310-540 Enterprise Development with iPlanet Application Server 6.0 dumps with test prep made up good pass marks

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Killexams : SUN Development availability - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/310-540 Search results Killexams : SUN Development availability - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/310-540 https://killexams.com/exam_list/SUN Killexams : Sun Pharma's Halol facility listed under USFDA import alert

Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd on Thursday said its Halol facility in Gujarat has been listed under import alert by the USFDA with products manufactured at the unit now are subject to refusal of admission in the US market.

Sun Pharma

Photograph: Francis Mascarenhas/Reuters

The development follows an inspection of the facility by the US Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) from April 26 to May 9, 2022.

"We now wish to inform you that the company has received a communication from the USFDA stating that the facility has been listed under Import Alert," Sun Pharma said in a regulatory filing.

Import alert implies that all future shipments of products manufactured at this facility are subject to refusal of admission to the US market until the facility becomes compliant with cGMP (current good manufacturing practice) standards, it added.

The company further said, "The USFDA has excluded 14 products from this import alert subject to certain conditions."

For the year ended 31-March-2022, supplies to the US market from the Halol facility accounted for approximately 3 per cent of the company's consolidated revenues, including the 14 excluded products, it added.

As per information available on BSE, Sun Pharma had clocked revenue of Rs 15,585.98 crore in 2021-22.

Sun Pharma said it "continues to cooperate with the USFDA and will undertake all necessary steps to resolve these issues and to ensure that the regulator is completely satisfied with the company's remedial action".

Wed, 07 Dec 2022 18:36:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.rediff.com/business/report/sun-pharmas-halol-facility-listed-under-usfda-import-alert/20221208.htm
Killexams : Sun Pharma clarifies on US FDA import alert on Halol plant; details here

Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd on December 8 clarified further on US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) listing its Halol plant on import alert earlier today.

In a regulatory filing, Sun Pharma answered some questions on the development, especially with regard to its overall revenue.

Earlier today, the US FDA had listed the Halol facility in Gujarat under import alert with products manufactured at the unit now subject to refusal of admission in the US market. The development followed an inspection of the facility by the USFDA from April 26 to May 9, 2022.

Clarifying the effect on the revenue and the revision of future guidance of the company, Sun Pharma stated that US supplies from Halol contributed approximately 3 percent of consolidated revenues for the year ended March 31, 2022, including sales from exempted products. "We are not revising our revenue guidance for the current financial year," it said. It also added that there will be no impact on the specialty revenues either.

With the Halol facility under the scanner, the pharma company said that the backup facilities for key products manufactured in the plant will be "on a case-to-case basis."

"Site transfer of all products manufactured at Halol would be a complex and time-consuming process, considering that other manufacturing facilities may not have similar infrastructure. Hence, we would evaluate product transfers on a case-to-case basis," Sun Pharma said.

Further, answering the conditions required by the USFDA for the supply of 14 exempted products from the said facility, Sun Pharma said that the conditions for the supplies of 14 exempted products are "confidential," adding, "We are assessing the incremental costs to meet conditions for the supply of these products. However, we believe that the same will not be material."

On the impact of the import alert on revenues next year, the company clarified that its revenue guidance for next year, as and when shared, shall incorporate the same. It also stated that it had no information currently, whether the supplies to other markets get impacted due to the import alert.

Moreover, on how much time will the company require to get the Halol facility back into full compliance, Sun Pharma said, "We are working with the USFDA and will undertake all necessary steps to resolve these issues. At this point in time, we are unable to provide a timeline for resolution."

As per information available on BSE, Sun Pharma had clocked revenue of Rs 15,585.98 crore in 2021-22.

Sun Pharma had earlier today said it ''continues to cooperate with the USFDA and will undertake all necessary steps to resolve these issues and to ensure that the regulator is completely satisfied with the company's remedial action''.

Meanwhile, shares of Sun Pharma on Thursday (December 8) closed 3.57 percent lower at Rs 980.95 apiece on BSE post the US FDA import alert news.
Wed, 07 Dec 2022 22:02:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.moneycontrol.com/news/business/companies/sun-pharma-clarifies-on-us-fda-import-alert-on-halol-plant-details-here-9672271.html
Killexams : Justin Sun is Propelling Efforts in Blockchain and the Decentralized Internet

Justin Sun believes users of the internet should own it together, rather than it being used by the few who own its data. That’s one of the primary reasons he founded Tron — to decentralize the internet via blockchain technology and decentralized apps.

Think about it.

You wake up and check the weather, either on your phone or by asking your smart device. During breakfast, you scroll through the morning articles on some of your favorite news publications’ apps. At work, you send countless emails, research a new project, and maybe take a break by checking your social media pages. At home, you unwind by streaming your favorite television show.

Justin Sun, crypto diplomat and entrepreneur, continues to spearhead evolution in the realm of blockchain and the decentralized internet.

Undoubtedly, the internet is seamlessly interwoven throughout our lives. More than just a resource for daily tasks and entertainment, the internet is a powerful tool that has become a basic necessity for economic and human development.

The proliferation of uses for the internet has brought with it questions about who should be in control of it, and a growing number of people believe that it should be out of the hands of the government regulators and massive technology companies that currently hold much of the power. In latest years, this conversation has only gotten louder, as questions about who is tracking and selling our private data have emerged as well.

Crypto diplomat Justin Sun, along with millions of others, wants a decentralized web. Sun is the founder of Tron DAO, a decentralized blockchain ecosystem seeking to create an efficient, scalable, and cost-effective solution through an open-source blockchain-based operating system. In just five years, Tron has become one of the most active open blockchain and smart contract platforms in the world, with over 122 million active user accounts and more than 4.2 billion transactions logged.

During the past development of Tron, Sun worked hard to propel forward the concept of a blockchain-based, decentralized internet. He famously made a record-breaking $4.6 million bid in a charity auction to dine with Warren Buffett, and reportedly used the subsequent meal to educate the renowned investor on the value of cryptocurrency and the blockchain, gifting him one bitcoin and several Tron TRX tokens that corresponded with his 89th birthday.

In December 2021, Sun stepped down as CEO of the Tron Foundation (which has also dissolved since his departure) in order to focus on his new role as the ambassador for Grenada to the World Trade Organization. Expressing his belief that the Caribbean is uniquely positioned to be particularly receptive to decentralized concepts, his acceptance of the position is the latest in a long line of efforts on his part to raise the worldwide profile of cryptocurrency and blockchain. Justin Sun has said that blockchain is an essential aspect of the decentralized internet (known as Web3 or Web 3.0) and believes it is a “revolutionary technology that will democratize the world of finance, art, and many others.”

Defining Blockchain Technology

While blockchain has certainly become a buzzword in latest years, for many, the concept itself is still shrouded in mystery. It is strongly associated with its applications in cryptocurrency, but in its simplest definition, blockchain technology is a system for recording information.

