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Killexams : SUN PROGRAMMER approach - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/310-036 Search results Killexams : SUN PROGRAMMER approach - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/310-036 https://killexams.com/exam_list/SUN Killexams : Chicago private school defends LGBTQ sex ed, tightens security after right-wing viral video

An elite Chicago private school tightened security and disabled its Twitter and Facebook accounts after a video of its dean of students secretly recorded by a conservative group went viral on Wednesday.

The video captures the dean talking last week about a visit to Francis W. Parker School by an LGBTQ health organization to discuss queer sexual health with high schoolers. The video of that conversation was edited by the right-wing group before it was posted.

Parker leaders sent a letter to the school community late Wednesday saying “we are heartbroken that one of our colleague’s words have been severely misrepresented for a malicious purpose.” The letter offered strong support for their faculty and staff and for the school’s “inclusive, LGBTQ+ affirming, and comprehensive approach to sex education.”

The school said the local alderman helped it expand the police presence around its Lincoln Park campus, and it has implemented higher security measures. At least one person marched in front of the school on Thursday to protest the school’s sex ed curriculum.

Project Veritas, the New York-based right-wing organization that made the video, claims on its website that it is “creating an army of guerilla journalists.” Its operatives assume fake identities and secretly record conversations, often attempting to shame or discredit progressive organizations and media outlets, including NPR.

The video footage was captured by an operative disguised as an attendee at the National Association of Independent Schools conference last week.

The operative recorded himself talking to Joseph Bruno, Parker’s dean of students. In the video, Bruno described an event during the school’s annual Pride Week last May. During an optional lunchtime session for high schoolers, educators from Howard Brown Health presented a lesson on queer sexual health that included showing sex toys to students. Bruno also mentioned a storytime and photo-op with a drag queen. The video does not mention that both events were optional.

The video, which had been viewed more than 4 million times as of Thursday afternoon, has made its way around right-wing media accounts and news sites. #ExposeGroomers trended Thursday on Twitter, and Fox News picked up the story in the morning.

Project Veritas posted a second video showing founder James O’Keefe attempting to confront Bruno on Wednesday afternoon on Parker’s campus. Bruno walks away from O’Keefe and his cameraman. O’Keefe then asks parents if they’re aware the school is “giving sex toys to children” in a voice loud enough for nearby elementary school-age students to hear. He is asked to leave by a parent volunteer.

Targets of previous Project Veritas undercover video projects have included educators and teachers unions. The American Federation of Teachers in 2018 posted about a “heavily-spliced” Project Veritas video that misrepresented the union’s response to an accusation of teacher misconduct.

This latest campaign is part of a trend of online right-wing attacks against LGBTQ+ books and events for children that have sometimes led to threats and violence. Earlier this month, an independent school in Clintonville, Ohio, canceled a drag queen storytime event after a post on the right-wing Twitter account LibsofTikTok inspired the Proud Boys, a militia group, to plan an armed rally outside the school.

Parker leaders said in their letter that they “are sickened by this group’s deceptive tactics, their invasion during a People of Color conference, and their attack on the LGBTQ+ community” and offered strong support for the dean.

“Parker administrators and Parker’s Board of Trustees support Parker’s programming, the strength and inclusivity of our curriculum, and the dedicated and talented faculty and staff that teach it.”

The school is offering mental health check-ins to students and held an assembly Thursday to discuss the news.

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 10:01:00 -0600 en text/html https://chicago.suntimes.com/education/2022/12/8/23500799/project-veritas-chicago-school-sex-ed-lgbtq-francis-parker
Killexams : Tapping into the buzz surrounding electronic duo, Wood Drift

WOOD DRIFT is a music project realised between Demi and Andy Dennis, two lifelong friends, bonded through formative experiences on the dance floors of some of London’s most iconic clubs during a golden era of music in the 90’s and noughties.

Demi’s career trajectory since then took his brand of music to all four corners of the globe with numerous awards, accolades and release compilations which endeared many to his brand of sound and personality.

The post rave, progressive sound with a more sophisticated euphoric approach in its composition underpins the Wood Drift vision.

A handful of single releases which featured on the Earth compilation, spearheaded by Eli from Soul Clap and Hernan Cattaneo’s Sunbeat imprint now sees the pair noticed by a wider audience with their first full EP release on Do Not Sit Recordings.

