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Killexams : SUN Administrator certification - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/310-011 Search results Killexams : SUN Administrator certification - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/310-011 https://killexams.com/exam_list/SUN Killexams : Colorado has no training on how to investigate school sexting

A student sends a nude image. A parent tells the school. Administrators investigate. 

It’s a near-weekly occurrence on many high school campuses, but under the law, underage sexting is far from minor: It’s child pornography. Unwitting educators who make copies of the explicit exchanges could be charged with felonies. In some states, consenting 16- and 17-year-olds who create and receive the images could be prosecuted, too.

Take the case of Bradley Bass, a 32-year-old high school principal in Colorado, who faces 12 years in prison and the possibility of being branded a sex offender.

No one has accused him of having ill-intent when he investigated a parent’s tip that explicit images were being shared on Brush School District campuses last spring. He found photos on several boys’ phones and used his work cellphone to take photos of the students’ devices with the images displayed. The photos were then transferred to a confidential school server where other disciplinary evidence, like photos of vape pens and confiscated marijuana, was stored. 

Bass didn’t know that doing so was legally akin to sexual exploitation of a minor. He’d never received training about how to investigate such a case. 

Still, he’s guilty, at least under the rigid terms of state law. He’s considering taking a plea deal — which would charge him with the misdemeanor of obstructing justice — so that he can continue to parent his toddler and baby boy. 

“To have him labeled as a sex offender is the most ludicrous thing in the world,” said Bass’ mother, Sonya, a lifelong Brush resident.

Many sexting laws nationwide were drafted in the 1970s and 1980s, before cellphones and applications like Snapchat made it easy to share nude images. Some states, including Colorado, have decided teenagers who consensually sext shouldn’t face criminal charges. 

But few, if any, states have carved out exceptions for adults who possess sexts without ill intent. And few, if any, require that teachers and administrators receive training about the legal liability they could face while investigating a report of sexting, experts say. 

“I think the assumption is they know better, know how to respond. But in my experience, many don’t,” said Justin Patchin, a criminal justice professor at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, who has researched cyberbullying and sexting laws. 

In Colorado, the attorney general’s office and the education department don’t offer training on how to investigate sexting cases. The Colorado School Safety Resource Center, within the Department of Public Safety, provides information about consent and what charges juveniles could face for sexting, but not administrators’ liability. 

Department of Public Safety spokeswoman Patricia Billinger said they recommend school administrators work with law enforcement on investigations, because sexting is potentially a criminal offense, and that law enforcement in turn should work closely with district attorneys.

Most educational associations declined to comment or did not respond to questions about whether they offered training or model policies on sexting investigations.

And Charles Russo, a past president of the Education Law Association, said school board members typically “don’t do enough to educate staff on sexting” or to stay informed about what’s happening on the ground in schools.

“With technology, you’ve got to keep up and be aware of what’s out there,” he said.

Brush School District Superintendent Bill Wilson declined to comment on behalf of the district and school board, saying they were continuing to “follow the legal processes.” The district is still working on a sexting policy, and will have a training for employees on the subject in January, Wilson said at a November court hearing. 

Bass does not fault the school for lack of training. 

The fact that teenagers sext is “not a surprise”

The lack of mandatory training comes as sexting has become nearly ubiquitous on school campuses nationwide. 

More than a quarter of students between the ages of 12 and 17 had received a sext, and nearly 15% had sent one, according to a 2018 analysis of research findings. The numbers are slightly higher in Colorado, according to research from the Cyberbullying Research Center, which is co-directed by Patchin. Nearly 27% of adolescents received a sext in 2019, up from 15% in 2016. About 20% had sent one. 

The prevalence of sexting and its spread to younger ages reflects how widespread cellphone use is and how easy it is to send explicit images, said Jeff Temple, an expert in adolescent health and social media whose 2011 research popularized the term “sexting.” 

“The fact that 17-year-olds, 16-year-olds, 15-year-olds are sexting is not a surprise,” he said. “If we had phones back in the 1400s, those same ages would be sexting as well.” 

Some legal and education experts believe attitudes and laws around sexting should change to reflect how common the practice is among teenagers naturally interested in sex. 

Temple, for example, initially looked at sexting as a risky behavior, like using drugs or alcohol. His views have changed over time and he now believes coerced — but not consensual — sexting should be criminalized.  

“If a 17-year-old is not interested in sex, I’d be thinking — as a psychologist, I’d be worried,” said Temple, who is director of the Center for Violence Prevention at UTMB Health, part of the University of Texas system.

Few legislatures are willing to draw a clearer distinction between child porn and consensual sexting because of how politically unpopular it is to loosen laws around child exploitation, said Jonathan Phillips, a private attorney and former prosecutor in Fairfax, Virginia, who now advocates against stringent sexting laws. 

He worked three times with a Virginia lawmaker to try to get passed a measure that would let prosecutors supply teenagers who consensually sext a lighter sentence. It failed each time — driven by fears it could be exploited by a pornography “kingpin” or pedophile, Phillips said.  

“That’s enough to scare them,” he said. “‘Oh, gosh, that anecdotal example could happen.’”  

