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Exam Code: 310-879 Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
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Killexams : SUN Certified candidate - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/310-879 Search results Killexams : SUN Certified candidate - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/310-879 https://killexams.com/exam_list/SUN Killexams : Election results: Greg Wallis leads Christy Holstege by 85 votes; deadline next week to seek recount A voter drops off their ballot at the Palm Springs Public Library on Nov. 8. © Taya Gray/The Desert Sun A voter drops off their ballot at the Palm Springs Public Library on Nov. 8.

Republican Greg Wallis was leading Democrat Christy Holstege by 85 votes on Wednesday in a tight race to represent California’s 47th Assembly District, with both candidates awaiting final vote updates from San Bernardino County amid the possibility of a recount.

Under state law, any registered voter can request a recount within five days of the vote certification scheduled for Thursday. That deadline will come in the middle of next week. (It falls on Tuesday or Wednesday, Dec. 13 or 14, depending on how the statute is read, and the San Bernardino registrar of voters said it's Tuesday.)

Holstege told The Desert Sun on Wednesday her team has not yet decided whether to ask for a recount.

“This is one of the closest legislative elections in California’s history, and we continue to eagerly watch as the last ballots are counted,” Holstege said, adding: “We have not yet made any decision on whether or not to request a recount. Out of respect to the voters and the democratic process, we are waiting until every vote is counted to make that decision.”

Wallis, a staff member for retiring Assemblymember Chad Mayes, has traded the lead with Holstege several times since Election Day, with the two separated by razor-thin margins in exact weeks as more ballots have been counted.

Holstege, a member of the Palm Springs City Council, won 54% of votes in Riverside County, where most of the district falls, but Wallis has kept a comfortable lead in San Bernardino County, bringing them within a historically close margin for a state legislative race.

Vote totals updated Wednesday afternoon showed Wallis with 84,752 votes to 84,667 for Holstege. While the results in Riverside County have been certified by the registrar of voters, a few hundred ballots were still being processed in San Bernardino County, though it’s unknown how many of those remaining are in Assembly District 47.

The San Bernardino County Registrar of Voters was set to certify its election results Thursday, according to an office spokesperson.

Wallis, who lives in Bermuda Dunes, said the close margin in Assembly District 47 “makes it clear that everyone’s vote counts.”

“It’s important that we treat every ballot with respect by making sure that each it counted,” Wallis told The Desert Sun. “It may take a little time, but our democracy is worth it. I’m looking forward to seeing the final certified results on Thursday.”

Assembly District 47 encompasses much of the previous district represented by Mayes and includes most of the western and central Coachella Valley. The district also includes Banning, Beaumont and Idyllwild, and extends into Yucca Valley and Yucaipa in San Bernardino County.

Meanwhile, other newly elected legislators in California were sworn in Monday, the same day the Legislature began a special session to consider Gov. Gavin Newsom’s proposal for a “price gouging” penalty on oil companies. Democratic lawmakers maintain a comfortable supermajority following this year’s elections.

Tom Coulter covers the cities of Palm Desert, La Quinta, Rancho Mirage and Indian Wells. Reach him at thomas.coulter@desertsun.com or on Twitter @tomcoulter_.

This article originally appeared on Palm Springs Desert Sun: Election results: Greg Wallis leads Christy Holstege by 85 votes; deadline next week to seek recount

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 08:10:05 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/election-results-greg-wallis-leads-christy-holstege-by-85-votes-deadline-next-week-to-seek-recount/ar-AA151ucE
Killexams : Donald Trump Loses His Free Pass Over Presidential Lawsuits

Donald Trump is at risk of being ruled liable over lawsuits related to actions during his presidency after a federal judge rejected a claim of absolute immunity in one suit.

On Monday, Washington District Judge Emmet Sullivan said Trump cannot use the presidential immunity defense in response to a lawsuit brought forward by the NAACP and the Michigan Welfare Rights Organization.