A blockchain is often compared to a ledger, but unlike those used in the past — both analog and digital — blockchain technology stores its information in a way that makes it almost 100% impregnable. Traditionally, a database will hold its data in tables, but blockchain gets its name from its unique way of structuring data. Information is collected together in groups known as “blocks,” and once the storage capacity for each block has been reached, it is linked to the block previously filled before it, creating a “chain” of data. The analogy to a chain is a fitting one, because just as chain links in the physical world are extremely strong and resilient, so too are blockchains in their ability to prevent changes, hacks, or cheating to the system.

History of Blockchain Technology

As with most technologies that have exploded onto the scene, iterations of blockchain technology have in fact been in the works for a number of decades. One of the first instances includes the Merkle tree, an approach to public key distribution and digital signatures that was put forward by computer scientist Ralph Merkle’s thesis in 1979.

The rest of the century was filled with other small, yet significant, technological advancements that helped set the stage for blockchain technology, including the invention of digital cash and timestamping digital documents. As proof of how one business’s failure can still make way for the success of many others, it was the now-defunct Napster that originally popularized the peer-to-peer network, a system that sees one network benefit from the computing power and storage capacity of thousands of computers.

It was in 2008 that blockchain got its true start when Satoshi Nakamoto — thought to be a pseudonym for either a single person or a group of individuals — first published a white paper on the ideas behind bitcoin and blockchain technology. A year later, Nakamoto mined the first bitcoin block, and throughout 2009, the concept was further refined with an exchange being established, as well as a forum for discussions. At the time, a bitcoin was worth less than one penny, but today, each bitcoin is worth over $16,000.

According to Sun, his first encounter with bitcoin was in early 2010, and soon after, he began “heavily investing” in crypto. Rather than a way to make money, Justin Sun said he saw the investments as a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to bring positive change to the world because of its ability to create and even automate trust.

In 2014, ethereum was launched, carving a path for blockchain to be utilized for purposes other than cryptocurrency by introducing smart contracts and giving developers a platform for creating other decentralized applications. From that point on, financial institutions and other industries began to recognize the value of the technology and tentatively explored its potential.

NFTs and Other Blockchain Applications

Although finance was one of the first sectors to see blockchain technology applied to it through cryptocurrency, its broader applications have seen it applied to practically every other industry today. NFTs are one of the most latest applications to make headlines, and although much of the media attention has focused on the perceived absurdity of purchases (such as Jack Dorsey’s first tweet for $2.9 million), Justin Sun has said that he believes NFTs are the most important component of the decentralized internet. He has collected millions of dollars worth of NFTs over the past few years, and said that they have the ability to bring “a new mode of transaction and transparency to the art world.”

The decentralized internet is a highly complex concept, but one that people like Justin Sun view as necessary to bring to the forefront of the conversation for a future that is innovative and egalitarian. Sun is quoted as saying, “I believe in the metaverse, which is an inclusive and empowering version of not only the next internet but also the future of how people will live their day-to-day lives. I hope I can be part of building a truly decentralized metaverse and make it accessible and available to everyone.”

Disclosure: Insider Monkey received compensation to publish this article. Insider Monkey doesn’t endorse any cryptocurrencies, products or companies mentioned in this article. Please read our Terms of Use before consuming any content presented on our website.

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 02:49:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.insidermonkey.com/blog/justin-sun-is-propelling-efforts-in-blockchain-and-the-decentralized-internet-1095012/
Killexams : Lewiston’s YWCA launches new professional development program

LEWISTON — YWCA Central Maine has announced a new workforce development program beginning in 2023.

YW Strive is a free, 11-week professional certificate course aimed at serving the unemployed and under-employed in Maine. YW Strive is designed to provide participants with critical digital literacy and workforce skills while also helping them explore and refine personal strengths and goals.

The curriculum includes the Google suite, interviewing skills, resume building, financial independence, and conflict resolution, according to a news release from Amanda Angelo Hatch, chief program and impact officer.

Classes can be taken virtually or in person at the YWCA in Lewiston, and financial assistance may be available for transportation, childcare, technology, or other barriers to participation. The program meets weekly for a total of six hours.

Applications are open now; the first cohort is scheduled to begin Monday, Jan. 9. Applicants must be at least 18, have basic English literacy and math skills, and show desire and ability to complete the full program.

YW Strive is an evidence-based program that has been offered at YWCAs nationwide. The program aims to support women and persons of color in the workforce, in service of the YWCA mission to eliminate racism and empower women. YWCA Central Maine’s Strive is partially funded by YWCA USA via grant funding from Google and Northeast Bank.

For additional information, or to apply, visit ywcamaine.org.

Check out other upcoming area events!

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 15:01:00 -0600 text/html https://www.sunjournal.com/2022/12/09/lewistons-ywca-launches-new-professional-development-program/
Killexams : Not ‘enough money to save them all.’ Volusia grapples with double hurricane whammy Kate Rose at her family's home in Wilbur-By-The-Sea, Fla., Friday, December 2, 2022. The south Volusia coastline was devastated by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties. © Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS Kate Rose at her family's home in Wilbur-By-The-Sea, Fla., Friday, December 2, 2022. The south Volusia coastline was devastated by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties.

WILBUR-BY-THE-SEA — Kate Rose stays awake at night thinking about her family’s oceanfront home perched perilously on the edge of the eroded shoreline.

The next storm could send it crashing into the ocean, just like some of her neighbors’ homes in Wilbur-by-the-Sea. The small community suffered some of the worst damage from back-to-back hurricanes that tore through Volusia County this year.

“You open up the door now, and it’s a 25-foot drop straight down,” Rose said, adding that the initial repair bill came in at almost $1 million. “I mean we’re teetering on the edge.”

Everyone has their eye on the vanishing sand. The pounding surf wiped out protective dunes, leaving coastal homes sitting ducks for Mother Nature’s wrath as seawalls crumbled.

Wilbur-by-the-Sea is a dream spot for those who want to wake up to the sound of waves, beautiful ocean views and the smell of salt air.

But Robert S. Young, a coastal geologist, views this picturesque seaside village south of Daytona Beach as a warning sign, a glimpse into the future. Beachside living will grow even riskier and more expensive as oceans rise and warming seas generate super-charged storms, he said.

“There will come a time, 10 years from now, who knows, 15 years from now, when you’re going to have lots of places like this all over Florida,” said Young, director of Western Carolina University’s Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines. “You’re not going to have enough money to save them all.”

A walk down the beach reveals Hurricane Ian and Hurricane Nicole’s destruction in Wilbur-by-the-Sea and nearby Daytona Beach Shores, which is still evident a month after Nicole lashed the coast.

The storm surge cleaved houses into two, exposing rooms like a dollhouse. It unearthed swimming pools and left them sprawled on the ground like empty tubs. Condo buildings stand on the edge of cliffs. The storm uncovered a shipwreck believed to be from the 1800s.

Nina Lavigna, 83, lost part of her house. When she surveys the damage, she sums it up concisely: “This is a nightmare.”

Time to retreat?

Floridians need to start asking themselves some hard questions, Young said. Does rebuilding on the beach in high-risk areas or on critically eroded beaches make sense with rising seas? Will nourishment projects that involve dumping sand to build back beaches become cost-prohibitive with climate change?

