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Killexams : Cisco Infrastructure Topics - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/500-710 Search results Killexams : Cisco Infrastructure Topics - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/500-710 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Cisco Killexams : Cisco Releases 2022 Purpose Report, Highlighting Progress on ESG Goals

NORTHAMPTON, MA / ACCESSWIRE / December 9, 2022 / Cisco Systems Inc.

Cisco Systems Inc., Friday, December 9, 2022, Press release picture

I'm happy to announce that today Cisco released its annual Purpose Report.

The 2022 Cisco Purpose Report describes our goals, progress, and impact for the environmental, social, and governance (ESG) Topics that are significant to achieving our purpose to Power an Inclusive Future for All, and that are important for our stakeholders.

The theme of this year's report is "Purpose Personified," and in it we highlight some of the people who have brought our purpose to life in our last fiscal year.

For example, you will meet J.J. Cummings, who helped identify and prevent cyberattacks against Ukrainian citizens and infrastructure after Russia invaded the country. You will learn from Beth Kochuparambil how the Cisco Common Hardware Group is developing ideas for energy efficiency and reducing the power needs of our products. And you will be inspired by people like Katherine Lucey, who founded the nonprofit Solar Sister (a Cisco Foundation grantee) to provide sustainable and affordable energy services and products to people who lack electricity around the world.

In the Purpose Report you will also learn about our progress from our last fiscal year, which ended in July 2022. For example:

  • We achieved a 60% increase in representation of all employees who self-identify as African American/Black (AA/B) from entry level through manager (FY20 base year)

  • Cisco and the Cisco Foundation Contributed US$494 million in cash and in-kind contributions to community programs, including US$377 million in in-kind contributions for Cisco Networking Academy

  • Cisco Networking Academy reached 3.2 million students in FY22, bringing the total number of students to 17.5 million worldwide since the program began in 1997

  • The Science Based Targets Initiative (SBTi) validated our goal to reach net zero greenhouse gas emissions across our value chain by 2040

  • We were #1 in the Gartner Supply Chain Top 25 for the third year in a row

Cisco has a long history of setting and achieving ESG goals. We published our first public report on these Topics in 2005, and continue to do so annually to provide our customers, employees, investors, and others a clear picture of our progress, impact, challenges and learnings.

In addition to the Purpose Report, our ESG Reporting Hub includes in-depth information on all the Topics in the report.

I invite you to explore these materials and comment below with any questions or observations.

Visit our ESG Reporting Hub to read the 2022 Cisco Purpose Report

View original content here.

View additional multimedia and more ESG storytelling from Cisco Systems Inc. on 3blmedia.com.

Contact Info:
Spokesperson: Cisco Systems Inc.
Website: http://csr.cisco.com/
Email: info@3blmedia.com

SOURCE: Cisco Systems Inc.

View source version on accesswire.com:
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Fri, 09 Dec 2022 02:14:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/cisco-releases-2022-purpose-report-161500507.html
Killexams : Tech Brief: AI general approach, the future of AdTech

Welcome to EURACTIV’s Tech Brief, your weekly update on all things digital in the EU. You can subscribe to the newsletter here

“The Czech EU Council presidency’s final compromise text takes into account the key concerns of the member states and preserves the delicate balance between the protection of fundamental rights and the promotion of uptake of AI technology.”

Ivan Bartoš, Czechia’s Deputy Prime Minister for Digitalisation

Story of the week: The Czech presidency achieved its main victory in the digital sphere this week, as EU ministers adopted its text as a general approach to the AI Act. For those closely following EURACTIV’s coverage, the final text presents no last-minute surprises. Here it is for those looking for an overview of the main changes. With a caveat, as is usually the case, that the Council built some margin of manoeuvre to negotiate with MEPs, especially in law enforcement.

All the eyes are on the Parliament’s timeline now: committee vote in February and plenary vote in March. The governance and enforcement part, which is hardly controversial, has needed four technical and one political meeting so far, and the question of resources and staffing remains. This week, the article on placing AI systems on the market has been closed, and progress has also been made on the subject matter, scope and final provisions. But sceptics point to the fact that some controversial parts of the proposal have hardly been touched yet.

Next Wednesday, a potential item on the agenda could be General Purpose AI. The infamous Annex III on high-risk use cases also needs to be discussed, but hardly anyone wants to open that conversation before Christmas. Another question is whether the centre-right EPP will support the final text. The atmosphere between lawmakers has steadily improved, but the AI definition and biometric recognition might lead large chunks of the conservatives to vote negatively, weakening the Parliament’s position.

Don’t miss: The Commission’s justice and consumer department (DG JUST) has been studying the AdTech sector to prepare for an update of the Unfair Commercial Practices Directive. In an exclusive interview, Commissioner Didier Reynders explained the main problems the EU executive is looking at transparency, unsubscribe process and cookie ‘fatigue’. The idea would be to start with a voluntary initiative as a pilot for some already called the Digital Fairness Act. And DG JUST is not the only Commission service looking at the sector. Read more.

Also this week

  • ETSI has been excluded from the draft standardisation request on the AI Act.
  • MEPs have reached a political agreement on the platform workers’ directive.
  • The Czech presidency obtained a general approach to the European digital identity.
  • The EU Council is moving to exclude Software-as-a-Service from the scope of the Cyber Resilience Act.
  • The EDPB decisions on three cases concerning Meta’s platforms could reportedly have a dramatic impact on their business model.

Before we start: If you just can’t get enough tech analysis, tune in to our weekly podcast.

Auditing algorithms

AI audits are a nascent field due to rapidly developing with the adoption of the EU’s AI Act. But what are the conditions for a robust auditing regime? And what are the risks of so-called ‘audit-washing’? We discuss this and …

 Artificial Intelligence

ETSI’s out of the game. The Commission has excluded the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI), one of the three European standardisation bodies, from its draft standardisation request for the AI Act. The move comes as part of broader tensions between the EU executive and ETSI, which the Commission has accused of being too dominated by the private sector and non-European influences, the reduction of which Brussels’ standard-setting strategy is centred around. The latest draft text, which downgrades ETSI to a consulting role, also contains some other significant changes. Read more.

Mind your bias. On Thursday, the EU’s Agency for Fundamental Rights released timely research on AI used in predictive policing and content moderation, pointing at their potential risks of perpetuating and reinforcing biases. The agency recommends the implementation of algorithm assessments before and during their deployment to conclude on a case-by-case basis whether these systems are fit for purpose. Read more.

Speaking of risks. The EU’s AI Act must include protections for people on the move, regardless of their migration status, a coalition of over 160 civil society organisations has said in an open letter published this week. The Commission’s original proposal, the group says, failed to adequately address potential harms due to using AI in the context of migration, particularly in areas including predictive systems, biometric identification and emotional recognition technologies.

The Consumers’ Voice. The EU consumer organisation BEUC criticised the general approach, saying that the definition is too narrow, the high-risk list too limited, effective redress is missing, horizontal rules of fairness are lacking, and private entities should be banned from using biometric identification.

Competition

Case closed? Amazon has reached a deal to be announced next month to conclude investigations by Brussels antitrust regulators into whether its data use undermined rivals, including pledged measures such as increasing the visibility of rival products and adding an alternative offer for buyers that deprioritises delivery speed.

We don’t trust you. The US Federal Trade Commission said on Thursday that Microsoft’s past behaviour regarding mergers does not bode well for the embattled Activision acquisition currently under scrutiny by numerous competition authorities. For instance, during its purchase of ZeniMax Media in 2020, Microsoft reneged on promises made to the European Commission during its investigation of the deal, casting suspicion on those made about the Activision one, the FTC says.

The telcos’ alternative. Major telecoms companies are facing questions from the Commission about a planned merger that would see giants such as Vodafone, Orange, and Deutsche Telekom join forces to develop a new AdTech to evade tracking restrictions implemented by Apple and Google. The project, which has already been locally trialled, would see the creation of digital tokens that advertisers could use to gain insight into user behaviour, a response to increased privacy measures implemented by tech companies.

Copyright

Have your say. The Commission has published the public consultation for its recommendation to combat the piracy of live online content, aimed for implementation in the first half of next year. The idea is to put forward a toolbox for combatting the offence and to encourage member states to implement their own measures.

Cybersecurity

SaaS is out. The Council’s new compromise text on the Cyber Resilience Act attempts to clarify the proposal’s scope. It places Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) firmly outside, contrary to what member states like the Netherlands and Germany have been asking. At the Telecom Council meeting on Tuesday, Commissioner Thierry Breton explained that including services like Spotify and Netflix would go against the regulation’s legal basis. However, the scope still needs to be fully clarified, notably in how web services and mobile apps interact with the new rules. Read more.

Discussing about discussing. During the ministerial discussion on the Data Act, Dutch minister Alexandra van Huffelen hit out at the cybersecurity cloud certification scheme, arguing that its sovereignty requirements could have negative implications for the European economy. The call for a political debate was seconded by Finland, Poland, Ireland, Estonia and… Spain. Madrid stands out since it is the only country supporting the sovereignty requirements, but since it takes the helm of the EU next year, they may have a vested interest in avoiding this hot potato landing on their desk. And yet, these calls elicited no reaction from Breton.

Winter is coming. Preparations should be made for major cyberattacks by Russia this winter, Microsoft has warned. Ongoing trends suggest that the coming months could bring assaults on critical infrastructure and cyber-influence operations in Ukraine and across Europe, the company said this week, setting out a plan to detect, disrupt, defend and deter such efforts in the digital sphere.

Companies’ resilience. Some 62% of organisations surveyed in Cisco’s Security Outcomes Study reported having experienced significant security incidents that jeopardised business operations, and 96% of executives consider cybersecurity a top priority.

Data & Privacy

Starting 2023 with a boom. The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) adopted three dispute resolutions concerning Meta this week, which will be formalised in January. The probe was initiated by Max Schrems’ NOYB, which contested Meta’s approach of not asking users for their consent to process their personal data for advertising purposes, but considered that part of a ‘contract’ since it was included in the platforms’ terms and conditions. According to the Wall Street Journal, the EDPB ruled Meta’s approach illegal. Although the fines are expected to be particularly hefty in these cases, most significantly, if the decisions are confirmed, they would undermine Meta’s entire business model.

Parliamentary discussions. The MEPs working on the Data Act in the Parliament’s industry committee met on Wednesday for the first political discussion on the B2G data-sharing obligations. The political groups started from very distant positions on fundamental aspects of the provisions, such as the type of data and companies that should be involved, but the positions have been slowly converging. Meanwhile, in the internal market committee, lawmakers called for political discussions on functional equivalence, barriers to switching and egress fees.

Not for me to judge. The EU Court of Justice has dismissed an appeal by WhatsApp against an EDPB ruling in August 2021 which found the company had violated the GDPR in its data processing practices, resulting in a €225 million fine. The EU court said the case was not admissible since the decision was not directly addressed to WhatsApp but to the Irish DPA. Still, a case could be brought before a national court.

Just forget it. Search engine operators are required to remove data that can be proven inaccurate by users from online search results, the EU Court of Justice has ruled. In a case brought by two executives seeking to uphold their right to be forgotten online, the court ruled that if the information is proven manifestly inaccurate, operators must de-reference it. Read more.

Clubhouse in hot waters. Italy’s privacy watchdog has fined Clubhouse’s parent company €2 million for numerous violations like a lack of transparency on data use, the ability for users to store and share audio without consent, the indefinite storage of audio recordings by the platform and the sharing of account information without an adequate legal basis.

LIBE’s timeline. The civil liberties committee plans to consider the Data Act amendments next Tuesday. A shadow meeting is scheduled for 12 January, and the committee vote on 30 January.