The suit claims Trump and the Republican National Committee committed civil rights violations by attempting to disenfranchise voters in the days after the 2020 Election by ways of "targeted harassment, intimidation, and efforts to prevent the complete counting and certification" of valid ballots in a number of states.

Trump's legal team had attempted to argue that the former president is "absolutely immune" from damages liability as his actions were on the "outer perimeter" of his official responsibility.

Former president Donald Trump speaks to supporters at a rally to support local candidates at the Mohegan Sun Arena on September 03, 2022 in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. Spencer Platt/Getty Images

In his ruling, Sullivan said that Trump cannot use absolute immunity to defend himself from the accusations he faces in the lawsuit, but did not determine that the former president could be liable for what the NAACP and the Michigan Welfare Rights Organization claim.

"If former President Trump disrupted the certification of the electoral vote count, as plaintiffs allege here, such actions would not constitute executive action in defense of the Constitution," Sullivan wrote.

"For these reasons, the court concludes that former President Trump is not immune from monetary damages in this suit."

The suit from the NAACP and the Michigan Welfare Rights Organization is not the only one the former president's legal team has attempted to claim presidential immunity from.

In 2019, former Elle magazine columnist E. Jean Carroll launched a defamation lawsuit over comments Trump made denying that he raped her in a Bergdorf Goodman dressing room in New York in the mid-1990s.

The suit said that Trump defamed Carroll's character by accusing her of lying about the alleged assault to sell books and "make money," as well as denying the rape occurred because "she's not my type."

Trump's legal team said that he was doing his job as then-president by denying the rape allegations.

Following Sullivan's ruling, attorney Rachel Fiset, co-founder and managing partner of Zweiback, Fiset & Zalduendo law firm, has suggested that the former president could be at risk of being found liable in the defamation lawsuit if another judge agrees his comments are not protected by presidential immunity.

"Trump is continually attempting to hide behind the immunity offered to presidents acting in their official duties as president. In Trump's very unusual presidency, however, he attempted acts that arguably exceed the boundaries of his official duties," Fiset told Newsweek.

"For instance, seeking to overturn an election illegally and disenfranchise voters for his own gain can be found to go beyond official duties and cross into acts that are 'purely political' and therefore subject to liability as this ruling supports.

"Likewise, as defamation could be found to be outside the boundaries of 'official duties,' Trump risks liability in Ms. Carroll's suit against him as well," Fiset added.

On November 25, Carroll launched a new defamation lawsuit against Trump, covering a time when he was not president.

The new defamation lawsuit was filed in response to Trump repeating the "not my type" remark about Carroll in an October 12 statement posted on Truth Social while calling the initial suit as a "complete con job."

Alongside a fresh defamation claim, Carroll filed a battery suit against Trump while taking advantage of the New York's Adult Survivors Act becoming active.

The law, which was passed in May, allows alleged adult sexual assault victims one year to bring lawsuits even if the statute of limitations has expired.

Trump's legal team has been contacted for comment.

Correction 12/01/2022: This article has been amended to attribute quote to Rachel Fiset.

Do you have a tip on a politics story that Newsweek should be covering? Do you have a question about Donald Trump? Let us know via politics@newsweek.com.

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 22:16:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.newsweek.com/donald-trump-absolute-immunity-lawsuit-president-1763488
Killexams : Election certification delays few, but a ‘test run’ for 2024 No result found, try new keyword!But this time even Otero certified its winners without complaint. In Michigan, where a GOP slate of election conspiracy theorists was defeated in statewide races, the Republican candidate for ... Tue, 29 Nov 2022 15:55:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://lasvegassun.com/news/2022/nov/29/election-certification-delays-few-but-a-test-run-f/ Killexams : In Arizona, losing candidate points to perceived conflict No result found, try new keyword!Republican Kari Lake and supporters of her failed campaign for Arizona governor are attacking Democratic Secretary of State Katie Hobbs as having a conflict of interest for overseeing the election she ... Wed, 30 Nov 2022 08:27:00 -0600 text/html https://www.sunherald.com/news/politics-government/national-politics/article269424477.html Killexams : Idaho certifies general election results

The Idaho State Board of Canvassers voted 3-0 Wednesday to certify the results of the state’s general election.