Installation continues of the tiger dam by the Florida Division of Emergency Management and Volusia County along a stretch of Daytona Beach Shores, Fla., Monday, December 5, 2022. The coastline was impacted by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties. © Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS Installation continues of the tiger dam by the Florida Division of Emergency Management and Volusia County along a stretch of Daytona Beach Shores, Fla., Monday, December 5, 2022. The coastline was impacted by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties.

Young’s answer is that Florida’s ever-expanding coastal development isn’t sustainable, and leaders need to stop incentivizing construction right on the beach.

“If your house is teetering on the edge of a bluff, then I think that’s a pretty clear signal that’s a part of the shoreline that we should be taking a step back from,” Young said.

The state is grappling with out-of-control property insurance costs, a problem worsened by repeated hurricanes. Private insurers increasingly refuse to write policies in storm-prone areas, forcing more people onto the state-backed Citizens Property Insurance Corp.

A collapsed swimming pool at a residence adjacent to Frank Rendon Park is seen as Installation continues of the tiger dam by the Florida Division of Emergency Management and Volusia County along a stretch of Daytona Beach Shores, Fla., Monday, December 5, 2022. The coastline was impacted by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties. © Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS A collapsed swimming pool at a residence adjacent to Frank Rendon Park is seen as Installation continues of the tiger dam by the Florida Division of Emergency Management and Volusia County along a stretch of Daytona Beach Shores, Fla., Monday, December 5, 2022. The coastline was impacted by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties.

Southwest Florida bore the brunt of Hurricane Ian with entire coastal communities wiped off the map. The storm made landfall on Sept. 28 west of Fort Myers as a powerful Category 4 hurricane.

Local leaders need to start thinking about relocating, instead of always rebuilding, Young said. One solution could be a buyout program that would turn the most vulnerable properties into public land that would serve as natural barriers during storms.

“At some point, these oceanfront residents have to realize that [the] sea level is rising and the shorelines are eroding and moving, and you cannot rely on the public sector to keep a beach in front of your house forever,” he said. “We’ve got thousands of miles of shoreline in the U.S. Eventually it’s just going to become impossible to certain everyone the right to have a full oceanfront lot.”

Young’s ideas haven’t caught on in Florida. After Hurricane Irma in 2017, a Florida House committee considered identifying high-risk areas and providing options for not rebuilding as part of its post-storm review. That proposal went nowhere during the legislative session.

Instead of shunning danger zones, investors are snatching up oceanfront properties destroyed by latest hurricanes and building bigger and even more expensive homes, said Mark Friedlander, a Florida spokesman for the Insurance Information Institute, an industry trade group.

“We are seeing a trend across the country of more people living in harm’s way than ever before,” he said. “Despite the potential hazard of a catastrophe impacting you and your family, people want to live along the coast.”

Florida’s world-famous beaches are one of its primary draws. About three-quarters of Florida’s 21.5 million residents live in coastal counties.

Compounding the issue, state lawmakers haven’t fixed a “manmade crisis” of fraud and excessive litigation that is driving up property insurance rates in Florida, Friedlander said. Even before the hurricanes, six insurers were declared insolvent and three more withdrew from the Florida market.

The surf continues to hit impacted dunes south of Toronita Avenue Beach Park in Wilbur-By-The-Sea, Fla., Friday, December 2, 2022. The southern Volusia coastline was devastated by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties. © Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS The surf continues to hit impacted dunes south of Toronita Avenue Beach Park in Wilbur-By-The-Sea, Fla., Friday, December 2, 2022. The southern Volusia coastline was devastated by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties.

The Legislature is meeting in a special session starting Monday to try to shore up the property insurance market.

A collapsed home south of Toronita Avenue Beach Park, with parts of a new, reinforced fiberglass seawall in the process of being installed, foreground, in Wilbur-By-The-Sea, Fla., Friday, December 2, 2022. The southern Volusia coastline was devastated by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties. © Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS A collapsed home south of Toronita Avenue Beach Park, with parts of a new, reinforced fiberglass seawall in the process of being installed, foreground, in Wilbur-By-The-Sea, Fla., Friday, December 2, 2022. The southern Volusia coastline was devastated by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties.

Friedlander doesn’t expect Floridians will see immediate relief with rates expected to rise 40% or more on average next year, on top of this year’s 33% increase. The average Florida homeowner is paying $4,231 in property insurance premiums, nearly three times the national average of $1,544, according to an analysis by his organization.

A collapsed home south of Toronita Avenue Beach Park, with parts for a new, reinforced fiberglass seawall in the process of being installed, foreground, in Wilbur-By-The-Sea, Fla., Friday, December 2, 2022. The southern Volusia coastline was devastated by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties. © Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS A collapsed home south of Toronita Avenue Beach Park, with parts for a new, reinforced fiberglass seawall in the process of being installed, foreground, in Wilbur-By-The-Sea, Fla., Friday, December 2, 2022. The southern Volusia coastline was devastated by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties.

‘It’s the American spirit’ to rebuild

Wilbur-by-the-Sea residents aren’t ready to retreat. They maintain that stronger coastal defenses would protect their community from future storms. They’ve been frustrated by what they consider to be government bureaucracy.

A collapsed swimming pool at a residence adjacent to Frank Rendon Park is seen as Installation continues of the tiger dam by the Florida Division of Emergency Management and Volusia County along a stretch of Daytona Beach Shores, Fla., Monday, December 5, 2022. The coastline was impacted by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties. © Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS A collapsed swimming pool at a residence adjacent to Frank Rendon Park is seen as Installation continues of the tiger dam by the Florida Division of Emergency Management and Volusia County along a stretch of Daytona Beach Shores, Fla., Monday, December 5, 2022. The coastline was impacted by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties.

Kenneth Meister, 58, is seeking a permit to build a 12-foot-high, 100-foot-long sea wall to protect his property, part of which fell into the sea. He said the state Department of Environmental Protection only signed off on a 4-four-foot temporary wall between Ian and Nicole, which wasn’t enough to save his home.

“People love the beach and love the area,” Meister said, while awaiting a call from his contractor. “As long as we know the property will be protected for the next 50 years, people are going to rebuild. It’s the American spirit. We take a hit, then we recover and we rebuild.”

Beachgoers walk past a new, reinforced fiberglass seawall in the process of being installed, south of Toronita Avenue Beach Park in Wilbur-By-The-Sea, Fla., Friday, December 2, 2022. The southern Volusia coastline was devastated by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties. © Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS Beachgoers walk past a new, reinforced fiberglass seawall in the process of being installed, south of Toronita Avenue Beach Park in Wilbur-By-The-Sea, Fla., Friday, December 2, 2022. The southern Volusia coastline was devastated by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties.

Meister said he isn’t asking for the state to pay for his seawall, just for it to expedite the permitting process.

Rose, too, is reluctant to abandon her family’s property. She grew up on Wilbur’s beaches and was married at the local boathouse. The unincorporated community retains an “old Florida feel” without built-up condos and retail strip malls. Neighbors hold potluck dinners and monthly yard sales, Rose said.