Refusing to create a separate process to handle consensual sexting cases means an adult possessing images of children being sexually abused is treated the same under the law as an administrator who makes a copy of an explicit image without lascivious intent, said Amy Hasinoff, a communication professor at the University of Colorado Denver who wrote the 2015 book “Sexting Panic: Rethinking Criminalization, Privacy, and Consent.”

“Penalties for child pornography are so incredibly harsh. They’re designed for what we imagine as an adult sexually abusing a child, filming it for their own gratification and then distributing it, selling it, providing it to others,” she said. “Pretty much everyone agrees that’s horrific. But that’s not what’s happening in all cases.”

Hasinoff advocated for a 2017 Colorado law that made consensual sexting a civil infraction punishable with a fine or an educational program. But she remembers hearing from opponents at the time that they didn’t want to encourage kids to sext by relaxing the penalties. She likened the reasoning to the thinking behind abstinence-only sex education.

“We are unable to first

acknowledge that teenagers are having sex and they’re going to. And then because of that, we then don’t provide them with the resources they need to do it in safe and healthy ways,” Hasinoff said. 

Experts warn of a chilling effect

Experts say the case in Brush could make students less likely to report harmful sexting incidents — those that aren’t consensual — because Bass was prosecuted. The alleged victim, the girl in the photos, and her parents have said they were happy with how Bass handled the sexting investigation and have asked police and the 13th Judicial District Attorney’s office to drop the case against the administrator. Prosecutors generally have broad discretion in choosing what cases to pursue and how to expend their resources.

“I don’t believe the decision to prosecute the administrator is doing anything to protect the girl from sexual exploitation — which is the intent of such laws,” Hasinoff said. “Instead, their decision to prosecute is likely making her life more difficult.”

Thirteenth Judicial District Attorney Travis Sides said that in most criminal cases, victims’ lives are made more difficult by a prosecution because they’re having to deal with the court system in addition to the psychological fallout of the original crime. 

Many victims also oppose prosecutions, he added. 

“A lot of victims of cases that get filed — not just in our jurisdiction but across Colorado, across the country — if they had a perfect world, they would prefer that charges not be filed. But as a prosecutor,” he said, “when you look at what the law requires, it requires us to enforce the law, and if there are violations of the law, to file charges.”

Sides spoke with Bass’ supporters outside the courthouse one afternoon not long after the case began. As he walked to his car, one woman told Sides it was hard to believe he wanted fairness for Bass and the school district, according to a video recording of the exchange.

“Well ma’am let me ask you this,” he responded, “do you want men to have nude images of your daughter on their phone?” 

Sides cited Colorado’s child exploitation law, which says that each time child pornography is viewed, the person pictured is “revictimized.” 

“We’re not going to see things just smooth out”

Jesse Weins, an Arizona State University researcher with expertise on sexting laws, said training for sexting investigations could be easily added on to mandatory training on the federal gender equity law Title IX, or may already overlap with antibullying and sexual harasment training required in some states. However, he said many educators already feel “trained to death” and view training as just a box to check each year.

Weins added it would be smart to have one administrator whose job it is to keep up to date on sexting laws and procedures. Other teachers would forward cases to that person when needed, similar to how educational institutions are now required to have a coordinator devoted to handling alleged Title IX violations. 

Training on how to investigate sexting cases has been a subject at industry conventions for years, and Weins said he would be surprised if many teachers aren’t already familiar with the topic. 

But he thinks the issue will continue to be messy. 

“We’re not going to see things just smooth out,” he said, “as long as we keep a harsh line on what we mean by child pornography — that all of this is just regular child pornography — and kids keep having phones with cameras.”

This story is from The Colorado Sun, a journalist-owned news outlet based in Denver and covering the state. For more, and to support The Colorado Sun, visit coloradosun.com. The Colorado Sun is a partner in the Colorado News Conservancy, owner of Colorado Community Media.

Tue, 13 Dec 2022 04:45:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.highlandsranchherald.net/stories/colorado-has-no-training-on-how-to-investigate-school-sexting,410644
Killexams : Nuclear fusion breakthrough in California seen as milestone toward clean energy future

In a first, U.S. scientists have created "net energy" through a nuclear fusion reaction, the Department of Energy announced Tuesday.

The successful experiment, which took place Dec. 5 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is the most significant milestone yet reached in the decades-long quest to produce cheap, clean, carbon-free energy through nuclear fusion.

“We have taken the first tentative steps toward a clean energy source that could revolutionize the world,” said Jill Hruby, administrator of the National Nuclear Security Administration.

Energy Secretary Jennifer M. Granholm called the achievement “one of the most impressive scientific feats of the 21st century," adding that it “will go down in the history books.”

In a nuclear fusion reaction, two atoms slam together and merge into a larger atom of a heavier element, releasing their excess mass in the form of energy.

Fusion is the process through which the sun makes energy. The sun’s core is the ideal high-pressure, high-temperature environment for hydrogen atoms to fuse into helium; replicating those conditions on Earth has proved much more difficult.

Scientists at Lawrence Livermore in the San Francisco Bay Area achieved their breakthrough by training 192 lasers at a diamond-coated target roughly the size of a peppercorn, heating it to more than 3 million degrees Celsius (more than 5.4 million degrees Fahrenheit) and — briefly — mimicking the conditions of a star. Fusion began.