The three track BuzzTap EP begins to demonstrate the breadth of their work together as Wood Drift. Timeless and universal are strong currents that flow in their production approach. We look forward to their full length album in 2023

We caught up with the duo and asked them to talk us through a playlist of their influences.

Payfone - Sofian (12" Mix)

These type of slow tempo sounds always run a risk of noodling for the sake of it. We try to ensure that whatever we make has some element of tension and momentum regardless of tempo. There has to be purpose. Here we have a very cool outing from Payfone that marries with soft spoken vocals which are very much a sonic blueprint of the comfort end of sounds we produce in the studio.

Maricopa - One Impulse

This is a classic Wood Drift influence sounding record. Drifting into a deep-sea ocean of harmonies and melodies that are underpinned by a soft rhythm section that keeps the momentum flowing. Positively charged.

Afterlife - La Torre

A comfort sounding trip that rhythmically sits perfectly with the soft pads and steady groove we look for in our productions.  A beautiful piece that slowly sits into your conscious stream.

Margino - Happy People

There is also very much a soulful and playful side to our characters too. At heart we are positively charged souls and there's so much 70's and 80's boogie music that we continue to unearth. This is a gorgeous slice of boogie funk for the dancefloor.

Hypnotique - Le Divan

A more uptempo slice of synth pop goodness that still draws influence from the 80's with the signature rhythms and snares. And who doesn't love the sound of a sultry French spoken voice too :) When Wood Drift pumps, it tends to follow and flow like this.

Body San - Last Breath

We're always striving to create ambient music and soundscapes that are tinged with that sense of euphoria.

A.C. Band - Good Feelings

Summer poolside vibes aplenty here!

Mystic Jungle - Money Wonder

Tune repeat alert. That iconic drum programming sound from the Roland Cr78. But that's not what carries this. Simplicity at its best here and what we strive to achieve with our work.

Wubble U - Time

Another key component in our music making is storytelling. We love the extended intro on this and is a great mix tool to use in your sets. An uptempo classic house number that ooozes class. Wait for the drop. A dancefloor moment!

Smith & Mudd - The Surveyor

We're big fans of the output from Claremont 56. We love every aspect of how they package their music as well. This is simply timeless. Pure Balaeric feels here in the slow steady tempo range.

Tommy Rawson - 7 Days (12" Digital Bonus)

Back to an uptempo bounce here. Tinged with a mature slice of funk and progressive. Very reminiscent of the vintage Spirit Catcher vibe. Another timeless masterpiece here by Tommy Rawson.

Semtek - Angel

Another example of the bounce we push for with our our sound. Simple bassline grooves and snappy rhythms with fleeting dreamy sounds layered on top. Yes please.

Trembling Blue Stars - The Rainbow

Hard to believe this was made 25 years ago. An indie pop band that formed in 1995 that unfortunately disbanded in 2010. A song with timeless lyrics that touches the soul.

Alias "Who's Story?" - Da Journey

Classic garage rhythms, with a killer groove but with the signiature elements that turn the Wood Drift camp on. Another timeless number.

Wood Drift - Buzztap EP is out now on Do Not Sit On The Furniture Recordings

CLICK ARTWORK TO STREAM ON SPOTIFY
Thu, 08 Dec 2022 02:47:00 -0600 en-gb text/html https://www.thescottishsun.co.uk/tvandshowbiz/music/9893821/tapping-into-the-buzz-surrounding-electronic-duo-wood-drift/
Killexams : New WFMT program brings fresh, young and hopefully hip perspective to classical music

Hoity-toity, pedantic or snooty.

Right or wrong, these stereotypes are sometimes associated with classical-music programming on the radio. And it’s just such perceptions — or misperceptions — that the hosts of “Sounds Classical,” a new Friday evening program on WFMT-FM (98.7) beginning Dec. 9, want to dispel.

The show, featuring Kristina Lynn, 31, and LaRob K. Rafael, 29, is meant to offer a fresh, down-to-earth and, yes, fun, approach to classical music at the same time as it expands the very idea of what the genre can be.

“I think we can all agree,” Lynn said, “that sometimes, if you’re not in the classical-music world, it can seem hard to reach or unapproachable in certain ways. You associate it with these grand music halls, these intellectual things and these bigger-than-life composers who are sometimes not very relatable.” 

