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300-410 Implementing Cisco Enterprise Advanced Routing and Services (ENARSI)

Exam: Implementing Cisco Enterprise Advanced Routing and Services
The Implementing Cisco Enterprise Advanced Routing and Services v1.0 (ENARSI 300-410) exam is a 90-minute exam associated with the CCNP Enterprise and Cisco Certified Specialist - Enterprise Advanced Infrastructure Implementation certifications. This exam certifies a candidate's knowledge for implementation and troubleshooting of advanced routing technologies and services including Layer 3, VPN services, infrastructure security, infrastructure services, and infrastructure automation. The course, Implementing Cisco Enterprise Advanced Routing and Services, helps candidates to prepare for this exam.

35% 1.0 Layer 3 Technologies
1.1 Troubleshoot administrative distance (all routing protocols)
1.2 Troubleshoot route map for any routing protocol (attributes, tagging, filtering)
1.3 Troubleshoot loop prevention mechanisms (filtering, tagging, split horizon, route poisoning)
1.4 Troubleshoot redistribution between any routing protocols or routing sources
1.5 Troubleshoot manual and auto-summarization with any routing protocol
1.6 Configure and verify policy-based routing
1.7 Configure and verify VRF-Lite
1.8 Describe Bidirectional Forwarding Detection
1.9 Troubleshoot EIGRP (classic and named mode)
1.9.a Address families (IPv4, IPv6)
1.9.b Neighbor relationship and authentication
1.9.c Loop-free path selections (RD, FD, FC, successor, feasible successor, stuck in active)
1.9.d Stubs
1.9.e Load balancing (equal and unequal cost)
1.9.f Metrics
1.10 Troubleshoot OSPF (v2/v3)
1.10.a Address families (IPv4, IPv6)
1.10.b Neighbor relationship and authentication
1.10.c Network types, area types, and router types
1.10.c (i) Point-to-point, multipoint, broadcast, nonbroadcast
1.10.c (ii) Area type: backbone, normal, transit, stub, NSSA, totally stub
1.10.c (iii) Internal router, backbone router, ABR, ASBR
1.10.c (iv)Virtual link
1.10.d Path preference
1.11 Troubleshoot BGP (Internal and External)
1.11.a Address families (IPv4, IPv6)
1.11.b Neighbor relationship and authentication (next-hop, mulithop, 4-byte AS, private AS, route refresh, synchronization, operation, peer group, states and timers)
1.11.c Path preference (attributes and best-path)
1.11.d Route reflector (excluding multiple route reflectors, confederations, dynamic peer)
1.11.e Policies (inbound/outbound filtering, path manipulation)
20% 2.0 VPN Technologies
2.1 Describe MPLS operations (LSR, LDP, label switching, LSP)
2.2 Describe MPLS Layer 3 VPN
2.3 Configure and verify DMVPN (single hub)
2.3.a GRE/mGRE
2.3.b NHRP
2.3.c IPsec
2.3.d Dynamic neighbor
2.3.e Spoke-to-spoke
20% 3.0 Infrastructure Security
3.1 Troubleshoot device security using IOS AAA (TACACS+, RADIUS, local database)
3.2 Troubleshoot router security features
3.2.a IPv4 access control lists (standard, extended, time-based)
3.2.b IPv6 traffic filter
3.2.c Unicast reverse path forwarding (uRPF)
3.3 Troubleshoot control plane policing (CoPP) (Telnet, SSH, HTTP(S), SNMP, EIGRP, OSPF, BGP)
3.4 Describe IPv6 First Hop security features (RA guard, DHCP guard, binding table, ND inspection/snooping, source guard)
25% 4.0 Infrastructure Services
4.1 Troubleshoot device management
4.1.a Console and VTY
4.1.b Telnet, HTTP, HTTPS, SSH, SCP
4.1.c (T)FTP
4.2 Troubleshoot SNMP (v2c, v3)
4.3 Troubleshoot network problems using logging (local, syslog, debugs, conditional debugs, timestamps)
4.4 Troubleshoot IPv4 and IPv6 DHCP (DHCP client, IOS DHCP server, DHCP relay, DHCP options)
4.5 Troubleshoot network performance issues using IP SLA (jitter, tracking objects, delay, connectivity)
4.6 Troubleshoot NetFlow (v5, v9, flexible NetFlow)
4.7 Troubleshoot network problems using Cisco DNA Center assurance (connectivity, monitoring, device health, network health)

Implementing Cisco Enterprise Advanced Routing and Services (ENARSI)
Cisco Implementing PDF Download
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Abstract

Reviews Cisco System's approach to implementing Oracle's Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) software product. This case chronologically reviews the diverse, critical success factors and obstacles facing Cisco during its implementation. Cisco faced the need for information systems replacement based on its significant growth potential and its reliance on failing legacy systems. The discussion focuses on where management was particularly savvy in contrast to where it was the beneficiary of good fortune.

Keywords

Citation

Sun, 31 Dec 2017 13:57:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.hbs.edu/faculty/Pages/item.aspx?num=22966
Killexams : Washington Schools Implement Desktop Virtualization Solution
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  • Mon, 04 Mar 2019 00:04:00 -0600 en text/html https://thejournal.com/whitepapers/2012/cisco_12a/vxi/washington-schools-implement-desktop-virtualization-solution.aspx?tc=page0
    Killexams : obtain a Google Doc: as a PDF, Word file, with comments

    Thanks to Google Docs you can create your text files, and other documents online without worrying that something might not be saved. It also lets you collaborate on your documents with colleagues easily in real-time. If for any reason, you'd like to obtain a Google Doc, this article is for you. Read our step-by-step guide about how to obtain a Google Doc on Windows or Mac computer.

    How to obtain a Google Doc as a PDF?

    The process is very easy if you’d like to obtain your document from Google Docs. Moreover, you can choose in which format you want to obtain your document: a pdf, .docx, .doc, .rtf, .odt, .txt, and more. To obtain your document from Google Doc, click on File > Download and select the format of your choice.

    You can save your file as a PDF by clicking on File > Print if your file is large. Next to Destination, select Save as PDF. Finally, click Save, and you’ll have your document downloaded.

    How to obtain an image from a Google Doc?

    If you want to save an image from your Google Doc and don’t know how to do it, don’t worry. The process is rather simple:

    • Right-click on the image you want to save from a Google Doc and select Save to Keep.
    • Right-click on this image in your right panel and select Save image As…, choose the directory on your computer and confirm your choice.

    If you want to save a Google Doc to your PC with the comments section, all you need to do is obtain the Google Doc file as a Word document:

    • In your Google Doc, go to File > download
    • Then click on Microsoft Word (.docx). Your Google Doc will be saved to your PC with its comments.