“This had all happened before. One hundred times before," said Marvin Adams, the National Nuclear Security Administration's deputy administrator for defense programs. "But last week, for the first time, they designed this experiment so that the fusion fuel stayed hot enough, dense enough and round enough for long enough that it ignited and produced more energy than the lasers had deposited.”

That net energy gain was “about two megajoules in, about three megajoules out," Adams said.

The National Ignition Facility target bay at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory uses 192 laser beams to make a tiny hydrogen fuel pellet implode. (Damien Jemison / Associated Press) © (Damien Jemison / Associated Press) The National Ignition Facility target bay at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory uses 192 laser beams to make a tiny hydrogen fuel pellet implode. (Damien Jemison / Associated Press)

A fusion reaction generates three to four times as much energy as fission, which itself is roughly a million times more powerful than any other energy source on Earth.

Nuclear fission, or the splitting of atoms, also releases a massive amount of energy in a chain reaction. Fission reactions have been channeled productively into nuclear power plants and destructively into nuclear weapons.

Unlike fission, nuclear fusion does not release harmful radioactive byproducts that take thousands of years to decay. And since it doesn't involve a chain reaction, it's intrinsically less dangerous.

In addition, fusion has long been seen as key to the goal of achieving net-zero emissions. Electricity and heat production currently account for 30% of global greenhouse gas emissions. A technology that successfully harnesses nuclear fusion could, in theory, create endlessly renewable amounts of clean, low-risk, carbon-free energy.

All these factors have made controllable nuclear fusion one of science’s most sought-after goals since the 1950s, attracting billions in government and private investment.

“We’ve taken a technology that was born for destruction, and we’ve now opened the door to it being used for more than that,” said Lee Bernstein, a professor of nuclear engineering at UC Berkeley and former deputy group leader at the Livermore lab's National Ignition Facility, where the experiment took place.

While Tuesday’s announcement is a major step toward that ideal, there’s a long road ahead. Any practical application is likely "decades" away, said Kim Budil, Livermore's director.

"This is one igniting capsule, one time. To realize commercial fusion energy, you have to do many things. You have to be able to produce many, many fusion ignition events per minute," Budil said. "With concerted effort and investment, a few decades of research on the underlying technologies could put us in a position to build a power plant."

Indeed, the achievement at Livermore is "a little bit like the Wright brothers’ first flight,” said Paul Bellan, a plasma physicist at Caltech.

With their self-designed airplane, Orville and Wilbur Wright proved in 1903 that “you could make a heavier-than-air craft that would take off and fly and not fall down,” Bellan said. "It didn’t mean you could fly from Los Angeles to London” right away. Nor did it mean the Wrights' plane was the only feasible design for an aircraft, he added. But it proved that a bold leap in physics was possible and inspired others to build upon their success.

"It’s a defining moment, certainly," Bellan said. "It shows that it's worth working on, and eventually, we'll get to something that will be profitable."

While it might take decades for fusion to reach commercial readiness, nuclear fission technology has powered the U.S. for decades. Ninety-three nuclear reactors generated nearly one-fifth of the nation’s electricity last year; among them is the Palo Verde plant just off Interstate 10 in Arizona, which supplies Los Angeles and other cities and is the country's largest electricity generator. President Biden sees nuclear power as crucial to meeting his goal of 100% climate-friendly electricity by 2035.

Even before Tuesday's historic announcement, a string of successes at the National Ignition Facility had inspired new generations of scientific talent. Since August 2021, when the team reached a key threshold in achieving a self-perpetuating reaction, student interest in fusion has spiked, said Siegfried Glenzer, a photon science professor at Stanford University and a division director at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

"This is really a big magnet now for young people who want to make a difference in the world. Many are driven by climate change, and they want to see a carbon-free energy source being produced," Glenzer said. "It's an exciting time for researchers of any age."

Times staff writer Sammy Roth contributed to this report.

This story originally appeared in Los Angeles Times.

Tue, 13 Dec 2022 02:55:48 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/nuclear-fusion-breakthrough-in-california-seen-as-milestone-toward-clean-energy-future/ar-AA15enV1
Killexams : A community is needed to demand fair treatment for all students

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Tue, 13 Dec 2022 04:57:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.kitsapsun.com/story/opinion/readers/2022/12/13/a-community-is-needed-to-demand-fair-treatment-for-all-students/69725362007/
Killexams : Illinois Clean Energy Law’s Failed Promises: No New Jobs or Job-Training

This article is published in partnership with the Chicago Sun-Times

CHICAGO—Lisa Benjamin has been running her own general contracting business south of Chicago since 2007 and is eager to expand and do more energy-efficient, environmentally friendly construction and remodeling.

“Anything and everything that’s green and clean,” said Benjamin, who is even planning green hardhats for her eight employees.

To be able to hire more workers and expand her business, Benjamin has been counting on job-training and placement help that Gov. J.B. Pritzker and other politicians promised last year when the Illinois Legislature passed and Pritzker signed a major clean energy law.

