to environmental science. This statement will be seen by the reviewers and will help ascertain the relevance of the article for a broad but technical audience and authors should use it to show that they have given serious consideration to problems that are environmental in nature. If the paper is accepted this statement will also be published.  Manuscripts cannot be reviewed without this statement.

Environmental Science: Nano is now offering authors the option of double-anonymised peer review. Both single- and double-anonymised peer review are now available to authors.

Title

An article should have a short, straightforward title directed at the general reader. Lengthy systematic names and complicated and numerous chemical formulae should therefore be avoided where possible. The use of non-standard abbreviations and symbols in a title is not encouraged. Please bear in mind that readers increasingly use search engines to find literature; recognisable, key words should be included in the title where possible. Brevity in a title, though desirable, should be balanced against its accuracy and usefulness.

The use of series titles and part numbers in titles of papers is discouraged. Instead these can be included as a footnote to the first page together with a reference (reference 1) to the preceding part. When the preceding part has been submitted to a Royal Society of Chemistry journal but is not yet published, the paper reference number should be given.

Author names

For single-blind peer review, please follow the instructions below regarding author names. For double-blind peer review, please follow the instructions here.

Full names for all the authors of an article should be given. To supply due acknowledgement to all workers contributing to the work, those who have contributed significantly to the research should be listed as co-authors. Authors who contributed equally can be noted with a Footnote and referenced with a symbol.

On submission of the manuscript, the corresponding author attests to the fact that those named as co-authors have agreed to its submission for publication and accepts the responsibility for having properly included all (and only) co- authors. If there are more than 10 co-authors on the manuscript, the corresponding author should provide a statement to specify the contribution of each co-author. The corresponding author signs a copyright licence on behalf of all the authors.

Table of contents entry

This entry should include a colour image (no larger than 8 cm wide x 4 cm high), and 20-30 words of text that highlight the novel aspects of your work.

Graphics should be as clear as possible; simple schematic diagrams or reaction schemes are preferred to ORTEP- style crystal structure depictions and complicated graphs, for example. The graphic used in the table of contents entry need not necessarily appear in the article itself. Authors should bear in mind the final size of any lettering on the graphic. For examples, please see the online version of the journal.

Abstract

Every paper must be accompanied by a summary (50-250 words) setting out briefly and clearly the main objects and results of the work; it should supply the reader a clear idea of what has been achieved. The summary should be essentially independent of the main text; however, names, partial names or linear formulae of compounds may be accompanied by the numbers referring to the corresponding displayed formulae in the body of the text.

Please bear in mind that readers increasingly use search engines to find literature; recognisable, searchable terms and key words should be included in the abstract to enable readers to more effectively find your paper. The abstract should aim to address the following questions.

  • What is the problem or research question being addressed?
  • What experimental approach was used to address the problem or question?
  • What key data and results were obtained?
  • What conclusions can be drawn from the experimental results?
  • What are the broader implications for the study with respect to environmental chemistry?

Environmental Significance Statement

Authors must provide an 'environmental significance statement' (120 words or less) that states how the work enhances or elucidates our understanding of nanomaterial interactions with natural systems that affect environmental or human health. This statement should be different from the abstract and set the work in broader context with regards to environmental science. It should aim to answer the following five questions.

  1. What is the problem?
  2. Why is it important?
  3. What is the key finding?
  4. How can this be generalised? 
  5. What is the environmental significance? 

This statement will be seen by the reviewers and will help ascertain the relevance of the article for a broad but technical audience, and authors should use it to show that they have given serious consideration to the positive or negative effects of nanomaterials on either humans or the environment. If the paper is accepted this statement will also be published. Please note that papers cannot be peer-reviewed without this statement.

Introduction

This should supply clearly and briefly, with relevant references, both the nature of the problem under investigation and its background.

Methods

Descriptions of methods and/or experiments should be given in detail sufficient to enable experienced experimental workers to repeat them.

Standard techniques and methods used throughout the work should be stated at the beginning of the section. Apparatus should be described only if it is non-standard; commercially available instruments are referred to by their stock numbers (for example, Perkin-Elmer 457 or Varian HA-100 spectrometers). The accuracy of primary measurements should be stated. In general there is no need to report unsuccessful experiments. Authors are encouraged to make use of electronic supplementary information (ESI) for lengthy synthetic sections.

Any unusual hazards inherent in the use of chemicals, procedures or equipment in the investigation should be clearly identified.

In cases where a study involves the use of live animals or human subjects, the author should include a statement that all experiments were performed in compliance with the relevant laws and institutional guidelines, and also state the institutional committee(s) that have approved the experiments. They should also include a statement that informed consent was obtained for any experimentation with human subjects. Referees may be asked to comment specifically on any cases in which concerns arise.

Results and discussion

It is usual for the results to be presented first, followed by a discussion of their significance. Only strictly relevant results should be presented and figures, tables, and equations should be used for purposes of clarity and brevity. The use of flow diagrams and reaction schemes is encouraged. Data must not be reproduced in more than one form - for example, in both figures and tables, without good reason.

Conclusion

This is for interpretation and to highlight the novelty and significance of the work. Authors are encouraged to discuss the real world relevance of the work reported and how it impacts on the environment. The conclusions should not summarise information already present in the text or abstract.

Acknowledgements

Contributors other than co-authors may be acknowledged in a separate paragraph at the end of the paper; acknowledgements should be as brief as possible. All sources of funding should be declared.

Bibliographic references and notes

These should be listed at the end of the manuscript in numerical order. We encourage the citation of primary research over review articles, where appropriate, in order to supply credit to those who first reported a finding. Find out more about our commitments to the principles of  San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA).

Bibliographic details should be cited in the order: year, volume, page, and must include the article title. For example: Lukas Mustajärvi, Ann-Kristin Eriksson-Wiklund, Elena Gorokhova, Annika Jahnke and Anna Sobek, Transferring mixtures of chemicals from sediment to a bioassay using silicone-based passive sampling and dosing, Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2017, 19, 1404-1413

Endnote style files. For Zotero, please use the Royal Society of Chemistry (with titles) template.

Bibliographic reference to the source of statements in the text is made by use of superior numerals at the appropriate place (for example, Wittig3). The reference numbers should be cited in the correct sequence through the text (including those in tables and figure captions, numbered according to where the table or figure is designated to appear).  Please do not use Harvard style for references.

The references themselves are given at the end of the final printed text along with any notes. The names and initials of all authors are always given in the reference; they must not be replaced by the phrase et al. This does not prevent some, or all, of the names being mentioned at their first citation in the cursive text; initials are not necessary in the text.

Notes or footnotes may be used to present material that, if included in the body of the text, would disrupt the flow of the argument but which is, nevertheless, of importance in qualifying or amplifying the textual material. Footnotes are referred to with the following symbols: †, ‡, §, ¶, ║etc.

Alternatively the information may be included as Notes (end-notes) to appear in the Notes/references section of the manuscript. Notes should be numbered using the same numbering system as the bibliographic references.

Journals
The style of journal abbreviations to be used in RSC publications is that defined in Chemical Abstracts Service Source Index (CASSI) (http://www.cas.org/expertise/cascontent/caplus/corejournals.html).

Bibliographic details should be cited in the order: year, volume, page.

Where page numbers are not yet known, articles should be cited by DOI (Digital Object Identifier) - for example, T. J. Hebden, R. R. Schrock, M. K. Takase and P. Müller, Chem. Commun., 2012, DOI: 10.1039/C2CC17634C.

Books
J. Barker, in Catalyst Deactivation, ed. B. Delmon and C. Froment, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2nd edn., 1987, vol. 1, ch. 4, pp. 253-255.

Patents
Br. Pat., 357 450, 1986. US Pat., 1 171 230, 1990.

Reports and bulletins, etc
R. A. Allen, D. B. Smith and J. E. Hiscott, Radioisotope Data, UKAEA Research Group Report AERE-R 2938, H.M.S.O., London, 1961.

Material presented at meetings
H. C. Freeman, Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Coordination Chemistry, Toulouse, 1980.

Theses
A. D. Mount, Ph.D. Thesis, University of London, 1977.

Reference to unpublished material
For material presented at a meeting, congress or before a Society, etc., but not published, the following form is used: 
A. R. Jones, presented in part at the 28th Congress of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, Vancouver, August, 1981.

For material accepted for publication, but not yet published, the following forms are used.

  • A. R. Jones, Dalton Trans., 2003, DOI: 10.1039/manuscript number, for RSC journals 
  • A. R. Jones, Angew. Chem., in press, for non-RSC journals

If DOI numbers are known these should be cited in the form recommended by the publisher.

For material submitted for publication but not yet accepted the following form is used.

  • A. R. Jones, Angew. Chem., submitted.

For personal communications the following is used.

  • G. B. Ball, personal communication.

If material is to be published but has yet to be submitted the following form is used.

  • G. B. Ball, unpublished work.

Reference to unpublished work should not be made without the permission of those by whom the work was performed.

Software
F James,  AIM2000, version 1.0, University of Applied Sciences, Bielefeld,  Germany, 2000. T Bellander, M Lewne and B Brunekreef, GAUSSIAN 3 (Revision B.05), Gaussian Inc., Pittsburgh, PA, 2003.

Online resources (including databases)
Please note the most important information to include is the URL and the data accessed.

  1. The Merck Index Online, http://www.rsc.org/Merck-lndex/monograph/mono1500000841, (accessed October 2013).
  2. ChemSpider, http://www.chemspider.com/Chemicai-Structure.1906.html, (accessed June 2011).

arXiv references
V. Krstic and M. Glerup, 2006, arXiv:cond-mat/0601513.

Figures & schemes

Preparation of graphics

Artwork should be submitted at its final size so that reduction is not required. The appearance of graphics is the responsibility of the author.

  • Graphics should fit within either single column (8.3 cm) or double column (17.1 cm) width, and must be no longer than 23.3 cm.
  • Graphical abstracts should be no larger than 8 x 4 cm.
  • Schemes and structures should be drawn to make best use of single and double column widths.

Colour figures

Colour figure reproduction is provided free of charge both online and in print.

Journal covers

Authors who wish to have their artwork featured on a journal cover should contact the editorial office of the journal to which the article is being submitted. A contribution to the additional production costs will be requested.

Use of such artwork is at the editor's discretion; the editor's decision is final. Examples of previous journal covers can be viewed via the journal homepage.

Electronic supplementary information

Introduction

The journal's electronic supplementary information (ESI) service is a free facility that enables authors to enhance and increase the impact of their articles. Authors are encouraged to make the most of the benefits of publishing supplementary information in electronic form. Such data can take full advantage of the electronic medium, allowing use of 3D molecular models and movies.

Authors can also Strengthen the readability of their articles by placing appropriate material, such as repetitive experimental details and bulky data, as ESI. All information published as ESI is also fully archived.

When preparing their ESI data files, authors should keep in mind the following points.

  • Supplementary data is peer-reviewed, and should therefore be included with the original submission.
  • ESI files are published 'as is'; editorial staff will not usually edit the data for style or content.
  • Data is useful only if readers can access it; use common file formats.
  • Large files may prove difficult for users to download and access.

Text and graphics

The preferred format for ESI comprising text and graphics is Microsoft Word. Publishing staff will convert Word files to PDF before publication, as this format can be accessed easily and reliably on most computing platforms using the freely available Adobe Acrobat Reader. If other formats are submitted they will also usually be converted to PDF files prior to publication.

Multimedia files

We welcome submission of multimedia files (including videos and animations) alongside articles for publication. Videos are an excellent medium to present elements of your work that can be difficult to communicate only in words. Please note that any videos of general interest are shared with the wider community via the RSC Journals YouTube channel. Please notify the editorial team if you prefer for your video(s) not to be uploaded to YouTube.

If you submit a multimedia file alongside your paper, please refer to it within your paper to draw it to the reader’s attention. Also please see the section on submitting multimedia files

Format
Acceptable formats for video or animation clips are listed below.

Please minimise file sizes where you can, by considering the following points.

  • The recommended maximum frame size is 640 x 480 pixels.
  • Our recommended maximum file size is 5 Mb.
  • Many packages output 30 frames per second (fps) as standard, but it's possible to specify a lower frame rate; this may not noticeably affect the quality of your video but will reduce the file size.
  • Use a 256 colour palette, if that is suitable for the presentation of the material.

Please consider the use of lower specifications for all these points if the material can still be represented clearly.

If your video is very short (that is, several seconds long) then it is recommended that you loop it and repeat a few times to provide a more detailed view.

Submitting multimedia files
Upload your video online, together with your manuscript under the category 'electronic supplementary material' and please supply the following.

  • A clear file name for your video.
  • A short descriptive title for the video, which can be used when uploading the video onto a streaming channel.
  • A video legend of approximately 30 words long; this caption must be provided to aid discoverability.
  • Five to 10 keywords that can be used to tag the video; the more accurate the tags are the better discoverability videos will have.

Copies of any relevant 'in press' references

Manuscripts should be submitted with copies of any ‘in press’ articles referenced.

Tue, 28 Jun 2022 20:11:00 -0500 en-GB text/html https://www.rsc.org/journals-books-databases/about-journals/environmental-science-nano/
Killexams : Dow sheds nearly 500 points, stocks finish lower on worries of further Fed rate hikes

Stocks fell Monday on fears that the Federal Reserve may continue tightening until it tips the economy into a recession.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 482.78 points, or 1.4%, to finish at 33,947.10. The S&P 500 slumped 1.79% to settle at 3,998.84. The Nasdaq Composite slid 1.93% to end the session at 11,239.94.

Tesla shares shed about 6.4% on reports of an output cut at its Shanghai factory, while tech stocks like Amazon and Netflix slid 3.3% and 2.4%, respectively, on growth concerns. Salesforce tumbled nearly 7.4% as it announced the departure of Slack's CEO.

Macao-linked casino stocks gained on hopes of easing Covid-19 restrictions, while VF Corp. shares slid 11.2% after the apparel company cut its outlook.

A hotter-than-expected memorizing of November ISM Services further fueled concerns that the Fed will continue hiking after the index topped Dow Jones' estimates and increased from October.

Bond yields pushed higher as equities fell, with the yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury last trading up nearly 9 basis points at 3.588% late Monday.

"Clearly, equity markets want to move higher, but that's very dependent on inflation getting under control," said Peter Essele, senior vice president of investment management and research at Commonwealth Financial Network. "And so, when you have above expectation prints on any econ number that comes out, that tends to fuel inflationary concerns, which sends rates higher."

Following a speech last week by Fed Chairman Jerome Powell, markets largely expect the central bank will approve a 0.5 percentage point interest rate increase. That would mark a step down from a series of four straight 0.75 percentage point hikes.

At the same time, Powell also said the "terminal rate," or point at which the Fed stops raising, likely "will need to be somewhat higher" than indicated at the September meeting. That could mean a fed funds rate that ends up in excess of 5%, from its current target range of 3.75%-4%.

The major averages are coming off a second consecutive positive week.

CNBC's Jeff Cox contributed reporting

Lea la cobertura del mercado de hoy en español aquí.

Mon, 05 Dec 2022 04:39:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.cnbc.com/2022/12/04/stock-futures-are-little-changed-as-investors-enter-a-quiet-period-ahead-of-the-feds-december-policy-meeting.html
Killexams : Tracking Biden’s environmental actions

President Biden pledged early on to use every corner of the federal government to combat climate change with “a greater sense of urgency.” This summer, as much of the country sweltered under intense heat and faced severe wildfires and drought, he and his party managed to usher through an unprecedented level of climate funding while his administration pressed ahead with other policies aimed at curbing planet-warming pollution.

The Inflation Reduction Act, which Biden signed Tuesday, provides roughly $385 billion to address climate change and speed the nation’s shift toward clean energy, according to the non-partisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget. This includes $260 billion in clean energy tax credits, $80 billion for rebates for electric vehicles, home energy efficiency upgrades and $1.5 billion in rewards for cutting methane, a potent greenhouse gas.

“This bill is the biggest step forward on climate ever,” the president said just before signing the bill at the White House. “Ever.”

While the measure will help Biden fulfill his pledge to halve the nation’s greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 compared with 2005 levels, it will take further executive action to realize that goal. The administration is working to lock in additional carbon cuts by approving offshore wind projects and pursuing rules to make everything from cars to home appliances more efficient.

Latest actions

Dec. 9, 2022

proposed

Restricting the use of super-polluting hydrofluorocarbons in certain products

The Environmental Protection Agency proposed restricting the use of hydrofluorocarbons, a potent greenhouse gas, in certain foams, aerosol products, and refrigeration, air conditioning, and heat pump equipment starting in 2025. Read more »

Dec. 5, 2022

proposed

Adding PFAS to list of “chemicals of special concern”

The Biden administration is seeking to remove a reporting exemption for certain so-called “forever chemicals” in an effort to have a more complete picture of how widespread their use is Read more »

The story of Biden’s time in office so far is one not just of doing, but also of undoing.

“We’ve had to do a lot of getting back to square one, which is frustrating,” Gina McCarthy, the president’s national climate adviser, said about the significant time and effort required to restore regulations that were weakened or eliminated under President Donald Trump. “We’ve had to roll back the rollbacks.”

Biden has now targeted or overturned about three-quarters of the Trump administration’s deregulatory actions, according to a Washington Post analysis, from nixing the controversial Keystone XL pipeline to imposing new curbs on emissions of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas. He has mobilized even far-flung agencies to focus on the issue, mandating that the federal government find ways to erase its carbon footprint by 2050.

Still, he has yet to deliver on some key pledges, such as halting all new oil and gas drilling on public lands and waters and ensuring that every federal infrastructure investment account for climate change.

Biden faces pressure from environmental allies to act faster to cut the country’s emissions, create green-energy jobs and lessen the burden of pollution on poor and minority communities. And the midterm elections this fall threaten to hand more power to Republicans, who have opposed the ways in which Biden has pushed to phase out fossil fuels.

“Misguided,” Rep. Bruce Westerman (Ark.), the ranking Republican on the House Natural Resources Committee, said of the administration’s energy policies to date.

He and other Republicans have criticized Biden’s attempts to scale back domestic oil and gas production, prevent more expansive minerals mining, halt pipelines and promote wind and solar above other forms of energy — an approach he argues makes the United States more dependent on other nations, threatens existing jobs and does little to tackle overall global emissions.

“It’s been punitive and illogical,” Westerman said in an interview.

But McCarthy said the administration has no plans to let up on its efforts to slow climate change, as extreme disasters mount and the world continues to warm.

“There’s lots more to do,” she said, adding about 2022, “I do think when all is said and done, people will look at this year as a game changer.”

[Track the latest developments in climate policy and politics with The Climate 202 newsletter]

President Biden speaks to the virtual Leaders Summit on Climate from the East Room of the White House in Washington. (Evan Vucci/AP)

Air pollution and greenhouse gases

26 new policies added22 proposed

Status of Trump’s rollbacks: 27 overturned 28 targeted 10 not yet targeted

The Trump administration enacted at least 64 policies weakening or overturning regulations aimed at curbing air pollution and greenhouse-gas emissions fueling global warming. Biden has said he will reverse that legacy and promote a low-carbon future instead. By signing a document to rejoin the Paris climate agreement on his first day in office, the new president reversed one of his predecessor’s signature policies and signaled a different path.