As part of the canvass and certification, the State Board of Canvassers met at the Idaho State Capitol, received a report from the Secretary of State’s Office and was presented with election data and results from every precinct in the state.

Prior to certifying election results, the State Board of Canvassers also reviewed findings from audits of election results from eight Idaho counties.

None of the legislative or statewide races were changed as a result of the audit or canvass. Additionally, no statewide or legislative races were within .1% or five votes, which is the threshold in Idaho law to qualify for a free recount.

“Overall I am happy with the results that we have,” Secretary of State Lawerence Denney, one of the members of the Idaho State Board of Canvassers, said as the election results were certified. “As the elections office, we always like to see large margins because there is such a thing as human error. I don’t think we have ever had a perfect election yet, but that is what we strive for.”

The unanimous vote to certify means the results of Idaho’s Nov. 8 general election are now official for the first time.

The Idaho State Board of Canvassers is made up of the secretary of state, state treasurer and state controller, by Idaho law. All three members, including Denney, State Treasurer Julie Ellsworth and State Controller Brandon Woolf participated in the meeting and vote.

The additional data released with the canvass showed that voter turnout across the state came to 56.8% and there were 44,285 Idahoans who registered to vote on Election Day. The county with the highest percentage of turnout was Camas County, with 69% turnout. The county with the lowest turnout was Madison County, with 38.6% turnout. Madison County is home to Brigham Young University-Idaho, and state elections officials speculated one reason turnout could be lower in Madison County is if a large number of students at the time registered to vote for the 2020 presidential election and then either didn’t vote this year or moved away from town but have yet to be purged from the voter rolls.

Now that the results are certified, candidates have 20 days to request a recount under Idaho law. Because none of the results were close enough to qualify for a free recount, any candidate requesting a recount would have to pay $100 per precinct that is recounted.

Idaho election officials identified three ‘challenges’

Although Denney said he was happy with the results overall, he and his staff said there were three challenges on election night.

Two of them occurred in Jerome County. One issue was that Jerome County incorrectly printed ballots that featured an independent candidate who had withdrawn from the District 26 Idaho Senate race. About 500 Jerome County early and absentee voters received those improper ballots, and 25 people cast ballots for that candidate, Deputy Secretary of State Jason Hancock said. Those 25 votes did not count, since voters marked a bubble for a candidate who was not running for office, Hancock said. In that race, Democrat Ron C. Taylor defeated Republican Laurie Lickley by a margin of 513 votes, 8,117 to 7,604. Hancock said the 25 votes for the ineligible candidate were not even close to enough to affect the outcome of the race either way.

Jerome County had a second challenge on Election Day as well. Jerome County officials initially did not include early votes when sending results to the Idaho Secretary of State’s office. Officials said that was a reporting error, not a counting error, and the issue did reverse what had initially appeared to be a Democratic victory but was in fact a victory for Republican Jack Nelsen, the Idaho Capital Sun previously reported.

Finally, Teton County officials found an extra box of uncounted absentee ballots after they had already reported election results. The box contained 402 ballots and has since been counted. The new vote totals did not change the outcome of any of those races, the Sun previously reported.

Idaho takes several steps to safeguard election results

Wednesday’s canvass and certification are just one of the steps in place to safeguard Idaho elections.

Prior to the election, county officials held logic and accuracy tests where they tested and demonstrated ballot tabulation equipment in public and answered questions from the news media and Idahoans about the process.

Beginning Saturday, officials from the Idaho Secretary of State’s Office conducted an audit of election results from eight Idaho counties that were selected in a random, lottery-style drawing.