Gov. J.B. Pritzker holds up the Climate and Equitable Jobs Act after signing it at Shedd Aquarium, Wednesday, Sept. 15, 2021. | Anthony Vazquez/Sun-Times

A key part of the Climate and Equitable Jobs Act would be job-training programs established through new state workforce development initiatives, which were an essential part of winning broad political support for the measure.

But 15 months after Pritzker signed what was touted as the most equitable climate change-fighting law in the country, the job-training programs those initiatives were supposed to establish, helping workers and businesses like Benjamin’s Millennium II Enterprises, still don’t exist.

And not a single new ”equity” job has been created.

That’s despite the promised job-creation efforts Pritzker’s state Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity is supposed to set up—for which it was given the authority to spend as much as $180 million a year. The money, from a fund paid for by customers of Illinois utilities, also can be spent on economic development aid—for instance for communities that might have lost jobs from the closing of a coal-burning power plant or a mine as a result of the state’s push to move to renewable energy sources like wind and solar power.

The state agency only recently has taken a small first step, holding “listening sessions” for business owners, community groups and others regarding the long-delayed job-training for what officials promised would help build a diverse workforce for a booming industry.

The jobs program isn’t the only part of the effort to move the state to a green economy that’s been slow to get going. The expected wave of utility-scale renewable energy projects has been held back by opposition from local governments and a lack of availability of interstate power lines.

Pritzker administration officials say they’re taking the time to get things right.

Backers of the measure say the delays are hurting the businesses and potential new employees it was supposed to help.

“Unfortunately, as these processes go on, the professionals responsible consistently get paid while the folks who may need the dollars the most on the other end wait to get paid,” said the Rev. Tony Pierce, a pastor and solar entrepreneur in Peoria who worked to get the law passed. “The people at the bottom—lots of people—hear about this stuff and ask, ‘Why is it taking so long?’ ” 

“Minority contractors and workers are eagerly looking for these opportunities in a new field,” said Curtis Thompson, chapter president of the National Minority Association for Contractors Chicago.   

Sylvia Garcia, who heads Pritzker’s state Commerce Department, said she understands the frustration that things aren’t moving faster. She said she hopes the training programs will be running early in 2023.

“There’s a big mandate here, and we want to make sure we are getting this right,” Garcia said. “We always knew that implementation would take some time.”

She said the state is creating a training curriculum that will include a wide range of clean-technology work programs.

At least 10 programs will be part of the workforce and related efforts, including recruiting and training with an emphasis on diversity that, as the state agency says in a written summary, aim to help “ensure that those individuals who have historically faced economic and environmental barriers have priority in these training programs.” 

When the law was enacted, it made Illinois the first Midwest state to set goals for phasing out fossil fuels in favor of clean energy sources. It aims to move Illinois to 100 percent clean energy by 2050. It also subsidizes three aging nuclear power plants owned by Exelon, all in northern Illinois. 

Demand for wind and solar energy is so strong that Illinois could meet the clean energy goals almost immediately—if projects that developers already have planned could actually get built.

But there are some substantial obstacles, including some that are beyond the control of the state government.

Among those: 

  • Developers of large-scale wind and solar projects, potentially covering thousands of acres, face long waits to get the approvals they need from regional electric power grid operators. The reason? There aren’t enough electric transmission lines to handle the energy they would produce.
  • And, some local governments have restricted renewable energy projects after nearby residents complained about wind and solar farms being unsightly.  

Together, the hurdles mean Illinois can’t build wind and solar projects as quickly as government officials and developers would like.

“There is a little bit of a disconnect here between what the state’s goals are and what’s happening on the ground,” said Chris Kunkle, director of state affairs in the Midwest for Apex Clean Energy, a wind and solar developer.

The lack of transmission lines is a problem across the country, but it’s especially bad in what’s called the PJM Interconnection grid region, which includes the Chicago area and then runs east to New Jersey. Downstate Illinois is in the MISO grid region.

If a developer wants to build a large solar or wind project in the PJM portion of Illinois, it’s likely it would have to wait for years after filing an application with the grid operator because so many other projects are ahead in line. Though the wait to build in the MISO grid is shorter, it also can stretch on for years.

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“In a lot of ways, this is like waiting in line for a ride at Disneyland,” said Jeff Danielson, vice president of advocacy for the Clean Grid Alliance, a clean energy business group. “You go to Disneyland, you know you’re gonna wait in line to ride that ride.”

Garcia said the state of Illinois is taking a more hands-on role, promoting equitable job creation compared with some other states. 

“We’ve seen in other states and other places where market forces drive what is happening,” Garcia said. “We can’t wait for things to get going. But we want to make it right.”

Benjamin said her company completes about 60 projects a year and has done about 20 home electrification conversions—a step in the path to phasing out fossil fuels such as natural gas. 

She and one of her employees have gone through training provided by the Chicago nonprofit Elevate. She’s hoping she can build her business and get workers trained under the state’s yet-to-begin programs. 

Benjamin, who is also a pastor and has a doctorate in theology, said it’s about more than business. 

“There’s so much pollution in the air,” she said. “Why add to it?”