“It’s home,” she said. “A lot of people have been there for years and years and years. And even the younger residents are the children or grandchildren of the people who built or bought that house back in the ‘50s.”

A seen from Frank Rendon Park, installation continues of the tiger dam by the Florida Division of Emergency Management and Volusia County along a stretch of Daytona Beach Shores, Fla., Monday, December 5, 2022. The coastline was impacted by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties. © Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS A seen from Frank Rendon Park, installation continues of the tiger dam by the Florida Division of Emergency Management and Volusia County along a stretch of Daytona Beach Shores, Fla., Monday, December 5, 2022. The coastline was impacted by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties.

Census figures aren’t available, but a 2006 county report estimated only about 2,000 people lived in Wilbur-by-the-Sea.

Rose faults Volusia County for not building seawalls to protect beach access points, which she said created gaps in Wilbur-by-the-Sea’s coastal defenses and resulted in the seawalls at neighboring homes being undermined.

Gutted homes north of Toronita Avenue Beach Park in Wilbur-By-The-Sea, Fla., Friday, December 2, 2022. The southern Volusia coastline was devastated by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties. © Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS Gutted homes north of Toronita Avenue Beach Park in Wilbur-By-The-Sea, Fla., Friday, December 2, 2022. The southern Volusia coastline was devastated by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties.

“I think the answer is to provide adequate armament for the beach line,” she said. “That is the shared responsibility of private property owners, state and county property managers as well. We would not be in the situation that we are in today in Wilbur-by-the-Sea, Florida, if Volusia County had armed the gap where the crosswalks exist. It’s a cold, hard fact.”

Kevin Captain, a Volusia County spokesman, said in an email the county isn’t under a legal obligation to armor its shoreline, and county officials cannot speculate on whether a seawall would have prevented damage in Wilbur-by-the-Sea.

Gutted homes north of Toronita Avenue Beach Park in Wilbur-By-The-Sea, Fla., Friday, December 2, 2022. The southern Volusia coastline was devastated by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties. © Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS Gutted homes north of Toronita Avenue Beach Park in Wilbur-By-The-Sea, Fla., Friday, December 2, 2022. The southern Volusia coastline was devastated by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties.

DEP issued an emergency order allowing existing seawalls to be repaired or replaced as long as they are within the same footprint as the previous structure with a typical processing time for applications of five days, Alexandra Kuchta, a DEP spokeswoman, said in an email. Permits to build new seawalls for properties without one are being reviewed on a case-by-case basis.

A beachgoer walks past a new, reinforced fiberglass seawall in the process of being installed, south of Toronita Avenue Beach Park in Wilbur-By-The-Sea, Fla., Friday, December 2, 2022. The southern Volusia coastline was devastated by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties. © Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS A beachgoer walks past a new, reinforced fiberglass seawall in the process of being installed, south of Toronita Avenue Beach Park in Wilbur-By-The-Sea, Fla., Friday, December 2, 2022. The southern Volusia coastline was devastated by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties.

The Florida Division of Emergency Management deployed a temporary barrier called a tiger dam in Daytona Beach Shores that is designed to prevent further erosion while residents rebuild their seawalls.

Before Nicole struck, police went door-to-door evacuating condos in Daytona Beach Shores. About two dozen buildings were initially declared to be structurally unsafe.

About 13 condos, hotels and other buildings remain off limits in Daytona Beach Shores, as engineers evaluate properties, according to Volusia County. Three coastal buildings in New Smyrna Beach and two in Ponce Inlet are also listed as unsafe.

An initial damage assessment found 29 homes in Wilbur-by-the-Sea sustained damage.

Installation continues of the tiger dam by the Florida Division of Emergency Management and Volusia County along a stretch of Daytona Beach Shores, Fla., Monday, December 5, 2022. The coastline was impacted by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties. © Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS Installation continues of the tiger dam by the Florida Division of Emergency Management and Volusia County along a stretch of Daytona Beach Shores, Fla., Monday, December 5, 2022. The coastline was impacted by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties.

A pretty penny for sand

Homeowners are looking at significant repair costs to replace lost sand, rebuild seawalls and address other issues caused by the erosion, said AJ Rockwell, owner of Sea Level Development in New Smyrna Beach.

“It is pretty typical to have a million dollars of damage just in your backyard,” he said.

Insurers are denying claims because of an “erosion exclusion” in their policies, Rockwell said.

Installation continues of the tiger dam by the Florida Division of Emergency Management and Volusia County along a stretch of Daytona Beach Shores, Fla., Monday, December 5, 2022. The coastline was impacted by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties. © Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS Installation continues of the tiger dam by the Florida Division of Emergency Management and Volusia County along a stretch of Daytona Beach Shores, Fla., Monday, December 5, 2022. The coastline was impacted by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties.

Beach-quality sand is in short supply. It must be either trucked in from inland mines or dredged from the bottom of the sea. But repeated storms are making it harder to find, Rockwell said.

Researchers from the St. Augustine Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program dig, Monday, December 5, 2022, to investigate what they say is a shipwreck, possibly from the 1800s, partially uncovered during severe beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole in Daytona Beach Shores, Fla. State archeologists are reportedly expected to also visit the site this week. © Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS Researchers from the St. Augustine Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program dig, Monday, December 5, 2022, to investigate what they say is a shipwreck, possibly from the 1800s, partially uncovered during severe beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole in Daytona Beach Shores, Fla. State archeologists are reportedly expected to also visit the site this week.

The cost of sand doubled after Hurricane Ian, going from about $600 a load to $1,200, Rockwell said. The typical home on Wilbur’s oceanfront is requiring 220 to as many as 400 loads, totaling up to $480,000 just for the material.

Seawalls also aren’t cheap, costing anywhere from $2,000 to $4,000 per linear foot, Rockwell said.

The barriers help protect valuable coastal real estate, but they aren’t without drawbacks.

Beach is lost in front of a seawall because it disrupts the natural sand replacement cycle. That means less sand for the public. It also carries environmental effects, harming sea turtle nesting and habitats for shore birds. Building a seawall increases erosion on neighboring properties that are unprotected.

Gutted homes north of Toronita Avenue Beach Park in Wilbur-By-The-Sea, Fla., Friday, December 2, 2022. The southern Volusia coastline was devastated by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties. © Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS Gutted homes north of Toronita Avenue Beach Park in Wilbur-By-The-Sea, Fla., Friday, December 2, 2022. The southern Volusia coastline was devastated by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties.

Even before the most latest hurricanes, about 426 miles of Florida beaches — more than half of the 825 miles of coastline surveyed — were considered to be critically eroded, including 22 miles in Volusia County, according to a June report from the DEP.