Each of the Iaho’s 44 counties also canvassed and certified their own election results.

Idaho’s largest county, Ada County, was one of the eight counties selected for a post-election audit.

“We are pleased by the results of the audit,” Ada County Clerk Phil McGrane, who was also elected as Idaho secretary of state, said in a written statement. “We work hard to ensure the utmost integrity in elections. In a time in which we are seeing an increase in questions regarding elections, these audits help build confidence in the process. Voters in Ada County can be confident that their votes count. We test our equipment extensively prior to an election so that we can ensure the accuracy of results. The audit demonstrates that the process works as intended.”

The other seven counties audited include Bonner, Bonneville, Kootenai, Nez Perce, Minidoka, Oneida and Shoshone. As part of the inventory control portion of the audit, the Secretary of State’s Office identified two ballots that were unaccounted for in Oneida County and one ballot that was unaccounted for in Ada County. Officials said those results were within their margins of error and did not affect the outcomes of any races.

There were no unaccounted ballots in Bonner, Bonneville, Kootenai, Nez Perce, Minidoka or Shoshone counties.

The Idaho Capital Sun can be found online at idahocapitalsun.com.

Fri, 25 Nov 2022 18:01:00 -0600 en text/html https://bonnercountydailybee.com/news/2022/nov/26/idaho-certifies-general-election-results/
Killexams : 2023: No legal impediment against any PDP candidate in Plateau – Mutfwang

From Gyang Bere, Jos

 

Plateau State governorship candidate of the Peoples Democratic Party, PDP), Barr. Caleb Mutfwang, has clarified that there is no legal obstacle against any candidate of the party ahead of the 2023 general elections.

He explained that the party is ready to go into the polls as a united front and assured that all votes that would accrue to the candidates and the party would be counted as valid votes contrary to insinuations in some quarters, who are jittery of failure.

Mutfwang disclosed this at the weekend during the inauguration of Atiku-Okowa/Mutfwang-Piyo/Gotom campaign council for Plateau Central Senatorial zone, under the Chairmanship of Engr. Jerry Satmak, Chairman PDP Plateau Central Zone.

He said the party became free of litigations following the dismissal of suit No. FHC/J/C5/64/2022 by the Federal High Court Jos, filed by Augustine Timkuk Dandam, an aspirant for Langtang North-North State Constituency, against the PDP, the Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC), and others.

Mutfwang said the dismissed suit was the only legal stumbling block orchestrated by the ruling All Progressives Congress (APC) in the State to frustrate the PDP from presenting candidates in the forthcoming elections.

The governorship candidate hailed the judiciary for restoring integrity to the electoral process, giving hope to the common man, and making Plateau people proud. 

He also added that that henceforth, there is no legal impediment against the PDP, as the back door the APC wanted to follow has been shut.

Sat, 03 Dec 2022 10:34:00 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.sunnewsonline.com/2023-no-legal-impediment-against-any-pdp-candidate-in-plateau-mutfwang/
Killexams : Road to 2023: Igbo community in Kogi says it has not endorsed any candidate

From Emmanuel Adeyemi, Lokoja

The Kogi State Association of Igbo community in Ebira land has said it has not endorsed any senatorial candidate from any political party or any other candidate of any other party whatsoever ahead of the 2023 general election.

In a press statement made available to reporters in Lokoja and signed by the public relations officer of the association, Sunday Ngene, it said anyone claiming that the association has endorsed any candidate is an interloper as such person is not a registered member of the association

The statement reads:

“The attention of the association of Igbo Community in Ebiraland has been drawn to a news item aired by Jatto FM Radio Station on Friday, 2nd December 2022.

‘The news item which claimed that the Igbo community has endorsed a particular senatorial candidate for the forthcoming 2023 general election was allegedly credited to one, Chukwudi Orah and Augustine Azoro, who falsely claimed to be president and spokesperson of the community, respectively.