Biden suedBiden action challenged in court

Trump suedTrump action challenged in court

Policy put in place or proposed by the Biden administration

Can be reversed by a simple act, such as signing an executive order or new directive

Can be reversed only through more extensive action, such as rewriting a regulation or court ruling

Can only be reversed through a lengthy regulatory process, act of Congress or court ruling

Launching Clean Technology Fund

The Treasury Department launched a $1 billion fund to help support clean-energy development in developing countries. Read more »

Passing the Inflation Reduction Act

The Inflation Reduction Act provides roughly $385 billion to address climate change and speed the shift to clean energy, including $260 billion in clean energy tax credits, $80 billion for rebates for electric vehicles, home energy efficiency upgrades and $1.5 billion in rewards for cutting methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Read more »

Doubling funding for climate-resilient infrastructure

President Biden doubled funding for the Building Rresilient Infrastructure and Communities (BRIC) program at the Federal Emergency Management Agency, bringing its budget to $2.3 billion. The program, started under Donald Trump, aims to protect communities from climate disasters before they strike. Read more »

Establishing the Navy’s 2030 climate action plan

The Department of the Navy adopted a blueprint to reduce the equivalent of CO2 emissions from 1 million cars through natural sequestration on Navy-owned lands by 2027, and establish climate-resilient, cyber-secure microgrids. Read more »

Cutting carbon in state transportation

The Transportation Department announced that it would provide $6.4 billion in funds under the bipartisan infrastructure bill to states. The program has few requirements, only calling for states to spend the money on programs aimed at cutting greenhouse gas emissions. Read more »

Federal support for failing nuclear plants

The Energy Department announced that it would provide $6 billion in funds under the bipartisan infrastructire bill to support struggling nuclear plants. Read more »

Launching new sustainability performance standards for federal buildings

Biden officials developed the first “building performance standards” for federal facilities, which will take effect in April 2023. Read more »

Auctioning wind leases off New York and New Jersey

The Biden administration auctioned off more than 488,000 acres of offshore wind leases in the Atlantic Ocean, netting $4.37 billion. The total energy that could be generated from the leases, an estimated 7,000 megawatts, would be enough to power 2 million homes. Read more »

Launching a U.S. Army climate strategy

The U.S. Army set two major climate goals -- a 50 percent cut in greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 compared to 2005 levels, and net-zero emissions by 2050 --as well as a plan to achieve them. Read more »

Investing in climate strategies through the USDA Commodity Credit Corporation

The Agriculture Department announced that it would invest $1 billion in climate-smart commodities and practices through its Commodity Credit Corporation. Read more »

Set hazardous air pollutants emissions standards for major industries

Since Biden took office the EPA has issued proposed or final rules for hazardous air pollutants stemming from copper smelting, cyanide chemicals,carbon black, refractory products, and polyurethane foam

Funding breakthrough climate technology and demonstration projects

The Energy Department established the office of Clean Energy Demonstrations to support up to $20 billion in projects with funding from the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act.

Making the federal government carbon neutral by 2050

President Biden signed an executive order calling for the federal government to run on all clean power by 2030, switch to zero-emission cars and light trucks by 2035, and make federal buildings carbon neutral by 2045. Read more »

Analyzing greenhouse gas emissions and social cost of carbon from oil and gas leases

The Bureau of Land Management announced it would analyze the national greenhouse gas emissions of all new oil and gas leases, and the social cost of those emissions, in its environmental impact statements. Read more »

National Intelligence Estimate on Climate Change, and related strategies

The Biden administration issued the first-ever National Intelligence Estimate on climate change, as well as a Defense climate risk analysis, and launched efforts at the Department of Homeland Security to address climate-related challenges including an uptick in migration to the United States. Read more »

Adopting an Interior Department climate action plan

Interior Secretary Deb Haaland issued a climate action plan six months after signing Secretarial Order 3399. That order established a climate task force and instructing the department to prioritize environmental justice concerns, tribal rights and scientific transparency in decisions through the National Environmental Policy Act. Read more »

Factoring climate risk into National Flood Insurance Program insurance rates

The National Flood Insurance Program instituted a more equitable pricing system for policies that would take climate risk into account. The change raises the premiums for most homeowners, including on the coasts and in flood-prone areas, while reducing them for some. Read more »

Phasing down hydrofluorocarbons Biden sued

EPA finalized a rule phasing down the production and import of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), potent greenhouse gases used in refrigeration and air conditioning, 85 percent by 2036. EPA has mandated a 40 percent cut in use and production by 2024. Read more »

Establishing electric vehicle target of half of new car sales by 2030

President Biden signed an executive order calling for half of all new cars and light trucks sold in 2030 to be electric or plug-in hybrids. Read more »

Requiring pipeline industry to curb methane leaks

The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration notified the pipeline industry that they’re legally required to fix leaks of methane, a potent greenhous gas, in their pipelines and pipeline facilities under the Protecting our Infrastructure of Pipelines and Enhancing Safety (PIPES) Act. Companies must update their maintenance and operations plans as a result. Read more »

Assessing climate-related risks across the federal government

President Biden tasked his top climate and economic advisers with developing a strategy for assessing climate-related financial risks to government programs, assets and liabilities within 120 days. Read more »

Promoting ‘climate-smart’ agriculture and forestry

Agriculture Secretary issued a plan to spur ‘climate-smart’ farming and forestry strategies on May 20, 2021. Read more »

Cutting U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by 50 to 52 percent by 2030

President Biden pledged the U.S. would cut its greenhouse gas emissions by between 50 and 52 percent, compared to 2005 levels, by the end of the decade. Read more »

Establishing Department of Defense climate working group

Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin established the Defense Climate Working Group to incorporate climate risk analysis into all of its operations and assess how it can curb the department’s greenhouse gas emissions. Read more »

Transitioning to a clean federal vehicle fleet

President Biden mandated buying clean and zero-emission vehicles for the federal fleet. The administration set targets for the 2027 and 2035 fleet on Dec. 8, 2021. Read more »

Making climate change a national security priority

President Biden ordered national security agencies to report within 90 days on integrating climate change into their work. The agencies submitted their reports to White House National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan, but did not release them to the public. Read more »

Restricting the use of super-polluting hydrofluorocarbons in certain products

The Environmental Protection Agency proposed restricting the use of hydrofluorocarbons, a potent greenhouse gas, in certain foams, aerosol products, and refrigeration, air conditioning, and heat pump equipment starting in 2025. Read more »

Tighter restrictions for venting and flaring methane on federal and tribal lands

The Bureau of Land Management proposed a new rule to prevent oil companies drilling on federal and tribal land from venting and flaring methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Read more »

Requiring major federal suppliers to cut their climate pollution

At the direction of the White House, the Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council proposed requiring any company with at least $50 million in contracts with the federal government disclose their greenhouse gas emissions and set emissions reduction taregts in line with the 2015 Paris agreement. Read more »

Establishing new standards for household gas furnaces

The Biden administration proposed strengthening efficiency standards for household gas-powered furnaces. The update would effectively phase out older “non-condensing” furnaces that burn more gas. Read more »

Establishing new standards for commercial gas water heaters

The Biden administration proposed tightening efficiency standards for commercial gas water heaters. The Obama administration proposed similar standards in 2016, which were blocked under Donald Trump. Read more »

Energy conservation standards for consumer pool heaters

The Biden administration is seeking heightened energy efficiency standards for pool heaters, saying it will benefit consumers if finalized. Read more »

Energy conservation standards for room air conditioners

Would mandate that certain room air conditioners become more efficient, which regulators estimate will save consumers money over time on utility costs. Read more »

‘Good Neighbor’ plan expanding cross-state air pollution requirements

EPA proposal expands the implementation of the 2015 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for ozone. It covers additional states -- California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming -- as well as industrial sources such as pulp and paper mills, cement kilns and boilers and furnaces in iron and steel mills. Read more »

Targeting smog-forming pollution from heavy trucks

The proposal takes aim at tailpipe pollution from new tractor-trailers, buses and other heavy-duty vehicles that form smog, along with emissions that warm the planet. Read more »

Modernizing building performance standards by Earth Day 2024

President Biden announced the creation of a coalition of 33 state and local governments that will work with the Energy Department and labor unions to cut emissions from homes and commercial buildings. The goal is for each participant to produce new regulations and legislation on building energy peformance standards by April 2024. Read more »

Limiting utilities’ effort to recover trade groups’ fees from ratepayers

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is taking comment on whether it should restrict power companies’ ability to force customers to finance the work of utility trade groups that advocate on behalf of fossil fuels, including the Edison Electric Institute and the American Gas Association. Read more »

Launching a government-wide strategy to cope with extreme heat

President Biden launched a government-wide strategy Monday to combat extreme heat, including the development of new federal labor standards aimed at protecting workers from rising temperatures linked to climate change. Read more »

Replacing traditional jet fuel with sustainable alternatives by 2050

The Biden administration set a goal of replacing all traditional jet fuel with sustainable alternatives by 2050, by boosting fuel production from waste and plants. Read more »

Assessing climate-related financial risks in the insurance sector

As part of efforts to assess climate change’s impact on the insurance sector, the Treasury proposed collecting data on climate-related risks from property and casualty insurers. Read more »

Establishing climate guidelines for federal coal leasing

The Bureau of Land Management said it would seek public comment on how to assess “the potential environmental, social and cultural impacts of the coal program” it operates. Read more »

Imposing new climate disclosure requirements on federal suppliers, lending programs

President Biden instructed his deputies to consider imposing new greenhouse gas disclosure requirements on federal suppliers and Strengthen reporting and management requirements for federal lending programs that take climate risk into account. Read more »

Encouraging financial regulators to Strengthen climate-related disclosures

President Biden instructed Treasury Secretary Janet Yellin, in her role as chair of the Financial Stability Oversight Council, to provide a report in 180 days on what the government should do to integrate climate risk into regulation of the financial sector. Read more »

Establishing new Energy Star standards for heat pumps and investing in innovation

Biden officials announced the government will develop new Energy Star ratings for electric heat pumps and invest $10 million in research and deployment of heat pump technology. Read more »

Doubling climate aid to developing countries by 2024

President Biden promised to work with Congress to boost annual public climate financing aid for developing countries to $11.4 billion by 2024. Read more »

Funding breakthrough climate technology and demonstration projects

President Biden proposed spending $35 billion on breakthrough climate technology and $15 billion on climate-related demonstrated projects. Read more »

Proposing Energy Efficiency and Clean Electricity Standard

President Biden proposed an “Energy Efficiency and Clean Electricity Standard” that would require utilities to get a percentage of their power from carbon-free sources. Read more »

Permitting for the Vineyard Wind Project

The Interior Department’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management signed off on the final environmental review for Vineyard Wind, an 800-megawatt offshore wind project. Read more »

Restoring California’s Clean Air Act waiverBiden suedTrump sued

The Transportation Department finalized a rule to restore California’s waiver to regulate air pollution under the Clean Air Act, and the Environmental Protection Agency took action in March 2020 to do the same. In May 2022, 17 states sued the Biden EPA over its decision. Read more »

Funding coal plants abroadBiden sued

The U.S. joined an agreement with other OECD countries that bans any financing of any unabated coal-fired power plants abroad. Read more »

Rescinding power plant emission limits during startup and shutdown

EPA reinstated a 2015 policy curbing pollutants power plants can emit during startup, shutdown and malfunctions, which the Trump administration had rescinded. Read more »

Paying the U.S. share of the Green Climate Fund

President Biden announced that he would not only resume payments to the Green Climate Fund, which helps poor nations address climate change, but seek to double them to $11.4 billion. Read more »

Weakening the regional haze ruleTrump sued

EPA issued guidance on regional haze standards that supercede an August 2019 policy weaening an Obama-era rule meant to Strengthen air quality in national parks and wilderness areas. Read more »

Testing for heavy-duty vehicles and engines

EPA finalized a rule that replaced a Trump proposal for testing for heavy-duty vehicles and engines that could have led to higher CO2 emissions. Read more »

Phasing out certain HFC uses

The EPA finalized a list of more climate-friendly refrigerants that could substitute for hydrofluorocarbons, potent greenhouse gases. Read more »

Targeting funding to combat cookstove pollution overseas

EPA Administrator Michael Regan announced the agency would resume funding the U.N. Foundation’s Clean Cooking Alliance, after Trump officials cut a $1.1 million grant to the group in 2017. Read more »

Rejoining the Paris Climate Agreement

President Biden rejoined the 2015 Paris accord, from which Donald Trump had withdrawn, on his first day in office. Read more »

Granting federal coal waste permits

Biden officials are reviewing comments made in response to a proposal that would grant coal ash disposal permits without review to some state and tribal sites, and plan to issue a final rule. Read more »

Setting emissions standards for major industries

EPA is in the process of setting standards for several industries, without changing how anticipated pollution from a new facility is calculated as the Trump administration has outlined. Read more »

Withdrawing climate guidance for federal departments and agencies

The Biden administration said it would issue guidance in the fall that would supercede a Trump-era policy directing agencies to scale back their climate analysis in environmental reviews. Read more »

Revoking Limetree Bay refinery permit

In 2021, the Biden administration withdrew a Trump-issued permit for Limetree Bay refinery, whose pollution levels disproportionately affected poor communities on St. Croix. In November, the EPA announced the refinery would have to obtain a new air pollution permit before restarting operations. Read more »

Ratifying climate super-pollutant treaty

The Biden administration submitted the Kigali Amendment, an amendment to the 1987 Montreal Protocol that phases down hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), for Senate approval. The Trump administration declined to transmit the treaty to the Senate for a vote. Read more »

Limiting climate projections at Interior

Instructs Interior Department scientists to use all climate models, including ones suggesting fewer impacts. Read more »

Changing test procedure for electric motors

The Biden administration is reexamining a Trump proposed rule that would allow manufacturers to use alternative standards to test small-motor efficiency. Read more »

Delaying energy-efficiency rulesTrump sued

The Energy Department has delayed updating 25 energy-efficiency rules Read more »

Recalculating the social cost of carbonBiden sued

The Biden administration reestablished the panel that formulates the social cost of carbon, an estimate for the damage caused by climate change for federal cost-benefit analyses, placing the interim figure at $51 per ton of CO2 released. While a federal judge in Louisiana blocked the administration from using the cost in permitting, regulatory and investment decisions, the 5th Circuit issued a stay of that ruling on March 16, 2022. Read more »

Lifting E15 summertime ban

Lifted the summertime ban on a gasoline-ethanol blend linked to smog formation. Read more »

Disbanding national climate assessment federal advisory panel

Dismantled the federal advisory panel for the National Climate Assessment. Read more »

Restricting 401(k) plan climate requirements

The Biden administration reversed a Trump-era rule that prevents environmental, social and government funds from being the default in 401(k) investments. Read more »

Reversing a mimimum efficiency standard for lightbulbs

The Energy Department reinstated an Obama-era rule that would require that bulbs produce at least 45 lumens per watt -- an amount of light generated by any LED lightbulb. The Trump administration reversed the rule shortly before it was set to take effect, on Jan. 1, 2020. Read more »

Weakening the lightbulb efficiency ruleTrump sued

The Energy Department finalized a rule making lightbulbs more efficient, reversing a Trump policy. The regulations affects bulbs used in 2 billion sockets in the U.S., from track lighting to candle-shaped bulbs installed in wall sconces. Read more »

Setting CO2 standards for cars and SUVsTrump sued

The Biden administration tightened fuel efficiency and greenhouse gas standards for the nation’s cars, pickup trucks and SUVs that were weakened by Trump, to reach an average of roughly 49 miles per gallon by 2026. Read more »

Changing hazardous air pollutant listingBiden suedTrump sued

EPA added 1-bromopropane (1-BP), a solvent linked to neurological damage, to the list of regulated hazardous air pollutants. Read more »

Approving Jordan Cove energy projectTrump sued

At the request of the Pembina Pipeline Corp., the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission vacated its approval of the Jordan Cove Energy Project, a natural gas export terminal, after the company failed to obtain the necessary state permits. Read more »

Imposing cost-benefit test on appliance standardsTrump sued

The Biden administration is reviewing a Trump rule requiring a comparative analysis of the relative benefits and burdens of potential energy conservation standards for appliances. Read more »

Granting a waiver on energy-efficiency rules for manufacturersTrump sued

The Biden administration reversed a rule granting manufacturers a waiver from uniform energy-efficiency test procedures. Read more »

Delaying the natural gas industry’s public dislosure about releasing toxic chemicals Trump sued

After environmentalists sued over the Trump administration’s refusal to finalize an Obama-era rule, EPA agreed to compel natural gas processing plants to start public reporting of toxic chemicals they release. Read more »

Curtailing environmental justice appeals

Removed the EPA Environmental Appeals Board’s authority to consider environmental justice challenges related to clean air, clean water or waste-permit decisions. Read more »

Landfill emissions guidelinesTrump sued

Trump stalled a rule to limit landfill methane emissions. Biden restored it soon after a federal court ruling throwing out the Trump action. Read more »

Changing cost-benefit rule for air policiesTrump sued

Biden officials rescinded a rule that restricted which public health benefits could be factored into new air rules. Read more »

Weakening cross-state air pollution requirementsTrump sued

EPA finalized standards in time for a court-ordered deadline that reduced cross-state air pollution involving soot and smog contributors. Read more »

Curtailing application of CO2 limitsTrump sued

On April 5, 2021, a federal court vacated the Trump-era policy that curbs CO2 only in sectors that account for at least 3 percent of U.S. emissions. Read more »

Expansion of Signal Peak’s Bull Mountains coal mineTrump sued

The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals struck down a Trump-era determination that the 175 million-ton expansion of a mining operation outside of Billings, Mont. could proceed, on the grounds that officials did not properly analyze its climate impacts. Read more »

Withdrawing fuel-efficiency measure for tires

Biden officials indicated that they will propose a rule by September 2022 to inform consumers about fuel-efficient replacement tires. The Trump administration delayed and then withdrew the proposal. Read more »

Easing oil and gas industry methane controlsTrump sued

The Biden administration proposed imposing requirements to control methane leaks across the oil and gas industry, including establishing standards for old wells, requiring stringent leak monitoring and the capture of natural gas emissions from drilling operations. Read more »

Reconsidering National Ambient Air Quality StandardsTrump sued

The EPA announced that it would reconsider National Ambient Air Quality Standards, which establish acceptable levels of smog-forming ozone. In December 2020, the Trump administration declined to tighten ozone standards. Read more »

Denying Endangered Species Act protections for the Joshua TreeTrump sued

A federal judge ruled that the Trump administration wrongly denied listing the Joshua Tree under the Endangered Species Act as threatened, due to climate change. Read more »

Withdrawing manufactured housing energy efficiency rule

The Biden administration revived a proposal to impose energy conservation standards on manufactured housing that were withdrawn under Trump. It is unclear if the new standards will be as stringent as those in the Obama-era proposed rule. Read more »

Limiting proxy voting related to climate change

The Biden administration proposed revoking this rule, which makes it more difficult to hold proxy and shareholder votes on environmental, social and governance grounds. Read more »

Withdrawing test procedures for conventional cooking tops

The Biden administration is reconsidering a Trump proposal to withdraw test procedures for conventional cooking tops Read more »

Imposing new energy-efficiency standardsTrump sued

On March 30 2021, the Biden administration proposed overhauling a Trump rule that made it more difficult to impose stricter energy-efficiency rules, known as the “process rule.” Read more »

Scaling back New Source Performance Standards for oil and gas

Scaled back measures oil and gas producers have to take to control air pollution. Read more »

Weakening washer and dryer efficiency standardsTrump sued

The Biden administration is reconsidering a rule exempting some clothes washers and dryers from current energy- and water-efficiency standards. Read more »

Rescinding the “Once In, Always In” policyTrump sued

Loosened a Clinton-era rule aimed at limiting toxic emissions from major emitters. Read more »

Reducing power plant mercury and air toxics standards

EPA has submitted a rule for inter-agency review that would replace a Trump-era rule reducing reporting requirements for hazardous pollutants issuing from power plants. Read more »

Mercury and Air ToxicsTrump sued

Withdrew the legal justification for a 2012 rule limiting mercury emissions from power plants. Read more »

Reversing leak detection and repair rules for hydrofluorcarbonsTrump sued

Biden officials are reviewing the Trump administration’s move to withdraw an Obama-era rule requiring the detection and repair of hydroflourocarbon leaks from major appliances. Read more »

Rescinding coal leasing moratoriumTrump sued

A federal judge in Montana district court reinstated a Obama-era moratorium on federal coal leasing, ordering the Bureau of Land Management to do a more thorough environmentalanalysis. The Trump administration lifted the moratorium through Secretarial Order 3348, which Biden officials rescinded. Read more »

Overhauling the BLM methane ruleTrump sued

Scaled back limits on methane emissions from drilling on public lands. Read more »

Denying Clean Air Act Section 126 petitionsTrump sued

EPA is reconsidering the Trump administration’s denial of petitions from Maryland and New York to regulate air pollution coming from upwind states. Read more »

Relaxed coal refuse ruleTrump sued

Relaxed air pollution regulations for a handful of power plants that burn coal mining waste Read more »

Reversing sewage treatment air pollutant standards

Reversed stricter emission standards for large, publicly owned sewage treatment plants. Read more »

Weakening dishwasher energy standards

The Biden administration revoked a rule that weakened energy-efficiency standards for dishwashers. Read more »

Weakening furnace and water heater efficiency

The Biden administration reversed Trump’s interpretive rule that withdrew efficiency standards for residential furnaces, commercial water heaters and gas appliances. Read more »

Weakening showerhead efficiency testing

The Biden administration revoked a rule that relaxed efficiency standards for showerheads, letting them use unlimited amounts of water. Read more »

Lifting methane limits for oil and gas operationsTrump sued

Biden signed a Congressional Review Act resolution, which passed both chambers, restoring a 2016 rule requiring oil and gas companies detect methane leaks and repair then. Read more »

Creating new power plant emissions accounting

Revised a program to make it easier for new power plants to avoid emissions regulations. Read more »