Digital Markets Act

First workshop done. On Monday, the first DMA workshop took place on self-preferencing. Many media reports focused on the fact that Google’s representative Oliver Bethell had hinted that search services like Maps and Shopping might escape the DMA’s definition of core platform service. However, perhaps more significant is that Google has publicly engaged with stakeholders for the first time showing their hand. More cynically, the workshop initiative might also be seen as the Commission trying to relieve some public pressure as everyone is still waiting for the draft secondary legislation to drop.

eGovernance

eIDs general approach. The Council formalised its position on the European digital identity proposal this week, with compromises met across some areas, from record matching and assurance level to certification and interoperability. The implementation timeline has also been solidified, with the Commission required to adopt acts on the regulation’s technical and operational specifics, along with cybersecurity requirements to be followed within the first six months of it being in place before the two-year deadline is reached. Read more.

You can do better. According to a report by the European Court of Auditors released this week, the Commission has fallen significantly short on its Action Plan for digitalising public services across the EU. A critical flaw in the 2016-2020 eGovernment Action Plan, the auditors said, was that member state action was voluntary, and discrepancies between the digitalisation in various individual countries remain high. Read more.

eGovernance accessibility. This week saw the publication of the Commission’s public consultation on the Web Accessibility Directive, an initiative designed to increase the accessibility of public-sector websites and mobile applications for vulnerable citizens.

Gig economy

EMPL report approaching. Elisabetta Gualmini, the rapporteur for the platform workers’ direction, told EURACTIV that a political agreement had been reached in the Parliament this week, with every side giving up on something. She also said that, while most people were obsessed with the rebuttable presumption, the most significant part of the proposal, in her view, is algorithmic management. While the leading MEP seems confident about Monday’s committee vote, the real question mark remains the plenary. Read more.

No means no. EU labour and social affairs ministers met in Brussels on Thursday (8 December) hoping for an 11th-hour compromise among member states over the platform workers’ directive – but that failed. This follows several setbacks by the Czech presidency, who’d faced a blocking minority in previous COREPER meetings because the compromise wouldn’t bring more legal certainty than what is already the case in case law and national legislation.

Industrial strategy

Not a good year. According to Atomico’s 2022 State of European Tech report, Europe’s start-up scene is falling behind. Despite a strong 2021 and a positive start to the year, the second half of 2022 saw a significant decline in investment, with late-stage companies hit particularly hard and the number of new unicorns dropping sharply. The tech workforce has also been hit hard, and founders are having difficulty raising funds, Atomico found, also pointing to the lack of progress on diversity when it comes to investment.

Law enforcement

No continent for human rights. Last year, a group of NGOs filed a complaint alleging that the EU had been irresponsibly contributing to developing “surveillance” capacities in third countries, particularly in the context of the Commission’s Emergency Trust Fund for Africa. The Ombudsman has concluded that the human rights implications of this project fell short and that more robust efforts must be made in future.

Wiretapping reform. Italy is seeking to reform wiretapping practices in the country due to their costs and potential misuse for political gains. Measures presented by Justice Minister Carlo Nordio would clamp down on wiretapping, rates of which he said are much higher than the European average and which has become a tool of pressure used against both the press and political opponents. Read more. 

Greece’s raging scandal. MEP and leader of Greece’s socialist opposition, Nikos Androulakis, will take his country’s government to the EU Court of Justice to find out why he was under surveillance. Athens has admitted that secret services tapped the politician’s phone but didn’t disclose the reason by shielding behind ‘national interest’. Read more. 

CSAM field trip. MEP Javier Zarzalejos, the rapporteur for the CSAM proposal, visited the UK’s Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) this week to examine how civil society organisations are helping to tackle online child pornography.

Media

Outstanding issues. The Council this week completed its first technical-level revision of the proposed Media Freedom Act, concluding the Czech presidency’s work on the file. The outstanding issues, which are now the upcoming Swedish presidency’s responsibility, were summarised last week in a progress report, including the regulation’s legal basis, scope and definitions, oversight and enforcement and provisions covering media service providers. Read more.

More media bans. Four TV channels have been included in the EU’s latest round of sanctions on Russia. Accused of being part of Moscow’s “propaganda machine”, the broadcasters will be taken off the air and banned from other modes of distribution, much like RT and Sputnik were in March. The channels have not officially been named but were reported by Politico as being NTV/NTV Mir, RENT TV, Rossiya 1 and Pervyi Kanal.

Go away, please. Latvia has blocked independent Russian TV Rain from broadcasting after designating it as a national security threat. The station, which left Russia after being shut down by Moscow following the invasion of Ukraine, was fined last week for showing a map of Russia that included occupied Crimea and describing Russian troops as “our army”. Read more. 

Media strike. Two private broadcasters in Serbia – N1 Srbija and Nova, known to be highly critical of the authorities – stopped broadcasting for 24 hours on Tuesday in protest at the poor state of media freedom in the Western Balkan EU candidate country. Read more

Metaverse

Committees’ competition. The European Parliament’s Conference of Committee Chairs also recently authorised the internal market (IMCO) committee to conduct an own-initiative report on “Virtual worlds: opportunities, risks and policy implications for the Single Market”. The initiative received the support of the EPP and S&D groups, but who will take the lead is still to be decided. The legal affairs (JURI) committee will also host a hearing on the metaverse. These initiatives a part of a strategy to position the committee as the point of reference in this increasingly hot topic.

Investment announcement. On Wednesday, Meta’s top lobbyist Nick Clegg was in Brussels to sing the praises of the metaverse and announce a €2.4 million investment in independent academic research on the topic. Perhaps more significantly, UK’s former deputy PM admitted that the metaverse would be much more about AR and VR.

Platforms

Online Safety Bill version 34356. The Online Safety Bill, the UK’s answer to the DSA, was reintroduced into Parliament on Monday after being shelved in the summer following Boris Johnson’s exit from office. A fundamental change has been made to the latest version of the draft bill, however, following criticism from some that its provisions concerning “legal but harmful” material would lead to the over-removal of content by platforms, posing a threat to freedom of speech. Last week, the government announced that these bill elements would be removed, meaning companies would no longer be required to have policies covering this material concerning adult users. However, they will still apply to children.

Empowering consumers. A new study by the Consumer Empowerment Project, backed by Euroconsumers and Google, has found that consumers overall feel that the role of digital services in their lives is a positive one. Still, that lack of awareness or trust in providers were two of the most significant barriers to utilising services, and that generational and socio-economic gaps remain.

Research & Innovation

Next two years’ programme. The main Horizon Europe work programme 2023-24 was adopted this week, providing approximately €13.5 billion in funding for researchers and innovators across Europe.

EIC in 2023. The 2023 work programme of the European Innovation Council (EIC) has been adopted, making €1.6 billion worth of funding available for scientists and innovators.

Defence funding. The Commission this week gave the green light to an investment of around €1.2 billion to fund research projects focused on high-end defence capabilities.

Telecom

Another week, another letter. Germany, Austria, Estonia, Finland, Ireland and the Netherlands have all joined a call for the Commission to clarify its plans to make Big Tech companies contribute to telecoms network costs, notably asking for it to be dealt with separately from the revision of the Broadband Cost Reduction Direction – which EURACTIV understands was already the case. Read more.

Transatlantic ties

Trade war or not? At the post-TTC press conference, anyone agreed an EU-US trade war should be avoided. Still, the question remains that the US Congress’ intention is precisely that of subsidising the American industry – and it is indeed the only thing US lawmakers seem able to agree on. The EU’s Cyber certification scheme was discussed at the recent transatlantic Trade and Technology Council, US Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo confirmed without giving any details.

Biden’s trade ambitions. Boldened by the mid-term elections, US President Joe Biden is said to be poised to ask Congress for the powers to negotiate trade agreements – which seems unlikely. The Biden administration is thirsty for foreign policy victories, and its plan would turn the TTC into a platform to negotiate a new trade agreement with the EU. However, Europeans have shown little appetite for that.

Twin transitions

Apple’s version of Right2Repair. Apple launched a self-service repair programme in eight European countries this week, making manuals and product parts available to customers wishing to undertake their own repairs. The Right to Repair campaign has hit back at the measure, which follows a similar pilot in the US, arguing that its scope is narrow and geographically limited, its costs extensive and procedures complex.

What else we’re reading this week:

A globally critical chip firm is driving a wedge between the U.S. and Netherlands over China tech policy (CNBC)

The Brilliance and Weirdness of ChatGPT (The New York Times)

Theo Bourgery-Gonse contributed to the reporting.

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 22:21:00 -0600 en-GB text/html https://www.euractiv.com/section/digital/news/tech-brief-ai-general-approach-the-future-of-adtech/
Killexams : Cisco Systems, Inc. (CSCO) Management Presents at Barclays 2022 Global Technology, Media and Telecommunications Conference Call Transcript

Cisco Systems, Inc. (NASDAQ:CSCO) Barclays 2022 Global Technology, Media and Telecommunications Conference Call December 7, 2022 3:10 PM ET

Company Participants

Bill Gartner - Senior Vice President, GM Optical Systems and Optics Group

Conference Call Participants

Tim Long - Barclays

Tim Long

Good. Yeah. Hello, everybody. Thank you for joining us here for this session with Cisco. Tim Long here, IT hardware com equipment analyst at Barclays. Very happy to have Bill Gartner with us, SVP, General Manager, Optical Systems, and Optics Business Unit. Looking forward to the discussion, pretty hot syllabu area for Cisco and for the industry.

So, I think Bill's going to read a safe harbor and then maybe after that if you wouldn't mind just kind of supply us a little overview of your roles and responsibilities at the areas that you're covering …

Bill Gartner

Right. Thanks Tim. First of all, thank you for having me. And before I start, I will be making some forward-looking statements that are subject to risk and uncertainties as outlined in our disclosures. Have I got all that right, Marilyn? Good. Okay.

My name is Bill Gartner and I responsible for two businesses in Cisco that, that are related by the fact that they both rely on optical communications. One is the optics business and the other is the optical systems business. And you can think of the optics business as the trans receivers that we sell with routers and switches that find their home inside a data center or inside a central office or within a campus environment. Those receivers are used typically to send optical signals on a fiber over relatively short distance like 10 kilometers. That's the optics business. And we serve all markets with that, that that includes the campus environments, enterprise, commercial, public sector, service provider and web.

And then the other businesses. Once you have to leave the data center and now send an optical signal across a city or across a country or even between continents, now it's a much more difficult problem to send that optical signal and it requires much more sophisticated solution that is classically chassis based. It's a chassis that we have to sell for an optical system to carry these signals reliably over very long distances. And the other thing that's unique about that world is that in a data center, when you add a new router or switch, you pull new fiber to every port on that router or switch because you're inside. You can do that.

When you leave the data center, now you're talking about crossing the Mississippi or crossing the Rockies, and you basically have to use the fiber that's in the ground. And so we have to put lots and lots of signals on one fiber. So, optical systems are what we use outside the data center or central office and optics what we use inside. That's the two worlds that I have. They're very different businesses, very different business models, but they're related by common technologies.

Question-and-Answer Session

Q - Tim Long

Great. Great. Thank you for that. Good start. So, maybe across the two businesses talk to us a little bit about kind of your priorities, looking out the next few years, obviously you've done the Acacia deal and integrated, you got routed out optical networks. There's just a lot going on, right? So, maybe talk about two or three of your priorities, then we'll dig more into it.

Bill Gartner

So, on the optical system side, we've just introduced a new optical layer platform called the NCS 1010 that offers some very innovative capabilities for customers to simplify operations. It runs IOS XR, which is our routing operating system. So, it's common for customers that have deployed our routers and it supports CNL band. So, massive capacity. That's our -- you can think about as a layer zero solution. We've just launched that.

And the other key thing for the optical systems business that we have under development is leveraging something that Acacia announced, which is a new DSP supporting 1.2 terabytes on a single wavelength, 1.2 terabytes on a single wavelength. And we'll be trialing that in second half of next year and we'll have that available in fourth quarter of next year. Those are two key development areas for the optical systems business.