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 23:17:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://insideclimatenews.org/news/09122022/illinois-clean-energy-laws-failed-promise-jobs/
Killexams : Illinois hasn’t delivered jobs, job-training promised under clean energy law

Lisa Benjamin has been running her own general contracting business in Matteson since 2007 and is eager to expand and do more energy-efficient, environmentally friendly construction and remodeling.

“Anything and everything that’s green and clean,” says Benjamin, who is even planning green hardhats for her eight employees.

To be able to hire more workers and expand her business, Benjamin has been counting on job-training and placement help that Gov. J.B. Pritzker and other politicians promised when the Illinois Legislature passed and Pritzker signed into law last year a major clean energy law.

A key part of the Climate and Equitable Jobs Act would be job-training programs established through new state workforce development initiatives, officials promised to win broad support for the measure.

But 15 months after Pritzker signed what was touted as the most equitable climate change-fighting law in the country, the job-training programs those initiatives were supposed to establish in the growing green economy, helping workers and businesses like Benjamin’s Millennium II Enterprises, still don’t exist.

And not a single new ”equity”  job has been created.

That’s despite the promised job-creation efforts Pritzker’s state Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity is supposed to set up — for which it was given the authority to spend as much as $180 million a year. The money, from a fund paid for by customers of Illinois utilities, also can be spent on economic development aid — for instance for communities that might have lost jobs from, say, the closing of a coal-burning power plant or a mine as a result of the state’s big push to move to renewable energy sources like wind and solar power. 

The state agency only recently has taken a small first step, holding “listening sessions” for business owners, community groups and others regarding the long-delayed job-training for what officials promised would help build a diverse workforce for a booming industry.

Gov. J.B. Pritzker holds a copy of the Illinois Climate and Equitable Jobs Act after he signed it into law on Sept. 15, 2921, at Shedd Aquarium.

Gov. J.B. Pritzker holds a copy of the Illinois Climate and Equitable Jobs Act after he signed it into law on Sept. 15, 2021, at Shedd Aquarium.

Anthony Vazquez / Sun-Times

The jobs program isn’t the only part of the effort to move the state to a green economy that’s been slow to get going. Pritzker signed the new law in September 2021 amid fanfare, but other key economic aspects of the measure also are yet to be fulfilled.

Pritzker administration officials say they’re taking the time to get things right.

Backers of the measure say the delays are hurting the businesses and potential new employees it was supposed to help.

“Unfortunately, as these processes go on, the professionals responsible consistently get paid while the folks who may need the dollars the most on the other end wait to get paid,” says the Rev. Tony Pierce, a pastor and solar entrepreneur in Peoria who worked to get the law passed. “The people at the bottom — lots of people — hear about this stuff and ask, ‘Why is it taking so long?’ ” 

The Rev. Tony Pierce, a pastor and solar entrepreneur in Peoria who worked to get the law passed.

The Rev. Tony Pierce, a pastor and solar entrepreneur in Peoria who worked to get the law passed.

“Minority contractors and workers are eagerly looking for these opportunities in a new field,” says Curtis Thompson, chapter president of the National Minority Association for Contractors Chicago. 

Sylvia Garcia, who heads Pritzker’s state Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, says she understands the frustration that things aren’t moving faster. She says she hopes the training programs will be running early in 2023.

“There’s a big mandate here, and we want to make sure we are getting this right,” Garcia says. “We always knew that implementation would take some time.”

Sylvia Garcia, director of the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity.

Sylvia Garcia, director of the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity.

She says the state is creating a training curriculum that will include a wide range of clean-technology work programs.

At least 10 programs will be part of the workforce and related efforts, including recruiting and training with an emphasis on diversity that, as the state agency says in a written summary, aims to help “ensure that those individuals who have historically faced economic and environmental barriers have priority in these training programs.” 

When the law was enacted, it made Illinois the first Midwest state to set goals for phasing out fossil fuels in favor of clean energy sources. It aims to move Illinois to 100% clean energy by 2050. To win support, it also subsidizes three aging nuclear power plants owned by Exelon, all in northern Illinois. 

Demand for wind and solar energy is so strong that Illinois could meet the clean energy goals almost immediately — if projects that developers already have planned could actually get built.

The hurdles in the way of that happening go beyond the jobs program and involve issues beyond the control of the state government.

Among those: 

  • Developers of large-scale wind and solar projects, potentially covering thousands of acres, face long waits to get the approvals they need from regional electric power grid operators. The reason? There aren’t enough electric transmission lines to handle the energy they would produce.
  • And some local governments have restricted renewable energy projects after nearby residents complained about wind and solar farms being unsightly. 

Together, the hurdles mean Illinois can’t build wind and solar projects as quickly as government officials and developers would like.

“There is a little bit of a disconnect here between what the state’s goals are and what’s happening on the ground,” says Chris Kunkle, director of state affairs in the Midwest for Apex Clean Energy, a wind and solar developer.

Chris Kunkle, director of state affairs in the Midwest for Apex Clean Energy, a wind and solar developer.

Chris Kunkle, director of state affairs in the Midwest for Apex Clean Energy, a wind and solar developer.