    Need more help with Google? Check out our Forum!

    Wed, 30 Nov 2022 21:59:00 -0600 NataliaKudryavtseva en text/html https://ccm.net/apps-sites/web/1073-how-to-download-a-google-doc/
    Killexams : Geomarketing Market Will Hit Big Revenues in Future : Google, Microsoft, IBM, Cisco No result found, try new keyword!The latest study released on the Global Geomarketing Market by AMA Research evaluates market size, trend, and forecast to 2027. The Geomarketing market study covers significant research data and ... Mon, 12 Dec 2022 02:35:00 -0600 https://markets.buffalonews.com/buffnews/article/sbwire-2022-12-12-geomarketing-market-will-hit-big-revenues-in-future-google-microsoft-ibm-cisco Killexams : WBBPE TET Result 2014 Announced @wbbpe.org: obtain PDF Here

    WBBPE TET Result 2014: West Bengal Board of Primary Education (WBBPE) published the marks of all the candidates who have qualified and a list of the reserved categories who have scored 82 marks in the Teacher Eligibility Test 2014 (TET 2014) at wbbpe.org. WBBPE TET Result Link is provided on the website of the WBBPE. Also, the link can be checked here.

    WBBPE TET Marks Download Link

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    1. Visit the website of WBBPE i.e. wbbpe.org
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    3. Download WBBPE TET Result PDF
    4. Check the Candidate's Name, Category-1, Category-2  and TET Marks
    5. Take the print out of the result

    According to the result notice, 'In compliance with the order of the Hon'ble Justice Abhijit Gangaopadhya passed on 9th Nov 2022 in WPA 20745 of 2022 and in other similar writ petitions the reserved category candidates who have obtained 82  as TET Marks in TET 2014 are declared as TET Qualified Candidates'.