And then on the optics side, we're I think still early stage on 400 gig deployments. So, a lot of effort in terms of getting 400 gig out there to our customers. We are also very focused on selling Cisco Optics, not only for Cisco routers and switches, but for third-party solutions as well. So, when customers want to consider optics as a buying center and say they want to consolidate their optic spend, we want to be considered as an optic supplier.

And then I think the one thing that's crossing the systems world and the optics world is Acacia has a very significant innovation in something called a 400 gig ZR or ZR Plus, which is effectively taking what was classically delivered in a chassis as part of an optical system and putting that into a plugable form factor. And that is a 400 gig ZR or ZR Plus. And that's part of our routed optical networking architecture. So that's an important thrust for really the optical systems business and the optics business.

And if you supply me a minute here, Tim, I actually brought some show and tell, I'm going to try to make that a little crisp for you because I know you guys don't live in this world. This is is a line card that goes into an optical system. We sell this to all the web players, service providers. This is -- this supports 1.2 terabytes of capacity and it goes plugs into a chassis with a bunch of other line cards that plug into a chassis. So, for 1.2 terabytes, the customer basically can put -- get two trunks, if you will, or wavelengths, and they can combine up to 1200 gig interfaces. So, this 1200 gig ports here, and out comes to 600 gig ports. That's where the 1.2 terabytes comes from. This is part of an optical system.

And what we're doing with ZR pluggable is effectively now using -- taking what's in there, largely speaking and putting it in here. Now it's not quite apples-to-apples. This is a 400 gig plugable, that's 1.2 terabytes. So, you'd need three of these to get to one of those. But from a cost, power, space perspective, this is way, way, way more efficient for customers than that. And so, if you think about it, I own this business, which is part of Acacia. I own this business, which is part of our optical systems. I'm going to cannibalize a part of this business in order to make this business successful. And we're okay with that because we own both businesses, but we think there's more potential for this business over time. Does that help?

Tim Long

Yeah. Yeah. I'm glad you didn't have to take an airplane to get here.

Bill Gartner

By the way, my supply chain lead always is terrified when he sees me walking around carrying his stuff in a shopping bag. But we're not going to plug it into any customer's network.

Tim Long

So, Maybe we'll start with this routed optical networks, ZR, ZR Plus. So, ZR, ZR Plus admittedly has been slow, right? Maybe talk to us a little bit about why it hasn't developed as quickly as most in the industry had expected. Why is that going to be different? And touch on the length power, some of the key issue -- technical issues that need to be tackled or tackled.

Bill Gartner

So, let me disagree with you on one point there, Tim. I think for the web players, ZR and ZR Plus not all the web players, but many of the web players are deploying it in massive volume. And that's characteristic, I think, of the web players. They are quick to adopt new technologies. They don't have a lot of overhead in terms of processes and operations to get in the way. They don't have a lot of legacy. So, when there's a new technology that offers significant benefits in terms of power, space, cost, they can jump on it very quickly. And so, we were at capacity for much of the last year trying to serve that segment of the market with ZR and ZR Plus.

For the service provider market, which is traditionally deploying like chassis-based solutions, there's -- we're on a journey that is not going to happen overnight in part because they've deployed these systems which have a lot of life left in them. And so, they're not going to jump to a new architecture overnight. There's also operations -- some operations differences that they have to accommodate in moving from a world of chassis-based solutions to a world where you plug this into a router. But we're seeing very good traction there. We've deployed to over 20 customers now. I'm very confident that over time -- this is going to be a five-year journey. This isn't going to happen overnight. But over time, this pluggable is going to replace that transponder in many, many applications and service provider markets. So, I don't think the journey has gone any slower than we expected. I think we anticipate that for service providers, it is always a much slower transition to a new architecture. And this is a new architecture. It's not just sort of a new technology. And -- but I think we're on pace with where we expect it to be.

Tim Long

Okay. And part of the architecture is to remove the full optical system from the network?

Bill Gartner

So -- yeah. Let me just outline kind of at a high level what routed optical networking architecture is about -- because there's a lot of [indiscernible] out there that my competitors love to throw out. There's some misinformation on that, too. Part of it is replacing this with this. That's part of routed, and it's a big part of routed optical networking. Some think that's all it is. It's not simply that although this is where a lot of the CapEx and OpEx and power savings arises from this, but routed optical networking really came about when we looked at the scale of routers, what's happening in ASICs that's allowing routers to scale so dramatically. It wasn't too long ago.

When I came to Cisco -- I've been with Cisco 14 years. And when I came to Cisco, we had a 40-gig line card on a router, and it had 14 ASICs. And now we've got one ASIC, one ASIC that does 19 terabits of capacity. And that’s not going to go to 25 to 50 over time, one ASIC instead of 14. Nominally, you can kind of think of it as the cost of an ASIC of the cost of an ASIC. So every time like I take 14 down to seven, down to three, down to two, down to one, I'm getting cost savings, but I'm also packing much more capacity now into that one. So that's driven down the cost per bit on a router very, very dramatically over the last 10 years. It's also driven down the power per bit, because now we have one ASIC rather than a whole bunch of ASICs. So, the cost per bit on a router has come down dramatically over the last 10 years.

When we started building networks with an IP layer and a DWDM layer and sometimes an OTN layer, the motivation for that was that the router was the most expensive resource in the network. It was by far the most expensive thing in the network 20 years ago. And what we did is we -- as an industry is we basically built layers of the network to bypass routers whenever you needed to. So, if you had to go from A to B to C to D to E and you had some demands from A to E, it was very expensive to go through B, C and D to get to E. So, we went around B, C and D with an optical layer using things like ROADMs. And that made sense economically. That really made sense from a technical and an economic perspective. But now the cost of the router has come down so dramatically that it's actually more expensive to go around those routers than it is to go through them.

So that was -- that's one key insight that drove routed optical networking is it's no longer more cost effective to go around the router than it is to go through it. And in fact, what we did as an industry is we built a lot of these bypass wavelengths that have very little capacity on them. So, we can now take advantage of the IP layer, aggregate a whole bunch of demands and basically go through routers rather than around them. And so that simplifies the network in a very significant way because you can simplify the DWDM layer. It doesn't go away. To be clear, the DWDM layer is still there, but it's simpler. It can be much simpler. You can take advantage of these pluggable optics. And if you can take private line services like a T1 service or an OTN service and now put it on the IP layer with something called private line emulation, you can take those private line services that were traditionally served with custom products, put that now on the IP layer. Now you can get down to one layer in the network. Instead of having IP, OTN, DWDM, you can have just the IP layer. And that simplifies operations, it simplifies planning, it simplifies life cycle management. So that all together, it's private line emulation. It's the idea of rethinking how traffic moves through the network. It's pluggable optics, and now it's automating all of that with an automation infrastructure. It's really those things that make up the routed optical networking architecture.

Tim Long

Okay. Great. Great. Maybe sticking on the system side for a little bit. I'd say if you look at Cisco's industry share or anything like that, it's not where it is in routing. Talk a little bit about owning a lot more of the IP and the optical layer. Does that help new products like the NCS 1010. It's real catchy name you got there, that one. Just talk a little bit about kind of that vertical integration and what that can do for you even outside of routed optical networks or the traditional systems business.

Bill Gartner

So, let me say something you probably don't hear a lot out of somebody from Cisco is, I don't aspire to be number one in optical. That's not my goal, to be number one or number two in that market. The optical portfolio for Cisco is more of a portfolio play for Cisco. When customers want to buy optical and routing from one vendor and want basically an integrated solution, we're there for them. That's not to say we don't sell optical standalone because we do, but it's opportunistically that we go after those standalone plays. I don't have an objective to be number one in optical. In fact, as I mentioned earlier, when we do -- when we replace this with this, this is the profit pool in optical.

This is the most profitable part of the optical system. There's other elements like the ROADMs and things like that, that are really common infrastructure that don't go in with high margins. This is where the margins are, and we're going to replace it with this. And when we sell this, we're going to count it as part of our routing sale. So, effectively, I'm going to take down the optical business in support of routing. And we have strength in routing that we're going to leverage. So, this is very much a portfolio play where we're looking -- I'm wearing a Cisco hat and saying it's good for Cisco to leverage our relative market strength in routing. And I may have to cannibalize the optical business in order to do that, and we're willing to do that. And we think that's the right thing for our customers, we think it's the right thing for Cisco.

Tim Long

Okay. Maybe just last on this topic. The optical system vendors that are trying to add routing as a software layer or something, why does that not work as a solution?

Bill Gartner

I will never say never, and I don't discount our competitors. We've got 25 years of investment in routing with a couple of thousand people writing software. Hard won lessons and building very large-scale networks around the world, and it's a hard problem. So, I wish them luck if they're undertaking that.

Tim Long

Yeah. Okay. Good. The -- maybe back to kind of the optics side. You talked about still being relatively early in 400-gig deployments. Kind of talk to us about that evolution and how you see the next timing and scale for the next few versions.

Bill Gartner

Yeah. Well, first -- one thing I would want to be clear about is depending on which market segment we're talking about and even within market segments, different customers, the lifecycle for a given technology can be very, very long. But we're still selling -- we're still selling a ton of 10-gig optics, a ton of 10-gig optics. And 10-gig was around 20 years ago. And so, I think the tail for things like 100-gig and 400-gig is a very, very long tail. And without generalizing too much, what you see is web will adopt a technology like 100-gig very quickly and jump to 400-gig very quickly and then jump to 800-gig, and they'll jump to 1.6T. The service providers are going to be -- to have a much longer timeframe for deploying that technology, easily 10 years for something like 100-gig, easily. And they are going to generally be slower in jumping on a 400-gig bandwagon or an 800-gig bandwagon. They'll be slower jumping on it and then have a much longer time of deployment.

And then when you look at something like enterprise, it's much, much later and much, much longer. So like most of my 10-gig or 1-gig, we still sell a ton of 1-gig is going in enterprise applications. So these technologies have a very, very long tail. And if you ask like what's Google going to do or what's Facebook or Amazon are going to do, you get a very different answer than if you ask what Bank of America might be doing or what AT&T might be doing.

Tim Long

Okay. And then talking about the big hyperscalers what kind of trends are you seeing there? And I'm assuming as capacities go higher, there's got to be optical -- much more optics around -- we know each generation of switch has more optics. So, maybe talk about the trends there and what you think that means for the business.

Bill Gartner

So, let me talk both inside the data center and outside the data center. The -- inside the data center, 400-gig is pretty well being deployed right now by the web players. That's, I would say, entering maturity. It's still relatively early stage, but entering maturity. 800-gig is probably coming in the next couple of years. And 800-gig will be a little different than what we've seen in previous technology jumps in that 800-gig will be on a router port, it will support 800-gig, but the optic itself will likely be 200, 400-gig side-by-side, packaged into one optic. And we do that for technology reasons and cost reasons. So, it will be a longer time before we see 8000gig on the optics side.

It's also an issue of compatibility. If they've got a lot of 400-gig out in their data center and they put an 800-gig optic that has two 400-gig ports effectively on it, they can connect it to an existing 400-gig. So, there's a life cycle management issue there as well. Pretty mature inside the data center for 400-gig, but I'd still say, there's a lot of growth there still ahead of us.

Once you leave the data center, the web guys have metro networks and long-haul and subsea networks. So, those are three very different markets. I think the metro markets for the -- or data center interconnect market for the web players are largely going to go to this. For a couple, they're already there. Like this is exclusively what they're deploying. For others, I think they'll get there. Once you leave the metro area and get into long-haul or subsea, then I think this -- which has higher performance than the pluggable supporting -- this can support many thousand kilometer applications. This was maybe up to 1,000 kilometers today. They'll still deploy something like this, a chassis based solution.