“We wish the general public to disregard the unfounded/misleading information, as not emanating from the Association of Igbo Community, as the alleged sponsors are non-registered members of Igbo community and cannot in any way take decisions or speak for the community.

“We wish to make it clear that the Association of Igbo Community in Ebiraland is a registered socio-cultural organisation, which leadership is under Chief Joseph Anikwe, the Gburu-Gburu Ndigbo.

“We, therefore, advise members of the public not to be misled by anybody or group of individuals who are out to use the name of the Community to engage in illegal transactions, cheat or defraud unsuspecting members of the public.

“Much as the association recognises the right of any individual Igbo or group to associate or endorse any candidate or political party of their choice, we use this medium to make it categorically clear that the Association of Igbo Community has not declared support or endorsed any candidate or party with respect to the forthcoming general elections.

“We, therefore, urge the general public to disregard the radio information in its entirety
and caution the public to beware of impersonators,” the statement added.

Sat, 03 Dec 2022 04:19:00 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.sunnewsonline.com/road-to-2023-igbo-community-in-kogi-says-it-has-not-endorsed-any-candidate/
Killexams : Replacing Baseboard Heaters Are Easier Than You Think © Family Handyman

Got old, rusty “hydronic” (hot water heat) baseboards? You could replace them in their entirety, but that’s expensive and time consuming. You could also sand and paint them, but that’s a lot of work.

The easiest option is to replace just the front covers and end caps with aftermarket ones made of plastic or metal, which are available at home centers and online. Supplyhouse.com sells several styles of replacement covers, called “baseboarders,” for about $16 to $27 per foot. End caps cost about $16 to $28 apiece. The company’s website has easy-to-follow installation videos.

© Family Handyman
Thu, 08 Dec 2022 12:15:15 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/other/replacing-baseboard-heaters-are-easier-than-you-think/ar-AA154Bdi
Killexams : Greg Wallis leads Christy Holstege by 69 votes; deadline next week to seek recount

A voter drops off their ballot at the Palm Springs Public Library on Nov. 8.

Republican Greg Wallis was leading Democrat Christy Holstege by 85 votes on Wednesday in a tight race to represent California’s 47th Assembly District, with both candidates awaiting final vote updates from San Bernardino County amid the possibility of a recount.

Under state law, any registered voter can request a recount within five days of the vote certification scheduled for Thursday. That deadline will come in the middle of next week. (It falls on Tuesday or Wednesday, Dec. 13 or 14, depending on how the statute is read, and the San Bernardino registrar of voters said it's Tuesday.)

Holstege told The Desert Sun on Wednesday her team has not yet decided whether to ask for a recount.

“This is one of the closest legislative elections in California’s history, and we continue to eagerly watch as the last ballots are counted,” Holstege said, adding: “We have not yet made any decision on whether or not to request a recount. Out of respect to the voters and the democratic process, we are waiting until every vote is counted to make that decision.”

Wallis, a staff member for retiring Assemblymember Chad Mayes, has traded the lead with Holstege several times since Election Day, with the two separated by razor-thin margins in exact weeks as more ballots have been counted.

Holstege, a member of the Palm Springs City Council, won 54% of votes in Riverside County, where most of the district falls, but Wallis has kept a comfortable lead in San Bernardino County, bringing them within a historically close margin for a state legislative race.

Vote totals updated Wednesday afternoon showed Wallis with 84,752 votes to 84,667 for Holstege. While the results in Riverside County have been certified by the registrar of voters, a few hundred ballots were still being processed in San Bernardino County, though it’s unknown how many of those remaining are in Assembly District 47.

The San Bernardino County Registrar of Voters was set to certify its election results Thursday, according to an office spokesperson.

Wallis, who lives in Bermuda Dunes, said the close margin in Assembly District 47 “makes it clear that everyone’s vote counts.”