    Fri, 11 Nov 2022 00:22:00 -0600 text/html https://www.jagranjosh.com/articles/wbbpe-tet-result-2014-announced-download-pdf-here-1668176199-1
    Killexams : Implementing Grand Strategy Toward China Susan Hayward, associate director of the Religious Literacy and the Professions Initiative at Harvard Divinity School, leads the conversation on religious literacy in international affairs.   FASKIANOS: Welcome to the final session of the Fall 2022 CFR Academic Webinar Series. I’m Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach here at CFR. Today’s discussion is on the record, and the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/Academic if you would like to share it with your classmates or colleagues. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We’re delighted to have Susan Hayward with us to discuss religious literacy in international affairs. Reverend Hayward is the associate director for the Religious Literacy and Professions Initiative at Harvard Divinity School. From 2007 to 2021, she worked for the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP), with focus on Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Columbia, and Iraq. And most recently serving as senior advisor for Religion and Inclusive Societies, and as a fellow in Religion and Public Life. During her tenure at USIP, Reverend Hayward also coordinated an initiative exploring the intersection of women, religion, conflict, and peacebuilding, partnership with the Berkley Center at Georgetown University and the World Faith Development Dialogue. And she coedited a book on the subject entitled Women, Religion and Peacebuilding: Illuminating the Unseen. Reverend Hayward has also taught at Georgetown and George Washington Universities and serves as a regular guest lecturer and trainer at the Foreign Service Institute. And she’s also a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. So, Susan, thank you very much for being with us today. Can you begin by explaining why religious literacy is so important for understanding international affairs? HAYWARD: Yeah, absolutely. Thank you, Irina. And thanks to the Council on Foreign Relations for inviting me to be a part of this webinar. And I really appreciate you and the invitation, and I appreciate all of you who have joined us today, taking time out of what I know is a busy time of year, as we hurdle towards final exams and cramming everything into these last weeks of the semester. So it’s great to be with all of you. I am going to be—in answering that broad question that Irina offered, I’m going to be drawing on my work. As Irina said, I worked at the—I work now at Harvard Divinity School’s Religion and Public Life Program. And what we seek to do here is to do here is to advance the public understanding of religion in service of a just world at peace. And we do that, in part, by working with professionals in governments and foreign policy, and in the humanitarian sector, as well as working with our students who are seeking to go into vocations in those professional spheres. And then my fourteen years with the Religion and Inclusive Societies Program at the U.S. Institute of Peace. So I’ll say a little bit more about both of those as we go along, and those experiences, but I’m also happy to answer any questions about either of those programs when we turn to the Q&A. And I should say that I’m going to be focusing as well—given that a lot of you all who are joining us today are educators yourselves or are students—I’m going to be focusing in particular on how we teach religious literacy within international affairs. So I wanted to begin with the definition of religious literacy, because this is a term that is increasingly employed as part of a rallying cry that’s based on a particular diagnosis. And the diagnosis is that there has been insufficient deep consideration of the multiple and complex dimensions of religion and culture that impact international affairs at all levels across the world. And that the result of that lack of a complex understanding of religion in this arena has been the—the hamstringing of the ability of the international system to operate in ways that are effective in bringing justice, peace, democracy, human rights, and development. So I’m going to circle back to that diagnosis in a bit. But first I want to jump to the prescription that’s offered, which is to enhance religious literacy using various resources, trainings, courses, and ways that are relevant for foreign policymakers and those working across the international system, as well as those students who are in the schools of international affairs, or other schools and planning to go into this space, into this profession. So the definition that we use here at Harvard Divinity School—and this is one that has been adopted by the American Academy of Religion, which is the scholarly guild for religious studies—defines it in this way: Religious literacy is the—entails the ability to discern and analyze the fundamental intersections of religion and social, political, and cultural life through multiple lenses. So specifically, one who is religious literate will possess a basic understanding of different religious traditions, including sort of fundamental beliefs and practices and contemporary manifestation of different religious traditions, as well as how they arose out of and continue to be shaped by particular social, historical, and cultural contexts. And the ability to discern and explore the religious dimensions of political, social, and cultural expressions across time and space. So this gets broken down in two different ways—three, according to me. But that definition focuses on two in particular. One is often referred to as the confessional approach or the substantive approach. So that’s looking at understanding different religious traditions and their manifestations in different places. That’s understanding something fundamental about the difference between Theravada Buddhism and Vajrayana Buddhism, for example. Or how Islam is practiced, and dominantly practiced in Nigeria, versus in North America, for example. The second approach is the religious studies approach. Which is sometimes also called the functional approach. So that’s the ability to be able to analyze the ways in which religions in complex ways are really intersecting with social, and political, and economic life, even if not explicitly so. But in implicit, embedded ways shaping different kinds of economic systems, social systems, and political systems, and being able to analyze and see that, and so ask particular questions and consider different kinds of policy solutions—diagnoses and solutions that can take that into account. And then finally, I add the religious engagement approach. That particularly comes out of my work when I was at USIP and working with foreign policymakers in the State Department and elsewhere. To some extent, overseas as well, those in the diplomatic sector. Which I understand is determining whether, when, and how to engage with specifically defined religious institutions, actors, and interests, including on issues related, for example, with religious freedom, in ways that are inclusive, just, strategic, and, importantly for the U.S. context, legal. So abiding by the Establishment Clause of the Constitution. Now, all three types of religious literacy defined here depend on three principles or ideas. So the first is that they understand religions as lived, as constituted by humans who are constantly interpreting and reinterpreting their religious traditions. This means that as a result they are internally diverse, sometimes very internally contradictory. They’ll have different religious interpretations with respect to particular human rights issues, particular social issues, issues related to gender, and so on and so forth. That they change over time. That that sort of complex interpretive process that is going on within religious traditions also leads to kind of larger normative changes within religious traditions over history in different temporal contexts. And that they’re culturally embedded. So as the question I was asking earlier, how is Islam, as it’s understood and practiced in Nigeria, different from how it’s understood and practiced in North America, for example. There are ways in which the particular religious interpretations and practices of a tradition are always going to be entangled with specific cultural contexts in ways that are near impossible to disentangle at times. And that means that they just manifest differently in different places. And this—these ideas of religion as lived pushes against an understanding of religions as being static or being monolithic. So that then leads us to ensure that there’s never—that it’s always going to be a problem to make sweeping claims about entire religious traditions because you’ll always find somebody or some community within those religious traditions that don’t believe or practice according to the claim that you just made about it. And that applies to situations of violent conflict and with respect to human rights, on global issues like climate and migration. This idea, the internal diversity in particular, is what is at play when you hear the phrase “Ambivalence of the Sacred” that was coined by Scott Appleby in his—in this very influential book by the same name. I’ll throw in here a quote from Scott Appleby from that book, this idea that religions are always going to show up in ambivalent or contradictory ways across different places, but also sometimes in the very same contexts. So I think we can see that, for example, in the U.S. right now, and that there’s no one, let’s say, religious position with respect to reproductive rights, for example. There’s a great deal of internal plurality and ambivalence that exists across religious traditions and interpretations within the Christian tradition and beyond about that specific issue. Moreover then, what religion is, what is considered religious, what is recognized as religious and what isn’t, and how it manifests in different contexts depends on just a complex array of intersecting factors. I’m going to come back to—that’s kind of meaty phrase just to throw out there, so I’m going to come back to that in a minute. So the second principle or idea of religious literacy that I want to highlight