Rather than focusing on Beethoven’s life span or the number of Mozart piano concertos, Rafael wants to explore the emotional aspects of classical music: “How do we feel when we hear this piece? Why do we like playing this piece on the radio? What does it evoke?”

In conceiving a new show for WFMT, said General Manager George Preston, the station wanted to present classical music from a younger perspective and provide more exposure for some of the station’s newer in-house talent.

“Over the past few years,” Preston said, “we’ve been broadening our play list at WFMT to be very inclusive, and we thought this would be a great opportunity to sort of help classical presentation on the radio evolve into the 21st century.”

Station leaders picked the 8 p.m. time slot on Fridays for the new hourlong program in part because of the station’s solid ratings at that time. In addition, listeners tend to engage more closely with its content in the evenings than during the day, when WFMT’s programming sometimes serves as background to other activities. 

Lynn and Rafael emerged as ideal choices as the hosts, Preston said, because they are “super-creative” and classically trained musicians — Lynn a trumpeter and Rafael a singer — and because of their “wonderful chemistry” and curious minds. 

Both joined WFMT’s announcing team in 2020. Lynn is also the station’s operations manager, and Rafael serves as founder and artistic director of Hearing in Color, a Chicago organization devoted to sharing music and composers who have been historically excluded.

Though the two attended DePaul University at the same time, they met at WMFT. They didn’t have a chance to really get to know each other until they began working on the show, and from their first minutes in the studio together, their personalities clicked.

“We get along very well,” Lynn said. “We have fun talking about music. We’re laughing. He’s a singer, so he’s singing the music. We’re getting emotional, and I think that dynamic between us is really exciting. It’s different than what you normally hear on WFMT. We don’t have a lot of co-hosted things at all, so it’s really nice to hear our dynamic together.” 

When they begin an installment of the show, the two hosts have a theme and a general direction they want the discussion to go. “But all of the reactions to the music or the spur-of-the-moment conversation just happen organically, and that’s what I really like,” Rafael said. 

In addition to music and their own conversations, the two plan to incorporate interviews with local artists and national figures. They have finished the first two installments of the show and are working on programs for the rest of the year, including one that looks at the best of 2022.

A focus of “Sounds Classical” is asking what “classical music” means in the 21st century and examining how the genre’s boundaries continue to bend and expand. The two dive right into that Topic in the Dec. 9 episode with music by such past and present composers as Michael Abels, Ludwig van Beethoven, Carlos Gesualdo and Max Richter. 

“It’s actually really hard to nail down an answer to that in today’s world, at least,” Lynn said. “That’s what we discovered. Is it a very Euro-centric perspective? It is just Western music? Is it just notated music or orchestral music? We want to include other voices than just what we have always learned about.”

A theme Rafael hopes to examine, for example, is the influence of hip-hop on classical music and vice versa. “There are shockingly so many references to classical music in hip-hop,” he said, “so I’m excited to talk to experts about how people decide to trial music. Why do they choose strings? Why do they choose orchestral arrangements and what that adds?”

While WFMT is constantly updating its musical repertory and presenting varied short-run series and specials, an inaugural show like “Sounds Classical” is a rarity. 

“It doesn’t happen all that often, to be honest,” Preston said. “To have a new, weekly hourlong program, it’s a pretty big deal.” 

Mon, 05 Dec 2022 02:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://chicago.suntimes.com/2022/12/5/23491328/wfmt-sounds-classical-show-kristina-lynn-larob-k-rafael
Killexams : Baltimore doubles down on curing city ‘of the disease of gun violence’ | GUEST COMMENTARY

Imagine this: A woman answers a knock at her door, and is greeted by community violence intervention workers who tell her that her grandson, whom she lives wih and who recently recovered from a gunshot, is thinking about retaliating. In fact, he’s said that he’s going to shoot the person who shot him. These workers had received a warning call from the woman’s son, who is currently serving a federal prison sentence, and is gravely concerned about both her safety and that of his own son. The workers tell the grandmother that she can’t stay in the house. They remain with her as she collects her things, and they move her to a safe location.

Back in the neighborhood, these front line workers undertake the deeply tailored work of cooling tensions and mediating the conflict. They locate the grandson and talk him down from retaliating, while making referrals for wraparound supports, including victim services and life coaching. After four days, the workers inform the grandmother that it’s safe for her to return home.