Weakening offshore air quality rule

Weakened a 2016 rule tightening air pollution limits on offshore operations. Read more »

Relaxing industrial facilities emissions

Made changes to a program aimed at curbing emissions from new or modified industrial facilities. Read more »

Managing air emissions in Indian Country

The rule streamlines pre-construction approval for minor sources of pollution on Indian Country. Read more »

Easing reporting Requirements for Large Animal FarmsTrump sued

Exempted large animal farms from having to report risks to state and local officials. Read more »

Revising commercial and industrial solid waste standards

Revised commercial and industrial incineration standards to address industry concerns. Read more »

Adopting petroleum refinery sector rule

Allows petroleum refineries more easily to flare gas and conduct other activities. Read more »

New 48

Policy put in place or proposed by the Biden administration

Launching Clean Technology Fund

The Treasury Department launched a $1 billion fund to help support clean-energy development in developing countries. Read more »

Passing the Inflation Reduction Act

The Inflation Reduction Act provides roughly $385 billion to address climate change and speed the shift to clean energy, including $260 billion in clean energy tax credits, $80 billion for rebates for electric vehicles, home energy efficiency upgrades and $1.5 billion in rewards for cutting methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Read more »

Doubling funding for climate-resilient infrastructure

President Biden doubled funding for the Building Rresilient Infrastructure and Communities (BRIC) program at the Federal Emergency Management Agency, bringing its budget to $2.3 billion. The program, started under Donald Trump, aims to protect communities from climate disasters before they strike. Read more »

Establishing the Navy’s 2030 climate action plan

The Department of the Navy adopted a blueprint to reduce the equivalent of CO2 emissions from 1 million cars through natural sequestration on Navy-owned lands by 2027, and establish climate-resilient, cyber-secure microgrids. Read more »

Cutting carbon in state transportation

The Transportation Department announced that it would provide $6.4 billion in funds under the bipartisan infrastructure bill to states. The program has few requirements, only calling for states to spend the money on programs aimed at cutting greenhouse gas emissions. Read more »

Federal support for failing nuclear plants

The Energy Department announced that it would provide $6 billion in funds under the bipartisan infrastructire bill to support struggling nuclear plants. Read more »

Launching new sustainability performance standards for federal buildings

Biden officials developed the first “building performance standards” for federal facilities, which will take effect in April 2023. Read more »

Auctioning wind leases off New York and New Jersey

The Biden administration auctioned off more than 488,000 acres of offshore wind leases in the Atlantic Ocean, netting $4.37 billion. The total energy that could be generated from the leases, an estimated 7,000 megawatts, would be enough to power 2 million homes. Read more »

Launching a U.S. Army climate strategy

The U.S. Army set two major climate goals -- a 50 percent cut in greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 compared to 2005 levels, and net-zero emissions by 2050 --as well as a plan to achieve them. Read more »

Investing in climate strategies through the USDA Commodity Credit Corporation

The Agriculture Department announced that it would invest $1 billion in climate-smart commodities and practices through its Commodity Credit Corporation. Read more »

Set hazardous air pollutants emissions standards for major industries

Since Biden took office the EPA has issued proposed or final rules for hazardous air pollutants stemming from copper smelting, cyanide chemicals,carbon black, refractory products, and polyurethane foam

Funding breakthrough climate technology and demonstration projects

The Energy Department established the office of Clean Energy Demonstrations to support up to $20 billion in projects with funding from the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act.

Making the federal government carbon neutral by 2050

President Biden signed an executive order calling for the federal government to run on all clean power by 2030, switch to zero-emission cars and light trucks by 2035, and make federal buildings carbon neutral by 2045. Read more »

Analyzing greenhouse gas emissions and social cost of carbon from oil and gas leases

The Bureau of Land Management announced it would analyze the national greenhouse gas emissions of all new oil and gas leases, and the social cost of those emissions, in its environmental impact statements. Read more »

National Intelligence Estimate on Climate Change, and related strategies

The Biden administration issued the first-ever National Intelligence Estimate on climate change, as well as a Defense climate risk analysis, and launched efforts at the Department of Homeland Security to address climate-related challenges including an uptick in migration to the United States. Read more »

Adopting an Interior Department climate action plan

Interior Secretary Deb Haaland issued a climate action plan six months after signing Secretarial Order 3399. That order established a climate task force and instructing the department to prioritize environmental justice concerns, tribal rights and scientific transparency in decisions through the National Environmental Policy Act. Read more »

Factoring climate risk into National Flood Insurance Program insurance rates

The National Flood Insurance Program instituted a more equitable pricing system for policies that would take climate risk into account. The change raises the premiums for most homeowners, including on the coasts and in flood-prone areas, while reducing them for some. Read more »

Phasing down hydrofluorocarbons Biden sued

EPA finalized a rule phasing down the production and import of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), potent greenhouse gases used in refrigeration and air conditioning, 85 percent by 2036. EPA has mandated a 40 percent cut in use and production by 2024. Read more »

Establishing electric vehicle target of half of new car sales by 2030

President Biden signed an executive order calling for half of all new cars and light trucks sold in 2030 to be electric or plug-in hybrids. Read more »

Requiring pipeline industry to curb methane leaks

The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration notified the pipeline industry that they’re legally required to fix leaks of methane, a potent greenhous gas, in their pipelines and pipeline facilities under the Protecting our Infrastructure of Pipelines and Enhancing Safety (PIPES) Act. Companies must update their maintenance and operations plans as a result. Read more »

Assessing climate-related risks across the federal government

President Biden tasked his top climate and economic advisers with developing a strategy for assessing climate-related financial risks to government programs, assets and liabilities within 120 days. Read more »

Promoting ‘climate-smart’ agriculture and forestry

Agriculture Secretary issued a plan to spur ‘climate-smart’ farming and forestry strategies on May 20, 2021. Read more »

Cutting U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by 50 to 52 percent by 2030

President Biden pledged the U.S. would cut its greenhouse gas emissions by between 50 and 52 percent, compared to 2005 levels, by the end of the decade. Read more »

Establishing Department of Defense climate working group

Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin established the Defense Climate Working Group to incorporate climate risk analysis into all of its operations and assess how it can curb the department’s greenhouse gas emissions. Read more »

Transitioning to a clean federal vehicle fleet

President Biden mandated buying clean and zero-emission vehicles for the federal fleet. The administration set targets for the 2027 and 2035 fleet on Dec. 8, 2021. Read more »

Making climate change a national security priority

President Biden ordered national security agencies to report within 90 days on integrating climate change into their work. The agencies submitted their reports to White House National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan, but did not release them to the public. Read more »

Restricting the use of super-polluting hydrofluorocarbons in certain products

The Environmental Protection Agency proposed restricting the use of hydrofluorocarbons, a potent greenhouse gas, in certain foams, aerosol products, and refrigeration, air conditioning, and heat pump equipment starting in 2025. Read more »

Tighter restrictions for venting and flaring methane on federal and tribal lands

The Bureau of Land Management proposed a new rule to prevent oil companies drilling on federal and tribal land from venting and flaring methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Read more »

Requiring major federal suppliers to cut their climate pollution

At the direction of the White House, the Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council proposed requiring any company with at least $50 million in contracts with the federal government disclose their greenhouse gas emissions and set emissions reduction taregts in line with the 2015 Paris agreement. Read more »

Establishing new standards for household gas furnaces

The Biden administration proposed strengthening efficiency standards for household gas-powered furnaces. The update would effectively phase out older “non-condensing” furnaces that burn more gas. Read more »

Establishing new standards for commercial gas water heaters

The Biden administration proposed tightening efficiency standards for commercial gas water heaters. The Obama administration proposed similar standards in 2016, which were blocked under Donald Trump. Read more »

Energy conservation standards for consumer pool heaters

The Biden administration is seeking heightened energy efficiency standards for pool heaters, saying it will benefit consumers if finalized. Read more »

Energy conservation standards for room air conditioners

Would mandate that certain room air conditioners become more efficient, which regulators estimate will save consumers money over time on utility costs. Read more »

‘Good Neighbor’ plan expanding cross-state air pollution requirements

EPA proposal expands the implementation of the 2015 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for ozone. It covers additional states -- California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming -- as well as industrial sources such as pulp and paper mills, cement kilns and boilers and furnaces in iron and steel mills. Read more »

Targeting smog-forming pollution from heavy trucks

The proposal takes aim at tailpipe pollution from new tractor-trailers, buses and other heavy-duty vehicles that form smog, along with emissions that warm the planet. Read more »

Modernizing building performance standards by Earth Day 2024

President Biden announced the creation of a coalition of 33 state and local governments that will work with the Energy Department and labor unions to cut emissions from homes and commercial buildings. The goal is for each participant to produce new regulations and legislation on building energy peformance standards by April 2024. Read more »

Limiting utilities’ effort to recover trade groups’ fees from ratepayers

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is taking comment on whether it should restrict power companies’ ability to force customers to finance the work of utility trade groups that advocate on behalf of fossil fuels, including the Edison Electric Institute and the American Gas Association. Read more »

Launching a government-wide strategy to cope with extreme heat

President Biden launched a government-wide strategy Monday to combat extreme heat, including the development of new federal labor standards aimed at protecting workers from rising temperatures linked to climate change. Read more »

Replacing traditional jet fuel with sustainable alternatives by 2050

The Biden administration set a goal of replacing all traditional jet fuel with sustainable alternatives by 2050, by boosting fuel production from waste and plants. Read more »

Assessing climate-related financial risks in the insurance sector

As part of efforts to assess climate change’s impact on the insurance sector, the Treasury proposed collecting data on climate-related risks from property and casualty insurers. Read more »

Establishing climate guidelines for federal coal leasing

The Bureau of Land Management said it would seek public comment on how to assess “the potential environmental, social and cultural impacts of the coal program” it operates. Read more »

Imposing new climate disclosure requirements on federal suppliers, lending programs

President Biden instructed his deputies to consider imposing new greenhouse gas disclosure requirements on federal suppliers and Strengthen reporting and management requirements for federal lending programs that take climate risk into account. Read more »

Encouraging financial regulators to Strengthen climate-related disclosures

President Biden instructed Treasury Secretary Janet Yellin, in her role as chair of the Financial Stability Oversight Council, to provide a report in 180 days on what the government should do to integrate climate risk into regulation of the financial sector. Read more »

Establishing new Energy Star standards for heat pumps and investing in innovation

Biden officials announced the government will develop new Energy Star ratings for electric heat pumps and invest $10 million in research and deployment of heat pump technology. Read more »

Doubling climate aid to developing countries by 2024

President Biden promised to work with Congress to boost annual public climate financing aid for developing countries to $11.4 billion by 2024. Read more »

Funding breakthrough climate technology and demonstration projects

President Biden proposed spending $35 billion on breakthrough climate technology and $15 billion on climate-related demonstrated projects. Read more »

Proposing Energy Efficiency and Clean Electricity Standard

President Biden proposed an “Energy Efficiency and Clean Electricity Standard” that would require utilities to get a percentage of their power from carbon-free sources. Read more »

Permitting for the Vineyard Wind Project

The Interior Department’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management signed off on the final environmental review for Vineyard Wind, an 800-megawatt offshore wind project. Read more »

Easy to overturn 20

Can be reversed by a simple act, such as signing an executive order or new directive

Restoring California’s Clean Air Act waiverBiden suedTrump sued

The Transportation Department finalized a rule to restore California’s waiver to regulate air pollution under the Clean Air Act, and the Environmental Protection Agency took action in March 2020 to do the same. In May 2022, 17 states sued the Biden EPA over its decision. Read more »

Funding coal plants abroadBiden sued

The U.S. joined an agreement with other OECD countries that bans any financing of any unabated coal-fired power plants abroad. Read more »

Rescinding power plant emission limits during startup and shutdown

EPA reinstated a 2015 policy curbing pollutants power plants can emit during startup, shutdown and malfunctions, which the Trump administration had rescinded. Read more »

Paying the U.S. share of the Green Climate Fund

President Biden announced that he would not only resume payments to the Green Climate Fund, which helps poor nations address climate change, but seek to double them to $11.4 billion. Read more »

Weakening the regional haze ruleTrump sued

EPA issued guidance on regional haze standards that supercede an August 2019 policy weaening an Obama-era rule meant to Strengthen air quality in national parks and wilderness areas. Read more »

Testing for heavy-duty vehicles and engines

EPA finalized a rule that replaced a Trump proposal for testing for heavy-duty vehicles and engines that could have led to higher CO2 emissions. Read more »

Phasing out certain HFC uses

The EPA finalized a list of more climate-friendly refrigerants that could substitute for hydrofluorocarbons, potent greenhouse gases. Read more »

Targeting funding to combat cookstove pollution overseas

EPA Administrator Michael Regan announced the agency would resume funding the U.N. Foundation’s Clean Cooking Alliance, after Trump officials cut a $1.1 million grant to the group in 2017. Read more »

Rejoining the Paris Climate Agreement

President Biden rejoined the 2015 Paris accord, from which Donald Trump had withdrawn, on his first day in office. Read more »

Granting federal coal waste permits

Biden officials are reviewing comments made in response to a proposal that would grant coal ash disposal permits without review to some state and tribal sites, and plan to issue a final rule. Read more »

Setting emissions standards for major industries

EPA is in the process of setting standards for several industries, without changing how anticipated pollution from a new facility is calculated as the Trump administration has outlined. Read more »

Withdrawing climate guidance for federal departments and agencies

The Biden administration said it would issue guidance in the fall that would supercede a Trump-era policy directing agencies to scale back their climate analysis in environmental reviews. Read more »

Revoking Limetree Bay refinery permit

In 2021, the Biden administration withdrew a Trump-issued permit for Limetree Bay refinery, whose pollution levels disproportionately affected poor communities on St. Croix. In November, the EPA announced the refinery would have to obtain a new air pollution permit before restarting operations. Read more »

Ratifying climate super-pollutant treaty

The Biden administration submitted the Kigali Amendment, an amendment to the 1987 Montreal Protocol that phases down hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), for Senate approval. The Trump administration declined to transmit the treaty to the Senate for a vote. Read more »

Limiting climate projections at Interior

Instructs Interior Department scientists to use all climate models, including ones suggesting fewer impacts. Read more »

Changing test procedure for electric motors

The Biden administration is reexamining a Trump proposed rule that would allow manufacturers to use alternative standards to test small-motor efficiency. Read more »

Delaying energy-efficiency rulesTrump sued

The Energy Department has delayed updating 25 energy-efficiency rules Read more »

Recalculating the social cost of carbonBiden sued

The Biden administration reestablished the panel that formulates the social cost of carbon, an estimate for the damage caused by climate change for federal cost-benefit analyses, placing the interim figure at $51 per ton of CO2 released. While a federal judge in Louisiana blocked the administration from using the cost in permitting, regulatory and investment decisions, the 5th Circuit issued a stay of that ruling on March 16, 2022. Read more »

Lifting E15 summertime ban

Lifted the summertime ban on a gasoline-ethanol blend linked to smog formation. Read more »

Disbanding national climate assessment federal advisory panel

Dismantled the federal advisory panel for the National Climate Assessment. Read more »

Medium 34

Can be reversed only through more extensive action, such as rewriting a regulation or court ruling

Restricting 401(k) plan climate requirements

The Biden administration reversed a Trump-era rule that prevents environmental, social and government funds from being the default in 401(k) investments. Read more »

Reversing a mimimum efficiency standard for lightbulbs

The Energy Department reinstated an Obama-era rule that would require that bulbs produce at least 45 lumens per watt -- an amount of light generated by any LED lightbulb. The Trump administration reversed the rule shortly before it was set to take effect, on Jan. 1, 2020. Read more »

Weakening the lightbulb efficiency ruleTrump sued

The Energy Department finalized a rule making lightbulbs more efficient, reversing a Trump policy. The regulations affects bulbs used in 2 billion sockets in the U.S., from track lighting to candle-shaped bulbs installed in wall sconces. Read more »

Setting CO2 standards for cars and SUVsTrump sued

The Biden administration tightened fuel efficiency and greenhouse gas standards for the nation’s cars, pickup trucks and SUVs that were weakened by Trump, to reach an average of roughly 49 miles per gallon by 2026. Read more »

Changing hazardous air pollutant listingBiden suedTrump sued

EPA added 1-bromopropane (1-BP), a solvent linked to neurological damage, to the list of regulated hazardous air pollutants. Read more »

Approving Jordan Cove energy projectTrump sued

At the request of the Pembina Pipeline Corp., the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission vacated its approval of the Jordan Cove Energy Project, a natural gas export terminal, after the company failed to obtain the necessary state permits. Read more »

Imposing cost-benefit test on appliance standardsTrump sued

The Biden administration is reviewing a Trump rule requiring a comparative analysis of the relative benefits and burdens of potential energy conservation standards for appliances. Read more »

Granting a waiver on energy-efficiency rules for manufacturersTrump sued

The Biden administration reversed a rule granting manufacturers a waiver from uniform energy-efficiency test procedures. Read more »

Delaying the natural gas industry’s public dislosure about releasing toxic chemicals Trump sued

After environmentalists sued over the Trump administration’s refusal to finalize an Obama-era rule, EPA agreed to compel natural gas processing plants to start public reporting of toxic chemicals they release. Read more »

Curtailing environmental justice appeals

Removed the EPA Environmental Appeals Board’s authority to consider environmental justice challenges related to clean air, clean water or waste-permit decisions. Read more »

Landfill emissions guidelinesTrump sued

Trump stalled a rule to limit landfill methane emissions. Biden restored it soon after a federal court ruling throwing out the Trump action. Read more »

Changing cost-benefit rule for air policiesTrump sued

Biden officials rescinded a rule that restricted which public health benefits could be factored into new air rules. Read more »

Weakening cross-state air pollution requirementsTrump sued

EPA finalized standards in time for a court-ordered deadline that reduced cross-state air pollution involving soot and smog contributors. Read more »

Curtailing application of CO2 limitsTrump sued

On April 5, 2021, a federal court vacated the Trump-era policy that curbs CO2 only in sectors that account for at least 3 percent of U.S. emissions. Read more »

Expansion of Signal Peak’s Bull Mountains coal mineTrump sued

The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals struck down a Trump-era determination that the 175 million-ton expansion of a mining operation outside of Billings, Mont. could proceed, on the grounds that officials did not properly analyze its climate impacts. Read more »

Withdrawing fuel-efficiency measure for tires

Biden officials indicated that they will propose a rule by September 2022 to inform consumers about fuel-efficient replacement tires. The Trump administration delayed and then withdrew the proposal. Read more »

Easing oil and gas industry methane controlsTrump sued

The Biden administration proposed imposing requirements to control methane leaks across the oil and gas industry, including establishing standards for old wells, requiring stringent leak monitoring and the capture of natural gas emissions from drilling operations. Read more »

Reconsidering National Ambient Air Quality StandardsTrump sued

The EPA announced that it would reconsider National Ambient Air Quality Standards, which establish acceptable levels of smog-forming ozone. In December 2020, the Trump administration declined to tighten ozone standards. Read more »

Denying Endangered Species Act protections for the Joshua TreeTrump sued

A federal judge ruled that the Trump administration wrongly denied listing the Joshua Tree under the Endangered Species Act as threatened, due to climate change. Read more »

Withdrawing manufactured housing energy efficiency rule

The Biden administration revived a proposal to impose energy conservation standards on manufactured housing that were withdrawn under Trump. It is unclear if the new standards will be as stringent as those in the Obama-era proposed rule. Read more »

Limiting proxy voting related to climate change

The Biden administration proposed revoking this rule, which makes it more difficult to hold proxy and shareholder votes on environmental, social and governance grounds. Read more »

Withdrawing test procedures for conventional cooking tops

The Biden administration is reconsidering a Trump proposal to withdraw test procedures for conventional cooking tops Read more »

Imposing new energy-efficiency standardsTrump sued

On March 30 2021, the Biden administration proposed overhauling a Trump rule that made it more difficult to impose stricter energy-efficiency rules, known as the “process rule.” Read more »

Scaling back New Source Performance Standards for oil and gas

Scaled back measures oil and gas producers have to take to control air pollution. Read more »

Weakening washer and dryer efficiency standardsTrump sued

The Biden administration is reconsidering a rule exempting some clothes washers and dryers from current energy- and water-efficiency standards. Read more »

Rescinding the “Once In, Always In” policyTrump sued

Loosened a Clinton-era rule aimed at limiting toxic emissions from major emitters. Read more »

Reducing power plant mercury and air toxics standards

EPA has submitted a rule for inter-agency review that would replace a Trump-era rule reducing reporting requirements for hazardous pollutants issuing from power plants. Read more »