here is the idea of right-sizing religion. This is a phrase that Peter Mandaville used quite a bit when he was in the State Department’s Religion and Global Affairs Office under the Obama administration and has written about. So I’ll turn you to that article of his to understand more about it. But the central idea is that we don’t want to over nor underemphasize religion’s role in any given context. So just by way of a quick example, in looking at the Rohingya crisis or the ethnic cleansing of Rakhine State in Myanmar, one could not say it was all about religion, that it was about Buddhist nationalists who are anti-Muslim wanting to destroy a particular religious community. Nor could you say it had nothing to do with religion, because there were these religious dimensions that were at play in driving the violence towards the Rohingya and the larger communities’ acceptance of that violence against the Rohingya community. But if you were to overemphasize the religious roles, the religious dimensions of that crisis, then your policy solutions—you might look at religious freedom tools and resources to be able to address the situation. And that would address the situation in part, but obviously there were other economic and political factors that were at play in leading to the Rohingya crisis. And including certain economic interests with oil pipelines that were being constructed across lands that the Rohingya were living on in Rakhine state, or the political conflict that was taking place between the military and the National League of Democracy, and so on. So addressing the crisis holistically and sustainably requires that we right-size the role that religion is playing in that particular crisis. And that goes across the board, in looking at conflicts and looking at the role of religion in climate, and addressing climate collapse, and so on and so forth. We need to always neither under nor overestimate the role that religion is playing in driving some of these issues and as a solution in addressing some of these issues. OK. So with that definition and principles of religious literacy in mind, I want to go back to the diagnosis that I gave at the—that I mentioned at the top, for which religious literacy is offered as a solution. The diagnosis, if you remember, was that there’s been insufficient consideration given to the multiple and complex dimensions of religion and culture that impact international affairs. So I’m going to demonstrate what it means to apply the religious studies approach to religious literacy, or the functional approach to religious literacy, to help us understand why that might be. And remember, the religious studies approach is seeking to discern and explore the religious dimensions of political, social, and cultural expressions and understandings across time and place. So this approach, in trying to answer that question and consider that diagnosis, it would invite us to look historically at the development of the modern international legal and political systems in a particular time and place in Western Europe, during the European Enlightenment. As many of you may well know, this came about in the aftermath of the so-called confessional or religious wars. Those were largely understood to have pitted Protestants against Catholics, though it’s more complicated in reality. But broadly, that’s the story. And the modern state, on which the international system was built, sought to create a separation between religious and state authority. For the first time in European history, this separation between religious and state authority that became more rigid and enforced over time, in the belief that this was necessary in order to ensure peace and prosperity moving forward, to bring an end to these wars, and to ensure that the state would be better able to deal with the reality of increasing religious pluralism within Europe. So this was essentially the idea of secular political structures that was born in that time and place. And these secular political structures were considered to be areligious or neutral towards religion over time, again. In the process of legitimating this sort of revolutionary new model of the secular modern state, and in the process of creating this demarcated distinction that had not previously existed—at least, not a neat distinction of the secular or the political authority and the religious—the religious authority—there was an assertion as part of that ideologically legitimate and support that. There was an assertion of the secular as rational, ordered, and associated with all of the good stuff of modernity. Meanwhile, the religious was defined in counter-distinction as a threat to the secular. It was irrational, backwards, a threat to the emerging order. A not-subtle presumption in all of this is that the new modern state and the international system would serve as a bulwark against archaic, dangerous, religious, and other traditionally cultural, in particular, worldviews and practices in—it would be a bulwark against that, and a support for this neutral and considered universal international law and system—secular system. Now, I realize I’m making some, like, huge, broad historical sweeps here, given the short amount of time I have. But within that story I just told, there is a lot more complexity that one can dig into. But part of what I seek to do in offering religious literacy in international relations theory and practice to students, and to practitioners in this realm, is to help those operating in the system think through how that historically and contextually derived conception of religion and the co-constitutive conception of secularism continues to operate within and shape how we interpret and respond to global events within the system. And this occurs—I see this happening in two dominant ways. One is, first, in thinking about religion as a distinct sphere of life that can be disentangled entirely from the political, when in reality religion is deeply entangled with the political, and vice versa. And scholars like Talal Asad and Elizabeth Shakman Hurd have done really great work to show how even our understanding of the secular and secular norms and so on is shaped by Protestant Christian commitments and understandings. And saying within that, our understanding of what religion is—like, a focus on belief, for example, which has been codified in a lot of religious freedom law, as part of the international system—again, tends to emphasize Protestant Christian understandings of what religion is and how it functions. So that’s the first reason for doing that. And then second, in understanding religion to be a threat to modernity, and sometimes seeing and responding to it as such rather than taking into account its complexity, its ambivalence, the ways in which it has been a powerful force for good, and bad, and everything in between, and in ways that sometimes let the secular off the hook for ways that it has driven forms of violence, colonialism, gender injustice, global inequalities, the climate crisis, and so on. So those are the consequences of when we don’t have that religious literacy, of those potential pitfalls. And, on that second point, of the ways in which religion continues to be defined in ways that can overemphasize its negative aspect at time within the international system, I commend the work of William Cavanaugh in particular and his book, The Myth of Religious Violence to dig into that a little bit more. So what we’re seeking to do, in bringing that kind of religious literacy to even thinking about the international system and its norms and how it operates, is to raise the consciousness of what Donna Haraway calls the situatedness of the international system, the embedded agendas and assumptions that inevitably operate within it. And it invites students to be skeptical of any claims to the systems neutrality about religion, how it’s defined, and how it’s responded to. So I recognize that that approach is very deconstructionist work. It’s informed by, post-colonial critical theory, which reflects where religious studies has been for the last couple decades. But importantly, it doesn’t, nor shouldn’t ideally, lead students to what is sometimes referred to as analysis paralysis, when there’s sort of groundedness within hypercritical approaches, only looking at the complexity to a degree that it’s hard to understand how to move forward then to respond constructively to these concerns. Rather, the purpose is to ensure that they’re more conscious of these underlying embedded norms or assumptions so that they can better operate within the system in just ways, not reproducing forms of Eurocentrism, Christo-centrism, or forms of cultural harm. So the hope is that it helps students to be able to better critique the ways in in which religion and secularism is being—are being discussed, analyzed, or engaged within international affairs, and then be able to enter into those kinds of analysis, policymaking, program development, and so on, in ways that can help disrupt problematic assumptions and ensure that the work of religious literacy or religious engagement is just. So I’m just going to offer one example of how this kind of critical thinking and critical—the way of thinking complexly about religion in this space can be fruitful. And it speaks back to one of the things Irina noted about my biography, the work I had done looking at women and religion and peacebuilding. So while I was at USIP, in that program, we spent several years looking specifically and critically at forms of theory and practice, and this subfield that had emerged of religious peacebuilding. And we were looking at it through the lens of gender justice, asking how religion was being defined in the theory or engaged in the peacebuilding practice and policy in ways that unintentionally reinforced gender injustice. And what we found is that there were assumptions operating about certain authorities—often those at the top of institutions, which tended to be older, well-educated men—representing entire traditions. Assumptions made about their social and political power as well. When in reality, we knew that those of different genders, and ages, and socioeconomic locations were doing their own work of peacebuilding within these religious landscapes, and had different experiences of violence, and