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Now imagine that this is a true story.

Because it is.

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Thanks to this life-saving intervention, there have been no incidents between the parties since. And it is just one example of many community violence interventions, or CVIs, underway in Baltimore.

Many residents know of the city’s Safe Streets program. It uses an evidence-based public health intervention known as “cure violence” in its work, reaching out to those at the highest risk of shooting someone or of getting shot within a set area that corresponds to BPD violent crime data in a 2.6 square miles region. And it serves as the cornerstone of the work in the Mayor’s Office of Neighborhood Safety and Engagement (MONSE), which I oversee. But we know we must cover more ground with the way we leverage and coordinate our partnerships.

Safe Streets is one component of the multi-faceted CVI ecosystem, which includes more than just outreach and violence intervention. It provides victim services, life coaching, crisis response management and other programming. The physical care the grandson in our true story received at the hospital, along with the outreach and violence intervention, helped him, his grandmother and his community in the moment. But without the provision of mental health, victim and life coaching services, the work would have been incomplete, and the young man wouldn’t be on a path to treating his emotional trauma.

Baltimore Mayor Brandon Scott has made a historic investment in this non-law enforcement, evidence-based work, and he is pulling disconnected efforts into strategic alignment to cover more ground through our office, which was established to institute the city’s very first comprehensive public safety strategy. MONSE is very intentionally balancing evidence-based approaches like cure violence with other innovative options. And, while much work remains, I’m proud of the foundation forged by our team, driving the integrated, strategic approaches of CVI and the Group Violence Reduction Strategy (GVRS).

Historically, City Hall has struggled to put strategies in place that reverse the trend of persistently high levels of gun violence — 338 people lost to homicide last year — for the long-term. As MONSE prepares to scale GVRS to more of the city in early 2023, we’re thrilled that our pilot project in the Western District has yielded a 32% reduction in gun violence since January. This approach employs CVI and relies on a strong partnership with law enforcement at all levels.

This is not overnight work. City Hall can’t do it alone. Its success will depend on partnership and further investment in the people who knowingly put themselves in between a gun and the person it’s pointed at. We are focused on doubling down on our early impacts and growing them until we have cured Baltimore of the disease of gun violence.

Shantay Jackson (monse@baltimorecity.gov) serves as director of the Mayor’s Office of Neighborhood Safety and Engagement.

Mon, 05 Dec 2022 00:53:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.baltimoresun.com/opinion/op-ed/bs-ed-op-1206-community-violence-interventions-20221205-n34yqbr24jc3fcgu22qhrgrvmy-story.html
Killexams : Ski Report No result found, try new keyword!Arizona Snowbowl — Wed 5:53a machine groomed 24 - 24 base 8 of 48 trails 17% open, 4 of 8 lifts, Mon-Fri: 9a-4p; Sat/Sun: 9a-4p. Sunrise Park — Wed 9:58a packed powder machine groomed 22 - 26 ... Sat, 03 Dec 2022 05:58:00 -0600 text/html https://www.sunherald.com/sports/article269539232.html Killexams : The Sun shines at 2022 NMMA

Features and Investigation Editor of The Sun, Mr. Henry Umahi, on Sunday, won the prestigious Investigative Reporter of the year award at the 2022 Nigeria Media Merit Award in Lagos.

Umahi won with his extraordinary report entitled: ‘South East: Beaten, battered, bleeding

•Real reasons anarchy reigns in the zone’.

The eight-page report x-rayed the killings and general insecurity in the region and exposed the conspiracies involved.

Other staff of The Sun, Messrs Henry Akubuiro and Steve Agbota, were also nominated for other categories.

Mon, 28 Nov 2022 10:33:00 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.sunnewsonline.com/the-sun-shines-at-2022-nmma/
Killexams : Gov. Kristi Noem proposes over $400 million for upgrading South Dakota prison infrastructure

PIERRE, S.D. — The largest budget in South Dakota history contains more than $400 million in planned expenditures toward building new state prisons in Sioux Falls and Rapid City.

The multi-year investments proposed by Gov. Kristi Noem in her Dec. 6 budget address would be a significant step toward modernizing a long-neglected state corrections infrastructure. Several legislators told Forum News Service that they were glad to see part of the state’s growing revenues and reserves invested in the aging, overcrowded prisons.