Mercury and Air ToxicsTrump sued

Withdrew the legal justification for a 2012 rule limiting mercury emissions from power plants. Read more »

Reversing leak detection and repair rules for hydrofluorcarbonsTrump sued

Biden officials are reviewing the Trump administration’s move to withdraw an Obama-era rule requiring the detection and repair of hydroflourocarbon leaks from major appliances. Read more »

Rescinding coal leasing moratoriumTrump sued

A federal judge in Montana district court reinstated a Obama-era moratorium on federal coal leasing, ordering the Bureau of Land Management to do a more thorough environmentalanalysis. The Trump administration lifted the moratorium through Secretarial Order 3348, which Biden officials rescinded. Read more »

Overhauling the BLM methane ruleTrump sued

Scaled back limits on methane emissions from drilling on public lands. Read more »

Denying Clean Air Act Section 126 petitionsTrump sued

EPA is reconsidering the Trump administration’s denial of petitions from Maryland and New York to regulate air pollution coming from upwind states. Read more »

Relaxed coal refuse ruleTrump sued

Relaxed air pollution regulations for a handful of power plants that burn coal mining waste Read more »

Reversing sewage treatment air pollutant standards

Reversed stricter emission standards for large, publicly owned sewage treatment plants. Read more »

Difficult 11

Can only be reversed through a lengthy regulatory process, act of Congress or court ruling

Weakening dishwasher energy standards

The Biden administration revoked a rule that weakened energy-efficiency standards for dishwashers. Read more »

Weakening furnace and water heater efficiency

The Biden administration reversed Trump’s interpretive rule that withdrew efficiency standards for residential furnaces, commercial water heaters and gas appliances. Read more »

Weakening showerhead efficiency testing

The Biden administration revoked a rule that relaxed efficiency standards for showerheads, letting them use unlimited amounts of water. Read more »

Lifting methane limits for oil and gas operationsTrump sued

Biden signed a Congressional Review Act resolution, which passed both chambers, restoring a 2016 rule requiring oil and gas companies detect methane leaks and repair then. Read more »

Creating new power plant emissions accounting

Revised a program to make it easier for new power plants to avoid emissions regulations. Read more »

Weakening offshore air quality rule

Weakened a 2016 rule tightening air pollution limits on offshore operations. Read more »

Relaxing industrial facilities emissions

Made changes to a program aimed at curbing emissions from new or modified industrial facilities. Read more »

Managing air emissions in Indian Country

The rule streamlines pre-construction approval for minor sources of pollution on Indian Country. Read more »

Easing reporting Requirements for Large Animal FarmsTrump sued

Exempted large animal farms from having to report risks to state and local officials. Read more »

Revising commercial and industrial solid waste standards

Revised commercial and industrial incineration standards to address industry concerns. Read more »

Adopting petroleum refinery sector rule

Allows petroleum refineries more easily to flare gas and conduct other activities. Read more »

Chemical safety

3 new policies added5 proposed

Status of Trump’s rollbacks: 3 overturned 13 targeted 3 not yet targeted

From plastic water bottles to farmworker pesticide exposure to chemical dangers for infants and children, the Trump administration favored industry over consumer health. At least 14 chemical safety laws are under review by the Biden administration to restore lost protections.

Biden suedBiden action challenged in court

Trump suedTrump action challenged in court

Policy put in place or proposed by the Biden administration

Can be reversed by a simple act, such as signing an executive order or new directive

Can be reversed only through more extensive action, such as rewriting a regulation or court ruling

Can only be reversed through a lengthy regulatory process, act of Congress or court ruling

Funding cleanup at brownfield sites

The Biden administration announced that it would award more than $254 million to clean up polluted sites across the country, with money provided under the bipartisan infrastructure law. Read more »

Consulting on the impact of new pesticides’ active ingredients on endangered species

Biden officials announced that before it registers any new active ingredient in a pesticide it will evaluate its impact on species listed under the Endangered Species Act, and their habitat, and will consult with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service as appropriate. Read more »

Phasing out uses of weedkilling pesticide propazine

The Biden administration said it had reached an agreement to phase out use of the chemical, which had been shown to harm an array of endangered species. Read more »

Adding PFAS to list of “chemicals of special concern”

The Biden administration is seeking to remove a reporting exemption for certain so-called “forever chemicals” in an effort to have a more complete picture of how widespread their use is Read more »

Declaring polyfluoroalkyl and perfluoroalkyl as hazardous substances

The Environmental Protection Agency proposed classifying polyfluoroalkyl and perfluoroalkyl (PFAS), known as “forever chemicals,” as hazardous substances. Read more »

Banning the import and use of chrysotile asbestos in the U.S.

The Environmental Protection Agency proposed banning the import and use of chrysotile asbestos, a carcinogen used in chlorine and other manufactured products. Read more »

Reviewing the Formosa Plastics Group petrochemical plant in Louisiana

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced it would conduct a full environmental impact statement for a massive petrochemical complex Formosa Plastics Group plans to build near historically Black communities in Louisiana. Read more »

Required reporting of PFAS manufactured in the United States

EPA proposed the first-ever reporting requirements to better understand sources and quantities of so-called “forever chemicals.” Read more »

Delaying the chlorpyrifos banTrump sued

The EPA banned the use of chlorpyrifos, a pesticide linked to neurological damage in children, on food crops. The move came in response to a ruling by the Ninth Circuit that the Trump administration had improperly moved to keep it on the market. Read more »

Making EPA chemical toxicity assessments subject to White House review

Biden officials withdrew a guidance document that subjected the Environmental Protection Agency’s chemical toxicity assessments subject to review by the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. Democratic Reps. Betty McCollum (Minn.) Chellie Pingree (Maine) and Diana DeGette (Colo.) pushed for the guidance to be abolished. Read more »

Withdrawal of Trump-era guidance on certain uses of “forever chemicals”

EPA withdrew Trump-era guidance that Biden officials say “weakened” the agency’s ability to oversee certain uses of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS. Read more »

National Park Service plastic water bottle ban

Trump reversed a restriction on platic water bottle sales in national parks. Biden is seeking to phase out all single-use plastic products on Interior Department-managed lands by 2032. Read more »

Narrowing regulation of toxic solventsTrump sued

Biden officials said they would expand the way they evaluate risks posed by toxic solvents used in dry cleaning, known as trichlorethylene. Read more »

Changing pyrethroid pesticide approval process

Biden officials are reviewing restrictions in an interim pesticide registration for pyrethroids, but also face a lawsuit from the Center for Biological Diversity. Read more »

Weakening farmworker protection standard

Unsuccessful effort to block Agricultural Worker Protection Standard. Read more »

Assessing the risks posed by ethylene oxide

EPA announced on Jan. 25, 2022 that it would reconsider the 2020 decision not to regulate ethylene oxide emissions from chemical plants as a hazardous air pollutant. EPA’s scientific review suggests that this chemical is more toxic than previously understood, and could pose a cancer risk. On Feb. 25, the agency said it would use its 2016 toxicity analysis to guide the review. Read more »

Banning N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP)Trump sued

Biden officials finished a risk evaluation of NMP, a toxic chemical used in paint strippers, so it could move to restrict it after the Trump administration reversed a proposed ban. Read more »

Mandatory reporting on use of and exposure to asbestosBiden sued

Under Biden, the Environmental Protection Agency proposed establishing a mandatory reporting program on asbestos use and exposure under the Toxic Substances Control Act. Activists had sued after the Trump administration had refused to take this step. Read more »

Delaying the chemical disaster ruleTrump sued

In accordance with Executive Order 13990, Biden officials are reassessing a rule that rescinded a chemical disaster rule aimed at improving safety at sites with dangerous chemicals. Read more »

Easing standards for storing volatile organic liquids

Eased compliance requirements for storing volatile organic liquids, including petroleum products Read more »

Implementing the pesticide applicators rule

Biden officials are not implementing a pesticide spraying rule, narrower than the Obama-era rule, that the Trump administration adopted after a court loss. The agency has not withdrawn the Trump rule, but have indicated that it will solicit comment on reconsidering part of it. Read more »

Delaying methylene chloride restrictions

Biden officials are considering whether to revise a Trump-era rule that limited the use of the deadly chemical methylene chloride but exempted commercial uses. Read more »

Evaluating the risks of toxic substancesTrump sued

Limited the scope of how the EPA evaluates the risks of toxic chemicals available on the market.

Creating reporting loopholes for PFAS emissions from chemical plants and military basesTrump sued

Both the Trump and Biden administration have created loopholes in how chemical plants and military bases report their emissions of polyfluoroalkyl and perfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS. On Jan. 20, Earthjustice and other groups sued in federal court in an effort to strike those exceptions. Read more »

Reclassifying radioactive wasteBiden suedTrump sued

The Trump administration reclassified the definition of high-level radioactive waste, which eased the federal government’s cleanup obligations for aging nuclear tanks in Washington, South Carolina, Idaho and New York. Read more »

Altering risk management plans

Biden officials proposed strengthening requirements for facilities that use extremely hazardous substances to develop risk management plans in case of accidental releases, which were weakened under the Trump administration. Read more »

Revising pesticide rules for endangered species

Revised how the government gauges pesticide effects on endangered species.

New 8

Policy put in place or proposed by the Biden administration

Funding cleanup at brownfield sites

The Biden administration announced that it would award more than $254 million to clean up polluted sites across the country, with money provided under the bipartisan infrastructure law. Read more »

Consulting on the impact of new pesticides’ active ingredients on endangered species

Biden officials announced that before it registers any new active ingredient in a pesticide it will evaluate its impact on species listed under the Endangered Species Act, and their habitat, and will consult with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service as appropriate. Read more »

Phasing out uses of weedkilling pesticide propazine

The Biden administration said it had reached an agreement to phase out use of the chemical, which had been shown to harm an array of endangered species. Read more »

Adding PFAS to list of “chemicals of special concern”

The Biden administration is seeking to remove a reporting exemption for certain so-called “forever chemicals” in an effort to have a more complete picture of how widespread their use is Read more »

Declaring polyfluoroalkyl and perfluoroalkyl as hazardous substances

The Environmental Protection Agency proposed classifying polyfluoroalkyl and perfluoroalkyl (PFAS), known as “forever chemicals,” as hazardous substances. Read more »

Banning the import and use of chrysotile asbestos in the U.S.

The Environmental Protection Agency proposed banning the import and use of chrysotile asbestos, a carcinogen used in chlorine and other manufactured products. Read more »

Reviewing the Formosa Plastics Group petrochemical plant in Louisiana

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced it would conduct a full environmental impact statement for a massive petrochemical complex Formosa Plastics Group plans to build near historically Black communities in Louisiana. Read more »

Required reporting of PFAS manufactured in the United States

EPA proposed the first-ever reporting requirements to better understand sources and quantities of so-called “forever chemicals.” Read more »

Easy to overturn 7

Can be reversed by a simple act, such as signing an executive order or new directive

Delaying the chlorpyrifos banTrump sued

The EPA banned the use of chlorpyrifos, a pesticide linked to neurological damage in children, on food crops. The move came in response to a ruling by the Ninth Circuit that the Trump administration had improperly moved to keep it on the market. Read more »

Making EPA chemical toxicity assessments subject to White House review

Biden officials withdrew a guidance document that subjected the Environmental Protection Agency’s chemical toxicity assessments subject to review by the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. Democratic Reps. Betty McCollum (Minn.) Chellie Pingree (Maine) and Diana DeGette (Colo.) pushed for the guidance to be abolished. Read more »

Withdrawal of Trump-era guidance on certain uses of “forever chemicals”

EPA withdrew Trump-era guidance that Biden officials say “weakened” the agency’s ability to oversee certain uses of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS. Read more »

National Park Service plastic water bottle ban

Trump reversed a restriction on platic water bottle sales in national parks. Biden is seeking to phase out all single-use plastic products on Interior Department-managed lands by 2032. Read more »

Narrowing regulation of toxic solventsTrump sued

Biden officials said they would expand the way they evaluate risks posed by toxic solvents used in dry cleaning, known as trichlorethylene. Read more »

Changing pyrethroid pesticide approval process

Biden officials are reviewing restrictions in an interim pesticide registration for pyrethroids, but also face a lawsuit from the Center for Biological Diversity. Read more »

Weakening farmworker protection standard

Unsuccessful effort to block Agricultural Worker Protection Standard. Read more »

Medium 10

Can be reversed only through more extensive action, such as rewriting a regulation or court ruling

Assessing the risks posed by ethylene oxide

EPA announced on Jan. 25, 2022 that it would reconsider the 2020 decision not to regulate ethylene oxide emissions from chemical plants as a hazardous air pollutant. EPA’s scientific review suggests that this chemical is more toxic than previously understood, and could pose a cancer risk. On Feb. 25, the agency said it would use its 2016 toxicity analysis to guide the review. Read more »

Banning N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP)Trump sued

Biden officials finished a risk evaluation of NMP, a toxic chemical used in paint strippers, so it could move to restrict it after the Trump administration reversed a proposed ban. Read more »

Mandatory reporting on use of and exposure to asbestosBiden sued

Under Biden, the Environmental Protection Agency proposed establishing a mandatory reporting program on asbestos use and exposure under the Toxic Substances Control Act. Activists had sued after the Trump administration had refused to take this step. Read more »

Delaying the chemical disaster ruleTrump sued

In accordance with Executive Order 13990, Biden officials are reassessing a rule that rescinded a chemical disaster rule aimed at improving safety at sites with dangerous chemicals. Read more »

Easing standards for storing volatile organic liquids

Eased compliance requirements for storing volatile organic liquids, including petroleum products Read more »

Implementing the pesticide applicators rule

Biden officials are not implementing a pesticide spraying rule, narrower than the Obama-era rule, that the Trump administration adopted after a court loss. The agency has not withdrawn the Trump rule, but have indicated that it will solicit comment on reconsidering part of it. Read more »

Delaying methylene chloride restrictions

Biden officials are considering whether to revise a Trump-era rule that limited the use of the deadly chemical methylene chloride but exempted commercial uses. Read more »

Evaluating the risks of toxic substancesTrump sued

Limited the scope of how the EPA evaluates the risks of toxic chemicals available on the market.

Creating reporting loopholes for PFAS emissions from chemical plants and military basesTrump sued

Both the Trump and Biden administration have created loopholes in how chemical plants and military bases report their emissions of polyfluoroalkyl and perfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS. On Jan. 20, Earthjustice and other groups sued in federal court in an effort to strike those exceptions. Read more »

Reclassifying radioactive wasteBiden suedTrump sued

The Trump administration reclassified the definition of high-level radioactive waste, which eased the federal government’s cleanup obligations for aging nuclear tanks in Washington, South Carolina, Idaho and New York. Read more »

Difficult 2

Can only be reversed through a lengthy regulatory process, act of Congress or court ruling

Altering risk management plans

Biden officials proposed strengthening requirements for facilities that use extremely hazardous substances to develop risk management plans in case of accidental releases, which were weakened under the Trump administration. Read more »

Revising pesticide rules for endangered species

Revised how the government gauges pesticide effects on endangered species.

Drilling and extraction

11 new policies added9 proposed

Status of Trump’s rollbacks: 22 overturned 24 targeted 21 not yet targeted

The 61 rollbacks Trump enacted on drilling, mining and logging ranged from weakened oil worker safety on offshore platforms to extracting fossil fuels from public lands. Biden announced a moratorium on oil and gas drilling on Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and is reassessing a range of extractive activities, including expanded timber operations in Alaska’s Tongass National Forest and coal leasing out west in the Lower 48.

Biden suedBiden action challenged in court

Trump suedTrump action challenged in court

Policy put in place or proposed by the Biden administration

Can be reversed by a simple act, such as signing an executive order or new directive

Can be reversed only through more extensive action, such as rewriting a regulation or court ruling

Can only be reversed through a lengthy regulatory process, act of Congress or court ruling

Canceling lease sales 259 and 261 in the Gulf of Mexico

The Interior Department announce that it would not move forward with two major lease sales in the Gulf of Mexico, “as a result of delays due to factors including conflicting court rulings that impacted work on these proposed lease sales.” Read more »

Funding for domestic battery manufacturing

The Biden administration announced plans to steer $3.1 billion from a bipartisan infrastructure law to boost manufacturing of batteries and components domestically. The efforts include creating “new, retrofitted and expanded commercial facilities,” among other measures.

Cleaning up abandoned coal mines

The Interior Department announced it would provide nearly $725 million to 22 states and the Navajo Nation to clean up abandoned coal mines. Read more »

Ending industrial-scale logging of old-growth on Tongass National Forest

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced the Biden administration would cancel three old-growth timber sales in Alaska’s Tongass National Forest. It would still allow Alaska Natives and small-scale timber operators to selectively log some old-growth trees. The move ends large-scale harvest of old growth trees on national forests. Read more »

Postponing June 2021 onshore lease sales

Biden officials canceled second-quarter lease sales, as part of its ongoing pause on new federal leasing. Read more »

Postponing March 2021 lease sales in Colorado, Montana, Utah and Wyoming

The Interior Department postponed quarterly lease sales in Colorado, Montana, Utah and Wyoming “to confirm the adequacy of underlying environmental analysis.” Read more »

Reviewing activities in roadless areas in national forests

Biden officials instructed that any activities in roadless areas must undergo special review, effectively barring logging in Alaska’s Tongass National Forest. Read more »

Launching coal and power plant community task force

President Biden established a new interagency council to devise economic strategies to shift communities away from fossil fuels. Read more »

Eliminating fossil fuel subsidies

President Biden instructed all agencies to identify existing fossil fuel subsidies and eliminate them from their FY 2021 budget request. Read more »

Pausing new federal oil and gas leasingBiden sued

After pausing new oil and gas leasing for nearly seven months, Biden officials announced they would hold Lease Sale 527 in the fall and auctions in Alabama, Mississippi, Montana, Oklahoma, and New Mexico in February 2022 to comply with a preliminary injunction ordered by a Louisiana judge. Read more »

Launching review of significant Interior Department decisions

In Secretarial Order 3395, Biden officials subjected all major Interior Department decisions, including awarding new permits, to approval by a senior political appointee. Read more »

Expansion of Rosebud coal strip-mine in Montana Biden suedTrump sued

On Sept. 30, 2022, a federal judge rejected the 2019 approval by the Trump administration expansion of the Rosebud strip mine in Montana, saying federal officials failed to fully consider the environmental impacts. Read more »

Reconsidering 4 million acres of lease sales

The Bureau of Land Management will reconsider the climate impacts of previous administrations’ decisions to sell nearly 4 million acres of oil and gas leases in Western states. The move is part of an agreement that settles three cases brought by climate advocates arguing that the government’s environmental analysis of the lease sales was incomplete. Read more »

Offshore safety regulations for novel technologies

Proposals would codify policies aimed improving safety and environmental protections in offshore operations that involve novel technologies and equipment used in high pressure or high temperature situations. Read more »

Weighing pipelines and natural gas projects’ climate and community impacts

In a 3-2 vote, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission said it will consider how pipelines and related projects affect climate change and environmental justice communities. The commission later said it would seek further public feedback on the new policies. Read more »

Banning oil and gas development around Chaco Canyon for 20 years

Proposed banning oil and gas leasing within a 10-mile radius of New Mexico’s Chaco Canyon for 20 years. Read more »

Raising royalty and bonding rates for the federal oil and gas program

The Biden administration released a report calling for higher royalty and bonding rates for drilling oil and gas from federal lands and waters. Read more »

Review of the oil and gas leasing program on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge’s coastal plain

The Biden administration announced plans to undertake a new environmental review of drilling within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The move came two months after Interior Secretary Deb Haaland suspended nearly a dozen oil and gas leases issued under President Trump, saying that an “insufficient analysis” had been done before the sale.