The lack of transmission lines is a problem across the country, but it’s especially bad in what’s called the PJM Interconnection grid region, which includes the Chicago area and runs east to New Jersey. Downstate Illinois is in the MISO grid region.

If a developer wants to build a large solar or wind project in the PJM portion of Illinois, it’s likely it would have to wait for years after filing an application with the grid operator because so many other projects are ahead in line. Though the wait to build in the MISO grid is shorter, it also can stretch on for years.

“In a lot of ways, this is like waiting in line for a ride at Disneyland,” says Jeff Danielson, vice president of advocacy for the Clean Grid Alliance, a clean energy business group. “You go to Disneyland, you know you’re gonna wait in line to ride that ride.”

Jeff Danielson, vice president of advocacy for the Clean Grid Alliance.

Jeff Danielson, vice president of advocacy for the Clean Grid Alliance.

Garcia says the state of Illinois is taking a more hands-on role than some states and promoting equitable job creation. 

“We’ve seen in other states and other places where market forces drive what is happening,” Garcia says. “We can’t wait for things to get going. But we want to make it right.”

Benjamin says her company completes about 60 jobs a year and has done about 20 home electrification conversions — a step in the path to phasing out fossil fuels such as natural gas. 

She and one of her employees have gone through training provided by the Chicago nonprofit Elevate. She’s hoping she can build her business and get workers trained under the state’s yet-to-begin programs. 

Benjamin, who is also a pastor and has a doctorate in theology, says it’s about more than business. 

“There’s so much pollution in the air,” she says. “Why add to it?”

Brett Chase’s reporting on the environment and public health is made possible by a grant from The Chicago Community Trust.

Fri, 09 Dec 2022 08:38:00 -0600 en text/html https://chicago.suntimes.com/2022/12/9/23499251/clean-energy-law-jobs-illinois-climate-equitable-jobs-act-lisa-benjamin-pritzker-exelon-solar-wind
Killexams : Training wheels: How changes in regulations are affecting driver training on the First Coast No result found, try new keyword!After the new regulations went into affect at the beginning of the year, here's how the commercial drivers license classroom has changed. Thu, 01 Dec 2022 15:59:00 -0600 text/html https://www.bizjournals.com/jacksonville/news/2022/12/02/cdl-training-changes.html Killexams : Colorado has no mandatory training on how to investigate school sexting. Educators face prison time if they do it wrong.

A student sends a nude image. A parent tells the school. Administrators investigate. 

It’s a near-weekly occurrence on many high school campuses, but under the law, underage sexting is far from minor: It’s child pornography. Unwitting educators who make copies of the explicit exchanges could be charged with felonies. In some states, consenting 16- and 17-year-olds who create and receive the images could be prosecuted, too.

Take the case of Bradley Bass, a 32-year-old high school principal in Colorado, who faces 12 years in prison and the possibility of being branded a sex offender.

No one has accused him of having ill-intent when he investigated a parent’s tip that explicit images were being shared on Brush School District campuses last spring. He found photos on several boys’ phones and used his work cellphone to take photos of the students’ devices with the images displayed. The photos were then transferred to a confidential school server where other disciplinary evidence, like photos of vape pens and confiscated marijuana, was stored. 

Bass didn’t know that doing so was legally akin to sexual exploitation of a minor. He’d never received training about how to investigate such a case. 

Still, he’s guilty, at least under the rigid terms of state law. He’s considering taking a plea deal — which would charge him with the misdemeanor of obstructing justice — so that he can continue to parent his toddler and baby boy. 

“To have him labeled as a sex offender is the most ludicrous thing in the world,” said Bass’ mother, Sonya, a lifelong Brush resident.

Many sexting laws nationwide were drafted in the 1970s and 1980s, before cellphones and applications like Snapchat made it easy to share nude images. Some states, including Colorado, have decided teenagers who consensually sext shouldn’t face criminal charges. 

But few, if any, states have carved out exceptions for adults who possess sexts without ill intent. And few, if any, require that teachers and administrators receive training about the legal liability they could face while investigating a report of sexting, experts say. 

“I think the assumption is they know better, know how to respond. But in my experience, many don’t,” said Justin Patchin, a criminal justice professor at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, who has researched cyberbullying and sexting laws. 

In Colorado, the attorney general’s office and the education department don’t offer training on how to investigate sexting cases. The Colorado School Safety Resource Center, within the Department of Public Safety, provides information about consent and what charges juveniles could face for sexting, but not administrators’ liability. 

Department of Public Safety spokeswoman Patricia Billinger said they recommend school administrators work with law enforcement on investigations, because sexting is potentially a criminal offense, and that law enforcement in turn should work closely with district attorneys.

Most educational associations declined to comment or did not respond to questions about whether they offered training or model policies on sexting investigations.

And Charles Russo, a past president of the Education Law Association, said school board members typically “don’t do enough to educate staff on sexting” or to stay informed about what’s happening on the ground in schools.

“With technology, you’ve got to keep up and be aware of what’s out there,” he said.

Brush School District Superintendent Bill Wilson declined to comment on behalf of the district and school board, saying they were continuing to “follow the legal processes.” The district is still working on a sexting policy, and will have a training for employees on the subject in January, Wilson said at a November court hearing. 