The other thing I would say is we're -- for the last 20 years, the industry has been sort of a game of leapfrog of let's go from 2.5-gig to 10-gig to 25-gig to 40-gig to 100-gig. And every time you do that leapfrog, you get more capacity on the fiber. We are now approaching the point where we're just -- we're hitting what's known as Shannon's limit. We're just going to be out of gas on the fiber. So, we can't play that game anymore. Like our next-generation DSP coming out of Acacia will deliver 1.2-terabit on a wavelength, but the total fiber capacity that can be supported isn't moving that much. So, we can get a little bit better economics with a 1.2-terabit wavelength and maybe a 600 or 800-gig wavelength, but we're not really moving the needle in a significant way in terms of the total capacity. And then if you ask what's beyond that, it's very little incremental gain that we can get in terms of the total capacity you can put on a fiber. So, then we have to turn our attention to things like power or cost and say, look, the game is going to be who can drive to a lower power consumption on these things. It's not necessarily a game of capacity gain.

Tim Long

Interesting. Interesting. One of the priorities you talked about was third-party for optics. How do you go about that? How difficult is that to really start moving the needle on that business?

Bill Gartner

So, I think we've made good -- I think we're early stage in there. We've made very good progress with some very key logos. When a customer -- and now I'm talking primarily about service provider customers, because web is a little bit in a different category. But when a customer decides, for instance, that they want to consolidate their optics spend because the optic looks the same to them for whether they're plugging it into Cisco or Juniper or Nokia, we want to have a seat at the table for that conversation because we put optics through a certification and qualification process that is absolutely unparalleled in the industry. No provider of optic, no other vendor, whether it's Juniper or Arista or Nokia, does the level of certification on an optic that we do.

So, we can supply our customers very high confidence that when they buy the optic, it will work in any host and it will work under all operating conditions. That means temperature variation, humidity variation, voltage variation, all these different permutations we test for, and we have a diverse supply chain. We make sure that even when we're sourcing the optic ourselves, even when we design and build the optic ourselves, we still have second sources for either all the technologies that go into that or the optic itself. So, we can take that supply chain management issue away from our customer and say, look, we will certain you that there's diversity in the supply chain. We'll certain that when there's typhoon in Thailand or an earthquake in Japan that takes down a good part of the optics supply chain, that we've already thought about that. And that gives our customers comfort. So, it's more than just does the optic work because the optics are fundamentally commodity. We make sure that we can certain it's going to work under all operating conditions and that we can diversify the supply chain on behalf of the customer. So, with that value, I think we have a good selling proposition to customers.

Tim Long

Okay. You mentioned supply chain, I didn't, but now I have a follow-up.

Bill Gartner

Sure.

Tim Long

So, maybe talk a little bit -- it's challenging, it's whack-a-mole and golden screws and all that stuff. So, where are you guys now looking on your business? How are you feeling about supply chain and volumes?

Bill Gartner

So, I would separate -- optics, I think, is in pretty good shape. We're heading down to back to like four-week sort of lead times. There are hot spots. So, we're not there yet, but we're heading there. And for many optics, we are -- we're within four-week lead time right now. Optics has not suffered in general from some of the other areas like the high capacity ASICs, the semiconductor industry has not hit as much in the optics area, and things like power supplies have not been a real constraint for the optics themselves. The optical systems are still on pretty long lead times, like 35, 37 week lead times, but we are seeing those come down as well.

I would characterize it as, I think there's daylight. We see daylight, we see improvement ahead. We're not out of the woods. This is not a mission accomplished statement yet. There is a whack-a-mole issue going on where there are some trouble spots we're still dealing with, and then there are some just pop up randomly that we still have to deal with. So, we're not out of the woods yet, but we're in a far better situation now than we were a year ago.

Tim Long

Okay. Just curious, obviously, you have Acacia and some real base level technology and IP. Could you talk a little bit about the broader Cisco-Silicon One and having silicon capabilities in addition to the optics? How does that better position you relative to maybe some optical or optics pure-play companies?

Bill Gartner

So, one thing, I think from an Acacia perspective, we worked really hard to vertically integrate as much as possible on the design and development side and really own all the key technologies there. And I think we're at a point where we can say that for all the key technologies that go into that optic, we've got ownership of that technology. That gives us control over the design, the performance, ultimately, the cost and it gives us comfort that we can manage those trade-offs between the various pieces in the optic.

I think it was December of 2019 that we made a pretty big announcement that we were going to shift our business model to support a component business model. So, in addition to doing our traditional systems business of selling fully integrated routers and switches with software and hardware and services, we were going to meet our customers where they want to be met. If they want to buy just the optic from us, not buy any of our systems, we'd sell them the optic. They want to buy just the silicon from us, like Silicon One, none of our systems, none of our software, we'd sell Silicon One. If they want to buy just our software or just our hardware platform and put their own software in it, we would do that. Very different business model for Cisco, has supply chain implications, has inventory implications, cash cycle implications. And it's fundamentally a different way we think about managing a business.

I think that, that opened up business for us with the web players, in particular, who were the main target for that whole announcement to say, look, if you want to go build your own, we want to be part of that solution with you. We don't want to be on the outside looking in. So, if you want to use our silicon, we'll be happy to work with you. And we now have customers buying only our silicon, only our optics, only our hardware platform with no software, putting their own software on or putting something like SONiC on it. Every combination you can possibly imagine, we are now to some customer offering. And I think it's opened up a lot of possibilities for us that we don't see many of our competitors being able to match with both silicon and optics.

End of Q&A

Tim Long

Okay. Great. Perfect. End time here, so thank you, everybody. Bill, thank you so much very much. Really appreciate it. Thank you.

Bill Gartner

Tim, thank you very much. Appreciate it. Appreciate you having me. Thanks, everybody.

Wed, 07 Dec 2022 12:06:00 -0600 en text/html https://seekingalpha.com/article/4563107-cisco-systems-inc-csco-management-presents-barclays-2022-global-technology-media-and
Killexams : Fastly: Rapid Revenue Growth With A Huge Cloud Opportunity
Big data and cloud computing, 3d rendering.

Jian Fan

Fastly (NYSE:FSLY) owns a global content delivery network [CDN] which provides fast and secure access website access for over 2,900 companies globally. Its customers include a host of reputable organizations such as the New York Times, Stripe, Reddit, Epic Games, Boots and many more. The company has recently hired a new CEO (Todd Nightingale), a former Cisco executive who aims to help Fastly penetrate lucrative new markets such as Cybersecurity and Cloud Computing. So far, the business has reported solid start with both growth of the top and bottom line beating analyst estimates. In this post, I'm going to break down the company's business model, financials and valuation. Let's dive in.

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Data by YCharts

Secure Business Model

Fastly owns a vast content delivery network which utilizes a network of global data centers or points of presence [POP]. The idea is to "cache" or store local versions of websites in order to increase speed, performance and security. For example, let us say you live in Austin, Texas and want to access a U.K. based website in London. Then rather than sending you the web page directly from London, it will send you a local copy from your local data center or server in Austin, Texas, reducing latency.

Fastly POP Network

Fastly POP Network (Fastly)

Fastly has gradually expanded its business model to attack two huge market opportunities: Cybersecurity, which McKinsey forecasts could be a $2 trillion market in the future, and cloud based "Compute" services, which is another fast growing market driven by the digital transformation of enterprises. Interestingly competitor CDN providers such as Cloudflare (NET) and Akamai (AKAM) are also expanding their business models into the same spaces and have gained strong transaction so far. For example, in the Web Application and API Protection (WAAP) market Fastly is a "Challenger" and Akamai is a leader. WAAP solutions are used to protect servers from DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service) attacks which basically involves overloading a server with requests. Fastly bolstered its WAAP solution through the acquisition of Signal Sciences for $775 million in cash and stock in 2020.

WAAP industry

WAAP industry (Gartner)

Fastly was also selected by the world's largest cloud infrastructure provider [AWS] as a VIP Marketing Accelerate partner. This should help to expand distribution of Fastly's solution and boost sales.

Strong Financials

Fastly reported strong financial results for the third quarter of 2022. Revenue was $108.5 million, which increased by 25% year over year and beat analyst expectations by $4.84 million.

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Data by YCharts

This was driven by strong growth in both the new Compute and Security services. Fastly has drove strong cross selling activity with Canada's leading content creation company and with "marquee" accounts like New Relic. The company also signed up one of the largest pharmaceutical chains in Europe to its Next GEN WAF (Web Application Firewall). A Japanese video game company also became a customer and is using all of Fastly's major services (WAF, Content Delivery and Compute). Fastly's Signal Sciences Security product grew its revenue by a rapid 44% year over year, which is a strong start to the aforementioned merger.

Fastly Solutions

Fastly Solutions (Fastly)

Fastly increased its total customer count in the third quarter of 2022 by 31 to 2,925. A large portion of these wins (11 new customers) were enterprise organizations and the company has a total of 482 of these major players.

The customers of Fastly are immensely "sticky" as the company reports a trailing 12 month net retention rate of 118%, with churn of less than 1% . This means customers are staying with the platform and spending more through account expansion. For example, the average spend for its enterprise customers has increased from $730,000 to $759,000, since the previous quarter which is a solid 4% expansion rate.

In terms of profitability Fastly reported a third quarter gross margin of 53.6% which increased by 320 basis points sequentially which was a positive sign. However, the company did report a 24% increase in Operating expenses which rose to $78 million. The good news is this was mainly driven by an increase in sales and marketing expenses as the company aims to grow its new products. Management is forecasting S&M costs to increase next quarter whiles its R&D and G&A expenses will remain flat.

The business's R&D investments have continued to pay off. For example, the business rolled out new features such as compliance routing which aims to help customers with data sovereignty requirements which is a hot syllabu for organizations. Driving down infrastructure costs is an area management is also focusing on as it aims to optimize its network utilization, capacity planning and remove duplicate site costs.

Fastly reported earnings per share of negative $0.52 which beat analyst estimates by $0.01.

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Data by YCharts

Free cash flow was negative $44 million which improved sequentially over the negative $61 million reported in the second quarter of 2022. This was mainly driven by a $27 million reduction in advanced payments for capital equipment. The business invested $15 million in capital expenditures in the third quarter of 2022, and moving forward this is expected to equate to between 10% and 12% of revenue.

Fastly has $719 million cash, cash equivalents, and marketable securities on its balance sheet. In addition, the business has $836.5 million in total debt of which the majority $704 million is long term debt.

Advanced Valuation

In order to value Fastly I have plugged the latest financials into my advanced valuation model which uses the discounted cash flow method of valuation. I have forecasted a conservative 17% revenue growth rate for next year based on management guidance at the midpoint. However, in years 2 to 5 I am forecasting revenue growth to accelerate to 19% per year which as Fastly's new products gain increasing traction.

Fastly stock valuation 1

Fastly stock valuation 1 (created by author Ben at Motivation 2 Invest)

In order to increase the accuracy of the valuation I have capitalized R&D expenses, which has lifted net income and the operating margin. Profitability is an issue for Fastly but if they can continue to keep G&A expenses level while generating returns on its S&M expenses as it reaches scale the business should become profitable. For my forecast I have assumed an operating margin of 24% over the next 5 years, which is close to the average of the software industry.

Fastly stock valuation 2

Fastly stock valuation 2 (created by author Ben at Motivation 2 Invest)

Given these factors I get a fair value of $13.30 per share, the stock is trading at $10 per share at the time of writing and is thus 25% undervalued. As an extra data point Fastly trades at a Price to Sales ratio =2, which is 79% cheaper than its 5 year average.

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Data by YCharts

Risks

Focused Customer Base/Recession

The company's revenue is fairly focused with its top 10 customers making up 36% of total revenue which is a risk. In 2020, we saw this dynamic play out as TikTok removed the majority of its traffic from the Fastly network which decimated revenue and caused the stock price to plummet.