Expansion of Alaska’s Mendenhall Glacier Recreation Area

The Biden administration has proposed withdrawing 4,560 acres of land that has been exposed by the retreat of Alaska’s Mendenhall Glacier from mining claims. Since 1910 the glacier has retreated nearly 9,200 feet due to climate change, and it continues to shrink. Read more »

Plugging abandoned oil and gas wells and restoring mining areas

President Biden proposed spending $16 billion on plugging abandoned oil and gas wells, and restoring lands that had been damaged by mining. Interior issued guidance on Jan. 5, 2022 on how states can apply for the funds. Read more »

Canceling Alaska offshore oil and gas sale

Interior canceled Cook Inlet OCS Oil & Gas Lease Sale 258, off Alaska’s southcentral coast, saying it conflicted with Biden’s EO 14008. The department formally canceled the sale on May 11, 2022 “due to a lack of industry interest in leasing in the area.” Read more »

Relaxing enforcement of pipeline regulations

Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration revised its enforcement rules against operators that do not comply with farm tap regulations in November 2021. But the rule will not take effect until May 16, 2022. Read more »

Reassessing Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monumentsTrump sued

President Biden restored the boundaries of two national monuments in Utah shrunk by Donald Trump, expanding Bears Ears National Monument to 1.36 million acres, and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument to 1.78 million acres. Read more »

Reviewing Antiquities Act designationsTrump sued

President Biden ordered a review of President Trump’s move to shrink two national monuments in Utah and call for changes to other national monuments. Read more »

Scaling back federal royalties reformTrump sued

Biden officials withdrew a rule overturning higher federal royalties for oil, gas and coal leases adopted at the end of the Obama administration. Read more »

Revoking Master Leasing PlansTrump sued

Biden officials let a guidance memo that sped up oil and gas leasing on Bureau of Land Management lands expire. Read more »

Offsetting public lands environmental damage

The Biden administration reinstated a policy that would require users of public lands to offset their environmental damage. Read more »

Weakening exploratory Arctic drilling rule

The Biden administration withdrew a proposed rule weakening standards governing oil and gas exploratory drilling in the Arctic Ocean. As a result, the Obama-era rule adopted in 2016 remains in effect. Read more »

Revoking Trump Interior secretarial orders

Interior Secretary Deb Haaland on April 16, 2021 signed Secretarial Order 3398, which reversed 12 secretarial orders issued under President Trump promoting fossil fuel development on public lands and waters. Read more »

Secretarial order on offshore leasing

The Interior Department revoked then-Secretary Zinke’s Secretarial Order 3350 when Interior Secretary Deb Haaland issued Secretarial Order 3398. Read more »

Setting priorities for the Outer Continental Shelf

Biden officials issued a new solicitor’s opinion on April 9, 2021 to override M-Opinion 37059, which prioritized offshore energy uses above other activities, including fishing. Read more »

Withdrawing areas in the Arctic and Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf from drillingTrump sued

The Interior Department revised guidance issued under the Trump administration, which opened most of the Arctic Ocean and parts of the Atlantic Ocean open to oil and gas leasing. Read more »

Changing protections for California Desert National Conservation LandsBiden sued

Canceled move to ban mining on 1.3 million acres of California Desert National Conservation Lands. Read more »

Amending the Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan

The Biden administration terminated a proposal scaling back protections in the plan Read more »

Permitting a copper mine in Tonto National ForestTrump sued

Biden officials rescinded a proposal that would have allowed mining giants Rio Tinto and BHP to mine copper in Oak Flat, Ariz. Read more »

Restoring the Hammond family’s grazing permits Trump sued

Biden officials reversed Trump Interior Secretary David Bernhardt’s move to award 10-year grazing permits to Hammond Ranches, whose owners had been convicted of arson in 2012 Read more »

Canceling Lease Sale 257 for the Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf

Interior officials rescinded the Record of Decision for a region-wide lease sale in the Gulf of Mexico. Read more »

Accelerating energy permitting

President Biden reversed a Trump-era executive order instructing agencies to speed up the development of energy projects such as pipelines. Read more »

Blocking the Keystone XL PipelineTrump sued

President Biden rescinded the 2017 cross-permit Trump granted for the Keystone XL pipeline. Read more »

Scaling back oil pipeline spill rules

Biden officials are reassessing a Trump-era policy scaling back rules governing oil pipeline spills. Read more »

Drilling near Chaco Culture National Historical ParkTrump sued

Biden announced he would initiate a 20-year withdrawal of lands within a 10-mile radius of Chaco Culture National Historical Park, after Trump officials had proposed to lease more than 2,300 oil and gas wells in the Greater Chaco area. Read more »

Narrowing climate impacts of pipelinesTrump sued

The Biden White House is reviewing how the Trump administration changed how regulators consider the greenhouse gas impacts of pipelines in environmental reviews. Read more »

Permitting Pebble Mine in Alaska

In December 2022, EPA moved one step closer to using its Clean Water Act authority to block construction of a controversal gold and copper mine near Bristol Bay in southwest Alaska Read more »

Overhauling public lands grazing rules

Proposed overhauling grazing on Bureau of Land Management lands. Read more »

Easing financial assurance requirements for offshore drillers

Proposal to reduce the financial assurances oil and gas firms leasing offshore rights must supply. Read more »

Permitting the Dakota Access PipelineTrump sued

The U.S, Army Corps of Engineers approved construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, but PHMSA issued notice of a potential violation on May 3, 2021. Read more »

Revising Central Yukon Draft Resource Management Plan

Biden officials extended the comment period for a draft management plan affecting 13 million acres of public land in Alaska by three months. Read more »

Revising rangeland management rule

The Biden administration extended the comment period for this proposed rule, which would allow ranchers to make nonmonetary settlements when they overgraze or illegally graze on public lands, by 60 days beyond the Feb. 16, 2021 deadline for public input. Read more »

Rewriting offfshore leasing plan

The Interior Department is revising a five-year offshore leasing plan to expand energy production in the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic Oceans. Read more »

Expanding timber harvesting on federal land

Proposal would make it easier to harvest timber on BLM land Read more »

Promoting oil and gas development on Forest Service land

Proposed speeding up the issuing of oil and gas permits on national forest land. Read more »

Easing minerals development on Forest Service land

Proposed making it easier to locate minerals on national forest land. Read more »

Changing royalty rates for non-energy minerals

Proposed reducing federal fees for non-energy minerals such as potash and phosphate. Read more »

Boosting natural gas exports outside trade agreements

Extended 20-year authorization for natural gas exports to non-trade agreement countries. Read more »

Allowing Big Cypress seismic testing

Allowed seismic testing in Big Cypress National Reserve without a permit. Read more »

Revising federal forest management

Executive order to encourage logging on federal lands. Read more »

Changing the management of Alaska’s Eastern Interior and Bering Glacier public lands

Allowed state and tribal officials to lay claim to 1.3 million acres of Alaska land for development. Read more »

Shifting responsibility for cross-border permittingTrump sued

Moved international border-crossing permit decisions to the White House, to speed pipelines. Read more »

Changing managment of Goodnews Bay public lands

Removes protections from 229,715 acres in Alaska to allow for minerals extraction. Read more »

Promoting oceanic, coastal and Great Lakes development

Instructed agencies to use coastal, oceanic and Great Lake resources for energy production. Read more »

Expanding drilling in the National Petroleum Reserve-AlaskaBiden suedTrump sued

The Bureau of Land Management reversed the Trump administration’s decision to expand drilling on the largest swath of federal land, in Alaska, by 7 million acres and reverted to the plan the Obama administration adopted in 2013. That plan allows drilling on roughly half the reserve, while putting the other half off limits to development. Read more »

Renewing Twin Metals Mine leases

Biden officials canceled Twin Metals’ mining leases near Minnesota’s Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, reversing a Trump-era decision. Read more »

Harming of marine mammals through Alaska offshore oil and gas activitiesBiden suedTrump sued

A federal court reversed the Trump administration’s authorization of a petroleum company, Hilcorp Alaska LLC, to “take” marine mammals incidental to oil and gas operations in Cook Inlet. Read more »

Changing sage grouse protection plan amendmentsTrump sued

The Bureau of Land Management published a notice of intent in the Federal Register that it will revisit the management plans that eliminated most of the “Sagebrush Focal Areas” created to protect the imperiled sage grouse. Read more »

Expanding mineral leasing in Western Alaska

Opens 9.7 million acres in western Alaska to mineral leasing. Read more »

Dictating bank lending policies for fossil fuel projects

Biden paused an Office of Comptroller of the Currency rule finalized on Jan. 14, 2021 that barred banks from refusing to finance projects for certain sectors, such as fossil fuels. It was set to take effect April 1, 2021. Read more »

Curtailing protest process for federal timber sales

Proposed limiting protests on federal timber sales. Read more »

Promoting energy extraction in Bering Sea-Western Interior Management Area

Would make more than 13 million acres in the Western Bering Sea open to development Read more »

Permitting ConocoPhillips’ Willow Project on the National Petroleum Reserve-AlaskaBiden sued

The Biden administration issued a draft environmental impact statement for ConocoPhillips Willow Project in Alaska, which could produce up to 160,000 barrels of oil a day during its 30-year operation, which did not indicate whether it will approve or halt the project. Read more »

Lifting Tongass National Forest roadless ruleBiden suedTrump sued

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack proposed a rule that would reinstate a Clinton-era policy prohibiting road-building and logging in more than 9.3 million acres of Alaska’s Tongass National Forest. Read more »

Transporting liquified gas by rail

The Biden administration proposed rescinding a rule allowing the bulk transport of liquified natural gas in rail tank cars. Read more »

Weakening financial assurances for hardrock miningTrump sued

The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law included language aimed at ensuring that mining firms paid the cost of cleaning up their operations, but did not include funding. Read more »

Easing fracking rules on Federal and Indian landsTrump sued

Rescinded tighter fracking rules on federal and Indian lands. Read more »

Drilling in Labyrinth CanyonTrump sued

Allowing drilling in Utah’s Labyrinth Canyon, in an area surrounded by wilderness Read more »

Forging Midas Gold settlement agreement

The Trump administration reached an agreement with Canadian-owned Midas Gold, over the objections of Idaho’s Nez Perce Tribe, to do a partial cleanup of the historical Stibnite Mine Site that clears the way for a massive open-pit gold mine. Read more »

Changing the Sonoran Desert National Monument Grazing PlanBiden sued

Expanded grazing by amending the Sonoran Desert National Monument Grazing Plan. Read more »

Changing tribal energy resource agreements

Reduced the requirements that tribes face when they enter into energy agreements involving tribal land/ Read more »

Approval of Caldwell Canyon Mine in IdahoBiden suedTrump sued

The Center for Biological filed suit on April 27, 2021 over the Trump administration’s approval of a phosphate mining operation by a subsidiary of Bayer. The group argues the government didn’t adequately consider the environmental impacts of the project. Read more »

Allowing the Alton Coal Mine DevelopmentTrump sued

Determined that coal mining can take place in an area near Bryce Canyon National Park. Read more »

Removing copper filter cake from hazardout materials list

Removed copper filter cake, which contains heavy metals, from EPA’s hazardous waste list. Read more »

Drilling in Arctic National Wildlife RefugeTrump sued

The Biden administration has paused the oil and gas leasing program in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Trump officials auctioned off 11 leases to drill on 552,000 acres in the refuge on Jan. 6, 2021, netting more than $12 million, and finalized the leases before Biden took office. Read more »

Tighter restrictions for blowout preventers on offshore wellsTrump sued

The Biden administration proposed stricter requirements on fail-safe devices used to prevent oil spills, part of an effort to prevent diasters such as the Deepwater Horizon incident in 2010. Read more »

Passing the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

Lifted the ban on drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge’s coastal plain. Read more »

Approving Thacker Pass Lithium Mine in NevadaBiden sued

Approval for a lithium mine on BLM land that provides habitat for sage grouse, pronghorn antelope and a rare type of springsnail. Read more »

Weakening federal oversight of mine safety violations

Weakened federal oversight of mine safety and requirements to report safety violations. Read more »

Easing Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas safety

Biden officials are looking at a rule rolling back offshore drilling equipment safety rules adopted after Deepwater Horizon disaster. Read more »

Promoting small-scale natural gas exports

Quickened approvals for small-scale natural gas exports to non-trade agreement countries Read more »

New 20

Policy put in place or proposed by the Biden administration

Canceling lease sales 259 and 261 in the Gulf of Mexico

The Interior Department announce that it would not move forward with two major lease sales in the Gulf of Mexico, “as a result of delays due to factors including conflicting court rulings that impacted work on these proposed lease sales.” Read more »

Funding for domestic battery manufacturing

The Biden administration announced plans to steer $3.1 billion from a bipartisan infrastructure law to boost manufacturing of batteries and components domestically. The efforts include creating “new, retrofitted and expanded commercial facilities,” among other measures.

Cleaning up abandoned coal mines

The Interior Department announced it would provide nearly $725 million to 22 states and the Navajo Nation to clean up abandoned coal mines. Read more »

Ending industrial-scale logging of old-growth on Tongass National Forest

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced the Biden administration would cancel three old-growth timber sales in Alaska’s Tongass National Forest. It would still allow Alaska Natives and small-scale timber operators to selectively log some old-growth trees. The move ends large-scale harvest of old growth trees on national forests. Read more »

Postponing June 2021 onshore lease sales

Biden officials canceled second-quarter lease sales, as part of its ongoing pause on new federal leasing. Read more »

Postponing March 2021 lease sales in Colorado, Montana, Utah and Wyoming

The Interior Department postponed quarterly lease sales in Colorado, Montana, Utah and Wyoming “to confirm the adequacy of underlying environmental analysis.” Read more »

Reviewing activities in roadless areas in national forests

Biden officials instructed that any activities in roadless areas must undergo special review, effectively barring logging in Alaska’s Tongass National Forest. Read more »

Launching coal and power plant community task force

President Biden established a new interagency council to devise economic strategies to shift communities away from fossil fuels. Read more »

Eliminating fossil fuel subsidies

President Biden instructed all agencies to identify existing fossil fuel subsidies and eliminate them from their FY 2021 budget request. Read more »

Pausing new federal oil and gas leasingBiden sued

After pausing new oil and gas leasing for nearly seven months, Biden officials announced they would hold Lease Sale 527 in the fall and auctions in Alabama, Mississippi, Montana, Oklahoma, and New Mexico in February 2022 to comply with a preliminary injunction ordered by a Louisiana judge. Read more »

Launching review of significant Interior Department decisions

In Secretarial Order 3395, Biden officials subjected all major Interior Department decisions, including awarding new permits, to approval by a senior political appointee. Read more »

Expansion of Rosebud coal strip-mine in Montana Biden suedTrump sued

On Sept. 30, 2022, a federal judge rejected the 2019 approval by the Trump administration expansion of the Rosebud strip mine in Montana, saying federal officials failed to fully consider the environmental impacts. Read more »

Reconsidering 4 million acres of lease sales

The Bureau of Land Management will reconsider the climate impacts of previous administrations’ decisions to sell nearly 4 million acres of oil and gas leases in Western states. The move is part of an agreement that settles three cases brought by climate advocates arguing that the government’s environmental analysis of the lease sales was incomplete. Read more »

Offshore safety regulations for novel technologies

Proposals would codify policies aimed improving safety and environmental protections in offshore operations that involve novel technologies and equipment used in high pressure or high temperature situations. Read more »

Weighing pipelines and natural gas projects’ climate and community impacts

In a 3-2 vote, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission said it will consider how pipelines and related projects affect climate change and environmental justice communities. The commission later said it would seek further public feedback on the new policies. Read more »

Banning oil and gas development around Chaco Canyon for 20 years

Proposed banning oil and gas leasing within a 10-mile radius of New Mexico’s Chaco Canyon for 20 years. Read more »

Raising royalty and bonding rates for the federal oil and gas program

The Biden administration released a report calling for higher royalty and bonding rates for drilling oil and gas from federal lands and waters. Read more »

Review of the oil and gas leasing program on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge’s coastal plain

The Biden administration announced plans to undertake a new environmental review of drilling within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The move came two months after Interior Secretary Deb Haaland suspended nearly a dozen oil and gas leases issued under President Trump, saying that an “insufficient analysis” had been done before the sale.

Expansion of Alaska’s Mendenhall Glacier Recreation Area

The Biden administration has proposed withdrawing 4,560 acres of land that has been exposed by the retreat of Alaska’s Mendenhall Glacier from mining claims. Since 1910 the glacier has retreated nearly 9,200 feet due to climate change, and it continues to shrink. Read more »

Plugging abandoned oil and gas wells and restoring mining areas

President Biden proposed spending $16 billion on plugging abandoned oil and gas wells, and restoring lands that had been damaged by mining. Interior issued guidance on Jan. 5, 2022 on how states can apply for the funds. Read more »

Easy to overturn 40

Can be reversed by a simple act, such as signing an executive order or new directive

Canceling Alaska offshore oil and gas sale

Interior canceled Cook Inlet OCS Oil & Gas Lease Sale 258, off Alaska’s southcentral coast, saying it conflicted with Biden’s EO 14008. The department formally canceled the sale on May 11, 2022 “due to a lack of industry interest in leasing in the area.” Read more »

Relaxing enforcement of pipeline regulations

Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration revised its enforcement rules against operators that do not comply with farm tap regulations in November 2021. But the rule will not take effect until May 16, 2022. Read more »

Reassessing Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monumentsTrump sued

President Biden restored the boundaries of two national monuments in Utah shrunk by Donald Trump, expanding Bears Ears National Monument to 1.36 million acres, and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument to 1.78 million acres. Read more »

Reviewing Antiquities Act designationsTrump sued

President Biden ordered a review of President Trump’s move to shrink two national monuments in Utah and call for changes to other national monuments. Read more »

Scaling back federal royalties reformTrump sued

Biden officials withdrew a rule overturning higher federal royalties for oil, gas and coal leases adopted at the end of the Obama administration. Read more »

Revoking Master Leasing PlansTrump sued

Biden officials let a guidance memo that sped up oil and gas leasing on Bureau of Land Management lands expire. Read more »

Offsetting public lands environmental damage

The Biden administration reinstated a policy that would require users of public lands to offset their environmental damage. Read more »

Weakening exploratory Arctic drilling rule

The Biden administration withdrew a proposed rule weakening standards governing oil and gas exploratory drilling in the Arctic Ocean. As a result, the Obama-era rule adopted in 2016 remains in effect. Read more »

Revoking Trump Interior secretarial orders

Interior Secretary Deb Haaland on April 16, 2021 signed Secretarial Order 3398, which reversed 12 secretarial orders issued under President Trump promoting fossil fuel development on public lands and waters. Read more »

Secretarial order on offshore leasing

The Interior Department revoked then-Secretary Zinke’s Secretarial Order 3350 when Interior Secretary Deb Haaland issued Secretarial Order 3398. Read more »

Setting priorities for the Outer Continental Shelf

Biden officials issued a new solicitor’s opinion on April 9, 2021 to override M-Opinion 37059, which prioritized offshore energy uses above other activities, including fishing. Read more »

Withdrawing areas in the Arctic and Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf from drillingTrump sued

The Interior Department revised guidance issued under the Trump administration, which opened most of the Arctic Ocean and parts of the Atlantic Ocean open to oil and gas leasing. Read more »

Changing protections for California Desert National Conservation LandsBiden sued

Canceled move to ban mining on 1.3 million acres of California Desert National Conservation Lands. Read more »

Amending the Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan

The Biden administration terminated a proposal scaling back protections in the plan Read more »

Permitting a copper mine in Tonto National ForestTrump sued

Biden officials rescinded a proposal that would have allowed mining giants Rio Tinto and BHP to mine copper in Oak Flat, Ariz. Read more »

Restoring the Hammond family’s grazing permits Trump sued

Biden officials reversed Trump Interior Secretary David Bernhardt’s move to award 10-year grazing permits to Hammond Ranches, whose owners had been convicted of arson in 2012 Read more »

Canceling Lease Sale 257 for the Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf

Interior officials rescinded the Record of Decision for a region-wide lease sale in the Gulf of Mexico. Read more »

Accelerating energy permitting

President Biden reversed a Trump-era executive order instructing agencies to speed up the development of energy projects such as pipelines. Read more »

Blocking the Keystone XL PipelineTrump sued

President Biden rescinded the 2017 cross-permit Trump granted for the Keystone XL pipeline. Read more »

Scaling back oil pipeline spill rules

Biden officials are reassessing a Trump-era policy scaling back rules governing oil pipeline spills. Read more »

Drilling near Chaco Culture National Historical ParkTrump sued

Biden announced he would initiate a 20-year withdrawal of lands within a 10-mile radius of Chaco Culture National Historical Park, after Trump officials had proposed to lease more than 2,300 oil and gas wells in the Greater Chaco area. Read more »

Narrowing climate impacts of pipelinesTrump sued

The Biden White House is reviewing how the Trump administration changed how regulators consider the greenhouse gas impacts of pipelines in environmental reviews. Read more »

Permitting Pebble Mine in Alaska

In December 2022, EPA moved one step closer to using its Clean Water Act authority to block construction of a controversal gold and copper mine near Bristol Bay in southwest Alaska Read more »

Overhauling public lands grazing rules

Proposed overhauling grazing on Bureau of Land Management lands. Read more »

Easing financial assurance requirements for offshore drillers

Proposal to reduce the financial assurances oil and gas firms leasing offshore rights must supply. Read more »