Researchers from the St. Augustine Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program dig, Monday, December 5, 2022, to investigate what they say is shipwreck, possibly from the 1800s, partially uncovered during severe beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole in Daytona Beach Shores, Fla. State archeologists are reportedly expected to also visit the site this week. At right, work continues on the installation of a tiger dam along several hundred yards of beachfront. (Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel). © Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS Researchers from the St. Augustine Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program dig, Monday, December 5, 2022, to investigate what they say is shipwreck, possibly from the 1800s, partially uncovered during severe beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole in Daytona Beach Shores, Fla. State archeologists are reportedly expected to also visit the site this week. At right, work continues on the installation of a tiger dam along several hundred yards of beachfront. (Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel).

Local, state and federal governments share the hefty cost of beach nourishment projects. It’s a temporary fix, as the sand eventually must be replenished.

More than $1.5 billion in public funds have been spent on beach nourishment in Florida, according to a database compiled by Western Carolina University researchers that includes projects dating back to 1923.

State economists, though, say those projects have paid off. A 2015 analysis found that for every dollar spent on beach management and restoration $5 is generated through tourists who pay taxes and support businesses and hotels. High-dollar beachfront homes also are a source of property tax revenue for local governments.

Howard Marlowe, who lobbies for coastal communities in Washington, D.C., and earned the nickname “the Sand King” for his work, said opponents of beach nourishment need to look at the issue in “a realistic way as opposed to an academic way.”

The projects create a first line of defense during storms, preventing damage to everything from mom-and-pop T-shirt shops to nuclear power plants, he said.

“It’s a lot of commerce along the coast,” said Marlowe, president of Warwick Group Consultants.

Expensive road to recovery

It’s a word Volusia County leaders can’t stop saying: “unprecedented.”

The back-to-back storms proved to be a catastrophe for one of Florida’s most iconic stretches of beach where cars once raced and college students rocked out at MTV spring break concerts during the 1980s.

The beach that residents and visitors knew over the summer is gone, Jessica Fentress, coastal division director for Volusia County, said in a taped message after the storm.

“It was nothing short of devastating. ... You’ve seen tears,” she said. “You’ve seen heartbreak, and our beach is truly changed.”

The surf continues to hit impacted dunes south of Toronita Avenue Beach Park in Wilbur-By-The-Sea, Fla., Friday, December 2, 2022. The southern Volusia coastline was devastated by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties. © Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS The surf continues to hit impacted dunes south of Toronita Avenue Beach Park in Wilbur-By-The-Sea, Fla., Friday, December 2, 2022. The southern Volusia coastline was devastated by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties.

Nicole, a rare November Category 1 hurricane when it made landfall near Vero Beach, caused $522 million in damage on top of the $377 million caused by Hurricane Ian, according to the county’s preliminary estimates.

Gutted homes north of Toronita Avenue Beach Park in Wilbur-By-The-Sea, Fla., Friday, December 2, 2022. The southern Volusia coastline was devastated by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties. © Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS Gutted homes north of Toronita Avenue Beach Park in Wilbur-By-The-Sea, Fla., Friday, December 2, 2022. The southern Volusia coastline was devastated by significant beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole, causing millions in damage to oceanfront properties.

President Joe Biden issued a major disaster declaration for Ian, but he has not issued one for Nicole. U.S. Sens. Marco Rubio and Rick Scott are urging Biden to declare Nicole a major disaster, which would unlock additional federal assistance.

County officials fear a winter storm could worsen coastal erosion even more. Gov. Ron DeSantis announced $20 million for emergency sand placement, $5 million of which is expected to go to Volusia.

Researchers from the St. Augustine Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program dig, Monday, December 5, 2022, to investigate what they say is a shipwreck, possibly from the 1800s, partially uncovered during severe beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole in Daytona Beach Shores, Fla. State archeologists are reportedly expected to also visit the site this week. © Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS Researchers from the St. Augustine Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program dig, Monday, December 5, 2022, to investigate what they say is a shipwreck, possibly from the 1800s, partially uncovered during severe beach erosion from Hurricane Ian and Tropical Storm Nicole in Daytona Beach Shores, Fla. State archeologists are reportedly expected to also visit the site this week.

That’s only a start of what will need to be spent to rebuild Volusia’s coastline, said Stephen Leatherman, a Florida International University geoscientist known as “Dr. Beach” for his annual rankings of the best beaches in America.

“Volusia County is looking at a pretty big bill,” Leatherman said. “I’d say hundreds of millions of dollars.”

Sand will return in the summer, Leatherman said, but he expects extensive beach nourishment and improvements in coastal defenses will be needed. That could affect the future of beach driving in Volusia County because the new sand will be coarser, he said.

Volusia has been fortunate because it has been able to maintain its beaches without nourishment projects, unlike other parts of the state that regularly bring in sand, Leatherman said.

A $25 million nourishment project was recently approved for nearby Flagler Beach, which sustained damage from latest hurricanes, most notably Hurricane Matthew in 2016. About $108 million has been spent on nourishment projects in Brevard County since 1966, according to Western Carolina University’s database.

Volusia County is working with state and federal officials to identify funding to restore its beaches, but it doesn’t have a cost estimate or timeframe yet, said Captain, the county spokesman.

Rockwell, the contractor who lives in New Smyrna Beach, said the damage to Volusia’s beaches is extensive.

“The county is going to have a tremendous problem drawing people to our beaches,” he said. “Our beaches have always been known as the drive-on beach. ... The only way to get the visitors and everyone back in our hotels is to get the beach built back up.”

Statewide, Hurricane Ian is on track to be the second costliest disaster in the United States with up to $60 billion in projected insured losses, according to the Insurance Information Institute. Only Hurricane Katrina caused more when adjusting for inflation, racking up about $90 billion in insured losses.

Nicole added another $1.5 billion in losses.

But Lavigna, the Wilbur-by-the-Sea resident, said she doesn’t want to abandon the seaside community she has loved for decades.

“There is nothing like living on the ocean,” she said.

sswisher@orlandosentinel.com

©2022 Orlando Sentinel. Visit orlandosentinel.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Fri, 09 Dec 2022 01:13:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/news/not-enough-money-to-save-them-all-florida-oceanside-towns-grapple-with-double-hurricane-whammy/ar-AA1534Q9
Killexams : UCLA football heads to the Sun Bowl to face Pitt

After a nine-win regular season, UCLA will look to tie a program record in wins at the Sun Bowl on Dec. 30 against Pitt in El Paso.

The Bruins have appeared in the Sun Bowl four previous times, most recently in 2013 when they beat Virginia Tech 42-12. UCLA is 3-1 in the Sun Bowl.

The Bruins are set to make their first appearance in a bowl game since 2017. UCLA was invited to the Holiday Bowl last season for its first bowl in the Chip Kelly era, but the game was canceled at the last minute after several COVID-19 infections.

UCLA went 9-3 in the regular season, with wins over then-No. 11 Utah and No. 15 Washington. It finished the season ranked No. 18 in the College Football Playoff rankings and No. 18 in the AP Top 25 poll.

The Bruins were 8-1 entering the final three games of the season, with the Pac-12 title and a possible College Football Playoff bid available. But UCLA was upset by Arizona on Nov. 12, and then lost an epic crosstown rivalry match to USC the following week.