Another risk for Fastly is the macroeconomic environment (high inflation, rising interest rates) which has caused many analysts to forecast a recession. This will likely result in longer sales cycles and slower growth.

Final Thoughts

Fastly is an interesting company with a huge amount of growth potential. The business is growing revenue at a solid rate and is expanding into lucrative new markets. The stock is undervalued intrinsically at the time of writing and thus could be a great long-term investment.

Mon, 05 Dec 2022 16:34:00 -0600 en text/html https://seekingalpha.com/article/4562547-fastly-rapid-revenue-growth-with-a-huge-cloud-opportunity
Killexams : The new space race will drive innovation. Here's where it goes next
Colin Anderson Productions pty ltd

By 1962, the first space race was already underway. The Soviet Union had sent the first human, Yuri Gagarin, into outer space. America's Alan Shepard followed soon after into suborbital space.

Then, with instantly iconic remarks, President John F. Kennedy upped the ante: "We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard."

With this bold goal, Kennedy put forward an ambitious vision for America's leadership in space and sparked a new era of innovation. 

Sixty years later, a new space race is underway. And this time, more players than ever have set their sights on daring goals -- from launching a space tourism sector and colonizing Mars, to taking humans beyond the bounds of the solar system. 

"I think that sense of boldness is coming back," Patricia Cooper, founder of the space consultancy firm Constellation Advisory, said in a recent online symposium hosted by the Space Foundation. "We've gotten back the sense of trying very hard things, and maybe failing but picking ourselves up again, and continuing to drive forward." 

The new space race involves, in some ways, higher stakes. There's more money on the table, we're sending 'tourists' without professional training into space, and we're sending astronauts and spacecraft further than ever before.

With that comes greater potential. To understand the scope of the current space race -- and why it matters to everyone -- it's worth first considering the resounding impact of the world's first generation of space pioneers. While only hundreds of humans have been to space, the technology created to support space exploration has had a huge impact on everyday life. Take, for instance, the development of GPS -- the first global navigation satellite system. 

"GPS is about a $300 billion per year business here on Earth, and since its inception it's estimated to have generated $1.4 trillion in the US alone," Lockheed Martin's Lisa Callahan noted on a recent podcast. Callahan is Lockheed's VP and GM of commercial civil space. 

"Just look at the rideshare industry, which is a $60 billion business annually, and all thanks to space assets providing those GPS signals," she continued. "Weather is very similar, with the US weather satellite market worth $162 billion a year, with space assets totaling about 77 percent of that. So space is really playing a huge role in the economy here on Earth."

While the satellite industry and other space-based sectors directly impact life here on Earth, space exploration has influenced humanity in countless ways -- culturally, economically, scientifically and technologically. Space-related innovations have led to advances in materials, medicine, computing, batteries, miniaturization and a whole host of other areas. 

While the space race of the 1960s inspired bold action and serious risk-taking, "there were a couple decades that followed where the goal was to take that danger out of the space sector," Cooper said. "To make it feel more accessible, less risky for those that were funding it and watching it."

Space: the comeback

After a few sleepy decades, space is making a comeback. In the first half of 2022, 72 rocket launches took 1,022 spacecraft into orbit -- that's more spacecraft in orbit than were launched in the first 52 years of the Space Age, according to the Space Foundation. Meanwhile, the global space economy hit $469 billion in 2021, growing at a brisk 9% clip from 2020. 

This decade's space race was sparked, in part, by ambitious new NASA programs, launched after years of preparation. 

For instance, after launching the James Webb Space Telescope on Christmas Day 2021, NASA and its partners earlier this year released the telescope's first full-color images. A true feat of science and engineering, the Webb telescope gave us an unprecedented glimpse into cosmic history -- images of stars forming and dying, of water vapor on planets more than 1,000 light-years away.

Meanwhile, NASA just last month launched Artemis, a mission that aims to send the first woman and the first person of color to the moon -- and ultimately prepare mankind for a journey to Mars. While NASA is leading the mission, the US has mobilized its government partners around the globe, as well as a number of private sector partners, to develop new technologies for the program -- like modern spacesuits, orbital outposts and new communications systems

Besides giving humanity an exciting new moon mission to root for, the Artemis program has delivered a clear signal that the new Space Era is here. While the Biden administration launched the first phase of the Artemis mission, the program started during the Trump administration. That degree of continuity from one administration to the next matters, space experts agree. 

The United States' renewed commitment to space should also be clear from its budget. The US last year increased its budget on military and civil space programs by 18%, the Space Foundation reported. Other governments have made similar moves -- China increased its space spending by an estimated 23%, while India's spending grew 36%. 

What's more remarkable in this new Space Era is the involvement of the private sector. A new crop of leading space businesses has emerged, thanks billionaire businessmen seeking lasting legacies. 

Elon Musk's SpaceX has transformed the satellite industry and developed groundbreaking, reusable rockets. Meanwhile, Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin is one of the principal partners leading the development of the 'Orbital Reef' -- a commercially owned and operated space station that, by the end of the decade, aims to provide accommodations for business, research and space tourism. Then there's Virgin Galactic, founded by Richard Branson, which is developing a commercial spaceflight business that will carry well-heeled customers on a 90-minute journey to micro-gravity and back. The company says its commercial missions are expected to start in the first quarter of 2023.

Meanwhile, VC firms and risk-tolerant investors are funding a bold batch of space startups. While investment in the sector took a hit like most of the economy this year, that followed a record-setting 2021. Startup space companies raised $15.4 billion in total financing in last year, double the amount raised in 2020.

Private investment, said Cooper, "allows a little bit more risk taking than playing with the public's money, and that's another great benefit of these last revolutionary years. That is true of today's satellite industry, it's true of today's launch industry, and it's going to be a factor going forward."

At this rate, the global space industry could very well become a $1 trillion market by 2040, according to analysts at Morgan Stanley. 

The new space economy will also require innovative contributions from our existing commercial leaders. 

"Non-aerospace industries are going to become space companies, whether they know it or not," said Lockheed Martin's Callahan. "For example, we're partnering with General Motors to build a lunar rover, leveraging their expertise in autonomous vehicles and their battery technology as they electrify their fleet. And taking those innovations here on Earth and bringing them into the space market is something that really gives me a lot of energy and excitement. GM is not a space company, but they are going to participate in the space economy."

Lockheed Martin has also partnered with Amazon and Cisco to bring everyday tools like Webex and Alexa to space. The three companies deployed Callisto, a tech demonstration payload, on board NASA'sArtemis I mission. Callisto includes technology that allows Alexa to work without an internet connection, as well as a demo of Webex running on NASA's Deep Space Network.

Innovations incoming

While the new space economy is in its nascent stages, we already have an idea of some of the innovations it will spur. For instance, 3D printing and additive manufacturing will be critical for building infrastructure in space. As the Space Foundation notes, 3D printing may also be combined with advancements in biotechnologies to create supplies like 'biobandages' for astronauts. Robots and autonomous tools will be necessary to search for and gather resources in space. 

Meanwhile, NASA and its partners have been exploring potential propulsion technologies that could help humans go farther into space than ever before -- including two types of nuclear propulsion systems: nuclear electric and nuclear thermal propulsion.

While there's plenty to look forward to from the new space race and the new space economy, they also come with massive challenges. A major one is the growing likelihood of conflict in space, noted Carissa Christensen, CEO and founder of BryceTech, an analytics and engineering firm that serves the space industry. 

"Thinking about Russia's and China's roles in space, and their increasing cooperation with one another, is a critical syllabu for this administration," Christensen said in the symposium hosted by the Space Foundation. 

"I do think we as a nation need to think about how we can use space activities in some limited way to build relationships with Russia and China," she continued, while "being mindful of the risks of technology transfer and strengthening adversaries."

Meanwhile, a growing space economy means space will literally be more crowded. While space may be infinite, the areas in which mankind operates are not. The huge number of satellites launching into space creates an increased risk for collisions. A collision could have catastrophic effects, given our growing dependence on satellite-based services, as well as the potential for space debris to crash down on Earth. 

Then, of course, as we set our sights on the next century of space exploration, humanity will be challenged to push innovation to its limits. 

"Things that are going to be transformational and important for our country, things that are critical for who we are as a nation, are not easy," said former NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine. "They're necessary and worth doing."

Tue, 06 Dec 2022 22:59:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.zdnet.com/article/the-new-space-race-will-drive-innovation-heres-where-it-goes-next/
Killexams : Want to Create Better Experiences for Customers? Embrace These Technologies

Incredible digital user experiences sit at the heart of a successful retail brand. Subpar shopping experiences won’t be tolerated by today’s digitally savvy consumers: 69% of online shopping carts are abandoned, and whilst the reasons for abandonment are wide and varied, many relate back to poor user experience.

Brands can’t afford to ignore any factors that drive their customers to the competition. They need to be able to truly dig into the performance of their applications and digital services and, critically, pinpoint how to address potential issues before the customer even experiences an interruption. To do this, retailers must embrace application monitoring solutions that supply visibility and insight across cloud, hybrid and on-premise infrastructure. 

Understand How the Customer Thinks

We see customers looking for increasingly intuitive and personalized digital experiences, and they have zero tolerance when these expectations aren’t met. In the recent Cisco AppDynamics App Attention Index report, we discovered that more than half of consumers supply brands one shot to impress. This means if the consumer had a single bad experience, the majority would move on and look elsewhere.

Technology teams in retail organizations recognize they play a key role in ensuring consumers have great digital experiences. Over the last few years, digital experiences for customers and employees have proven to be mission-critical. As a result, organizations in all sectors are being defined by their ability to deliver world-class digital experiences.

According to the App Attention Index, 84% of technologists say the need to maintain the performance of applications is now more important than ever. And customer demands for incredible digital experiences are only going to increase in the coming years. Retail tech teams need to act quickly to stay on top of this shift.

Achieve End-to-End Visibility

With evolving technologies relying on a tremendous amount of data generated every single second, organizations must adopt a more proactive and strategic approach to innovation that will enable them to reap the benefits of scaling applications at speed and delivering game-changing, innovative experiences for customers.

Our research further highlighted technologists’ urgent need to gain better visibility into availability and performance. Today, 66% of technologists say they feel overwhelmed by data complexity, and they’re highly aware that this problem will only get worse unless things change quickly.

A key solution is having unified visibility into their entire IT environment, including cloud, hybrid and on-premise. Additionally, technologists need to be able to link IT availability and performance data to real-time business metrics to identify and prioritize those issues that could profoundly damage digital experiences for customers.

In fact, 85% of technologists now regard end-to-end visibility across an entire IT stack as core to sustainable transformation and innovation in their organization. To achieve this, full-stack observability can provide the necessary unified, real-time visibility into availability and performance across the IT stack. This includes compute, storage, network and public internet, across both customer-facing applications through to backend infrastructure.

From Visibility to Insight and Action

Most technologists simply do not have the right tools and insight at their disposal to cope with such heightened IT complexity and spiraling volumes of data, particularly when it comes to monitoring performance across the IT estate.

Implementing an observability solution allows for increased infrastructure visibility and enables technologists to identify and resolve IT performance issues more quickly. This allows them to focus attention on the most critical issues and gain a high level of insight into IT performance. When connected to real-time business data, this insight is game-changing in maintaining faultless digital experiences for customers and employees.

But it’s also worth considering the benefits that this level of visibility and real-time insight can bring to retail technologists themselves. Rather than spending significant amounts of time trying to identify the root cause of performance issues, retail technologists can immediately see the origin of issues. As they are free to make smarter, more informed decisions, retail technologists can focus on the things that really matter, which is meeting and exceeding customer expectations.

When visibility and insight are then connected to business outcomes, retail technologists are able to become a more strategic function within the organization.

Better Technology for Better Shopping Experiences

As ecommerce expectations continue to climb, and consumers’ patience disappears, retail technologists can no longer afford to settle for the status quo.