Permitting the Dakota Access PipelineTrump sued

The U.S, Army Corps of Engineers approved construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, but PHMSA issued notice of a potential violation on May 3, 2021. Read more »

Revising Central Yukon Draft Resource Management Plan

Biden officials extended the comment period for a draft management plan affecting 13 million acres of public land in Alaska by three months. Read more »

Revising rangeland management rule

The Biden administration extended the comment period for this proposed rule, which would allow ranchers to make nonmonetary settlements when they overgraze or illegally graze on public lands, by 60 days beyond the Feb. 16, 2021 deadline for public input. Read more »

Rewriting offfshore leasing plan

The Interior Department is revising a five-year offshore leasing plan to expand energy production in the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic Oceans. Read more »

Expanding timber harvesting on federal land

Proposal would make it easier to harvest timber on BLM land Read more »

Promoting oil and gas development on Forest Service land

Proposed speeding up the issuing of oil and gas permits on national forest land. Read more »

Easing minerals development on Forest Service land

Proposed making it easier to locate minerals on national forest land. Read more »

Changing royalty rates for non-energy minerals

Proposed reducing federal fees for non-energy minerals such as potash and phosphate. Read more »

Boosting natural gas exports outside trade agreements

Extended 20-year authorization for natural gas exports to non-trade agreement countries. Read more »

Allowing Big Cypress seismic testing

Allowed seismic testing in Big Cypress National Reserve without a permit. Read more »

Revising federal forest management

Executive order to encourage logging on federal lands. Read more »

Changing the management of Alaska’s Eastern Interior and Bering Glacier public lands

Allowed state and tribal officials to lay claim to 1.3 million acres of Alaska land for development. Read more »

Shifting responsibility for cross-border permittingTrump sued

Moved international border-crossing permit decisions to the White House, to speed pipelines. Read more »

Changing managment of Goodnews Bay public lands

Removes protections from 229,715 acres in Alaska to allow for minerals extraction. Read more »

Promoting oceanic, coastal and Great Lakes development

Instructed agencies to use coastal, oceanic and Great Lake resources for energy production. Read more »

Medium 20

Can be reversed only through more extensive action, such as rewriting a regulation or court ruling

Expanding drilling in the National Petroleum Reserve-AlaskaBiden suedTrump sued

The Bureau of Land Management reversed the Trump administration’s decision to expand drilling on the largest swath of federal land, in Alaska, by 7 million acres and reverted to the plan the Obama administration adopted in 2013. That plan allows drilling on roughly half the reserve, while putting the other half off limits to development. Read more »

Renewing Twin Metals Mine leases

Biden officials canceled Twin Metals’ mining leases near Minnesota’s Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, reversing a Trump-era decision. Read more »

Harming of marine mammals through Alaska offshore oil and gas activitiesBiden suedTrump sued

A federal court reversed the Trump administration’s authorization of a petroleum company, Hilcorp Alaska LLC, to “take” marine mammals incidental to oil and gas operations in Cook Inlet. Read more »

Changing sage grouse protection plan amendmentsTrump sued

The Bureau of Land Management published a notice of intent in the Federal Register that it will revisit the management plans that eliminated most of the “Sagebrush Focal Areas” created to protect the imperiled sage grouse. Read more »

Expanding mineral leasing in Western Alaska

Opens 9.7 million acres in western Alaska to mineral leasing. Read more »

Dictating bank lending policies for fossil fuel projects

Biden paused an Office of Comptroller of the Currency rule finalized on Jan. 14, 2021 that barred banks from refusing to finance projects for certain sectors, such as fossil fuels. It was set to take effect April 1, 2021. Read more »

Curtailing protest process for federal timber sales

Proposed limiting protests on federal timber sales. Read more »

Promoting energy extraction in Bering Sea-Western Interior Management Area

Would make more than 13 million acres in the Western Bering Sea open to development Read more »

Permitting ConocoPhillips’ Willow Project on the National Petroleum Reserve-AlaskaBiden sued

The Biden administration issued a draft environmental impact statement for ConocoPhillips Willow Project in Alaska, which could produce up to 160,000 barrels of oil a day during its 30-year operation, which did not indicate whether it will approve or halt the project. Read more »

Lifting Tongass National Forest roadless ruleBiden suedTrump sued

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack proposed a rule that would reinstate a Clinton-era policy prohibiting road-building and logging in more than 9.3 million acres of Alaska’s Tongass National Forest. Read more »

Transporting liquified gas by rail

The Biden administration proposed rescinding a rule allowing the bulk transport of liquified natural gas in rail tank cars. Read more »

Weakening financial assurances for hardrock miningTrump sued

The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law included language aimed at ensuring that mining firms paid the cost of cleaning up their operations, but did not include funding. Read more »

Easing fracking rules on Federal and Indian landsTrump sued

Rescinded tighter fracking rules on federal and Indian lands. Read more »

Drilling in Labyrinth CanyonTrump sued

Allowing drilling in Utah’s Labyrinth Canyon, in an area surrounded by wilderness Read more »

Forging Midas Gold settlement agreement

The Trump administration reached an agreement with Canadian-owned Midas Gold, over the objections of Idaho’s Nez Perce Tribe, to do a partial cleanup of the historical Stibnite Mine Site that clears the way for a massive open-pit gold mine. Read more »

Changing the Sonoran Desert National Monument Grazing PlanBiden sued

Expanded grazing by amending the Sonoran Desert National Monument Grazing Plan. Read more »

Changing tribal energy resource agreements

Reduced the requirements that tribes face when they enter into energy agreements involving tribal land/ Read more »

Approval of Caldwell Canyon Mine in IdahoBiden suedTrump sued

The Center for Biological filed suit on April 27, 2021 over the Trump administration’s approval of a phosphate mining operation by a subsidiary of Bayer. The group argues the government didn’t adequately consider the environmental impacts of the project. Read more »

Allowing the Alton Coal Mine DevelopmentTrump sued

Determined that coal mining can take place in an area near Bryce Canyon National Park. Read more »

Removing copper filter cake from hazardout materials list

Removed copper filter cake, which contains heavy metals, from EPA’s hazardous waste list. Read more »

Difficult 7

Can only be reversed through a lengthy regulatory process, act of Congress or court ruling

Drilling in Arctic National Wildlife RefugeTrump sued

The Biden administration has paused the oil and gas leasing program in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Trump officials auctioned off 11 leases to drill on 552,000 acres in the refuge on Jan. 6, 2021, netting more than $12 million, and finalized the leases before Biden took office. Read more »

Tighter restrictions for blowout preventers on offshore wellsTrump sued

The Biden administration proposed stricter requirements on fail-safe devices used to prevent oil spills, part of an effort to prevent diasters such as the Deepwater Horizon incident in 2010. Read more »

Passing the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

Lifted the ban on drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge’s coastal plain. Read more »

Approving Thacker Pass Lithium Mine in NevadaBiden sued

Approval for a lithium mine on BLM land that provides habitat for sage grouse, pronghorn antelope and a rare type of springsnail. Read more »

Weakening federal oversight of mine safety violations

Weakened federal oversight of mine safety and requirements to report safety violations. Read more »

Easing Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas safety

Biden officials are looking at a rule rolling back offshore drilling equipment safety rules adopted after Deepwater Horizon disaster. Read more »

Promoting small-scale natural gas exports

Quickened approvals for small-scale natural gas exports to non-trade agreement countries Read more »

Infrastructure and permitting

5 new policies added7 proposed

Status of Trump’s rollbacks: 17 overturned 6 targeted 9 not yet targeted

The Trump administration circumvented environmental rules to speed approval of major projects such as a four-lane highway that could crush desert tortoises in the Red Cliffs National Conservation Area and adopting changes that will curb public input in the development of highways, power plants and incinerators near communities.

Biden suedBiden action challenged in court

Trump suedTrump action challenged in court

Policy put in place or proposed by the Biden administration

Can be reversed by a simple act, such as signing an executive order or new directive

Can be reversed only through more extensive action, such as rewriting a regulation or court ruling

Can only be reversed through a lengthy regulatory process, act of Congress or court ruling

Requiring remote or automatic pipeline valves and rupture detection standards

The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration finalized new requirements to install remote or automatic shut-off valves on all new or replaced onshore pipelines six inches in diameter or greater. Biden officials said this would curb greenhouse gas emissions and other environmental damage in the wake of accidents. Read more »

Carbon limits on concrete for federal projects

The federal government will require contractors to use more climate-friendly concrete and asphalt in major projects going forward, a move expected to impact billions of dollars in infrastructure investment. Read more »

Accelerating transmission on the U.S. electricity grid

Biden officials took steps to speed transmission on the electricity grid, including issuing a new Transportation Department guidance that allows the use of existing highway rights of way for siting transmission lines and new Energy Department funding and loan guarantees for renewable energy transmission projects and ones owned by tribes and Alaska Native Corporations. Read more »

Establishing Civilian Climate Corps

President Biden established a new cadre of workers to help restore landscapes and help communities adapt to climate change. Read more »

Doubling offshore wind development by 2030

President Biden vowed to double offshore wind production by 2030. Read more »

Replacing lead and copper drinking water pipes

Biden officials announced plans to create new standards to replace millions of underground lead water service lines, while providing $15 billion to help finance the effort. Read more »

Assessing federal floodplain management standards for communities

FEMA issued a request for information on how to guide potential updates to the National Flood Insurance Program’s flood plain management standards, which have not been changed substantially since 1976. It is also seeking input on better protecting the habitats and populations of threatened and endangered species in the face of these risks. The comment period ended on Dec. 31, 2021. Read more »

Protect eagle populations while permitting wind and other complex projects

Interior issued an advance notice of proposed rulemaking that would protect eagle populations while permitting complex projects such as wind energy facilities.

Permiting Line 3 pipeline in Minnesota Biden sued

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers defended the Trump administration’s environmental analysis of Enbridge’s Line 3, which runs through Minnesota and has sparked protests from tribal and climate activists. The pipeline transports oil from Alberta, Canada to Superior, Wis., a distance of roughly 1,000 miles. The pipeline started operating on Oct. 1, 2021.

Expanding offshore wind power off California’s coast

Biden officials from the Interior and Defense departments reached an agreement with California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) to identify two areas for potential offshore wind development in the Pacific Ocean. If fully developed, they could produce up to 4.6 gigawatts of power, enough to power 1.6 million homes. Read more »

Expanding electric vehicle charging infrastructure and supply chain

President Biden proposed investing $174 billion in electric vehicle charging stations, supply chains and raw materials. Read more »

Expanding U.S. offshore wind production to 30 gigawatts by 2030

The Biden administration launched an initiative to expand offshore wind production to 30 gigawatts by 2030 by streamlining permitting, offering low-interest loans and funding research. On Oct. 13, Interior’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management announced it would hold up to seven lease sales by 2025, in the Gulf of Maine, New York Bight, Central Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, as well as offshore the Carolinas, California and Oregon. Read more »

Awarding mineral rights to the part of the Missouri River on Fort Berthold Reservation

The Biden administration issued a Solicitor’s Opinion, 37073, which said that the rights to minerals lying under the section of the Missouri River flowing through North Dakota’s Fort Berthold Indian Reservation belongs to the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nation. The DOI solicitor serving under Barack Obama had made a similar determination in 2017, which was reversed under Donald Trump. In 2020, then-DOI Solicitor Dan Jorjani awarded the rights to North Dakota instead. Read more »

Approving Yazoo Backwater Area Pumps ProjectBiden suedTrump sued

Biden officials restored a Clean Water Act veto of a project that will drain and damage Mississippi wetlands. Read more »

Allowing some property owners to veto National Register of Historic Places listings

The Biden administration withdrew a proposed rule that would have allowed large property owners the ability to veto a proposal to add a site to the National Register of Historic Places. Read more »

Changing the coastal barrier resources sand policyTrump sued

Ruled it was legal to take sand from a protected area to replenish a beach elsewhere. Read more »

Using radioactive phosphogypsum in roadsBiden suedTrump sued

The Biden administration withdrew approval granted under the Trump administration allowing the use of radioactive phosphogypsum in government road construction projects. Read more »

Imposing EPA cost-benefit rule

Biden officials rescinded a Trump administration proposal changing the way the EPA weighs costs and benefits of environmental regulation. Read more »

Overhauling Interior’s environmental analysis process

Trump officials directed Interior Department to streamline its environmental review documents in Secretarial Order 3355, on Aug. 31, 2017. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland overturned this directive with Secretarial Order 3398 on April 16, 2021. Read more »

Restricting fireworks at Mount RushmoreBiden sued

After Biden officials prohibited a fireworks display at Mount Rushmore, which the Trump administration allowed it for the first time in a decade, South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem (R) sued. Read more »

Revoking guidance on greenhouse gas emissions

The White House rescinded Trump-era guidance that agencies do not have to take a project’s long-term climate impacts into account. Read more »

Expediting infrastructure projects during pandemic

President Biden revoked Donald Trump’s instruction to agencies that they expedite infrastructure projects during the pandemic. Read more »

Accelerating infrastructure projects

President Biden partly revoked Trump’s Executive Order 13834, which instructed agencies to invoke their emergency powers to speed up infrastructure projects. Read more »

Revoking consideration of climate impacts on infratructure projects

Revoked Obama-era standards requiring that federal projects consider sea-level rise and other climate impacts. Read more »

Promoting climate resilience through an executive order

President Biden restored a 2013 executive order on preparing for climate change impacts by issuing Executive Order 13990. Read more »

Restoring federal flood protection standards

President Biden restored federal flood standards Trump revoked in 2017. Read more »

Promoting “America First” offshore energy strategyTrump sued

President Biden rescinded Donald Trump’s reversal of an Obama executive order promoting climate resilience in the northern Bering Sea. Read more »

Setting federal flood standards for public housing

The Biden administration is working to stiffen federal flood risk standards for public housing after Trump officials withdrew an Obama-era proposal. Read more »

Curtailing environmental reviews of transportation projects

Biden officials suspended a proposal that would narrow the Transportation Department’s environmental reviews of major projects until September 14, 2023. Read more »

Providing regulatory relief to spur economic recovery

Citing the pandemic, instructed agencies to waive regulations to bolster the economy. Read more »

Allowing off-road vehicles at Factory Butte

Opened up 5,400 acres surrounding Utah’s Factory Butte to off-road vehicles. Read more »

Dismantling the Fish and Wildlife Service mitigation policy

Revoked directive to minimize impacts on wildlife and land when approving development projects. Read more »

Allowing a road through Izembek National Wildlife RefugeBiden suedTrump sued

The Trump administration reversed a Obama-era policy to protect Alaska’s Izembek National Wildlife Refuge and allowed a land swap with the state so that a road could be built across it. Environmentalists sued and won in district court, but federal officials appealed to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. On March 8, 2021 the Biden Justice Department filed a brief defending the process by which the previous administration made this decision. Read more »

Eliminating Director’s Order 100 on national parks and climate change

Withdrew 2016 order to consider climate change in the management of national parks. Read more »

Approving the Cadiz Water ProjectBiden sued

A federal judge vacated a Trump-era permit greenlighting a project to allow a private company to extract water from beneath the Mojave Desert and transport it through a pipeline to the Colorado River Aqueduct. Read more »

Overhauling the National Environmental Policy ActBiden suedTrump sued

The Biden administration finalized a set of changes to this Trump-era rule, to ensure agencies conducted a climate analysis of major federal actions and allow for greater community impact. Read more »

Dredging the San Juan Bay shipping channel

The Center for Biological Diversity sued the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for doing an inadequate environment review of a project to expand the San Juan Bay shipping channel. The suit argues that dredging the bay to allow for liquified natural gas tanker traffic will harm the area’s corals and wildlife. Read more »

Approving Ambler Mining RoadBiden suedTrump sued

The Trump administration granted a 50-year right-of-way for a 210-mile private mining road over an Alaskan roadless area that includes Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve. On Jan. 21, 2022, the Biden administration asked for a 30-day extension in a lawsuit brought by environmental and Alaska Native groups. Read more »

Overhauling Forest Service environmental reviews

Biden officials suspended a proposal to speed up environmental review process for U.S. Forest Service projects until Sept. 14, 2023. Read more »

Changing the use of sand, gravel, and shell resources Trump sued

Changed policy to allow coastal replenishment projects to use sand from protected ecosystems. Read more »

Streamlining U.S. Army Corps permitsBiden sued

Streamlined Army Corps of Engineers permitting for pipelines and other projects. Read more »

Allowing highway expansion through Red Cliffs National Conservation Area Biden sued

Allows construction of a four-lane highway in a protected area home to threatened desert tortoises. The plaintiffs amended their lawsuit in July to target the Biden administration, which has not acted to revoke the right-of-way granted to the Utah Department of Transportation. Read more »

Easing natural gas exports

Exempted exports of natural gas from environmental reviews. Read more »

Nullifying BLM’s Planning 2.0 rule

Nullified the Bureau of Land Management’s updated planning rule. Read more »

New 12

Policy put in place or proposed by the Biden administration

Requiring remote or automatic pipeline valves and rupture detection standards

The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration finalized new requirements to install remote or automatic shut-off valves on all new or replaced onshore pipelines six inches in diameter or greater. Biden officials said this would curb greenhouse gas emissions and other environmental damage in the wake of accidents. Read more »

Carbon limits on concrete for federal projects

The federal government will require contractors to use more climate-friendly concrete and asphalt in major projects going forward, a move expected to impact billions of dollars in infrastructure investment. Read more »

Accelerating transmission on the U.S. electricity grid

Biden officials took steps to speed transmission on the electricity grid, including issuing a new Transportation Department guidance that allows the use of existing highway rights of way for siting transmission lines and new Energy Department funding and loan guarantees for renewable energy transmission projects and ones owned by tribes and Alaska Native Corporations. Read more »

Establishing Civilian Climate Corps

President Biden established a new cadre of workers to help restore landscapes and help communities adapt to climate change. Read more »

Doubling offshore wind development by 2030

President Biden vowed to double offshore wind production by 2030. Read more »

Replacing lead and copper drinking water pipes

Biden officials announced plans to create new standards to replace millions of underground lead water service lines, while providing $15 billion to help finance the effort. Read more »

Assessing federal floodplain management standards for communities

FEMA issued a request for information on how to guide potential updates to the National Flood Insurance Program’s flood plain management standards, which have not been changed substantially since 1976. It is also seeking input on better protecting the habitats and populations of threatened and endangered species in the face of these risks. The comment period ended on Dec. 31, 2021. Read more »

Protect eagle populations while permitting wind and other complex projects

Interior issued an advance notice of proposed rulemaking that would protect eagle populations while permitting complex projects such as wind energy facilities.

Permiting Line 3 pipeline in Minnesota Biden sued

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers defended the Trump administration’s environmental analysis of Enbridge’s Line 3, which runs through Minnesota and has sparked protests from tribal and climate activists. The pipeline transports oil from Alberta, Canada to Superior, Wis., a distance of roughly 1,000 miles. The pipeline started operating on Oct. 1, 2021.