“We were close,” Kelly said in a conference call on Sunday afternoon. “We were about a play away in two games from being an 11-1 team.”

But Kelly said the team was excited to have nearly a month to practice ahead of the bowl game.

“We get to play football for about another 26 days now,” Kelly said. “So we’re fired up to be in this game against a really good Pitt team.”

UCLA has faced Pitt 14 times in its history and is 9-5 against the school. Their most latest matchup was in 1972. The Bruins do have some familiarity with Pitt quarterback Kedon Slovis, who was at USC from 2019 to 2021 before transferring.

It is not immediately clear if there will be UCLA players opting out of the bowl game. Kelly said he hasn’t had any discussions with players yet, though the team had full participation in practice on Saturday and Sunday.

UCLA has finals this week while the coaches hit the road to recruit, and won’t be back on the practice field until next Saturday.

The Bruins finished tied for fifth in the Pac-12. Their bowl matchup was likely impacted by USC’s loss to Utah in the Pac-12 Championship Game, which knocked USC out of playoff contention and shuffled the order of the Pac-12’s bowl bids. The Las Vegas Bowl — which chose Oregon State and Florida — had also been a possible destination for the Bruins.

A win at Cal to finish the season gave UCLA nine wins — its first nine-win season since 2014. A Bruins’ victory in the bowl game would tie the program record for most wins in a season. UCLA has won 10 games nine different times.

“It’s not something that’s just regularly done around here, getting nine wins,” Thompson-Robinson said after the Cal game. “We worked really hard. I’ve been here for a very long time and to see the growth and all the things that go into it is really special.”

Thompson-Robinson said after the Cal game that his availability for the bowl game was “to be determined,” though the Las Vegas Bowl would have been a tough decision. Thompson-Robinson starred at Bishop Gorman High School in Las Vegas.

“Obviously I want to go back and play in front of my hometown, and to be able to get the opportunity to do that would be very special,” Thompson-Robinson said.

Instead, Thompson-Robinson and the Bruins will be in El Paso on Dec. 30.

Kicker and punter Nicholas Barr-Mira, who reportedly entered the transfer portal last week, will be available in the game, according to Kelly.

The status of defensive coordinator Bill McGovern —  who missed the last five games with an unspecified illness — remains uncertain. Kelly said the coach was back on the field in practice but didn’t specify if he was in a coaching capacity.

Kelly said the date of the game falls at a good time, with finals and a key recruiting week coming up.

“The ability to get another 12 to 14 practices in before we play the bowl game, I think is critical for your development,” Kelly said.

Author

Eric He is a sports freelancer for the Southern California News Group. He also is the LA City Hall Bureau Chief for City News Service. He is a graduate of USC, where he majored in journalism and served as sports editor and managing editor of the Daily Trojan. A Bay Area native, he reluctantly concedes that the food is just a bit better down here.

Sun, 04 Dec 2022 06:20:00 -0600 Eric He en-US text/html https://www.dailynews.com/2022/12/04/ucla-football-heads-to-the-sun-bowl-to-face-pitt/
Killexams : Violence against Women: Stumbling Block to Economic Development

Stopping violence against women is not only a moral imperative, but also new evidence that depicts it can help the economy leading to development of a country. It’s now called the “shadow pandemic”—an increase in physical, sexual and emotional abuse of women. No woman or girl in the world is entirely free of the risk of violence and abuse. The evidence is only growing globally. In Bangladesh, the number of reported cases of gender-violence increased by more than 130 percent in latest days.

Violence against women is a major problem in all countries, especially developing and the least developed countries.  In this existing scenario, International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women is being observed on 25 November 2022. It is a 16-Day international campaign to challenge violence against women and girls. The campaign runs every year from 25 November to 10 December, Human Rights Day

The financial impact of violence to the global economy comes with a hefty price tag $14.4 trillion, to be precise. The consequences of violence amount to considerable direct and indirect costs that erode economic development, increase instability and increase inequality. Domestic violence exacerbates economic inequality, as both economic abuse, and other tactics of violence, generate costs for women and contribute to financial instability and stress.

Violence against women has huge direct and indirect costs for survivors, employers and the public sector in terms of health, police, legal and related expenditures as well as lost wages and productivity. Gender-based violence severely restricts women’s ability to exercise their reproductive rights, with grave consequences for sexual and reproductive health. Women who experience violence tend to have more children than they themselves want. This not only shows how little control they have over decisions affecting their sexual and reproductive lives, but also reduces the potential demographic benefits of reproductive health, estimated to reduce poverty by 14 percent.

Violence against women and girls obviously affects victims in many damaging ways; physically, emotionally, and beyond. A 2018 survey by the Institute for Women's Policy Research (IWPR) revealed just how deeply violence can affect survivors' education, career, and economic stability over the course of their lives. When violence is committed against women, they become mentally, physically, and emotionally disturbed; and finally they lose their creativity leading to less productivity for their family and society.

The costs and consequence of violence against women last for generations. Children who witness violence against their mothers or female family members are at increased risk of anxiety, depression, low-self esteem, inattention to study, and poor school performance, among other problems that harm their well-being and personal development.  In a study, it is found in Nicaragua that 63 percent of children of abused women had to repeat a school year and they left school on average 4 years earlier than other children.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the financial impact of domestic violence ranges from individual to societal. In fact, they say the lifetime economic cost associated with medical services, lost productivity from work, criminal justice, and other costs, was $3.6 trillion. The cost of domestic violence over a victim’s lifetime was $103,767 for women and $23,414 for men.

It is an obstacle to achieving equality, development, peace as well as to the fulfillment of women and girls’ human rights. All in all, the promise of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) - to leave no one behind - cannot be achieved without putting an end to violence or reduction of violence against women and girls in remarkable level.

The violence impedes economic development in every unit of a nation, say a family. From an economic point of view, violence reduces foreign and domestic investment as well as domestic savings, thus hindering prospects for long term growth. From the development standpoint, one of the effects of violence is to dissuade individuals from investing time and money in education.

In a research conducted CARE Bangladesh - Cost of Violence against Women (COVAW) initiative 10 year back found that the total cost of domestic violence in Bangladesh in 2010 equated to 143 billion taka (over US$1.8 billion). This amounted to 2.05 per cent of GDP of that time, or the equivalent of 12.65 per cent of government spending that year. Needless to say the situation has not been improved rather it deteriorated. According to CARE Bangladesh’s cost analysis study, survivors and their families paid an average cost of nearly Tk 11,900 per family in direct costs. For perpetrators and their families, the direct cost was estimated at about T10,400.

According to latest research findings by Action Aid and Jatiya Nari Nirjatan Protirodh Forum (JNNPF), two-thirds of all violence against women takes place inside victims' premises. In a survey, conducted by Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics (BBS) found that among the victims nearly 73% never reported the incidents; only 2% women reported them to social leaders, and only 1% takes legal step.