so different prescriptions for how to build peace. So we began to ask questions, like whose peace is being built in this field of religious peacebuilding that was emerging? And the work that USIP had been doing in this space of religious peacebuilding? Whose stories were being left out in the dominant analyses or narratives in the media about religious dimensions of certain conflicts, and what are the consequences of that? So these kinds of questions are grounded in the recognition of, again, the internal diversity, the change over time of religious traditions. And they help ensure that analysis and policy actions aren’t unintentionally reproducing forms of harm or structural violence. I’m almost done. So please do bring your questions so that we can engage in a discussion with each other. But I wanted to end by offering a couple examples of resources that I think might be helpful to both enhancing your own religious literacy but also as potential pedagogical tools in this work. So first is Religious Peacebuilding Action Guides that were produced by the U.S. Institute of Peace, in partnership with Salam Institute for Peace and Justice, and the Network for Religious and Traditional Peacemakers. There’s four guides. They’re all available for free online. Once I close down my PowerPoint, I’m going to throw the links for all of these things I’m mentioning into the chat box so you can all see it. But one of the things—I’m just going to dive in a little bit to the analysis guide, because one of the things that I think is useful in helping, again, to help us think a little bit more complexly about religion, is that it takes you through this process of thinking about the different dimensions of religion as defined here—ideas, community, institutions, symbols and practices, and spirituality. So it’s already moving beyond just an idea of religious institutions, for example. And it takes you through doing a conflict assessment, and asking the questions related to religion with respect to the drivers of the conflict and the geographic location and peacebuilding initiatives, to help you craft a peacebuilding—a religious peacebuilding initiative. I have used this framework as a means to help students think through the ambivalence of religion as it manifests in different places. So I have an example there of a question that I have sometimes used that has been fruitful in thinking about how these five different dimensions of religion have manifested in American history in ways that either have advanced forms of racialized violence and injustice or that have served as drivers of peace and justice. And there’s lots of examples across all of those dimensions of the ways in which religion has shown up in ambivalent ways in that respect. There’s also—USIP’s team has produced a lot of amazing things. So I’ll put some links to some of their other resources in there too, which includes they’re doing religious landscape mappings of conflict-affected states. They have an online course on religious engagement in peacebuilding that’s free to take. Another resource is from here, at Harvard Divinity School in the Religion in Public Life Program. And we provide a series of case studies that is for educators. It’s primarily created educators in secondary schools and in community colleges, but I think could easily be adapted and used in other kinds of four-year universities or other kinds of professional settings, where you’re doing trainings or workshops, or even just holding discussions on religious literacy. So there’s a series of kind of short, concise, but dense, case studies that are looking at different religions as they intersect with a host of issues, including peace, climate, human rights, gender issues. And it says something about that case study here—the example that I have here is the conflict in Myanmar, pre-coup, the conflicts that were occurring between religious communities, and particularly between Buddhist communities and Muslim communities. And then there’s a set of discussion questions there that really help to unearth some of those lessons about internal diversity and about the ways in which religious intersects with state policies and other kinds of power interests and agendas—political power interests and agendas. And then also, at our program, Religion and Public Life, we have a number of courses that are available online, one that’s more on the substantive religious literacy side, looking at different religious traditions through their scriptures. Another course, it’s on religion, conflict and peace, all of which are free and I’m going to throw them into the chat box in a moment. And we also have ongoing workshops for educators on religious literacy, a whole network with that. So you’re welcome to join that network if you’d like. And then finally, we have a one-year master’s of religion and public life program for people in professions—quote/unquote, “secular” professions—who want to come and think about—they’re encountering religion in various ways in their work in public health, or in their work in journalism. And so they want to come here for a year and to think deeply about that, and bring something back into their profession. And then the final thing, and then I’m going to be done, and this one is short, is the Transatlantic Policy for Religion and Diplomacy, which brings together point people from—who work on religion across different foreign ministries in North America and Europe. And their website, religionanddiplomacy.org, has a lot of really great resources that—reports on various thematic issues, but also looking at religion in situ in a number of different geographic locations. They have these strategic notes, that’s what I have the image of here, that talk about, at a particular time, what are some of the big stories related to religion and international affairs overseas. And they list a number of other religious literacy resources on their website as well. So I commend all of that to. And with that, let me stop share, throw some links into the chat box, and hear responses and questions from folks. FASKIANOS: Wonderful. Thank you for that. That was terrific. And we are going to send out—as a follow-up, we’ll send out a link to this webinar, maybe a link to your presentation, as well as the resources that you drop into the chat. So if you don’t get it here, you will have another bite at the apple, so to speak. (Gives queuing instructions.) So I’m going to go first to the written question from Meredith Coon, who’s an undergraduate student at Lewis University: What would be a solution for India to have many different religions live in peace with each other, especially since most religions share a lot of the same core values of how people should live? And how can society prevent the weaponization of religion, while still allowing broad religious freedom? HAYWARD: All right. Thank you for the question, Meredith. And one thing just to note, by way of housekeeping, I’m not sure I can actually share the links with all of the participants. So we’ll make sure that you get all of those links in that follow-up note, as Irina said. So, Meredith, I think a couple things. One, I just want to note that one of the assumptions within your question itself is that folks of different religious persuasions are constantly at conflict with one another. And of course, there is a reality of there is increasing religious tensions around the world, communal tensions of many different sorts, ethnic, and religious, and racial, and so on, across the world. And the threat to democracy and increasing authoritarianism has sometimes exacerbated those kinds of tensions. But there’s also a lot of examples presently and historically of religiously incredibly diverse communities living in ways that are harmonious, that are just, and so on. So I think it is important—there’s a lot of work that supports forms of interfaith dialogue and intra-faith dialogue. And I think that that work is—will always be important, to be able to recognize shared values and shared commitments, and in order to acknowledge and develop respect and appreciation for differences as well on different topics—again, both within religious traditions and across them. But I think that dialogue alone, frankly, is not enough. Because so often these tensions and these conflicts are rooted in structural violence and discrimination and concerns, economic issues, and political issues, and so on. And so I think part of that work, it’s not just about building relationships kind of on a horizontal level, but also about ensuring that state policies and practice, economic policies and practices, and so on, are not operating in ways that disadvantage some groups over others, on a religious side, on a gender side, on a racial side, and so on. So it’s about ensuring as well inclusive societies and a sense as well of inclusive political systems and inclusive economic systems. And doing that work in kind of integrated ways is going to be critical for ensuring that we’re able to address some of these rising forms of violations of religious freedom. Thanks again for the question. FASKIANOS: Thank you. Next question from Clemente Abrokwaa. Clemente, do you want to ask your question? Associate teaching professor of African studies at Pennsylvania State University? I’m going to deliver you a moment, so we can hear some voices. Q: OK. Thank you very much. Yeah, my question is I’m wondering how peacebuilding, in terms of religious literacy, how would you look at—or, how does it look at those that are termed fundamentalists? How their actions and beliefs, especially their beliefs, those of us—there are those outside who perceive them as being destructive. So then to that person, is their beliefs are good. So they fight for, just like anyone will fight for, what, a freedom fighter or something, or a religious fighter in this case. So I’m just wondering how does religious literacy perceive that in terms of peacebuilding? HAYWARD: Right. Thank you for the question, Professor Abrokwaa. I really appreciate it. So a couple things. One, first of all, with respect to—just going back, again, to the ambivalence of the sacred—recognizing that that exists. That there are particular religious ideas, commitments, groups, practices that are used in order to fuel and legitimate forms of violence. And I use violence