Bass does not fault the school for lack of training. 

The fact that teenagers sext is “not a surprise”

The lack of mandatory training comes as sexting has become nearly ubiquitous on school campuses nationwide. 

More than a quarter of students between the ages of 12 and 17 had received a sext, and nearly 15% had sent one, according to a 2018 analysis of research findings. The numbers are slightly higher in Colorado, according to research from the Cyberbullying Research Center, which is co-directed by Patchin. Nearly 27% of adolescents received a sext in 2019, up from 15% in 2016. About 20% had sent one. 

The prevalence of sexting and its spread to younger ages reflects how widespread cellphone use is and how easy it is to send explicit images, said Jeff Temple, an expert in adolescent health and social media whose 2011 research popularized the term “sexting.” 

“The fact that 17-year-olds, 16-year-olds, 15-year-olds are sexting is not a surprise,” he said. “If we had phones back in the 1400s, those same ages would be sexting as well.” 

Some legal and education experts believe attitudes and laws around sexting should change to reflect how common the practice is among teenagers naturally interested in sex. 

Temple, for example, initially looked at sexting as a risky behavior, like using drugs or alcohol. His views have changed over time and he now believes coerced — but not consensual — sexting should be criminalized.  

“If a 17-year-old is not interested in sex, I’d be thinking — as a psychologist, I’d be worried,” said Temple, who is director of the Center for Violence Prevention at UTMB Health, part of the University of Texas system.

Few legislatures are willing to draw a clearer distinction between child porn and consensual sexting because of how politically unpopular it is to loosen laws around child exploitation, said Jonathan Phillips, a private attorney and former prosecutor in Fairfax, Virginia, who now advocates against stringent sexting laws. 

He worked three times with a Virginia lawmaker to try to get passed a measure that would let prosecutors supply teenagers who consensually sext a lighter sentence. It failed each time — driven by fears it could be exploited by a pornography “kingpin” or pedophile, Phillips said.  

“That’s enough to scare them,” he said. “‘Oh, gosh, that anecdotal example could happen.’”  

Refusing to create a separate process to handle consensual sexting cases means an adult possessing images of children being sexually abused is treated the same under the law as an administrator who makes a copy of an explicit image without lascivious intent, said Amy Hasinoff, a communication professor at the University of Colorado Denver who wrote the 2015 book “Sexting Panic: Rethinking Criminalization, Privacy, and Consent.”

Bradley and Tressa Bass at Tressa’s mother’s home just outside of Brush, CO. Tressa’s mother wrote a character letter for her son-in-law saying one of the greatest blessings in her life was when Bradley married Tressa. “I have watched him love her unconditionally, be supportive, selfless, and always putting her needs first,” she wrote. (Photo By Kathryn Scott)

“Penalties for child pornography are so incredibly harsh. They’re designed for what we imagine as an adult sexually abusing a child, filming it for their own gratification and then distributing it, selling it, providing it to others,” she said. “Pretty much everyone agrees that’s horrific. But that’s not what’s happening in all cases.”

Hasinoff advocated for a 2017 Colorado law that made consensual sexting a civil infraction punishable with a fine or an educational program. But she remembers hearing from opponents at the time that they didn’t want to encourage kids to sext by relaxing the penalties. She likened the reasoning to the thinking behind abstinence-only sex education.

“We are unable to first acknowledge that teenagers are having sex and they’re going to. And then because of that, we then don’t provide them with the resources they need to do it in safe and healthy ways,” Hasinoff said. 

Experts warn of a chilling effect

Experts say the case in Brush could make students less likely to report harmful sexting incidents — those that aren’t consensual — because Bass was prosecuted. The alleged victim, the girl in the photos, and her parents have said they were happy with how Bass handled the sexting investigation and have asked police and the 13th Judicial District Attorney’s office to drop the case against the administrator. Prosecutors generally have broad discretion in choosing what cases to pursue and how to expend their resources.

“I don’t believe the decision to prosecute the administrator is doing anything to protect the girl from sexual exploitation — which is the intent of such laws,” Hasinoff said. “Instead, their decision to prosecute is likely making her life more difficult.”

Thirteenth Judicial District Attorney Travis Sides said that in most criminal cases, victims’ lives are made more difficult by a prosecution because they’re having to deal with the court system in addition to the psychological fallout of the original crime. 

Many victims also oppose prosecutions, he added. 

“A lot of victims of cases that get filed — not just in our jurisdiction but across Colorado, across the country — if they had a perfect world, they would prefer that charges not be filed. But as a prosecutor,” he said, “when you look at what the law requires, it requires us to enforce the law, and if there are violations of the law, to file charges.”

Sides spoke with Bass’ supporters outside the courthouse one afternoon not long after the case began. As he walked to his car, one woman told Sides it was hard to believe he wanted fairness for Bass and the school district, according to a video recording of the exchange.

“Well ma’am let me ask you this,” he responded, “do you want men to have nude images of your daughter on their phone?” 

Sides cited Colorado’s child exploitation law, which says that each time child pornography is viewed, the person pictured is “revictimized.” 