Expanding offshore wind power off California’s coast

Biden officials from the Interior and Defense departments reached an agreement with California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) to identify two areas for potential offshore wind development in the Pacific Ocean. If fully developed, they could produce up to 4.6 gigawatts of power, enough to power 1.6 million homes. Read more »

Expanding electric vehicle charging infrastructure and supply chain

President Biden proposed investing $174 billion in electric vehicle charging stations, supply chains and raw materials. Read more »

Expanding U.S. offshore wind production to 30 gigawatts by 2030

The Biden administration launched an initiative to expand offshore wind production to 30 gigawatts by 2030 by streamlining permitting, offering low-interest loans and funding research. On Oct. 13, Interior’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management announced it would hold up to seven lease sales by 2025, in the Gulf of Maine, New York Bight, Central Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, as well as offshore the Carolinas, California and Oregon. Read more »

Easy to overturn 22

Can be reversed by a simple act, such as signing an executive order or new directive

Awarding mineral rights to the part of the Missouri River on Fort Berthold Reservation

The Biden administration issued a Solicitor’s Opinion, 37073, which said that the rights to minerals lying under the section of the Missouri River flowing through North Dakota’s Fort Berthold Indian Reservation belongs to the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nation. The DOI solicitor serving under Barack Obama had made a similar determination in 2017, which was reversed under Donald Trump. In 2020, then-DOI Solicitor Dan Jorjani awarded the rights to North Dakota instead. Read more »

Approving Yazoo Backwater Area Pumps ProjectBiden suedTrump sued

Biden officials restored a Clean Water Act veto of a project that will drain and damage Mississippi wetlands. Read more »

Allowing some property owners to veto National Register of Historic Places listings

The Biden administration withdrew a proposed rule that would have allowed large property owners the ability to veto a proposal to add a site to the National Register of Historic Places. Read more »

Changing the coastal barrier resources sand policyTrump sued

Ruled it was legal to take sand from a protected area to replenish a beach elsewhere. Read more »

Using radioactive phosphogypsum in roadsBiden suedTrump sued

The Biden administration withdrew approval granted under the Trump administration allowing the use of radioactive phosphogypsum in government road construction projects. Read more »

Imposing EPA cost-benefit rule

Biden officials rescinded a Trump administration proposal changing the way the EPA weighs costs and benefits of environmental regulation. Read more »

Overhauling Interior’s environmental analysis process

Trump officials directed Interior Department to streamline its environmental review documents in Secretarial Order 3355, on Aug. 31, 2017. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland overturned this directive with Secretarial Order 3398 on April 16, 2021. Read more »

Restricting fireworks at Mount RushmoreBiden sued

After Biden officials prohibited a fireworks display at Mount Rushmore, which the Trump administration allowed it for the first time in a decade, South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem (R) sued. Read more »

Revoking guidance on greenhouse gas emissions

The White House rescinded Trump-era guidance that agencies do not have to take a project’s long-term climate impacts into account. Read more »

Expediting infrastructure projects during pandemic

President Biden revoked Donald Trump’s instruction to agencies that they expedite infrastructure projects during the pandemic. Read more »

Accelerating infrastructure projects

President Biden partly revoked Trump’s Executive Order 13834, which instructed agencies to invoke their emergency powers to speed up infrastructure projects. Read more »

Revoking consideration of climate impacts on infratructure projects

Revoked Obama-era standards requiring that federal projects consider sea-level rise and other climate impacts. Read more »

Promoting climate resilience through an executive order

President Biden restored a 2013 executive order on preparing for climate change impacts by issuing Executive Order 13990. Read more »

Restoring federal flood protection standards

President Biden restored federal flood standards Trump revoked in 2017. Read more »

Promoting “America First” offshore energy strategyTrump sued

President Biden rescinded Donald Trump’s reversal of an Obama executive order promoting climate resilience in the northern Bering Sea. Read more »

Setting federal flood standards for public housing

The Biden administration is working to stiffen federal flood risk standards for public housing after Trump officials withdrew an Obama-era proposal. Read more »

Curtailing environmental reviews of transportation projects

Biden officials suspended a proposal that would narrow the Transportation Department’s environmental reviews of major projects until September 14, 2023. Read more »

Providing regulatory relief to spur economic recovery

Citing the pandemic, instructed agencies to waive regulations to bolster the economy. Read more »

Allowing off-road vehicles at Factory Butte

Opened up 5,400 acres surrounding Utah’s Factory Butte to off-road vehicles. Read more »

Dismantling the Fish and Wildlife Service mitigation policy

Revoked directive to minimize impacts on wildlife and land when approving development projects. Read more »

Allowing a road through Izembek National Wildlife RefugeBiden suedTrump sued

The Trump administration reversed a Obama-era policy to protect Alaska’s Izembek National Wildlife Refuge and allowed a land swap with the state so that a road could be built across it. Environmentalists sued and won in district court, but federal officials appealed to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. On March 8, 2021 the Biden Justice Department filed a brief defending the process by which the previous administration made this decision. Read more »

Eliminating Director’s Order 100 on national parks and climate change

Withdrew 2016 order to consider climate change in the management of national parks. Read more »

Medium 6

Can be reversed only through more extensive action, such as rewriting a regulation or court ruling

Approving the Cadiz Water ProjectBiden sued

A federal judge vacated a Trump-era permit greenlighting a project to allow a private company to extract water from beneath the Mojave Desert and transport it through a pipeline to the Colorado River Aqueduct. Read more »

Overhauling the National Environmental Policy ActBiden suedTrump sued

The Biden administration finalized a set of changes to this Trump-era rule, to ensure agencies conducted a climate analysis of major federal actions and allow for greater community impact. Read more »

Dredging the San Juan Bay shipping channel

The Center for Biological Diversity sued the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for doing an inadequate environment review of a project to expand the San Juan Bay shipping channel. The suit argues that dredging the bay to allow for liquified natural gas tanker traffic will harm the area’s corals and wildlife. Read more »

Approving Ambler Mining RoadBiden suedTrump sued

The Trump administration granted a 50-year right-of-way for a 210-mile private mining road over an Alaskan roadless area that includes Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve. On Jan. 21, 2022, the Biden administration asked for a 30-day extension in a lawsuit brought by environmental and Alaska Native groups. Read more »

Overhauling Forest Service environmental reviews

Biden officials suspended a proposal to speed up environmental review process for U.S. Forest Service projects until Sept. 14, 2023. Read more »

Changing the use of sand, gravel, and shell resources Trump sued

Changed policy to allow coastal replenishment projects to use sand from protected ecosystems. Read more »

Difficult 4

Can only be reversed through a lengthy regulatory process, act of Congress or court ruling

Streamlining U.S. Army Corps permitsBiden sued

Streamlined Army Corps of Engineers permitting for pipelines and other projects. Read more »

Allowing highway expansion through Red Cliffs National Conservation Area Biden sued

Allows construction of a four-lane highway in a protected area home to threatened desert tortoises. The plaintiffs amended their lawsuit in July to target the Biden administration, which has not acted to revoke the right-of-way granted to the Utah Department of Transportation. Read more »

Easing natural gas exports

Exempted exports of natural gas from environmental reviews. Read more »

Nullifying BLM’s Planning 2.0 rule

Nullified the Bureau of Land Management’s updated planning rule. Read more »

Accountability

4 new policies added2 proposed

Status of Trump’s rollbacks: 3 overturned 0 targeted 0 not yet targeted

Biden has said he will change the way the federal government works, making environmental justice a top priority. He will also restore the role of science in decision-making across the entire federal government. That includes taking aim at one of the EPA’s final acts under Trump: limiting the scientific data that can be used in the crafting of public health protections.

Biden suedBiden action challenged in court

Trump suedTrump action challenged in court

Policy put in place or proposed by the Biden administration

Can be reversed by a simple act, such as signing an executive order or new directive

Can be reversed only through more extensive action, such as rewriting a regulation or court ruling

Targeting environmental justice enforcement

The Justice Department established an Office of Environmental Justice to target pollution in marginalized communities, and launched an effort along with the Environmental Protection Agency to address historic racial inequities. Read more »

Planning for climate change-induced migration

President Biden ordered a report within 180 days on how climate change will spur migration, including climate refugees’ security impacts and foreign aid plans. Read more »

Investing in disadvantaged communities

President Biden mandated that 40 percent of all federal sustainability investments go to disadvantaged communities. Read more »

Establishing new federal environmental justice offices

President Biden established a new White House interagency council, as well as new offices in the Justice and Health and Human Services Departments. Read more »

Developing a national strategy to account for natural capital

The White House Office of Management and Budget issued a draft strategy for accounting for the value of natural capital. Read more »

Enhanced disclosure requirements for ESG funds

The SEC voted on proposals aimed at providing more transparency to investors in funds that centered on environmental, social and corporate-governance, or ESG, factors. The agency said it plans to require funds and advisers to provide more disclosure about environmentally-focused investments, as well as generally require them to “disclose greenhouse gas emissions” associated with those portfolios. Read more »

Barring settlement payments to third parties in Justice Department casesTrump sued

Biden officials published an interim final rule to allow funding of environmental and community projects through legal settlements and lawsuits Read more »

Scientific studies used to craft regulations

Biden officials overturned a policy limiting the scientific studies the Interior Department uses to craft rules. Read more »

Revoking EPA scientific ‘transparency’ ruleTrump sued

The Environmental Protection Agency finalized a rule that formalized the decision by a Montana federal judge vacating a Trump-era rule restricting EPA’s use of scientific studies in crafting public health rules. Read more »

New 6

Policy put in place or proposed by the Biden administration

Targeting environmental justice enforcement

The Justice Department established an Office of Environmental Justice to target pollution in marginalized communities, and launched an effort along with the Environmental Protection Agency to address historic racial inequities. Read more »

Planning for climate change-induced migration

President Biden ordered a report within 180 days on how climate change will spur migration, including climate refugees’ security impacts and foreign aid plans. Read more »

Investing in disadvantaged communities

President Biden mandated that 40 percent of all federal sustainability investments go to disadvantaged communities. Read more »

Establishing new federal environmental justice offices

President Biden established a new White House interagency council, as well as new offices in the Justice and Health and Human Services Departments. Read more »

Developing a national strategy to account for natural capital

The White House Office of Management and Budget issued a draft strategy for accounting for the value of natural capital. Read more »

Enhanced disclosure requirements for ESG funds

The SEC voted on proposals aimed at providing more transparency to investors in funds that centered on environmental, social and corporate-governance, or ESG, factors. The agency said it plans to require funds and advisers to provide more disclosure about environmentally-focused investments, as well as generally require them to “disclose greenhouse gas emissions” associated with those portfolios. Read more »

Easy to overturn 2

Can be reversed by a simple act, such as signing an executive order or new directive

Barring settlement payments to third parties in Justice Department casesTrump sued

Biden officials published an interim final rule to allow funding of environmental and community projects through legal settlements and lawsuits Read more »

Scientific studies used to craft regulations

Biden officials overturned a policy limiting the scientific studies the Interior Department uses to craft rules. Read more »

Medium 1

Can be reversed only through more extensive action, such as rewriting a regulation or court ruling

Revoking EPA scientific ‘transparency’ ruleTrump sued

The Environmental Protection Agency finalized a rule that formalized the decision by a Montana federal judge vacating a Trump-era rule restricting EPA’s use of scientific studies in crafting public health rules. Read more »

Water pollution

2 new policies added

Status of Trump’s rollbacks: 3 overturned 7 targeted 4 not yet targeted

Trump eased restrictions on how companies store coal ash, weakened rules on dumping toxic waste from power plants into waterways and altered which wetlands and streams require federal oversight. Biden has said he will crack down on legacy pollution, particularly in vulnerable communities, and will prioritize upgrading the nation’s crumbling drinking-water infrastructure.

Biden suedBiden action challenged in court

Trump suedTrump action challenged in court

Policy put in place or proposed by the Biden administration

Can be reversed by a simple act, such as signing an executive order or new directive

Can be reversed only through more extensive action, such as rewriting a regulation or court ruling

Can only be reversed through a lengthy regulatory process, act of Congress or court ruling

PFAS drinking water health advisories

EPA issued new drinking water health advisories for several certain types of polyfluoroalkyl and perfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS -- a ubiquitous class of compounds that poses risks to dozens of communities across the country. Read more »

Funding for Great Lakes restoration

The Biden administration plans to distribute more than $1 billion to clean and restore environmentally degraded sites around the Great Lakes, a major source of drinking water. The funding comes from an infrastructure bill passed by Congress in 2021. Read more »

Creating a loophole in water pollution discharge rules

The EPA on Sept. 15, 2021 rescinded a guidance that created a loophole in the discharge of water pollution, despite a Supreme Court ruling in County of Maui v. Hawaii Wildlife Fund. It is now exploring next steps in light of the Supreme Court decision. Read more »

Rolling back coal ash standards, Phase 2

Biden officials extended the notice of data availability for a rule that proposed limiting the scope of an Obama-era coal ash rule, notified some operators about their need to comply with federal cleanup requirements, and proposed denying four requests to delay closing unlined coal ash ponds. Read more »

Delaying electronic reporting of dumping water pollution

Biden officials withdrew a Trump-era guidance that delayed electronic reporting requirements for water pollution discharges by five years. Read more »

Removing protections from San Francisco’s South Bay Salt PondsTrump sued

The Biden administration dropped the appeal of a district court decision that the Environmental Protection Agency improperly removed Clean Water Act protections from the San Francisco South Bay salt ponds. The Trump administration’s action made it easier for Cargill to sell off the wetlands area. Read more »

Weakening industry cleanup requirements

EPA is reviewing a Trump-era rule that weakened what would have been tougher cleanup requirements for the power, oil and gas, and chemical manufacturing industries. Read more »

Delaying closing of coal ash impoundments

Allowed some coal ash impoundments to keep operating. Read more »

Changing the Clean Water Act’s criminal negligence standard

Trump officials proposed a rule that would let states set any criminal negligence standard for the Clean Water Act. Read more »

Regulating perchlorateTrump sued

Reversed the finding that perchlorate, a toxic chemical, must be regulated nationwide. Read more »

Easing uranium mines groundwater protections

Withdrew a proposed rule requiring groundwater protections in uranium mine operations. Read more »

Scaling back federal protections for waterwaysTrump sued

Biden officials proposed a rule restoring the pre-2015 definition for what streams, wetlands and other waterways are federally protected, to replace a narrower Trump-era rule. Read more »

Weakening the power plant wastewater ruleTrump sued

EPA announced it would develop stricter limits on dumping toxic waste from power plants into waterways. But in the meantime, it would leave a Trump-era rule finalized in 2020 in place. Read more »

Weakening coal ash rules, Part ATrump sued

EPA announced stricter rules on coal combustion residuals and increased enforcement on some coal ash ponds leaking toxic waste. Read more »

Limiting state and tribal input under the Clean Water ActTrump sued

The Biden Administration Protection Agency is seeking to return authority to states and tribes to oppose gas pipelines, coal terminals and other projects that pose a threat to lakes, rivers and streams — reversing a major Trump administration rule. Read more »

Nullifying the Stream Protection RuleTrump sued

Scrapped an Obama rule requiring mining firms to reduce harm to streams. Read more »

New 2

Policy put in place or proposed by the Biden administration

PFAS drinking water health advisories

EPA issued new drinking water health advisories for several certain types of polyfluoroalkyl and perfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS -- a ubiquitous class of compounds that poses risks to dozens of communities across the country. Read more »

Funding for Great Lakes restoration

The Biden administration plans to distribute more than $1 billion to clean and restore environmentally degraded sites around the Great Lakes, a major source of drinking water. The funding comes from an infrastructure bill passed by Congress in 2021. Read more »

Easy to overturn 2

Can be reversed by a simple act, such as signing an executive order or new directive

Creating a loophole in water pollution discharge rules

The EPA on Sept. 15, 2021 rescinded a guidance that created a loophole in the discharge of water pollution, despite a Supreme Court ruling in County of Maui v. Hawaii Wildlife Fund. It is now exploring next steps in light of the Supreme Court decision. Read more »

Rolling back coal ash standards, Phase 2

Biden officials extended the notice of data availability for a rule that proposed limiting the scope of an Obama-era coal ash rule, notified some operators about their need to comply with federal cleanup requirements, and proposed denying four requests to delay closing unlined coal ash ponds. Read more »

Medium 7

Can be reversed only through more extensive action, such as rewriting a regulation or court ruling

Delaying electronic reporting of dumping water pollution

Biden officials withdrew a Trump-era guidance that delayed electronic reporting requirements for water pollution discharges by five years. Read more »

Removing protections from San Francisco’s South Bay Salt PondsTrump sued

The Biden administration dropped the appeal of a district court decision that the Environmental Protection Agency improperly removed Clean Water Act protections from the San Francisco South Bay salt ponds. The Trump administration’s action made it easier for Cargill to sell off the wetlands area. Read more »

Weakening industry cleanup requirements

EPA is reviewing a Trump-era rule that weakened what would have been tougher cleanup requirements for the power, oil and gas, and chemical manufacturing industries. Read more »

Delaying closing of coal ash impoundments

Allowed some coal ash impoundments to keep operating. Read more »

Changing the Clean Water Act’s criminal negligence standard

Trump officials proposed a rule that would let states set any criminal negligence standard for the Clean Water Act. Read more »

Regulating perchlorateTrump sued

Reversed the finding that perchlorate, a toxic chemical, must be regulated nationwide. Read more »

Easing uranium mines groundwater protections

Withdrew a proposed rule requiring groundwater protections in uranium mine operations. Read more »

Difficult 5

Can only be reversed through a lengthy regulatory process, act of Congress or court ruling

Scaling back federal protections for waterwaysTrump sued

Biden officials proposed a rule restoring the pre-2015 definition for what streams, wetlands and other waterways are federally protected, to replace a narrower Trump-era rule. Read more »

Weakening the power plant wastewater ruleTrump sued

EPA announced it would develop stricter limits on dumping toxic waste from power plants into waterways. But in the meantime, it would leave a Trump-era rule finalized in 2020 in place. Read more »

Weakening coal ash rules, Part ATrump sued

EPA announced stricter rules on coal combustion residuals and increased enforcement on some coal ash ponds leaking toxic waste. Read more »

Limiting state and tribal input under the Clean Water ActTrump sued

The Biden Administration Protection Agency is seeking to return authority to states and tribes to oppose gas pipelines, coal terminals and other projects that pose a threat to lakes, rivers and streams — reversing a major Trump administration rule. Read more »

Nullifying the Stream Protection RuleTrump sued

Scrapped an Obama rule requiring mining firms to reduce harm to streams. Read more »

Wildlife

6 new policies added7 proposed

Status of Trump’s rollbacks: 9 overturned 11 targeted 12 not yet targeted

One of the hallmarks of former interior secretary David Bernhardt’s legacy has been the narrowing of safeguards for endangered wildlife. The northern spotted owl, whose forest habitat is disappearing; the Pacific walrus, which faces shrinking sea ice; and the Bryde’s whale, threatened by oil and gas drilling in the Gulf of Mexico, are likely to receive enhanced protections under Biden.

Biden suedBiden action challenged in court

Trump suedTrump action challenged in court

Policy put in place or proposed by the Biden administration

Can be reversed by a simple act, such as signing an executive order or new directive

Can be reversed only through more extensive action, such as rewriting a regulation or court ruling

Can only be reversed through a lengthy regulatory process, act of Congress or court ruling

Curbing government subsidies for illegal fishing operators worldwide

The U.S. Trade Representative helped broker an agreement under the World Trade Organization barring government subsidies to vessels that engage in illegal fishing, or in fisheries that are overexploited or take place on the high seas.

Seasonal gear closures to protect right whales in the Gulf of MaineBiden sued

The National Marine Fisheries Service finalized a rule restricting lobster fishing with buoy lines in the Gulf of Maine between October and May to protect endangered North Atlantic right whales. A group of lobstermen sued and won an injunction, but the First Circuit Court of Appeals reinstated the seasonal closure. Read more »

Protection of endangered Alabama mussels

The Biden administration designated the Canoe Creek clubshell, a freshwater mussel species found in north-central Alabama, as endangered. It also protected 36 river miles of the mussel’s critical habitat. Read more »

Executive order on illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing

President Biden signed a memorandum that pledged the U.S., U.K. and Canada will take steps to monitor fisheries more closely and work to “hold bad actors accountable.” The effort includes a 21-agency working group that will devise a five-year plan to curb illegal fishing.