It is very inspiring news that, unprecedented awareness and momentum have been created  against the women oppression because of the relentless work of grassroots activists, women’s human rights defenders and survivors. Though many preventive and protective measures have been taken by the government around the world, violence against women is not lowering down.

As a preventive measure, the government of Bangladesh established a helpline centre in 2012, with a helpline number 109 available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, to provide the immediate service to victims and links up to relevant agencies.  It’s a confidential service that offers legal advice, police assistance, telephone counseling, referrals to other organizations service, information regarding violence issues.

When we end violence against women, everyone wins. We believe that the norms and cultures that cause and continue violence against women hurt us all. These norms include limiting, damaging notions and models of the “right” way to be a man or a woman. The more we challenge and dismantle those norms, the more we are all safe, free, and able to be our best and realest selves. Ending violence against women will help end violence against everyone. We stand against all forms of violence and discrimination. And in fact, all are interconnected.

(The writer is educational researcher and teacher educator.)

Email: [email protected]

Source: Sun Editorial

Sat, 26 Nov 2022 03:04:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.daily-sun.com/post/658681/Violence-against-Women:-Stumbling-Block-to-Economic-Development
Killexams : Sun, sea and tax breaks for homebuyers on the Costa del Sol

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When Zsolt Kigyossy recently sold his Budapest-based games development company, he could have chosen anywhere to enjoy early retirement with his wife and two children, who are aged 12 and 15. Hungarian winters didn’t appeal, so instead the family has relocated to Marbella on the Costa del Sol.

“I had money to spend, so why not spend it on something fantastic?” says Kigyossy, 54, who will move soon into two penthouse apartments that he is combining into one at Epic Marbella, a new Fendi-branded development where properties start at €4.5mn.

“People don’t come to Marbella to make money. They come to spend it and to enjoy life,” he says. “There’s nothing better than sitting in a chiringuito on the beach with a cold beer and freshly grilled fish.”

Foreign demand for property in Spain hit an all-time high in the third quarter of this year, according to Spanish land registry data. And the Costa del Sol has emerged as a particular haven, especially among Scandinavian buyers. Spanish Notaries’ figures show the number of Swedish buyers in Málaga province — which includes the Costa del Sol — in the first half of the year was 36 per cent up year-on-year to 1,102, according to analysis by Mark Stucklin at Spanish Property Insight Data Hub.

In Marbella, home to most of the coast’s super-prime properties, including beachfront estates on the Golden Mile priced €30mn-plus, sales in the first three months of the year were 65 per cent higher than a year before, reaching their highest number since 2004.

The fact the European Central Bank’s interest rate rises at the beginning of November were widely anticipated “may have encouraged buyers to get ahead of the curve”, Stucklin says — though some estate agents say their international buyers rarely use financing, especially if they want to take advantage of the golden visa scheme, available to non-EU nationals who spend more than (an unmortgaged) €500,000 on property.

There is a new fiscal incentive that is encouraging wealthy European buyers to consider the southern Spanish coast, however. Andalucía is the only Spanish region, outside of Madrid, to overturn its wealth tax (impuesto de patrimonio) in a move to attract high-earners to relocate there. Since September 20, anyone who is a tax resident in Andalucía and has worldwide assets above €700,000 receives a 100 per cent deduction on the wealth tax.

The Centre Pompidou, Málaga, an offshoot of the Paris museum
The Centre Pompidou, Málaga, an offshoot of the Paris museum © M Ramírez/Alamy 

The region also recently scrapped its inheritance tax (IHT), which means that anyone (resident or not) who inherits Andalucían assets of up to €1mn is no longer liable to pay IHT. 

For 39-year-old Swede Mikael Johansson, who recently moved from London to a €3.3mn villa in Nagüeles near Marbella’s Golden Mile and who runs several social enterprise businesses, the tax break comes as a windfall. “We had factored wealth tax into our financials when moving, so it’s a welcome surprise,” he says.

Agents, meanwhile, are divided over how much impact it will have on encouraging buyers in Andalucía. “I’ve had no one specifically mention the wealth tax issue, and it’s only aimed at full-time residents, not second-home owners, who still make up the majority of foreign buyers there,” says Barbara Wood, founder of buying agency The Property Finders. There is also talk of Spain introducing a new “solidarity tax” next year for those with a net wealth above €3mn, which would cancel out the benefits for some.

But for the wealthiest buyers, the tax break brings sizeable savings. Assuming no other assets, someone with €3mn taxable wealth — which means €4mn assets (including property), as residents get a €1mn allowance — would previously have paid €31,500 a year in wealth tax. For someone with €20mn, their annual wealth tax bill would have been €400,000. 

Mike Trezise, a tech entrepreneur from Cardiff who is also due to move into an apartment in Epic Marbella soon, describes the tax overhaul as “life-changing”. “I’ve spent a lot of time in Marbella in latest years, but I’ve never been able to become resident due to the onerous tax system, in particular wealth tax,” he says. Still, some HNWIs may bristle at the prospect of completing the Modelo 720 form to claim their rebate, thinking of it as a way for the tax office to keep tabs on the wealthy.

Scrapping the wealth tax is a good marketing move, says Carlos Rodriguez, co-managing director at Sierra Blanca Estates, developers of Epic Marbella and an adjacent scheme of five Karl Lagerfeld-branded villas (one of which recently sold for €15mn). “People will view Andalucía as tax-friendly. Portugal has been great at selling itself on that score. Now we need to do the same in Spain,” he says.

Málaga city, too, is growing in popularity among high-budget buyers, propelled by the likes of Google and Citigroup opening major hubs there. The city is hoping for a further economic boost if it wins its bid to host Expo 2027. Apartments at Sierra Blanca Tower, a new beachfront development, are selling for €12,000 per sq m, 30 per cent more than their launch price three years ago. “That price is unheard of here. It proves there’s a market. We need more products like it,” says Rodriguez.

Whether it’s the superyacht and champagne buckets-on-the-beach scene that draws buyers or the coast’s less ostentatious charms, fiscal breaks will always play second fiddle to the lifestyle pleasures of a region blessed with a beautiful coastline, mountains and captivating cities. “Wealth tax or not,” says Johansson, “buyers will always come to this region as it’s such a beautiful place to bring up a family.”

Buying guide

  • Between April and June, the average property price in Málaga province was €2,016 per sq m, up 9 per cent on the year before, according to Spain’s Ministry of Development. The number of sales was up 60 per cent over the same period.

What you can buy . . . 

Contemporary villa, Nueva Andalucía, €3.875mn

A modern villa in a gated complex, a short drive from Puerto Banús. The 516 sq m house has five bedrooms, seven bathrooms, a gym and games room. For sale with Knight Frank.


Villa, Golden Mile, €6.5mn

A five-bedroom, five-bathroom property in the Casablanca neighbourhood of Marbella’s Golden Mile, 300m from the beach. It has a separate guesthouse with its own roof terrace and sauna. On the market with Lucas Fox.


Villa, La Zagaleta, €12.75mn

An eight-bedroom, 2,050 sq m villa in a gated community, 25 minutes’ drive from central Marbella. The house, built in 2018, has indoor and outdoor pools, a cinema and gym, while the gated estate has two golf courses, equestrian centre and helipad. Available through Home Hunts.