“I'm happy with it,” Rep. Greg Jamison, who served on the task force on the Incarceration Construction Fund, said. “I think over the years it's always been a piecing-it-together approach, and now we're taking a strong approach to address the issue.”

Recognizing the need to upgrade this infrastructure, the legislature in 2021 made the first deposit in the new Incarceration Construction Fund, which at the moment holds $86 million set aside for these sorts of upgrades.

Noem’s proposed budget appropriates $60 million from the Incarceration Construction Fund to build a 300-bed, minimum-security women’s prison in Rapid City to relieve some of the issues with the overcrowded women’s facility in Pierre.

According to the Bureau of Finance and Management, staffing and operational costs for this facility will be appropriated in 2025.

Another $52 million this year will go toward the initial planning, design and land purchase steps in replacing the maximum-security state prison in Sioux Falls, which was built in 1881 and, as Noem said during her address, is “outdated, not compliant with [disability] requirements, and overcrowded.”

While no final decision has been made on where the land will be purchased, Jamison said it would likely make sense to use the area that already houses the state prison and attached complexes, though he admitted, “she's a little locked, there isn’t much room.”

Finally, nearly $300 million will be transferred back into the Incarceration Construction Fund to anchor the building phase of the new state penitentiary.

“The more one-time funds we can use, the lower the interest payments will be [when we use bond financing], so we have to start putting away some dollars for that,” Rep. Mike Derby, who will chair the House Appropriations Committee, said.

Earlier this year, a consulting firm estimated construction costs at around $338 million, though rising construction and labor costs have almost certainly moved that price tag higher.

DSC_3409.JPG
Lawmakers provide a standing ovation following Gov. Kristi Noem's budget address, which she delivered on Dec. 6, 2022. Several legislators said that the large investment in prisons was a wise use of dollars, as it will lower the burden taken on by the state in a future bond raise.

Jason Harward / Forum News Service

“Under Governor Noem's leadership, we're ready to work with state lawmakers on these projects to modernize our corrections system,” Corrections Secretary Kellie Wasko, who has been an advocate for quickly addressing these issues since she began her stint earlier this year, wrote in a statement to Forum News Service.

Some legislators say that, while the dollars are a starting point for a better correctional system, the work does not stop at new facilities.

“We need buildings, but we also need programs and that’s what has been missing in our budget has been paying those correctional officers enough and funding alcohol, drug, job training, all of the other programming that needs to go on there,” Sen. Reynold Nesiba said. “In so many ways, this is a public health problem that we're trying to incarcerate our way out of.”

For Wasko and the rest of the governor’s team, the two goals of new facilities and new programming are hand-in-hand.

According to a one-page summary of the investment in the women’s prison, the new, less crowded facility “would allow for a therapeutic community where drug offenders would receive addiction treatment.”

On the men’s side, Wasko said at a July 26 Incarceration Construction Fund task force meeting that a new facility would have the benefit of efficient, centralized programming for inmates with physical disabilities, addiction and mental illness.

A separate yet parallel study during this past interim session looked at ways to relieve similar problems of overcrowding and lack of investment at the county level.

Proponents of using some state dollars to help with upgrades in regional jail hubs like Brown County and Pennington County were surprised to see no mention of those ideas in the incarceration portion of Noem’s budget address.

“Many of us thought that [Incarceration Construction Fund] also was for local county needs for remodeling and construction of jails,” said Sen. Helene Duhamel, who served on the summer study and will chair the Senate Judiciary Committee this session. “So the question is now, you know, are we going to try to find more money for the counties that definitely have needs and no resources?”

While a draft final report from that regional jail's summer study specifically mentioned the Incarceration Construction Fund as a funding source, the final report as presented to the executive committee was changed.

Now, it simply asks the legislature to consider appropriating some funds in the form of “grants to counties, or through a revolving loan fund, or a combination of both,” removing the mention of the Incarceration Construction Fund and leaving a funding source up in the air.

“We have to take care of what's in our requirements and by law, and what we're obligated to take care of first, and that's the state penitentiary,” Jamison said. “We need to take care of that first and foremost.”

For Duhamel and others looking to make progress on regional jails, the lack of funding has jumpstarted another idea, which would create a sort of Regional Jail Authority to help groups of countries raise funds to fulfill their constitutional duties to house their inmates.