Visibility across the application infrastructure is key for retailers to embrace the next era of innovation and shift to a future-looking approach. This can be achieved through linking IT performance to business decision-making and will be a top priority for technologists in the months ahead.

By pinpointing the most pressing IT issues, identifying what matters most and prioritizing actions, technologists in retail can drive game-changing innovation and deliver incredible digital experiences.


Joe Byrne is VP of Technology Strategy and Executive CTO at AppDynamics, a part of Cisco. His primary focus is on working with customers and prospects on APM strategy and helping with digital transformations. He also works closely with sales, marketing, product and engineering on product strategy. Prior to AppDynamics, Byrne held technology leadership roles at Albertsons, EllieMae and Johnson and Johnson.

Thu, 24 Nov 2022 22:47:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.retailtouchpoints.com/topics/customer-experience/want-to-create-better-experiences-for-customers-embrace-these-technologies
Killexams : Hyper Converged Infrastructure Market 2023 : Impressive Growth Rate, Regional Insights, Competitive Outlook, and Geographical Divisions 2028

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Dec 08, 2022 (The Expresswire) -- Final Report will add the analysis of the impact of Russia-Ukraine War and COVID-19 on this industry.

"Hyper Converged Infrastructure Market" Insights 2022 - By Applications (BFSI, Government, IT and Telecommunication, Healthcare and Life Science, Other), By Types (10Gb, 40Gb, Other), By Segmentation analysis, Regions and Forecast to 2028. The Global Hyper Converged Infrastructure market Report provides In-depth analysis on the market status of the Hyper Converged Infrastructure Top manufacturers with best facts and figures, meaning, Definition, SWOT analysis, PESTAL analysis, expert opinions and the latest developments across the globe., the Hyper Converged Infrastructure Market Report contains Full TOC, Tables and Figures, and Chart with Key Analysis, Pre and Post COVID-19 Market Outbreak Impact Analysis and Situation by Regions.

Hyper Converged Infrastructure Market Size is projected to Reach Multimillion USD by 2028, In comparison to 2021, at unexpected CAGR during the forecast Period 2022-2028.

Browse Detailed TOC, Tables and Figures with Charts which is spread across 107 Pages that provides exclusive data, information, vital statistics, trends, and competitive landscape details in this niche sector.

Considering the economic change due to COVID-19 and Russia-Ukraine War Influence, Hyper Converged Infrastructure, which accounted for % of the global market of Hyper Converged Infrastructure in 2021

TO KNOW HOW COVID-19 PANDEMIC AND RUSSIA UKRAINE WAR WILL IMPACT THIS MARKET - REQUEST SAMPLE

Moreover, it helps new businesses perform a positive assessment of their business plans because it covers a range of Topics market participants must be aware of to remain competitive.

Hyper Converged Infrastructure Market Report identifies various key players in the market and sheds light on their strategies and collaborations to combat competition. The comprehensive report provides a two-dimensional picture of the market. By knowing the global revenue of manufacturers, the global price of manufacturers, and the production by manufacturers during the forecast period of 2022 to 2028, the reader can identify the footprints of manufacturers in the Hyper Converged Infrastructure industry.

Get a sample PDF of report -https://www.360researchreports.com/enquiry/request-sample/20244784

Hyper Converged Infrastructure Market - Competitive and Segmentation Analysis:

Hyper Converged Infrastructure Market Reportproviding an overview of successful marketing strategies, market contributions, and recent developments of leading companies, the report also offers a dashboard overview of leading companies' past and present performance. Several methodologies and analyses are used in the research report to provide in-depth and accurate information about the Hyper Converged Infrastructure Market.

The Major players covered in the Hyper Converged Infrastructure market report are:

● Nutanix
● Simplivity
● Pivot3
● Atlantis Computing
● Dell EMC
● Stratoscale
● VMWare
● Cisco Systems
● Scale Computing
● Nimboxx
● Huawei Technologies

Short Description About Hyper Converged Infrastructure Market:

The Global Hyper Converged Infrastructure market is anticipated to rise at a considerable rate during the forecast period, between 2022 and 2028. In 2021, the market is growing at a steady rate and with the rising adoption of strategies by key players, the market is expected to rise over the projected horizon.

Market Analysis and Insights: Global Hyper Converged Infrastructure Market

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the global Hyper Converged Infrastructure market size is estimated to be worth USD 27540 million in 2022 and is forecast to a readjusted size of USD 94220 million by 2028 with a CAGR of 22.8% during the review period. Fully considering the economic change by this health crisis, 10Gb accounting for % of the Hyper Converged Infrastructure global market in 2021, is projected to value USD million by 2028, growing at a revised % CAGR in the post-COVID-19 period. While BFSI segment is altered to an % CAGR throughout this forecast period.

China Hyper Converged Infrastructure market size is valued at USD million in 2021, while the US and Europe Hyper Converged Infrastructure are USD million and USD million, severally. The proportion of the US is % in 2021, while China and Europe are % and % respectively, and it is predicted that China proportion will reach % in 2028, trailing a CAGR of % through the analysis period. Japan, South Korea, and Southeast Asia are noteworthy markets in Asia, with CAGR %, %, and % respectively for the next 6-year period. As for the Europe Hyper Converged Infrastructure landscape, Germany is projected to reach USD million by 2028 trailing a CAGR of % over the forecast period.

The global key manufacturers of Hyper Converged Infrastructure include Nutanix, Simplivity, Pivot3, Atlantis Computing, Dell EMC, Stratoscale, VMWare, Cisco Systems and Scale Computing, etc. In 2021, the global top five players have a share approximately % in terms of revenue.

In terms of production side, this report researches the Hyper Converged Infrastructure capacity, production, growth rate, market share by manufacturers and by region (region level and country level), from 2017 to 2022, and forecast to 2028.

In terms of sales side, this report focuses on the sales of Hyper Converged Infrastructure by region (region level and country level), by company, by Type and by Application. from 2017 to 2022 and forecast to 2028.

Global Hyper Converged Infrastructure Scope and Segment

Hyper Converged Infrastructure market is segmented by Type and by Application. Players, stakeholders, and other participants in the global Hyper Converged Infrastructure market will be able to gain the upper hand as they use the report as a powerful resource. The segmental analysis focuses on production capacity, revenue and forecast by Type and by Application for the period 2017-20

Get a sample Copy of the Hyper Converged Infrastructure Report 2022

Hyper Converged Infrastructure Market is further classified on the basis of region as follows:

● North America (United States, Canada and Mexico) ● Europe (Germany, UK, France, Italy, Russia and Turkey etc.) ● Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India, Australia, Indonesia, Thailand, Philippines, Malaysia and Vietnam) ● South America (Brazil, Argentina, Columbia etc.) ● Middle East and Africa (Saudi Arabia, UAE, Egypt, Nigeria and South Africa)

This Hyper Converged Infrastructure Market Research/Analysis Report Contains Answers to your following Questions

● What are the global trends in the Hyper Converged Infrastructure market? Would the market witness an increase or decline in the demand in the coming years? ● What is the estimated demand for different types of products in Hyper Converged Infrastructure? What are the upcoming industry applications and trends for Hyper Converged Infrastructure market? ● What Are Projections of Global Hyper Converged Infrastructure Industry Considering Capacity, Production and Production Value? What Will Be the Estimation of Cost and Profit? What Will Be Market Share, Supply and Consumption? What about Import and Export? ● Where will the strategic developments take the industry in the mid to long-term? ● What are the factors contributing to the final price of Hyper Converged Infrastructure? What are the raw materials used for Hyper Converged Infrastructure manufacturing? ● How big is the opportunity for the Hyper Converged Infrastructure market? How will the increasing adoption of Hyper Converged Infrastructure for mining impact the growth rate of the overall market? ● How much is the global Hyper Converged Infrastructure market worth? What was the value of the market In 2020? ● Who are the major players operating in the Hyper Converged Infrastructure market? Which companies are the front runners? ● Which are the recent industry trends that can be implemented to generate additional revenue streams? ● What Should Be Entry Strategies, Countermeasures to Economic Impact, and Marketing Channels for Hyper Converged Infrastructure Industry?

Customization of the Report

Our research analysts will help you to get customized details for your report, which can be modified in terms of a specific region, application or any statistical details. In addition, we are always willing to comply with the study, which triangulated with your own data to make the market research more comprehensive in your perspective.

Inquire more and share questions if any before the purchase on this report at -https://www.360researchreports.com/enquiry/pre-order-enquiry/20244784

Detailed TOC of Global Hyper Converged Infrastructure Market Insights and Forecast to 2028

1 Hyper Converged Infrastructure Market Overview
1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Hyper Converged Infrastructure
1.2 Hyper Converged Infrastructure Segment by Type
1.2.1 Global Hyper Converged Infrastructure Market Size Growth Rate Analysis by Type 2022 VS 2028
1.3 Hyper Converged Infrastructure Segment by Application
1.3.1 Global Hyper Converged Infrastructure Consumption Comparison by Application: 2022 VS 2028
1.4 Global Market Growth Prospects
1.4.1 Global Hyper Converged Infrastructure Revenue Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)
1.4.2 Global Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)
1.5 Global Market Size by Region
1.5.1 Global Hyper Converged Infrastructure Market Size Estimates and Forecasts by Region: 2017 VS 2021 VS 2028
1.5.2 North America Hyper Converged Infrastructure Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)
1.5.3 Europe Hyper Converged Infrastructure Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)
1.5.4 China Hyper Converged Infrastructure Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)
1.5.5 Japan Hyper Converged Infrastructure Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)
1.5.6 South Korea Hyper Converged Infrastructure Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)

2 Market Competition by Manufacturers
2.1 Global Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production Market Share by Manufacturers (2017-2022)
2.2 Global Hyper Converged Infrastructure Revenue Market Share by Manufacturers (2017-2022)
2.3 Hyper Converged Infrastructure Market Share by Company Type (Tier 1, Tier 2 and Tier 3)
2.4 Global Hyper Converged Infrastructure Average Price by Manufacturers (2017-2022)
2.5 Manufacturers Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production Sites, Area Served, Product Types
2.6 Hyper Converged Infrastructure Market Competitive Situation and Trends
2.6.1 Hyper Converged Infrastructure Market Concentration Rate
2.6.2 Global 5 and 10 Largest Hyper Converged Infrastructure Players Market Share by Revenue
2.6.3 Mergers and Acquisitions, Expansion

3 Production by Region
3.1 Global Production of Hyper Converged Infrastructure Market Share by Region (2017-2022)
3.2 Global Hyper Converged Infrastructure Revenue Market Share by Region (2017-2022)
3.3 Global Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)
3.4 North America Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production
3.4.1 North America Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production Growth Rate (2017-2022)
3.4.2 North America Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)
3.5 Europe Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production
3.5.1 Europe Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production Growth Rate (2017-2022)
3.5.2 Europe Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)
3.6 China Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production
3.6.1 China Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production Growth Rate (2017-2022)
3.6.2 China Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)
3.7 Japan Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production
3.7.1 Japan Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production Growth Rate (2017-2022)
3.7.2 Japan Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)
3.8 South Korea Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production
3.8.1 South Korea Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production Growth Rate (2017-2022)
3.8.2 South Korea Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)

4 Global Hyper Converged Infrastructure Consumption by Region
4.1 Global Hyper Converged Infrastructure Consumption by Region
4.1.1 Global Hyper Converged Infrastructure Consumption by Region
4.1.2 Global Hyper Converged Infrastructure Consumption Market Share by Region
4.2 North America
4.2.1 North America Hyper Converged Infrastructure Consumption by Country
4.2.2 United States
4.2.3 Canada
4.3 Europe
4.3.1 Europe Hyper Converged Infrastructure Consumption by Country
4.3.2 Germany
4.3.3 France
4.3.4 U.K.
4.3.5 Italy
4.3.6 Russia
4.4 Asia Pacific
4.4.1 Asia Pacific Hyper Converged Infrastructure Consumption by Region
4.4.2 China
4.4.3 Japan
4.4.4 South Korea
4.4.5 China Taiwan
4.4.6 Southeast Asia
4.4.7 India
4.4.8 Australia
4.5 Latin America
4.5.1 Latin America Hyper Converged Infrastructure Consumption by Country
4.5.2 Mexico
4.5.3 Brazil

5 Segment by Type
5.1 Global Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production Market Share by Type (2017-2022)
5.2 Global Hyper Converged Infrastructure Revenue Market Share by Type (2017-2022)
5.3 Global Hyper Converged Infrastructure Price by Type (2017-2022)

6 Segment by Application
6.1 Global Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production Market Share by Application (2017-2022)
6.2 Global Hyper Converged Infrastructure Revenue Market Share by Application (2017-2022)
6.3 Global Hyper Converged Infrastructure Price by Application (2017-2022)

7 Key Companies Profiled
7.1 Company 1
7.1.1 Company 1 Hyper Converged Infrastructure Corporation Information
7.1.2 Company 1 Hyper Converged Infrastructure Product Portfolio
7.1.3 Company 1 Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)
7.1.4 Company 1 Main Business and Markets Served
7.1.5 Company 1 recent Developments/Updates

Continued..