Find out about our latest stories first — follow @FTProperty on Twitter or @ft_houseandhome on Instagram

Wed, 30 Nov 2022 02:36:00 -0600 en-GB text/html https://www.ft.com/content/add7e35b-49c9-46a6-b2fd-f2b9d5a35efd
Killexams : Sun Resorts announces rebrand

Luxury Mauritian Hotel Group, Sun Resorts, has rebranded to Sunlife.

Image supplied: The Sunlife rebrand was announced at a celebration on Sugar Beach

The announcement was made at a #ComeAlive celebration at Sugar Beach in Mauritius. The evening was filled by spectacular artistic performances and was illuminated by a heart-stirring evolutive décor. At its most emotional point, local talent AnneGa sang Dance until the Rise, a hymn written especially for Sunlife.

The newly launched Come Alive Collection introduces a range of special experiences available across all the Sunlife resorts with clear messages around the core values of Sunlife.

Francois Eynaud, Sunlife’s chief executive officer, says: “I am extremely proud to introduce Sunlife, a brand looking to the future, celebrating a life in the sun, a life enjoyed with the inherent magic of our beautiful island. Through this rebrand our vision is to celebrate Mauritian culture alongside each of our hotels’ unique identities.”

Additionally, besides a new logo, the group has harnessed the power of technology with a new-look website, as well as an in-resort app to offer guests a seamless encounter, from the booking stage through to the in-resort details and unique experiences.

Guests can look forward to Crazy Croquet, Beauty Bubble, Putting on the Ritz, Strictly Sugar, Time or Tea, L’Atelier Les Sens at Sugar Beach and Pirogue Painting, Brilliant Breakfast, Village Vibe Marsan Confit, Sega Zoomba and Coral Farming at La Pirogue.

The modern Long Beach offers the experience of seeing the Piazza transformed, the Bio-Diversity Trail, Santé, Swing and Drift and Energy Gym. Izzy the Bee, the new mascot of the Sunlife Kid’s Club will also guide our youngest guests on a journey of learning that encourages their critical understanding and connection with nature.

The rebrand is also a reinforcement and recommitment to sustainability. Sunlife is a signatory to the United Nations Global Compact and is committed to upholding the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals.

Its sustainability programme aims to lead the way in terms of sustainable and impact-driven travel experiences and ensure its properties function sustainably and responsibly. The ethos behind the programme focuses on leading with kindness and showing that same kindness to the land, resources and people.

Wed, 07 Dec 2022 10:00:00 -0600 en-ZA text/html https://www.msn.com/en-za/lifestyle/travel/sun-resorts-announces-rebrand/ar-AA1545GF
Killexams : Community group makes headway at neglected Morgan Park corner

At the northwest corner of 115th and Halsted streets sits a stretch of urban pavement that bears mute witness to Chicago’s economic divide.

The 12-acre parcel fronts on two busy streets. A Jewel grocery closed there years ago, and nobody has moved in since. Put a parcel of this size in Fulton Market or Logan Square, and developers would race to line up a deal. On the South Side, though, things can be excruciatingly slow — if they happen at all.

It’s taken a nonprofit group years of effort to get control of the property, arrange key partnerships in the private sector and develop a plan for the site that passes muster. But the resolve of the Far South Community Development Corp. could soon be rewarded.

Abraham Lacy, the group’s president and CEO, has been running the gantlet of community meetings any for-profit developer would recognize. He said various proposed uses were floated and rejected. The availability of fresh food is always an issue in the Black community, but that wasn’t a pressing need for this particular site, as there’s an Aldi just south on Halsted. Also, when the Jewel closed, the company wasn’t abandoning the market; it opened a larger store a few blocks west.

So, working with the Chicago architectural firm Lamar Johnson Collaborative, Lacy’s group has crafted a plan for 286 residences, a mix of multifamily buildings and townhomes, some with subsidized rents.

They call it Morgan Park Commons. The corner is on the edge of Morgan Park, abutting Roseland and Pullman. The development would include about 18,000 square feet of retail space along the major streets. There also would be a 3-acre park connecting to the Major Taylor Bike Trail, along the western edge of the property.

Lacy said in an area where single-family homes predominate, the development would offer a new housing option. The park and other open space would help with stormwater management while making the development an attractive place to live, he said. As is, the site — an empty, 67,000-square-foot store with a parking lot — has been an eyesore.

Abraham Lacy, president and CEO of the Far South Community Development Corp.

Abraham Lacy, president and CEO of the Far South Community Development Corp.

In a sign the project is nearly set for city zoning review, the planning department’s Committee on Design looked it over Nov. 9 and gave feedback. The committee is an independent group of urban design professionals that advises developers and the city, suggesting improvements.

The recommendations aren’t binding, but the process amounts to a high-level focus group offering free advice. Developers have grumbled about the committee, but they get a lot of benefit from it.

Committee members liked much about the project, including its attention to community spaces. But they said the site plan gives too much space to streets and to parking. At full buildout, the site could have as many as 346 parking spaces.

Reed Kroloff, dean of the architecture college at the Illinois Institute of Technology, suggested rethinking the street grid. Hana Ishikawa, principal at Site Design Group, said: “The boulevards are problematic,” so wide that “it doesn’t feel like a connected community.” Architect John Ronan said putting four-story buildings along the site’s edges, with shorter buildings in the interior, could create a harmful “fortress-like” effect.

Lacy said he and his architects are considering revisions but noted neighbors wanted the development to have ample on-site parking.

An employee of the neighborhood group for 11 years, Lacy said this is his first large-scale project. He’s hoping to get started on site preparation next year, with construction of the first phase along Halsted beginning a year later.

The organization has been resourceful in seeking help. The state, through efforts of the Illinois Legislative Black Caucus, appropriated $15 million in seed money for the project, and Lacy said he’s waiting for the funds to be released.

City officials have determined it will qualify for low-income housing tax credits. And Lacy is drawing on advice from prominent South Side investor Leon Walker, managing principal of DL3 Realty, and from Preservation of Affordable Housing, a nonprofit that builds multifamily homes.

“They have a heart to teach the next generation of developers,” Lacy said. “I’m leading this project, but I’m observing at the same time.”

In addition, Far South is a finalist for a $10 million Chicago Prize to be awarded by the Pritzker Traubert Foundation. It’s seeking money for a broad community investment initiative. Lacy said the group targets new housing and retail space along Halsted from 99th to 122nd streets, hoping to make it a more attractive southern gateway to the city. He said Morgan Park Commons can proceed without that grant.

If that neglected corner gets redone, who knows what the community can accomplish?

A rendering shows part of the interior of the planned Morgan Park Commons development.

A rendering shows part of the interior of the planned Morgan Park Commons development.

Mon, 28 Nov 2022 03:19:00 -0600 en text/html https://chicago.suntimes.com/2022/11/28/23478297/morgan-park-housing-project-far-south-community-development-corporation-115th-halsted
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