“It’s patterned after the railroad, the Regional Rail Authority, where all the counties along the route of the railroad combined, and all their property taxes went up just a very small amount,” Duhamel said. “So it's that same thinking for the counties that want this option to go together.”

The prospect of counties joining together and only slightly raising property taxes, Duhamel said, could make the bond measure referendums required to build these jails — which had been difficult for counties to pass through the voters — more popular with residents.

“It’ll be one of the first couple of weeks [of session] where we'll try to get that going,” Duhamel said, adding that she and others on the summer study have been passing a draft around to different groups. “I don't know why people would be opposed to it because they don't have to use it if they don't want to. It's just there to help the counties that don't have any source of income other than their fees and property taxes.”

December 06, 2022 03:55 PM

December 05, 2022 03:47 PM

December 05, 2022 09:07 AM

Jason Harward is a Report for America corps reporter who writes about state politics in South Dakota. Contact him at 605-301-0496 or jharward@forumcomm.com.

Wed, 07 Dec 2022 01:41:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.jamestownsun.com/news/south-dakota/gov-kristi-noem-proposes-over-400-million-for-upgrading-south-dakota-prison-infrastructure
Killexams : ‘Housing first’ is a failed approach to chronic homelessness in California

How much money is enough to solve the homelessness crisis, and on what should it be spent?

Every poll shows that Californians list homelessness as a top concern, and the posturing by politicians has reached theatrical proportions.

For example, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced on November 3, five days before the statewide general election, that he was pausing the distribution of what remained of the third round of grants under the state’s Homelessness Housing, Assistance and Prevention program.

“Californians demand accountability and results, not settling for the status quo,” the governor said five days before the November election, citing the “urgency of this moment.”

The funding was released two weeks later.

According to the governor’s office, the state has provided “over $1.5 billion of flexible emergency aid to address homelessness through the Homeless Emergency Aid Program and the first two rounds of HHAP funding.”

That $1.5 billion is just part of “a $15.3 billion, multi-year state effort to turn the tide on homelessness,” the governor’s office said.

Before releasing the grants that he decided to “pause,” Newsom called local leaders to Sacramento for a meeting and instructed them to make plans that “must include a landscape analysis” and “outcome-driven results and strategies” with “clear metrics.” The local plans must also “identify all existing programs and all sources of funding.”

That answers any questions about how the money should be spent. It could cost $15 billion just for consultants and bureaucrats pushing paperwork from desk to desk.

Novelist and philosopher Ayn Rand wrote, “When you’re on the wrong premise, you will always achieve the opposite of what you intend.” She could have been explaining California’s homelessness problem, growing worse by the hour as billions of dollars are spent to Improve it.

Consider the “housing first” premise that is deeply embedded in federal, state and local funding. “Housing first” holds that the solution to the growth of sprawling tent encampments on sidewalks and other public spaces is  to construct and award free supportive housing to individuals without requiring sobriety, mental health treatment, job training, school attendance or anything else as a condition of receiving or keeping that housing.

There is no evidence that this model works at all to reduce homelessness in a community. The “housing first” program in Utah that was promoted as a success was exposed in 2015 by economist Kevin Corinth as a successful statistical trick — the number of “chronically homeless” people fell only because the definition of “chronically homeless” was changed. The policy did not “end” chronic homelessness as advertised.

But advertising makes it happen, and in Los Angeles, voters have just approved Initiative Ordinance ULA, a tax on real estate transfers. Starting April 1, 2023, property sold for more than $5 million, which typically will include apartment buildings, shopping malls and other places where the prices paid by tenants and consumers pay the bills, will be taxed an amount equal to 4% of the sale price. Property sold for $10 million or more will be taxed at the rate of 5.5%. The measure was promoted as a solution to homelessness in Los Angeles.

This new real estate transfer tax will raise an estimated $600 million to $1.1 billion per year, depending on how many properties in Los Angeles are sold. An appointed governance board will spend the money on homelessness housing and related services, but none of the money may be spent on temporary housing or emergency shelters.

The law on the power to clear encampments in California and other western states is controlled by the decision in the Martin v. Boise case, in which the Ninth Circuit held that it is unconstitutional to arrest people for sleeping on the sidewalks unless there are a sufficient number of shelter beds available. The court’s ruling didn’t require individual apartments.