8 Hyper Converged Infrastructure Manufacturing Cost Analysis
8.1 Hyper Converged Infrastructure Key Raw Materials Analysis
8.1.1 Key Raw Materials
8.1.2 Key Suppliers of Raw Materials
8.2 Proportion of Manufacturing Cost Structure
8.3 Manufacturing Process Analysis of Hyper Converged Infrastructure
8.4 Hyper Converged Infrastructure Industrial Chain Analysis

9 Marketing Channel, Distributors and Customers
9.1 Marketing Channel
9.2 Hyper Converged Infrastructure Distributors List
9.3 Hyper Converged Infrastructure Customers

10 Market Dynamics
10.1 Hyper Converged Infrastructure Industry Trends
10.2 Hyper Converged Infrastructure Market Drivers
10.3 Hyper Converged Infrastructure Market Challenges
10.4 Hyper Converged Infrastructure Market Restraints

11 Production and Supply Forecast
11.1 Global Forecasted Production of Hyper Converged Infrastructure by Region (2023-2028)
11.2 North America Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production, Revenue Forecast (2023-2028)
11.3 Europe Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production, Revenue Forecast (2023-2028)
11.4 China Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production, Revenue Forecast (2023-2028)
11.5 Japan Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production, Revenue Forecast (2023-2028)
11.6 South Korea Hyper Converged Infrastructure Production, Revenue Forecast (2023-2028)

12 Consumption and Demand Forecast
12.1 Global Forecasted Demand Analysis of Hyper Converged Infrastructure
12.2 North America Forecasted Consumption of Hyper Converged Infrastructure by Country
12.3 Europe Market Forecasted Consumption of Hyper Converged Infrastructure by Country
12.4 Asia Pacific Market Forecasted Consumption of Hyper Converged Infrastructure by Region
12.5 Latin America Forecasted Consumption of Hyper Converged Infrastructure by Country

13 Forecast by Type and by Application (2023-2028)
13.1 Global Production, Revenue and Price Forecast by Type (2023-2028)
13.1.1 Global Forecasted Production of Hyper Converged Infrastructure by Type (2023-2028)
13.1.2 Global Forecasted Revenue of Hyper Converged Infrastructure by Type (2023-2028)
13.1.3 Global Forecasted Price of Hyper Converged Infrastructure by Type (2023-2028)
13.2 Global Forecasted Consumption of Hyper Converged Infrastructure by Application (2023-2028)
13.2.1 Global Forecasted Production of Hyper Converged Infrastructure by Application (2023-2028)
13.2.2 Global Forecasted Revenue of Hyper Converged Infrastructure by Application (2023-2028)
13.2.3 Global Forecasted Price of Hyper Converged Infrastructure by Application (2023-2028)

14 Research Finding and Conclusion

15 Methodology and Data Source
15.1 Methodology/Research Approach
15.1.1 Research Programs/Design
15.1.2 Market Size Estimation
15.1.3 Market Breakdown and Data Triangulation
15.2 Data Source
15.2.1 Secondary Sources
15.2.2 Primary Sources
15.3 Author List
15.4 Disclaimer

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Wed, 07 Dec 2022 19:45:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.marketwatch.com/press-release/hyper-converged-infrastructure-market-2023-impressive-growth-rate-regional-insights-competitive-outlook-and-geographical-divisions-2028-2022-12-08
Killexams : Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Market is booming in near Future 2022-2028

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Nov 26, 2022 (The Expresswire) -- Final Report will add the analysis of the impact of Russia-Ukraine War and COVID-19 on this industry.

"Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Market" Insights 2022 - By Applications (Financial Institutions, Healthcare, Government, Education, Cloud Service Providers), By Types (VMware, KVM, Hyper-V), By Segmentation analysis, Regions and Forecast to 2028. The Global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure market Report provides In-depth analysis on the market status of the Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Top manufacturers with best facts and figures, meaning, Definition, SWOT analysis, PESTAL analysis, expert opinions and the latest developments across the globe., the Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Market Report contains Full TOC, Tables and Figures, and Chart with Key Analysis, Pre and Post COVID-19 Market Outbreak Impact Analysis and Situation by Regions.

Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Market Size is projected to Reach Multimillion USD by 2028, In comparison to 2021, at unexpected CAGR during the forecast Period 2022-2028.

Browse Detailed TOC, Tables and Figures with Charts that provides exclusive data, information, vital statistics, trends, and competitive landscape details in this niche sector.

Considering the economic change due to COVID-19 and Russia-Ukraine War Influence, Hyper-Converged Infrastructure, which accounted for % of the global market of Hyper-Converged Infrastructure in 2021

TO KNOW HOW COVID-19 PANDEMIC AND RUSSIA UKRAINE WAR WILL IMPACT THIS MARKET - REQUEST SAMPLE

Moreover, it helps new businesses perform a positive assessment of their business plans because it covers a range of Topics market participants must be aware of to remain competitive.

Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Market Report identifies various key players in the market and sheds light on their strategies and collaborations to combat competition. The comprehensive report provides a two-dimensional picture of the market. By knowing the global revenue of manufacturers, the global price of manufacturers, and the production by manufacturers during the forecast period of 2022 to 2028, the reader can identify the footprints of manufacturers in the Hyper-Converged Infrastructure industry.

Get a sample PDF of report -https://www.360researchreports.com/enquiry/request-sample/21779749

Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Market - Competitive and Segmentation Analysis:

Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Market Reportproviding an overview of successful marketing strategies, market contributions, and recent developments of leading companies, the report also offers a dashboard overview of leading companies' past and present performance. Several methodologies and analyses are used in the research report to provide in-depth and accurate information about the Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Market.

The Major players covered in the Hyper-Converged Infrastructure market report are:

● Atlantis Computing
● Cisco
● EMC
● Fujitsu
● Gridstore
● HP
● SimpliVity
● Maxta
● Nimboxx
● Nutanix
● Pivot3
● Scale Computing
● NetApp
● DataCore Software
● Vmware

Short Description About Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Market:

The Global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure market is anticipated to rise at a considerable rate during the forecast period, between 2022 and 2028. In 2021, the market is growing at a steady rate and with the rising adoption of strategies by key players, the market is expected to rise over the projected horizon.

Highlights

The global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure market is projected to reach USD million by 2028 from an estimated USD million in 2022, at a CAGR of % during 2023 and 2028.

North American market for Hyper-Converged Infrastructure is estimated to increase from USD million in 2022 to reach USD million by 2028, at a CAGR of % during the forecast period of 2023 through 2028.

Asia-Pacific market for Hyper-Converged Infrastructure is estimated to increase from USD million in 2022 to reach USD million by 2028, at a CAGR of % during the forecast period of 2022 through 2028.

The major global companies of Hyper-Converged Infrastructure include Atlantis Computing, Cisco, EMC, Fujitsu, Gridstore, HP, SimpliVity, Maxta, Nimboxx, Nutanix, Pivot3, Scale Computing, NetApp, DataCore Software, Vmwareetc. In 2021, the world's top three vendors accounted for approximately % of the revenue.

The global market for Hyper-Converged Infrastructure is estimated to increase from USD million in 2022 to USD million by 2028, at a CAGR of % during the forecast period of 2022 through 2028.

Report Scope

This report aims to provide a comprehensive presentation of the global market for Hyper-Converged Infrastructure, with both quantitative and qualitative analysis, to help readers develop business/growth strategies, assess the market competitive situation, analyze their position in the current marketplace, and make informed business decisions regarding Hyper-Converged Infrastructure.

The Hyper-Converged Infrastructure market size, estimations, and forecasts are provided in terms of output/shipments (K PCs) and revenue (USD millions), considering 2021 as the base year, with history and forecast data for the period from 2017 to 2028. This report segments the global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure market comprehensively. Regional market sizes, concerning products by types, by application, and by players, are also provided. The influence of COVID-19 and the Russia-Ukraine War were considered while estimating market sizes.

For a more in-depth understanding of the market, the report provides profiles of the competitive landscape, key competitors, and their respective market ranks. The report also discusses technological trends and new product developments.

The report will help the Hyper-Converged Infrastructure manufacturers, new entrants, and industry chain related companies in this market with information on the revenues, production, and average price for the overall market and the sub-segments across the different segments, by company, product type, application, and regions.

Get a sample Copy of the Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Report 2022

Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Market is further classified on the basis of region as follows:

● North America (United States, Canada and Mexico) ● Europe (Germany, UK, France, Italy, Russia and Turkey etc.) ● Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India, Australia, Indonesia, Thailand, Philippines, Malaysia and Vietnam) ● South America (Brazil, Argentina, Columbia etc.) ● Middle East and Africa (Saudi Arabia, UAE, Egypt, Nigeria and South Africa)

This Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Market Research/Analysis Report Contains Answers to your following Questions

● What are the global trends in the Hyper-Converged Infrastructure market? Would the market witness an increase or decline in the demand in the coming years? ● What is the estimated demand for different types of products in Hyper-Converged Infrastructure? What are the upcoming industry applications and trends for Hyper-Converged Infrastructure market? ● What Are Projections of Global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Industry Considering Capacity, Production and Production Value? What Will Be the Estimation of Cost and Profit? What Will Be Market Share, Supply and Consumption? What about Import and Export? ● Where will the strategic developments take the industry in the mid to long-term? ● What are the factors contributing to the final price of Hyper-Converged Infrastructure? What are the raw materials used for Hyper-Converged Infrastructure manufacturing? ● How big is the opportunity for the Hyper-Converged Infrastructure market? How will the increasing adoption of Hyper-Converged Infrastructure for mining impact the growth rate of the overall market? ● How much is the global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure market worth? What was the value of the market In 2020? ● Who are the major players operating in the Hyper-Converged Infrastructure market? Which companies are the front runners? ● Which are the recent industry trends that can be implemented to generate additional revenue streams? ● What Should Be Entry Strategies, Countermeasures to Economic Impact, and Marketing Channels for Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Industry?

Customization of the Report

Our research analysts will help you to get customized details for your report, which can be modified in terms of a specific region, application or any statistical details. In addition, we are always willing to comply with the study, which triangulated with your own data to make the market research more comprehensive in your perspective.