Allowing oil and gas operators to harass Southern Beaufort Sea polar bears and Pacific walrusesBiden sued

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service finalzed a rule that allows oil and gas companies to disturb polar bears and walruses in the Beaufort Sea as well as the Western Arctic through their drilling activities over the next five years. Read more »

Conserving public lands and waters

President Biden set a goal of conserving 30 percent of U.S. lands and waters by 2030. Read more »

Designating Avi Kwa Ame as a national monument

President Biden announced that he would protect hundreds of thousands of acres around Nevada’s Avi Kaw Ame, or Spirit Mountain. The future national monument, which could span 450,000 acres, provides a critical migratory corridoor for wildlife and is sacred to a dozen tribes.. Read more »

Vessel speed regulations to reduce threats to endangered right whales

New restrictions aim to reduce boat collisions with right whales, which are a leading cause of the species’ decline. Read more »

Protection of northern long-eared bat

The Biden administration wants to reclassify the northern long-eared bat from “threatened” to “endangered.” The species has been devastated by a deadly disease known as white-nose syndrome. Read more »

Protections for the Sacremento Mountains Checkerspot Butterfly

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed listing the Sacremento Mountains checkerspot butterfly, which is only found in the higher-elevation mountains around the village of Cloudcroft in New Mexico’s Lincoln National Forest. The Center for Biological Diversity had filed three legal petitions over the course of two decades in an effort to get the butterfly listed. Read more »

Protection of emperor penguins

The Biden administration intends to list emperor penguins as “threatened” under the Endangered Species Act, arguing that the flightless bird species from Antarctica faces a myriad of risks posed by climate change. The comment period on the proposal ended in October 2021. Read more »

Listing the lesser prairie chicken under the Endangered Species Act

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed listing the lesser prairie chicken in the southern portion of its range, which includes part of New Mexico and Texas. The comment period has ended. Read more »

Protecting critical habitat for Tiehm’s buckwheat

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed protecting 910 acres of critical habitat for Tiehm’s buckwheat, a rare Nevada wildflower that threatened by a proposed lithium mine, Thacker Pass. The Center for Biological Diversity successfully sued the agency, and as part of a May 17, 2021 legal settlement the Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed listing it as an endangered species listed. Read more »

Shrinking the spotted owl’s critical habitatTrump sued

The Biden administration reversed Trump’s move to shrink the spotted owl’s critical habitat by 3.4 million acres, instead reducing it by 204,294 acres. Read more »

Barring Arctic National Wildlife Refuge seismic testing

Interior officials informed the Kaktovik Iñupiat Corporation it failed to survey maternal polar bear dens as required for a seismic testing permit in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Read more »

Easing fishing restrictions at Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National MonumentTrump sued

President Biden reimposed all commericial fishing limits within the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument. Read more »

Applying the Migratory Bird Treaty Act

The Interior Department finalized a rule revoking a Trump-era legal interpretation that killing scores birds by accident is not subject to prosecution. The department will also take comment on how to Strengthen the act’s implementation going forward. Read more »

Restoring Outdoor Recreation Legacy Partnership

Biden officials rescinded an order that eliminated the Outdoor Recreation Legacy Partnership, which funds parks and greenspace projects in urban areas, and underserved communities. Read more »

Brown Bear Hunting in Kenai National Wildlife RefugeTrump sued

Biden officials reopened the comment period on a proposal allowing the trapping and baiting of brown bears in Alaska’s Kenai National Wildlife Refuge. On April 19, 2022, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the prohibition on brown bear baiting in the refuge. Read more »

Denying critical habitat designation for rusty patched bumblebeeBiden suedTrump sued

The Biden administration is defending the Trump administration’s determination that designating habitat for the rusty patched bumble bee would be “not prudent,” despite the fact that it’s listed under the Endangered Species Act. The Biden administration later issued a recovery plan that would take steps to recover the species. Read more »

Withdrawing National Wildlife Refuges pesticide banTrump sued

Withdrew a prohibition on using neonicotinoid pesticides and GMOs in national wildlife refuges. Read more »

Controlling Canada Goose populations

Made it legal to destroy Canada geese nests year-round. Read more »

Allowing elephant and lion trophy imports

Lifted ban to allow for some elephant and lion trophy imports. Read more »

Weakening turtle-excluder requirements in shrimp trawl netsBiden suedTrump sued

NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service required, starting Aug. 1, 2021, that all shrimp trawlers 40 feet or greater in length use turtle excluder devices in their nets. The state of Louisiana challenged the policy in federal court, and a judge suspended the new requirement in in Louisiana inshore waters until Feb. 1, 2022. Read more »

Harming marine mammals in Gulf of Mexico oil and gas surveys

Biden officials modified this Trump-era rule, which would have allowed oil and gas operators to harm marine mammals while during surveys in the Gulf of Mexico. Read more »

Withdrawal of the bi-state sage grouse listing determinationTrump sued

A federal judge ruled that the Trump administration illegally denied Endangered Species Act protections to the bi-state sage grouse, which straddles the Nevada-California state line, and ordered the Biden administration to make a final determination. Read more »

Removing gray wolves from the endangered species list

The Biden administration is considering whether to restore Endangered Species Act protections to gray wolves in the Lower 48. On Feb. 10, 2022, a federal judge reimposed these safeguards in many states but did not apply them to populations in the northern Rockies. Read more »

Denying protections for the Pacific walrusBiden suedTrump sued

The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals sent this rule back to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service after the Trump administration denied Endangered Species Act protections to the Pacific walrus, which is threatened by climate change. On June 3, 2021, the U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the agency failed to justify this decision and sent it back, demanding a proper justification. Read more »

Expanding sheep grazing around U.S Sheep Experiment StationTrump sued

In July 2018, the Trump administration expanded grazing in the Centennial Mountains, on the Idaho-Montana border. On April 16, 2021 a federal judge in the U.S. District Count for the District of Idaho ruled that the federal government failed to do an adequate analysis of the environmental impact of the move on native grizzly bears, wolves, bighorn sheep, and sage grouse. Read more »

Overhauling critical habitat designationTrump sued

The Biden administration proposed revoking a rule that prioritized industrial and other uses when making critical habitat designations. Read more »

Scaling back sage grouse habitat protectionsTrump sued

The Bureau of Land Management published a notice saying it would reconsider the Trump administration’s management plans to withdraw sage grouse protections spanning 10 million acres to allow drilling. Read more »

Easing salmon and smelt protectionsTrump sued

Relaxed environmental protections for salmon and smelt in California’s Central Valley. Read more »

Changing Endangered Species Act consultations

The Trump administration scaled back consultations under the Endangered Species Act. A federal court later vacated that action. Read more »

Logging large Trees in eastern Oregon and Washington

Reversed a 25-year policy of barring the logging of trees with a diameter of 21 inches or more in national forests in eastern Oregon and Washington. Read more »

Vetoing the Driftnet Act

Vetoed bipartisan bill phasing out mile-long driftnets that entangle marine mammals and sharks. Read more »

Changing black-footed ferret recovery plans

Scuttled a recovery site for the endangered black-footed ferret. Read more »

Downlisting of the American burying beetleBiden suedTrump sued

The Center for Biological Diversity has sued the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service over its move during the Trump administration to reclassify American burying beetle from endangered to threatened, despite ongoing threats. Read more »

Modifying Atlantic bluefin tuna catchTrump sued

Adopted rules with fewer safeguards for Atlantic bluefin tuna. Read more »

Reversing the lead ammunition and fishing tackle standardsTrump sued

Overturned a ban on the use of lead ammunition and fishing tackle on federal lands. Read more »

Creating critical habitat exclusionsTrump sued

The Biden administration revoked a rule that requires consideration of financial impacts in designating critical habitats under the Endangered Species Act. The comment period has ended. Read more »

Narrowing Critical Habitat DefinitionTrump sued

President Biden rescinded a Trump-era rule that narrowed the definition of what constitutes critical habitat for imperiled species. Read more »

Changing hunting and trapping rules in Alaska preservesTrump sued

Reversed Obama-era ban on controversial hunting practices on some lands in Alaska. Read more »

Changing critical habitat applicationTrump sued

In July 2022, a federal district court vacated a Trump-era rule that limited how the government identifies habitat as critical for an imperiled species. Read more »

Changing endangered species pesticides consultations

Rolled back inter-agency Endangered Species Act consultations on pesticides. Read more »

Hunting predators in Alaska National Wildlife RefugesBiden suedTrump sued

Overturned a ban on the hunting of predators in Alaskan wildlife refuges. Read more »

New 13

Policy put in place or proposed by the Biden administration

Curbing government subsidies for illegal fishing operators worldwide

The U.S. Trade Representative helped broker an agreement under the World Trade Organization barring government subsidies to vessels that engage in illegal fishing, or in fisheries that are overexploited or take place on the high seas.

Seasonal gear closures to protect right whales in the Gulf of MaineBiden sued

The National Marine Fisheries Service finalized a rule restricting lobster fishing with buoy lines in the Gulf of Maine between October and May to protect endangered North Atlantic right whales. A group of lobstermen sued and won an injunction, but the First Circuit Court of Appeals reinstated the seasonal closure. Read more »

Protection of endangered Alabama mussels

The Biden administration designated the Canoe Creek clubshell, a freshwater mussel species found in north-central Alabama, as endangered. It also protected 36 river miles of the mussel’s critical habitat. Read more »

Executive order on illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing

President Biden signed a memorandum that pledged the U.S., U.K. and Canada will take steps to monitor fisheries more closely and work to “hold bad actors accountable.” The effort includes a 21-agency working group that will devise a five-year plan to curb illegal fishing.

Allowing oil and gas operators to harass Southern Beaufort Sea polar bears and Pacific walrusesBiden sued

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service finalzed a rule that allows oil and gas companies to disturb polar bears and walruses in the Beaufort Sea as well as the Western Arctic through their drilling activities over the next five years. Read more »

Conserving public lands and waters

President Biden set a goal of conserving 30 percent of U.S. lands and waters by 2030. Read more »

Designating Avi Kwa Ame as a national monument

President Biden announced that he would protect hundreds of thousands of acres around Nevada’s Avi Kaw Ame, or Spirit Mountain. The future national monument, which could span 450,000 acres, provides a critical migratory corridoor for wildlife and is sacred to a dozen tribes.. Read more »

Vessel speed regulations to reduce threats to endangered right whales

New restrictions aim to reduce boat collisions with right whales, which are a leading cause of the species’ decline. Read more »

Protection of northern long-eared bat

The Biden administration wants to reclassify the northern long-eared bat from “threatened” to “endangered.” The species has been devastated by a deadly disease known as white-nose syndrome. Read more »

Protections for the Sacremento Mountains Checkerspot Butterfly

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed listing the Sacremento Mountains checkerspot butterfly, which is only found in the higher-elevation mountains around the village of Cloudcroft in New Mexico’s Lincoln National Forest. The Center for Biological Diversity had filed three legal petitions over the course of two decades in an effort to get the butterfly listed. Read more »

Protection of emperor penguins

The Biden administration intends to list emperor penguins as “threatened” under the Endangered Species Act, arguing that the flightless bird species from Antarctica faces a myriad of risks posed by climate change. The comment period on the proposal ended in October 2021. Read more »

Listing the lesser prairie chicken under the Endangered Species Act

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed listing the lesser prairie chicken in the southern portion of its range, which includes part of New Mexico and Texas. The comment period has ended. Read more »

Protecting critical habitat for Tiehm’s buckwheat

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed protecting 910 acres of critical habitat for Tiehm’s buckwheat, a rare Nevada wildflower that threatened by a proposed lithium mine, Thacker Pass. The Center for Biological Diversity successfully sued the agency, and as part of a May 17, 2021 legal settlement the Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed listing it as an endangered species listed. Read more »

Easy to overturn 10

Can be reversed by a simple act, such as signing an executive order or new directive

Shrinking the spotted owl’s critical habitatTrump sued

The Biden administration reversed Trump’s move to shrink the spotted owl’s critical habitat by 3.4 million acres, instead reducing it by 204,294 acres. Read more »

Barring Arctic National Wildlife Refuge seismic testing

Interior officials informed the Kaktovik Iñupiat Corporation it failed to survey maternal polar bear dens as required for a seismic testing permit in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Read more »

Easing fishing restrictions at Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National MonumentTrump sued

President Biden reimposed all commericial fishing limits within the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument. Read more »

Applying the Migratory Bird Treaty Act

The Interior Department finalized a rule revoking a Trump-era legal interpretation that killing scores birds by accident is not subject to prosecution. The department will also take comment on how to Strengthen the act’s implementation going forward. Read more »

Restoring Outdoor Recreation Legacy Partnership

Biden officials rescinded an order that eliminated the Outdoor Recreation Legacy Partnership, which funds parks and greenspace projects in urban areas, and underserved communities. Read more »

Brown Bear Hunting in Kenai National Wildlife RefugeTrump sued

Biden officials reopened the comment period on a proposal allowing the trapping and baiting of brown bears in Alaska’s Kenai National Wildlife Refuge. On April 19, 2022, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the prohibition on brown bear baiting in the refuge. Read more »

Denying critical habitat designation for rusty patched bumblebeeBiden suedTrump sued

The Biden administration is defending the Trump administration’s determination that designating habitat for the rusty patched bumble bee would be “not prudent,” despite the fact that it’s listed under the Endangered Species Act. The Biden administration later issued a recovery plan that would take steps to recover the species. Read more »

Withdrawing National Wildlife Refuges pesticide banTrump sued

Withdrew a prohibition on using neonicotinoid pesticides and GMOs in national wildlife refuges. Read more »

Controlling Canada Goose populations

Made it legal to destroy Canada geese nests year-round. Read more »

Allowing elephant and lion trophy imports

Lifted ban to allow for some elephant and lion trophy imports. Read more »

Medium 16

Can be reversed only through more extensive action, such as rewriting a regulation or court ruling

Weakening turtle-excluder requirements in shrimp trawl netsBiden suedTrump sued

NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service required, starting Aug. 1, 2021, that all shrimp trawlers 40 feet or greater in length use turtle excluder devices in their nets. The state of Louisiana challenged the policy in federal court, and a judge suspended the new requirement in in Louisiana inshore waters until Feb. 1, 2022. Read more »

Harming marine mammals in Gulf of Mexico oil and gas surveys

Biden officials modified this Trump-era rule, which would have allowed oil and gas operators to harm marine mammals while during surveys in the Gulf of Mexico. Read more »

Withdrawal of the bi-state sage grouse listing determinationTrump sued

A federal judge ruled that the Trump administration illegally denied Endangered Species Act protections to the bi-state sage grouse, which straddles the Nevada-California state line, and ordered the Biden administration to make a final determination. Read more »

Removing gray wolves from the endangered species list

The Biden administration is considering whether to restore Endangered Species Act protections to gray wolves in the Lower 48. On Feb. 10, 2022, a federal judge reimposed these safeguards in many states but did not apply them to populations in the northern Rockies. Read more »

Denying protections for the Pacific walrusBiden suedTrump sued

The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals sent this rule back to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service after the Trump administration denied Endangered Species Act protections to the Pacific walrus, which is threatened by climate change. On June 3, 2021, the U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the agency failed to justify this decision and sent it back, demanding a proper justification. Read more »

Expanding sheep grazing around U.S Sheep Experiment StationTrump sued

In July 2018, the Trump administration expanded grazing in the Centennial Mountains, on the Idaho-Montana border. On April 16, 2021 a federal judge in the U.S. District Count for the District of Idaho ruled that the federal government failed to do an adequate analysis of the environmental impact of the move on native grizzly bears, wolves, bighorn sheep, and sage grouse. Read more »

Overhauling critical habitat designationTrump sued

The Biden administration proposed revoking a rule that prioritized industrial and other uses when making critical habitat designations. Read more »

Scaling back sage grouse habitat protectionsTrump sued

The Bureau of Land Management published a notice saying it would reconsider the Trump administration’s management plans to withdraw sage grouse protections spanning 10 million acres to allow drilling. Read more »

Easing salmon and smelt protectionsTrump sued

Relaxed environmental protections for salmon and smelt in California’s Central Valley. Read more »

Changing Endangered Species Act consultations

The Trump administration scaled back consultations under the Endangered Species Act. A federal court later vacated that action. Read more »

Logging large Trees in eastern Oregon and Washington

Reversed a 25-year policy of barring the logging of trees with a diameter of 21 inches or more in national forests in eastern Oregon and Washington. Read more »

Vetoing the Driftnet Act

Vetoed bipartisan bill phasing out mile-long driftnets that entangle marine mammals and sharks. Read more »

Changing black-footed ferret recovery plans

Scuttled a recovery site for the endangered black-footed ferret. Read more »

Downlisting of the American burying beetleBiden suedTrump sued

The Center for Biological Diversity has sued the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service over its move during the Trump administration to reclassify American burying beetle from endangered to threatened, despite ongoing threats. Read more »

Modifying Atlantic bluefin tuna catchTrump sued

Adopted rules with fewer safeguards for Atlantic bluefin tuna. Read more »

Reversing the lead ammunition and fishing tackle standardsTrump sued

Overturned a ban on the use of lead ammunition and fishing tackle on federal lands. Read more »

Difficult 6

Can only be reversed through a lengthy regulatory process, act of Congress or court ruling

Creating critical habitat exclusionsTrump sued

The Biden administration revoked a rule that requires consideration of financial impacts in designating critical habitats under the Endangered Species Act. The comment period has ended. Read more »

Narrowing Critical Habitat DefinitionTrump sued

President Biden rescinded a Trump-era rule that narrowed the definition of what constitutes critical habitat for imperiled species. Read more »

Changing hunting and trapping rules in Alaska preservesTrump sued

Reversed Obama-era ban on controversial hunting practices on some lands in Alaska. Read more »

Changing critical habitat applicationTrump sued

In July 2022, a federal district court vacated a Trump-era rule that limited how the government identifies habitat as critical for an imperiled species. Read more »

Changing endangered species pesticides consultations

Rolled back inter-agency Endangered Species Act consultations on pesticides. Read more »

Hunting predators in Alaska National Wildlife RefugesBiden suedTrump sued

Overturned a ban on the hunting of predators in Alaskan wildlife refuges. Read more »

About this story

The Post assembled data on the Trump administration’s environmental regulatory rollbacks from several sources: the White House, the Interior Department, the Energy Department, the Commerce Department, the Transportation Department, the Justice Department, the EPA, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, Harvard Law School’s Environmental and Energy Law Program, Earthjustice, the Natural Resources Defense Council, the Center for Biological Diversity and the Berkeley Center for Law, Energy and the Environment.

Illustrations by Aaron Steckelberg. First published Jan. 21, 2021, and periodically updated.

Mon, 08 Feb 2021 02:55:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2021/climate-environment/biden-climate-environment-actions/
Killexams : U.S. manufacturing sector contracts in November - ISM

WASHINGTON, Dec 1 (Reuters) - U.S. manufacturing activity contracted for the first time in 2-1/2 years in November as higher borrowing costs weighed on demand for goods, but a measure of prices paid by factories for inputs fell for a second straight month, supporting views that inflation could continue trending lower.

The Institute for Supply Management (ISM) said on Thursday that its manufacturing PMI fell to 49.0 last month. That was the first contraction and also the weakest memorizing since May 2020, when the economy was reeling from the initial wave of COVID-19 infections, and followed 50.2 in October.

A memorizing below 50 indicates contraction in manufacturing, which accounts for 11.3% of the U.S. economy. Still, the index remains above the level that is typically associated with a recession in the broader U.S. economy. Economists polled by Reuters had forecast the index sliding to 49.8.

The Federal Reserve is in the midst of what has become the fastest rate-hiking cycle since the 1980s, as it battles inflation, raising the risks of a recession next year.

Fed Chair Jerome Powell said on Wednesday the U.S. central bank could scale back the pace of its rate increases "as soon as December." The Fed has raised its policy rate by 375 basis points this year from near zero to a 3.75%-4.00% range.

Manufacturing is also being pressured by the rotation of spending back to services from goods as the nation moves away from the pandemic.

The ISM survey's forward-looking new orders sub-index dropped to 47.2, remaining in contraction territory for a third straight month. Order backlogs also dwindled further also a function of improving supply chains.

The survey's measure of supplier deliveries rose to 47.2 from 46.8 in September, which was the first decline below the 50 threshold since February 2016. A memorizing below 50 indicates faster deliveries to factories.

With supply chain bottlenecks easing, the outlook for inflation is improving. A measure of prices paid by manufacturers fell to a 2-1/2 year low of 43.0 from 46.6 in October. The drop, which also reflected a moderation in commodity prices, offers hope that inflation has already peaked.

Annual consumer prices increased below 8% in October for the first time in eight months.

The ISM survey's measure of factory employment decreased to 48.4 from 50.0 in October. The decline is likely because of slowing demand for labor as manufacturers brace for economic turbulence.

The government reported on Wednesday that nondurable manufacturing job openings decreased by 95,000 at the end of October, contributing to a drop in overall vacancies in the economy. Still job openings remain considerably high and there were 1.7 openings for every unemployed person in October.

Reporting by Lucia Mutikani; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Thu, 01 Dec 2022 01:26:00 -0600 Reuters en text/html https://www.reuters.com/markets/us/us-manufacturing-sector-contracts-november-ism-2022-12-01/
Killexams : Graduate Program in Environmental Science (GPES)

The Graduate Program in Environmental Science (GPES) supports interdisciplinary environmental research and teaching at SUNY ESF and offers unique graduate programs that serve the needs of our students. GPES is comprised of faculty from each of the seven departments at SUNY ESF who understand the importance of interdisciplinary collaborations to manage and solve critical environmental problems.

GPES is centered on three Study Areas:

Study Areas are designed to group faculty around broad research and teaching themes. Prospective students identify potential Major Professors within one of these Study Areas when applying to the program.

GPES offers Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Master of Science (MS), and Master of Professional Studies (MPS) degree programs. The program is designed to have minimal required coursework so students can uniquely design a graduate curriculum that satisfies their research and professional needs.

We encourage you to learn more about our programs, contact potential Major Professors, and join us to work towards making our world a more just, healthy and sustainable environmental system.

GPES Student Success Stories:

More GPES Student Success Stories

Research Highlights

Fri, 13 Nov 2020 09:58:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.esf.edu/environmentalscience/gpes/
630-006 exam dump and training guide direct download
Training Exams List