“It’s important that we treat every ballot with respect by making sure that each it counted,” Wallis told The Desert Sun. “It may take a little time, but our democracy is worth it. I’m looking forward to seeing the final certified results on Thursday.”

Assembly District 47 encompasses much of the previous district represented by Mayes and includes most of the western and central Coachella Valley. The district also includes Banning, Beaumont and Idyllwild, and extends into Yucca Valley and Yucaipa in San Bernardino County.

Meanwhile, other newly elected legislators in California were sworn in Monday, the same day the Legislature began a special session to consider Gov. Gavin Newsom’s proposal for a “price gouging” penalty on oil companies. Democratic lawmakers maintain a comfortable supermajority following this year’s elections.

Tom Coulter covers the cities of Palm Desert, La Quinta, Rancho Mirage and Indian Wells. Reach him at thomas.coulter@desertsun.com or on Twitter @tomcoulter_.

This article originally appeared on Palm Springs Desert Sun: Wallis leads Holstege for California’s 47th Assembly District

Wed, 07 Dec 2022 07:21:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://news.yahoo.com/greg-wallis-leads-christy-holstege-212103384.html
Killexams : Election certification delays few, but a 'test run' for 2024

Before November, election officials prepared for the possibility that Republicans who embraced former President Donald Trump's lies about voter fraud would challenge the verdict of voters by refusing to certify the midterm results.

Three weeks after the end of voting, such challenges are playing out in just two states, Arizona and Pennsylvania, where Democrats won the marquee races for governor and Senate.

Legal experts predict the bids are doomed because local governmental agencies typically don't have the option to vote against certifying the results of their elections. But experts also say the delays are a signal that the United States must brace itself for similar disruptions in the next presidential contest.

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“It is one of the few places where election deniers have a lever of power,” Rick Hasen, a law professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, said of the local political authorities responsible for certifying election results in most states. “It’s a good test run for 2024, showing state courts they’re going to have to step in.”

For now, the certification delay in a smattering of rural counties in just two states reflects the limited ability of election conspiracy theorists to disrupt the midterms. One rural Arizona county has drawn court challenges after its refusal to certify, but a second one that was flirting with blocking certification backed off amid legal threats.

In Pennsylvania, a handful of the state's 67 counties have delayed certification because of recounts demanded by local conspiracy theorists in scattered precincts. But in most states, certification has gone smoothly.

“Before Election Day, I thought Republicans would exploit the certification process to undermine election results,” said Marc Elias, a Democratic lawyer who has sued to compel the lone Arizona county to certify.

That there's only one county delaying so far in that important battleground state, where Republican candidates who denied Joe Biden's victory in the 2020 presidential race ran unsuccessfully for governor and secretary of state, is “good news, and a bit of a surprise,” Elias said.

In Wisconsin, where Trump pressured Republican lawmakers to decertify the 2020 results, the chair of the state elections commission certified the results of the midterm election during a quick meeting Wednesday without fanfare. Minnesota, where the failed Republican secretary of state candidate had cast doubt on the legitimacy of the 2020 presidential election, the state canvassing board certified this year's results without drama on Tuesday.

The smooth outcome in most of the country is a reflection of the diminished opportunities election conspiracy theorists have to control elections after a number of their candidates were routed in statewide elections for positions overseeing voting. They're largely left with a footprint in conservative, rural counties. Still, that's enough to cause headaches for having the election results certified on a statewide basis, raising concerns about how rural counties might respond after the next presidential election.

The movement that embraces Trump's lies about voting hoped it would have many more levers after November. Candidates who backed Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election ran for top posts with power over state voting — including secretary of state, which in most states is the top election position — in five of the six swing states that were key to Trump's 2020 loss. They lost every race in each of those states.

Democratic Secretary of State Katie Hobbs defeated Trump-backed Republican Kari Lake in the race for Arizona governor, flipping it out of the GOP category, and a Democrat also won the race to replace Hobbs. A Democrat defeated an election conspiracy theorist running for Nevada secretary of state, shifting another swing-state election office from the GOP.