in a capacious understanding of it, that includes both direct forms of violence but also structural and cultural forms of violence, to use the framework of Johan Galtung. And so that needs to be addressed as part of the work to build peace, is recognizing religious and nonreligious practices and ideas that are driving those forms of violence. But when it comes to religious literacy to understand that, a couple ways in which the principles apply. One is, first, not assuming that their—that that is the only or exclusive religious interpretation. And I think sometimes well-meaning folks end up reifying this idea that that is the exclusive religious interpretation or understanding when they’re—when they’re offering sometimes purely nonreligious responses to it. And what I mean by this, for example, let’s look at Iran right now. I read some analyses where it’s saying that, the Iranian authorities and the Ayatollahs who comprise the Supreme Council and so on, that they—that they define what Islamic law is. And there’s not a qualification of that. And in the meantime, the protesters are sort of defined as, like, secular, or they’re not—the idea that they could be driven by certain—their own Islamic interpretations that are just as authoritative to them, and motivating them, and shaping them is critical. So being able to recognize the internal plurality and not unintentionally reify that particular interpretation of a religious tradition as exclusive or authoritative. Rather, it’s one interpretation of a religious tradition with particular consequences that are harmful for peace. And there are multiple other interpretations of that religious tradition that are operating within that context. And then a second way that the religious literacy would apply would also look at the ways in which sometimes the diagnoses of extremist groups that are operating within a religious frame doesn’t right-size the role of religion in that. It sometimes overemphasizes the religious commitments, and drives, and so on. And so, again, we need to right-size. There are religious motivations. And we need to take those seriously. And we need to develop solutions for addressing that. And there are economic interests. And there are political interests. So there’s a whole host of factors that are motivating and inspiring and legitimating those groups. And being able to take into account that more holistic picture and ensure that your responses to it are going to be holistic. And then one final thing I want to say that’s not with respect to religious literacy as much—or, maybe it is—but it’s more just about my experience of work at USIP, is that—and it kind of goes back to the question that Meredith asked before you about religious harmony between multireligious relations and harmony, is that I sometimes finds that engaging with groups that are defining themselves and motivating themselves with a primary grounding in religion, that they’re not going to participate generally in interfaith initiatives, and so on, right? And so that’s where some of that intra-faith work can be particularly important. I saw this, for example, in Myanmar, when their—when previously the movement that was known as Ma Ba Tha, which was defined by some as a Buddhist nationalist anti-Muslim kind of Buddhist supremacist group. The folks who were most successful in being able to engage in a values-grounded conversation with members of the organization were other Buddhist monks, who were able to speak within the language of meaning and to draw attention to, like, different understandings of religious teachings or religious principles with respect to responding to minority groups, and so on. So I think that’s in particular, with addressing those groups, that’s where that intra-religious work or intra-communal work can be really critical, in addition to some of that cross-communal work. FASKIANOS: Thank you. So we’ve seen, obviously, the war in Ukraine and how Christian Orthodoxy is being—or, Greek Orthodoxy in Ukraine, and the division. Can you talk a little bit about that and how it’s playing out with Russian identity? HAYWARD: Yeah, absolutely. There’s been some really good analysis and work out there of the religious dimensions of the Russia-Ukraine conflict. So again, the sort of dominant story that you see, which reflects a reality, is that there are ways in which political and religious actors and interests are aligning on the Russian side in order to advance particular narratives and that legitimate the invasion of Ukraine that—that are about sort of fighting back against an understanding of the West as being counter to traditional and religious values. Those are some of the religious understandings. And then that concern gets linked then to the establishment of an independent or autocephalous Orthodox Church within the Ukraine context. And you see—in particular, what’s pointed to often is the relationship between Patriarch Kirill in the Russian Orthodox Church, and Putin, and the ways in which they’ve sort of reinforced each other’s narrative and offered support to it. And there’s really great analysis out there and stories that have been done about that. And that needs to be taken into account in responding to the situation and, I would say, that some of the religious literacy principles would then ask us to think about other ways in which religion is showing up within that, that go beyond the institution too. So a lot of the news stories that I’ve seen, for example, have focused exclusively on—sometimes—exclusively on the clerics within the Orthodox Church and their positions, either in support of or in opposition to the war. But in reality, on the ground there’s a lot more complexity that’s taken place, and a lot more of the ways in which different individuals and communities on both the Russia and the Ukraine side are responding to the violence, to the displacements, and so on. It paints a more complex and, I think, fascinating story, frankly. And sort of illuminates ways forward in support of peacebuilding. For example, there’s ways in which different kinds of ritual practices within Orthodoxy have served as a source of support and constancy to folks who are living in this situation of insecurity and displacement, in ways that have been helpful. There are, of course, other religious traditions that exist within both Ukraine and Russia that are operating and responding in different ways. Like, the Jewish community in Ukraine and the Catholic—the Greek Catholic Church in Ukraine. So looking at those complexities both within Orthodoxy, but there’s many different ways that Orthodox Christians are responding in both countries. There’s not one story of Orthodox Christianity and the invasion of Ukraine. But also looking at some of the religious diversity within it. And that helps to ensure, like I said, one, that we’re developing solutions that are also recognizing the ways in which religion at a very ground level is serving as a source of support, humanitarian relief, social, psychological support to people on the ground, as well as the ways in which it’s sort of manifesting ambivalently and complexly in ways that are driving some of the violence as well. And it also helps to push back against any sort of a narrative that this is about a Russian religion—on the Russian side—this is about a religious war against a secular, non-religious West or Ukraine, right? That that goes back to what I was talking about with the historical sort of contingencies that are baked into this system a little bit. And in defining it in that way, Russia’s religious and its motivations are religious, Ukraine’s not religious, that’s both not true—(laughs)—because there’s many religious folks within the Ukraine and within the West generally, but also feeds—it feeds the very narrative that Putin and Kirill are giving of a secular West that is anti-religion, that is in opposition to Russian traditional values. FASKIANOS: It seems like there needs to be some training of journalists too to have religious literacy, in the same way that we’re talking about media literacy. HAYWARD: Yeah. FASKIANOS: Probably should be introduced as well. (Laughs.) HAYWARD: Yeah, Irina, it’s funny, we did—one of my students actually did a kind of mapping and analysis of stories about the Russia-Ukraine conflict and the religious dimensions of it. And she noted that there was—for example, it was—almost always it was male clerics who were being quoted. So there was very little that was coming from other gendered perspectives and experiences on the ground, lay folks and so on. And again, for that—for that very reason it’s sort of—because we know so many policymakers and international analysis are depending on these kinds of media stories, I worry that it creates a blinder to potential opportunities for different kinds of ways of addressing needs and partners for addressing needs on the ground. FASKIANOS: Great. Thank you. I’m going to go next to Liam Wall, an undergraduate student at Loyola Marymount University: With so much diversity within religions itself, how can we avoid the analysis paralysis you mentioned and take in as many unique perspectives as possible, without letting that stand in the way of progress? How does one know that they have enough religious literacy and can now become an effective practitioner? HAYWARD: Well, OK, the bad news is that you will never have enough religious literacy. (Laughs.) This is a process, not an end. There are scholars here at Harvard who have been studying one particular sect of a particular religious tradition for their entire adult lives, and they would still say that they are students of those traditions, because they’re so complex. Because so many of these traditions are composed of a billion people or just—just 500 million people. But that means that there’s going to be an incredible diversity to explore. And so that’s the bad news. But the good news is, one, like, first take the burden off of your shoulders of having to be an expert on any one particular religious tradition, in order to be able to help to develop and enhance your own religious literacy, and those of others, and to operate in ways that reflect the principles of religious literacy, is the good news. As well as there are many different kinds of resources that you can turn to in order to understand, for