If California had spent $15.3 billion on the premise that sleeping on the streets should never be an option, therefore the state’s first priority must be to get people off the streets and into safe shelters and temporary housing, where they can be triaged into services that will help them get well and get on their feet, the crisis might have been over by now.It’s not too late.

Write Susan@SusanShelley.com and follow her on Twitter @Susan_Shelley

Author

Susan Shelley is an editorial writer and columnist for the Southern California News Group, writing on local, state and national issues.

Wed, 30 Nov 2022 02:28:00 -0600 Susan Shelley en-US text/html https://www.sbsun.com/2022/11/30/housing-first-is-a-failed-approach-to-chronic-homelessness-in-california/
Killexams : A Chicago private school defends LGBTQ sex ed after right-wing viral video

An elite Chicago private school tightened security and disabled its Twitter and Facebook accounts after a video of its dean of students secretly recorded by a conservative group went viral on Wednesday.

The video captures the dean talking last week about a visit to Francis W. Parker School by an LGBTQ health organization to discuss queer sexual health with high schoolers. The video of that conversation was edited by the right-wing group before it was posted.

Parker leaders sent a letter to the school community late Wednesday saying “we are heartbroken that one of our colleague’s words have been severely misrepresented for a malicious purpose.” The letter offered strong support for their faculty and staff and for the school’s “inclusive, LGBTQ+ affirming, and comprehensive approach to sex education.”

The school said the local alderman helped it expand the police presence around its Lincoln Park campus, and it has implemented higher security measures. At least one person marched in front of the school on Thursday to protest the school’s sex ed curriculum.

Project Veritas, the New York-based right-wing organization that made the video, claims on its website that it is “creating an army of guerilla journalists.” Its operatives assume fake identities and secretly record conversations, often attempting to shame or discredit progressive organizations and media outlets, including NPR.

The video footage was captured by an operative who presented himself as an attendee at the National Association of Independent Schools conference last week, according to Parker officials.

The operative recorded himself talking to Joseph Bruno, Parker’s dean of students. In the video, Bruno described an event during the school’s annual Pride Week last May. During an optional lunchtime session for high schoolers, educators from Howard Brown Health presented a lesson on queer sexual health that included showing sex toys to students. Bruno also mentioned a story time and photo-op with a drag queen. The video does not mention that both events were optional.

The video, which had been viewed nearly 5 million times as of Friday morning, has made its way around right-wing media accounts and news sites. #ExposeGroomers trended today on Twitter, and Fox News picked up the story this morning.

Project Veritas posted a second video showing founder James O’Keefe attempting to confront Bruno Wednesday afternoon on Parker’s campus. Bruno walks away from O’Keefe and his cameraman. O’Keefe then asks parents if they’re aware the school is “giving sex toys to children” in a voice loud enough for nearby elementary school age students to hear. He is asked to leave by a parent volunteer.

Targets of previous Project Veritas undercover video projects have included educators and teachers unions. The American Federation of Teachers in 2018 posted about a “heavily-spliced” Project Veritas video that misrepresented the union’s response to an accusation of teacher misconduct.

This latest campaign is part of a trend of online right-wing attacks against LGBTQ+ books and events for children that have sometimes led to threats and violence. Earlier this month an independent school in suburban Clintonville, Ohio, canceled a drag queen story time event after a post on the right-wing Twitter account LibsofTikTok inspired the Proud Boys, a militia group, to plan an armed rally outside the school.

Parker leaders said in their letter that they “are sickened by this group’s deceptive tactics, their invasion during a People of Color conference, and their attack on the LGBTQ+ community” and offered strong support for the dean.

“Parker administrators and Parker’s Board of Trustees support Parker’s programming, the strength and inclusivity of our curriculum, and the dedicated and talented faculty and staff that teach it.”

The school is offering mental health check-ins to students and held an assembly Thursday to discuss the news.

Char Daston covers education for WBEZ. Follow him @behindthissky and @WBEZeducation

The story has been updated to make clear that Parker School officials are the source behind this statement: The video footage was captured by an operative who presented himself as an attendee at the National Association of Independent Schools conference last week.

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 06:51:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.wbez.org/stories/a-chicago-private-school-defends-lgbtq-sex-ed-after-right-wing-viral-video/6436d6b5-3f20-4074-9482-5e48ebadb1a8
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