On the local level, the picture is blurrier.

There are more than 10,000 local election offices in the country that follow guidelines set by secretaries of state or other agencies that their states designate as the top election authorities. That's where conspiracy theorists won at least some new offices and still have the power to disrupt proceedings.

During the June primary in New Mexico, rural Otero County refused to certify the results of its election, preventing the state from making the winners official until the state Supreme Court ordered it to act. That set a template that election lawyers feared would be vastly replicated in the weeks after the midterms. But this time, even Otero County certified its winners without a delay. New Mexico's canvass board certified the statewide results Wednesday.

In Michigan, where a GOP slate of election conspiracy theorists was defeated in statewide races, the Republican candidate for secretary of state, Kristina Karamo, implored the state's bipartisan board of canvassers not to certify the election during a hearing this week. Karamo insisted there had been widespread fraud, even though she lost her race against Democratic Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson by more than 13 percentage points.

Tony Daunt, the Republican chair of the certification board, responded by blasting candidates who “feed into this nonsense” by making “claims that fire everybody up because it’s a short-term gain for them, and that’s dangerous to our system.” The board unanimously certified the election.

In Pennsylvania, the most prominent certification hiccup has come in Luzerne County, north of Philadelphia, which voted for Trump by 14 percentage points in 2020. County commissioners delayed certifying the election on Monday after one Democrat abstained from voting following an Election Day fiasco in which the election office ran out of ballots.

The Democrat, Daniel Schramm, joined the two other Democratic commissioners on the five-member board Wednesday to certify the vote after telling reporters he was confident no citizen was unable to vote. Certification is being delayed in a few other counties after local Republican committees and voters requested recounts.

In Arizona, the two Republicans on Cochise County's three-member county commission blew past Monday's certification deadline, saying they needed more information on the certification of vote tabulators, even though there have been no problems with voting or ballot counting in their county.

The secretary of state's office has sued, saying that it must certify the state's elections by Dec. 8.

“The only legal effect this has is to disenfranchise all their voters,” said David Becker of the Center for Election Innovation.

The efforts to delay certification are dangerous even if they're doomed to fail, Becker and others said. They continue to sow discontent and distrust of voting and democracy.

David Levine, a former election official who is a fellow with the Alliance for Securing Democracy, noted that conspiracy theories about elections have reached such a fever pitch in Arizona that Bill Gates, the Republican chair of the county commission in Maricopa County, which includes Phoenix. has been given additional security by the local sheriff.

“When you supply legitimacy to baseless accusations about the election process, there is a concern that more of that will occur," Levine said.

Maricopa County, which includes Phoenix, certified its election results on Monday, after dozens of attendees demanded the board not do it. Some complained about printer malfunctions in the county, the state's most populous, that led to confusion and long lines on Election Day — even though Maricopa officials said everyone had a chance to vote and that all legal ballots were counted.

In other counties, activists also spoke out against certification, though unsuccessfully. In Yavapai County, north of Phoenix, a woman who gave her name as Nancy Littlefield, wearing a hoodie patterned on the American flag, made clear that part of her objections were because she simply didn't like the outcome of the election.

She urged Yavapai board members not to certify the vote because “I moved from California so I could be free and live my life and have my voice heard.”

Associated Press writers Joey Cappelletti in Lansing, Michigan; Jonathan J. Cooper and Anita Snow in Phoenix; Christina A. Cassidy in Atlanta; and Mark Scolforo in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, contributed to this report.

Follow the AP’s coverage of the 2022 midterm elections at https://apnews.com/hub/2022-midterm-elections

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 15:47:00 -0600 en text/html https://azdailysun.com/news/national/govt-and-politics/election-certification-delays-few-but-a-test-run-for-2024/article_b07fddf3-d9c2-52eb-84e1-94e48b83f702.html
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