example if you’re going to be working in a particular geographic location, scholarship, people you can speak to in order to begin to understand at least some of the specific manifestations and practices, and some of the disputes and diversity that exists within that particular country or geographic location across religious traditions. But, secondly, I would say, it’s almost more important than—like, the substance is important. But what’s just as important, if not more important, is understanding what kinds of questions to be asking, and to be curious about these religious questions and their intersection with the political and social. So we sometimes say that religious literacy is about developing habits of mind in how we think about these religious questions, and what kinds of questions we ask about religion. So it’s about developing that kind of a reflex to be able to kind of see what’s underneath some of the analysis that you’re seeing that might be relevant to religion or that might be advancing particularly problematic understandings of religion, or reinforcing binaries like the secular and the religious and so on. And that’s just as—just as important. So the extent to which you’re continuing to, like, hone those—that way of thinking, and those habits of mind, that will set you up well for then going into this space and being able to ask those particular questions with respect to whatever issues you’re focusing on, or whatever geographic location you’re looking at. FASKIANOS: Great. I’m going to go next to Mohamed Bilal, a postgraduate student at the Postgraduate Institute of Management in Sri Lanka. HAYWARD: Yay! FASKIANOS: Yes. How does sectarianism influence our literacy? In turn, if we are influenced by sectarianism, then would we be illiterate of the religion but literate of the sect? Thus, wouldn’t such a religious literacy perpetuate sectarianism? HAYWARD: Thank you for the question, Mohamed. It’s—I miss Sri Lanka. I have not been there in too long, and I look forward to going back at some point. So I would say sectarianism, in the sense of—so, there’s both religious sects, right? There’s the existence of different kinds of religious traditions, interpretive bodies, jurisprudential bodies in the case of Islam. And then broader, different schools or denominations. The term that’s used depends on the different religious tradition. And that reflects internal diversity. Sectarianism, with the -ism on the end of it, gets back to the same kinds of questions that I think Professor Clemente was asking with respect to fundamentalism. That’s about being sort of entrenched in an idea that your particular religious understanding and practice is the normative, authentic, and pure practice, and that all others are false in some ways. That is a devotional claim or—what I mean by a devotional claim, is that is a knowledge claim that is rooted within a particular religious commitment and understanding. And so religious literacy in this case would—again, it’s the principles of internal diversity, recognizing that different sects and different bodies of thought and practice are going to exist within religious traditions, but then also ensuring that any claim to be normative or to be orthodox by any of these different interpretive bodies is always a claim that is rooted within that religious tradition that we sometimes say is authentic. It’s authentic to those communities and what they believe. But it’s not exclusive. It’s not the only claim that exists within that religious tradition more broadly. And the concern is about—sects are fine. Different denominations, different interpretative bodies are fine and a good and sort of natural thing, given the breadth and the depth of these religious traditions. The problem is that -ism part of it, when it becomes a source of competition or even potentially violence between groups. And so that’s what needs to be interrogated and understood. FASKIANOS: So another question from John Francis, who’s the senior associate vice president for academic affairs at the University of Utah: If you were training new diplomats in other countries to be stationed in the United States, where a wide range of religious traditions thrive, how would you prepare them for dealing with such religious variation? HAYWARD: The same way I would—and thank you, again, for the question. The same way that I would with any other diplomats going to any other—the same way I do with foreign service officers at the Foreign Service Institute, who are going to work overseas. I would—I would invite them to think about their own assumptions and their own worldviews and their own understandings of what religion is, based on their own contexts that they grew up in. So how that shapes how they understand what religion is, in the ways I was speaking to before. So for example, in Protestant Christianity, we tend to emphasize belief as the sort of core principle of religious traditions. But other religious traditions might emphasize different forms of practice or community as sort of the central or principal factor. So recognizing your own situatedness and the ways in which you understand and respond to different religious traditions. I would invite those who are coming to work here to read up on the historical developments and reality of different religious communities and nonreligious communities in the U.S. and encourage them to look not just at some of the—what we call the world religions, or the major religions, but also at indigenous traditions and different practices within different immigrant communities. And I would have them look at the historical relationship between the state and different religious communities as well, including the Mormon tradition there in Utah, and how the experience of, for example, the Mormon community has shaped its own relationship with the state, with other religious communities on a whole host of issues as well. And then I would encourage—just as I was saying earlier—no diplomat going to the U.S. is going to become an expert on the religious context in the U.S., because it’s incredibly complex, just like anywhere else in the world. But to be able to have sort of a basic understanding to be able to then continue to ask the kinds of questions that are going to help to understand how any political action is taken or response to any policy issues kind of inevitably bumps up against particular religious or cultural commitments and values. FASKIANOS: Great. I’m going to take the next question from Will Carpenter, director of private equity principal investments at the Teacher Retirement System of Texas, and also taking a course at the Harvard Extension School. HAYWARD: Hey! FASKIANOS: I’m going to ask the second part of Will’s question. How will the current polarized domestic debate regarding U.S. history, which is often colored by the extremes—as a force for good only versus tainted by a foundation of injustice—impact America’s capacity to lead internationally? HAYWARD: Hmm, a lot. (Laughter.) Thank you for the question. I mean, I think the fact of polarization in the U.S. and the increasing difficulty that we’re facing in being able to have really deep conversations and frank conversations about historical experiences and perceptions of different communities, not just religiously, not just racially even, but across different—urban-rural, across socioeconomic divides, across educational divides and, of course, across political divides, and so on. I think that—I think that absolutely hampers our ability to engage within the global stage effectively. One, just because of the image that it gives to the rest of the world. So how can we—how can we have an authentic moral voice when we ourselves are having such a hard time engaging with one other in ways that reflect those values and that are grounded within those values? But also because I think get concern—with respect to religion questions in particular—I get concern about the increasing polarization and partisanization of religion in foreign policy and issues of religious freedom, and so on. Which means that we’re going to constantly have this sort of swinging back and forth then between Republican and Democratic administrations on how we understand and engage issues related to religion and foreign policy, different religious communities in particular, like Muslim communities worldwide, or on issues of religious freedom. So I think it’s incredibly critical—always has been, but is particularly right now at this historical moment—for us to be in the U.S. doing this hard work of having these conversations, and hearing, and listening to one another, and centering and being open about our values and having these conversations on that level of values. To be able to politically here in the U.S., much less overseas, to be able to work in ways that are effective. Irina, you’re muted. FASKIANOS: Thank you. (Laughs.) With that, we are at the end of our time. Thank you so much for this. This has been a really important hour of discussion. Again, we will send out the link to the webinar, as well as all the resources that you mentioned, Susan. Sorry we didn’t have the chat open so that we could focus on what you were saying and all the questions and comments that came forward. So we appreciate it. And thank you so much, again, for your time, Susan Hayward. And I just want to remind everybody that this is the last webinar of the semester, but we will be announcing the Winter/Spring Academic Webinar lineup in our Academic bulletin. And if you’re not already subscribed to that, you can email us at [email protected] Just as a reminder, you can learn about CFR paid internships for students and fellowships for professors at CFR.org/careers. Follow @CFR_Academic on Twitter and visit CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for research and analysis on global issues. Good luck with your exams. (Laughs.) Grading, taking them, et cetera. Wishing you all a happy Thanksgiving. And we look forward to seeing you again next semester. So, again, thank you to Susan Hayward. HAYWARD: Thank you, everybody. Take care. Wed, 15 Jan 2020 15:08:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.cfr.org/report/implementing-grand-strategy-toward-china Killexams : IoT Identity and Access Management (IAM) Market to Reach $47.2 Billion by 2031: Allied Market Research