Inquire more and share questions if any before the purchase on this report at -https://www.360researchreports.com/enquiry/pre-order-enquiry/21779749

Detailed TOC of Global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Market Insights and Forecast to 2028

1 Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Market Overview
1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Hyper-Converged Infrastructure
1.2 Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Segment by Type
1.2.1 Global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Market Size Growth Rate Analysis by Type 2022 VS 2028
1.3 Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Segment by Application
1.3.1 Global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Consumption Comparison by Application: 2022 VS 2028
1.4 Global Market Growth Prospects
1.4.1 Global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Revenue Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)
1.4.2 Global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)
1.5 Global Market Size by Region
1.5.1 Global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Market Size Estimates and Forecasts by Region: 2017 VS 2021 VS 2028
1.5.2 North America Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)
1.5.3 Europe Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)
1.5.4 China Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)
1.5.5 Japan Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)
1.5.6 South Korea Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Estimates and Forecasts (2017-2028)

2 Market Competition by Manufacturers
2.1 Global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production Market Share by Manufacturers (2017-2022)
2.2 Global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Revenue Market Share by Manufacturers (2017-2022)
2.3 Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Market Share by Company Type (Tier 1, Tier 2 and Tier 3)
2.4 Global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Average Price by Manufacturers (2017-2022)
2.5 Manufacturers Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production Sites, Area Served, Product Types
2.6 Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Market Competitive Situation and Trends
2.6.1 Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Market Concentration Rate
2.6.2 Global 5 and 10 Largest Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Players Market Share by Revenue
2.6.3 Mergers and Acquisitions, Expansion

3 Production by Region
3.1 Global Production of Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Market Share by Region (2017-2022)
3.2 Global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Revenue Market Share by Region (2017-2022)
3.3 Global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)
3.4 North America Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production
3.4.1 North America Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production Growth Rate (2017-2022)
3.4.2 North America Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)
3.5 Europe Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production
3.5.1 Europe Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production Growth Rate (2017-2022)
3.5.2 Europe Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)
3.6 China Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production
3.6.1 China Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production Growth Rate (2017-2022)
3.6.2 China Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)
3.7 Japan Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production
3.7.1 Japan Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production Growth Rate (2017-2022)
3.7.2 Japan Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)
3.8 South Korea Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production
3.8.1 South Korea Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production Growth Rate (2017-2022)
3.8.2 South Korea Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)

4 Global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Consumption by Region
4.1 Global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Consumption by Region
4.1.1 Global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Consumption by Region
4.1.2 Global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Consumption Market Share by Region
4.2 North America
4.2.1 North America Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Consumption by Country
4.2.2 United States
4.2.3 Canada
4.3 Europe
4.3.1 Europe Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Consumption by Country
4.3.2 Germany
4.3.3 France
4.3.4 U.K.
4.3.5 Italy
4.3.6 Russia
4.4 Asia Pacific
4.4.1 Asia Pacific Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Consumption by Region
4.4.2 China
4.4.3 Japan
4.4.4 South Korea
4.4.5 China Taiwan
4.4.6 Southeast Asia
4.4.7 India
4.4.8 Australia
4.5 Latin America
4.5.1 Latin America Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Consumption by Country
4.5.2 Mexico
4.5.3 Brazil

5 Segment by Type
5.1 Global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production Market Share by Type (2017-2022)
5.2 Global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Revenue Market Share by Type (2017-2022)
5.3 Global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Price by Type (2017-2022)

6 Segment by Application
6.1 Global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production Market Share by Application (2017-2022)
6.2 Global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Revenue Market Share by Application (2017-2022)
6.3 Global Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Price by Application (2017-2022)

7 Key Companies Profiled
7.1 Company 1
7.1.1 Company 1 Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Corporation Information
7.1.2 Company 1 Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Product Portfolio
7.1.3 Company 1 Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)
7.1.4 Company 1 Main Business and Markets Served
7.1.5 Company 1 recent Developments/Updates

Continued..

8 Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Manufacturing Cost Analysis
8.1 Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Key Raw Materials Analysis
8.1.1 Key Raw Materials
8.1.2 Key Suppliers of Raw Materials
8.2 Proportion of Manufacturing Cost Structure
8.3 Manufacturing Process Analysis of Hyper-Converged Infrastructure
8.4 Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Industrial Chain Analysis

9 Marketing Channel, Distributors and Customers
9.1 Marketing Channel
9.2 Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Distributors List
9.3 Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Customers

10 Market Dynamics
10.1 Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Industry Trends
10.2 Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Market Drivers
10.3 Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Market Challenges
10.4 Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Market Restraints

11 Production and Supply Forecast
11.1 Global Forecasted Production of Hyper-Converged Infrastructure by Region (2023-2028)
11.2 North America Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production, Revenue Forecast (2023-2028)
11.3 Europe Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production, Revenue Forecast (2023-2028)
11.4 China Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production, Revenue Forecast (2023-2028)
11.5 Japan Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production, Revenue Forecast (2023-2028)
11.6 South Korea Hyper-Converged Infrastructure Production, Revenue Forecast (2023-2028)

12 Consumption and Demand Forecast
12.1 Global Forecasted Demand Analysis of Hyper-Converged Infrastructure
12.2 North America Forecasted Consumption of Hyper-Converged Infrastructure by Country
12.3 Europe Market Forecasted Consumption of Hyper-Converged Infrastructure by Country
12.4 Asia Pacific Market Forecasted Consumption of Hyper-Converged Infrastructure by Region
12.5 Latin America Forecasted Consumption of Hyper-Converged Infrastructure by Country

13 Forecast by Type and by Application (2023-2028)
13.1 Global Production, Revenue and Price Forecast by Type (2023-2028)
13.1.1 Global Forecasted Production of Hyper-Converged Infrastructure by Type (2023-2028)
13.1.2 Global Forecasted Revenue of Hyper-Converged Infrastructure by Type (2023-2028)
13.1.3 Global Forecasted Price of Hyper-Converged Infrastructure by Type (2023-2028)
13.2 Global Forecasted Consumption of Hyper-Converged Infrastructure by Application (2023-2028)
13.2.1 Global Forecasted Production of Hyper-Converged Infrastructure by Application (2023-2028)
13.2.2 Global Forecasted Revenue of Hyper-Converged Infrastructure by Application (2023-2028)
13.2.3 Global Forecasted Price of Hyper-Converged Infrastructure by Application (2023-2028)

14 Research Finding and Conclusion

15 Methodology and Data Source
15.1 Methodology/Research Approach
15.1.1 Research Programs/Design
15.1.2 Market Size Estimation
15.1.3 Market Breakdown and Data Triangulation
15.2 Data Source
15.2.1 Secondary Sources
15.2.2 Primary Sources
15.3 Author List
15.4 Disclaimer

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Killexams : Fortinet's cloud firewall ditches custom ASICs for Amazon's Graviton CPUs

For years, Fortinet has leaned on its custom security and networking ASICs to compete against rival vendors like Juniper, Palo Alto Networks, and Cisco in the firewall space.

But when it comes to extending their security stack to the cloud, any advantage offered by its custom silicon starts to erode. Fortinet can’t exactly deploy its hardware in the cloud. Instead, it’s forced to — like most other vendors — run its firewall on general-purpose compute infrastructure, which has traditionally meant x86 CPUs from Intel or AMD.

Fortinet’s latest attempt to sell customers on its cloud firewalls involves repackaging its security stack as a software-as-a-service platform in AWS. Dubbed FortiGate CNF, the service features the standard assortment of security functionality you’d expect from a next-generation firewall, including URL, DNS and application filtering and intrusion prevention/detection to name a few.

However, unlike most virtualized or containerized firewalls, Fortinet’s kit is designed to take advantage of Amazon Web Services (AWS) own custom silicon in the form of its Graviton CPUs.

AWS began offering Arm-based VMs with the launch of Graviton in 2018. Rather than trying to out-perform x86 CPUs from Intel or AMD, the Graviton sought to achieve better value. Amazon claims its third-gen Graviton CPUs offer 40 percent better price-to-performance than “comparable fifth-generation x86-based instances.”

In a similar vein, Fortinet went out of its way to avoid the syllabu of performance in its announcement. It’s an uncharacteristic move for a company that rarely misses an opportunity to call out the performance gap between its appliances and that of its competitors. Instead, the vendor highlighted the consistent management experience and touting lower operating costs associated with running its software stack on Amazon’s Arm-based CPUs.

Lower operating costs have been a hallmark of Arm CPUs, as cloud providers attempt to attract customers to the architecture. When Oracle introduced its Ampere Altra-based instances it did so at $0.01 per core per hour.

Whether Fortinet somehow managed to achieve consistent performance across on-prem and cloud deployments by going the cloud native route or opting for Amazon’s Arm cores remains unclear. Pressed on any performance delta between its on-prem and cloud capabilities, Fortinet provided the following vague statement. “We’re running FortiGate-VMs that deliver very-high firewall throughput performance.”

Each customer is assigned its own VM that’s autoscaled to as demands change, Fortinet tells The Register. And a peek at AWS Graviton instances offers some clues as to what the upper limits of Fortinet’s new cloud firewalls may be. Amazon’s largest Graviton instance — the 64-core, 128GB c7g.16xlarge — maxes out at 30Gbps of network bandwidth.

That would put the maximum threat inspection on par with the FortiGate 3000F — a high-throughput firewall appliance aimed at hyperscale environments — but that’s assuming that the CPU can actually keep up. And even if it could, it wouldn’t be cheap. At $2.7/hour plus $0.031 per gigabyte inspected, 30Gbps worth of data flows would run a customer somewhere in the neighborhood of $420 an hour.

With that said, there’s still some merit to maintaining a consistent security stack across on-prem and cloud infrastructure.

While all the major cloud providers offer some kind of firewalling functionality in house, employing them usually requires maintaining two separate security policies. Microsoft’s security wing this summer attributed 80 percent of ransomware attacks back to configuration errors.

Extending an enterprises’ existing security stack to the cloud to minimize this potential has been a major selling point behind any number of virtualized or containerized firewalls, including those from Juniper, Palo Alto Networks, and in this case Fortinet. ®

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 19:50:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.theregister.com/2022/11/29/fortinet_aws_firewall/
Killexams : ARTICLE | O-Zone Podcast: Andre Cisco

JACKSONVILLE – Andre Cisco's confidence remains strong.

That's true for Cisco personally. It's also true regarding the Jaguars' hopes for the 2022 season. Yes, the Jaguars are 3-7 with six losses in the past seven games.

But Cisco said that hasn't affected the players' approach.

"The confidence comes from within," Cisco said as the Jaguars prepared to play the AFC North-leading Baltimore Ravens (7-3) at TIAA Bank Field Sunday at 1 p.m. "We've got so much love and appreciation for each other that we know we're capable of turning this around at any moment.

"We're not giving up on us and we're not listening to any outside noise, either. Keeping it close and keeping it tight has been our strength."

Cisco, a third-round selection by the Jaguars in the 2021 NFL Draft, joined senior writer John Oehser for this Week 12 2022 O-Zone Podcast. He addressed multiple topics, including maintaining confidence personally as he matures and grows in the NFL.

Cisco started the final three games of his rookie season and moved into starting lineup entering this season.

"It was an opportunity to learn behind the scenes," he said. "Not every rookie is ready in that aspect, so I got to do it a different way. I learned a ton last year. I had good mindset going into OTAs [the NFL offseason] and I've been able to carry it out.

"I'd say I'm light years ahead of where I was a year ago in terms of mentality and understanding what it takes. I'd say my confidence was up and down through my rookie season. It's tough being on the bench, and you're in the NFL. Guys are better and you're trying to make sure you're one of them. I had some lessons I had to learn.

"Even this year, I've had some ups and downs. That comes with the game. You have to make plays to remember you can make plays. You want to stay as steady as possible."

Cisco, who leads the Jaguars with three interceptions this season – with one returned for a touchdown – said he sees himself as a "much-improved player" from even the one who started Week 1 this season.

"Finishing each game was the one thing I think I needed to learn," he said. "You can't let up in the NFL. Every hole in the defense, offenses will catch up on it. It's been a lot of learning lessons.

"From now until Week 1, I feel like a year ahead honestly."

Listen to the entire O-Zone Podcast with Cisco below, and click HERE to view other O-Zone Podcast episodes

Thu, 24 Nov 2022 12:35:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.jaguars.com/news/jaguars-o-zone-podcast-andre-cisco-2022
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