“We’re not going to see things just smooth out”

Jesse Weins, an Arizona State University researcher with expertise on sexting laws, said training for sexting investigations could be easily added on to mandatory training on the federal gender equity law Title IX, or may already overlap with antibullying and sexual harasment training required in some states. However, he said many educators already feel “trained to death” and view training as just a box to check each year.

Weins added it would be smart to have one administrator whose job it is to keep up to date on sexting laws and procedures. Other teachers would forward cases to that person when needed, similar to how educational institutions are now required to have a coordinator devoted to handling alleged Title IX violations. 

Training on how to investigate sexting cases has been a subject at industry conventions for years, and Weins said he would be surprised if many teachers aren’t already familiar with the topic. 

But he thinks the issue will continue to be messy. 

“We’re not going to see things just smooth out,” he said, “as long as we keep a harsh line on what we mean by child pornography — that all of this is just regular child pornography — and kids keep having phones with cameras.”

UPDATED: The story was updated December 8 at 11:15 a.m to add comments from Patricia Billinger.

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 04:17:00 -0600 More by Shannon Najmabadi en-US text/html https://coloradosun.com/2022/12/08/colorado-sexting-training-educators/
Killexams : Anne Heche's son named administrator of her estate

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Anne Heche’s son has been granted control over her estate.

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The Donnie Brasco actress died in August following a car crash and since then, her 20-year-old offspring Homer Laffoon – whose father is her ex-husband Coleman Laffoon – and former partner James Tupper have been locked in a dispute over the control of her affairs.

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However, on Wednesday, Homer was named general administrator of his mother’s estate and granted permission to “take possession of all the personal property of the estate of the decedent and preserve it from damage, waste, and injury.

Judge Lee Bogdanoff dismissed claims from Tupper – who has 13-year-old son Atlas with the late star – that Homer is “not suitable” to run the estate because of his age, unemployment status and the fact he wasn’t in contact with his mother at the time of her death.

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The judge added: “I find no malfeasance by Mr. Laffoon.”

In addition, the judge also denied Tupper’s request for a hearing to investigate a claim that Heche’s $200,000 jewelry collection has gone missing.

We apologize, but this video has failed to load.

The judge did issue a caveat that Homer could be removed as administrator if any evidence of fraud or embezzlement surfaces related to the estate.

A future hearing has been scheduled to address an $800,000 bond on the estate previously requested by Homer because the judge noted the value of Heche’s estate is not yet set as she still has acting residuals incoming, as well as plans for the release of her second memoir in January.

As part of his new role, Homer is able to receive copies of his mother’s financial records, file tax returns on her behalf, and “commence and maintain or defend” suits and other legal proceedings.

Homer’s legal team welcomed the ruling.

  1. Anne Heche and her son Homer Laffoon at the launch of a new book

    Anne Heche’s son bids to ‘expand authority’ over late mom’s estate

  2. Anne Heche and James Tupper - HBO Emmy Awards After Party - Los Angeles - 2017 - AVALON

    Anne Heche’s ex James Tupper wants to be legal guardian of son Atlas

  3. Anne Heche and her son Homer Laffoon.

    Anne Heche’s son questions validity of will

“We believe the court reached the correct result this morning, both legally and equitably, and are glad to have this phase of the process behind us,” attorney Bryan Phipps told PEOPLE magazine.

“With Mr. Tupper’s allegations and objections now resolved, we are hopeful the administration of the Estate can proceed without unnecessary complication.”

Thu, 01 Dec 2022 02:09:00 -0600 en-CA text/html https://winnipegsun.com/entertainment/celebrity/anne-heches-son-named-administrator-of-her-estate
Killexams : First Deputy Head of Kherson Administration Injured in Assassination Attempt — Authorities No result found, try new keyword!First Deputy Head of Administration Vitaly Bulyuk was slightly injured. There is no threat to his life and health now," the administration said. Acting Kherson Governor Vladimir Saldo specified that ... Mon, 12 Dec 2022 18:20:00 -0600 en-CA text/html https://winnipegsun.com/entertainment/celebrity/anne-heches-son-named-administrator-of-her-estate Killexams : Sun Pharma unit’s exports to US halted

Company says USFDA has excluded 14 products from this import alert, subject to certain conditions

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Our Special Correspondent   |   Mumbai   |   Published 09.12.22, 02:37 AM


The US Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) has issued an import alert on the Halol unit of Sun Pharmaceutical Industries.

All future shipments of products manufactured at the facility are subject to the refusal of admission to the US market until the facility becomes compliant with cGMP (current good manufacturing practice) standards.

It follows an inspection of the facility by the US drug regulator from April 26 to May 9, 2022.

“We now wish to inform you that the company has received a communication from the USFDA stating that the facility has been listed under import alert,” Sun Pharma said in a regulatory filing.

The disclosure led to the shares of the country’s top drug maker falling 3.57 per cent or Rs 36.30 on the BSE to Rs 980.95. Sun Pharma was the top loser in the Sensex pack on a day the benchmark index rose 160 points.

Sun Pharma added that the USFDA has excluded 14 products from this import alert, subject to certain conditions.

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 12:37:00 -0600 text/html https://www.telegraphindia.com/business/sun-pharma-units-exports-to-us-halted/cid/1902781
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