    Allied Market Research

    Rising security breaches and identity fraud incidences to boost the global IoT identity and access management (IAM) market trends. The rise in need for remote-based monitoring of employees working from home during the COVID-19 period resulted in massive demand for IoT solutions, thereby driving the global market growth. Based on region, the market across the North American region held the major market share in 2021.

    Portland, OR , Nov. 03, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- According to the report published by Allied Market Research, the global Iot Identity and Access Management (IAM) Market generated $4.9 billion in 2021, and is projected to reach $47.2 billion by 2031, growing at a CAGR of 25.4% from 2022 to 2031. The report offers a detailed analysis of the top winning strategies, evolving market trends, market size and estimations, value chain, key investment pockets, drivers & opportunities, competitive landscape, and regional landscape. The report is a useful source of information for new entrants, shareholders, frontrunners, and shareholders in introducing necessary strategies for the future and taking essential steps to significantly strengthen and heighten their position in the market.

    Download Free sample Report (334 Pages PDF with Insights, Charts, Tables, Figures):

    https://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/request-sample/31995             

    Report coverage & details:

    Report Coverage

    Details

    Forecast Period

    2022­–2031

    Base Year

    2021

    Market Size in 2021

    $4.9 billion

    Market Size in 2031

    $47.2 billion

    CAGR

    25.4%

    No. of Pages in Report

    334

    Segments Covered

    Offering, Deployment Model, Security Type, Enterprise Size, Industry Vertical, and Region.

    Drivers

    Rising security breaches and identity fraud incidences.

    Growing awareness about compliance control methods has led to massive demand for IAM and IoT.

    Rise in expenditure on cyber security.

    Opportunities

    Proliferation of cloud-based IAM solutions and rise in adoption of hybrid cloud models.

    Rapid acceptance of technologies such as artificial intelligence, machine learning, blockchain, and biometrics for identity and access management systems.

    Restraints

    Huge costs associated with the implementation and maintenance of IoT identity and access management (IAM) solutions.

    Growing concerns pertaining to the privacy and security of data of firms.

    COVID-19 Scenario:

    • The outbreak of the COVID-19 had a positive impact on the growth of the global IoT Identity and Access Management (IAM) market, owing to a substantial increase in the demand for IoT solutions in the BFSI, healthcare, and manufacturing sectors.

    • Rise in number of cyber-attacks during the COVID-19 period resulted in a humongous demand for the IoT identity and access solutions across various sectors.

    • Apart from this, the rise in need for remote-based monitoring of employees working from home during the COVID-19 period resulted in a massive demand for IoT solutions.

    The report offers a detailed segmentation of the global IoT Identity and Access Management (IAM) market based on offering, deployment model, security type, enterprise size, industry vertical, and region.  The report provides a comprehensive analysis of every segment and their respective sub-segment with the help of graphical and tabular representation. This analysis can essentially help market players, investors, and new entrants in determining and devising strategies based on the fastest-growing segments and highest revenue generation that is mentioned in the report.

    Based on offering, the solution segment held the major market share in 2021, holding more than two-thirds of the global IoT Identity and Access Management (IAM) market share, and is expected to maintain its leadership status during the forecast period. Nevertheless, the service segment is expected to cite the fastest CAGR of 27.0% during the forecast period.

    In terms of deployment model, the on-premise segment held the major market share in 2021, contributing nearly three-fifths of the global IoT Identity and Access Management (IAM) market share, and is expected to maintain its leadership position during the forecast period. However, the cloud segment, on the other hand, is expected to cite the highest CAGR of 26.7% during the forecast period.

    In terms of enterprise size, the large enterprises segment held the major market share in 2021, contributing nearly three-fourths of the global IoT Identity and Access Management (IAM) market share, and is expected to maintain its leadership position during the forecast period. However, the SMEs segment, on the other hand, is expected to cite the highest CAGR of 28.0% during the forecast period.

    Based on region, the market across the North American region held the major market share in 2021, holding nearly two-fifths of the global IoT Identity and Access Management (IAM) market share, and is expected to maintain its leadership status during the forecast period. However, the Asia-Pacific region is expected to cite the fastest CAGR of 28.5% during the forecast period.

    Purchase Inquiry: https://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/purchase-enquiry/31995

    The key players analyzed in the global IoT Identity and Access Management (IAM) market report include Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson, Amazon Web Services, Inc., Google LLC, Microsoft Corporation, IBM Corporation, Cisco Systems, Inc., Oracle Corporation, HID Global Corporation, DigiCert, Inc.,  Entrust Corporation, GlobalSign, One Identity, LLC, KaaIoT Technologies, LLC, Sailpoint Technologies Holdings, Inc., Optiv Security, Inc., and IdentityFusion, Inc.

    The report analyzes these key players in the global IoT Identity and Access Management (IAM) market. These market players have made effective use of strategies such as joint ventures, collaborations, expansion, new product launches, partnerships, and others to maximize their foothold and prowess in the industry. The report is helpful in analyzing recent developments, product portfolio, business performance, and operating segments by prominent players in the market.

    Buy this Report at:

    https://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/checkout-final/dd747d21bbbe7f0f94f4f0afa5e17d81

    About Us

    Allied Market Research (AMR) is a full-service market research and business-consulting wing of Allied Analytics LLP based in Portland, Oregon. Allied Market Research provides global enterprises as well as medium and small businesses with unmatched quality of "Market Research Reports" and "Business Intelligence Solutions." AMR has a targeted view to provide business insights and consulting to assist its clients to make strategic business decisions and achieve sustainable growth in their respective market domain.

    We are in professional corporate relations with various companies and this helps us in digging out market data that helps us generate accurate research data tables and confirms utmost accuracy in our market forecasting. Allied Market Research CEO Pawan Kumar is instrumental in inspiring and encouraging everyone associated with the company to maintain high quality of data and help clients in every way possible to achieve success. Each and every data presented in the reports published by us is extracted through primary interviews with top officials from leading companies of domain concerned. Our secondary data procurement methodology includes deep online and offline research and discussion with knowledgeable professionals and analysts in the industry.

    CONTACT: Contact: David Correa 5933 NE Win Sivers Drive #205, Portland, OR 97220 United States USA/Canada (Toll Free): +1-800-792-5285, +1-503-894-6022 UK: +44-845-528-1300 Hong Kong: +852-301-84916 India (Pune): +91-20-66346060 Fax: +1(855)550-5975 help@alliedmarketresearch.com Web: https://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/reports-store/information-and-communication-technology-and-media
    Thu, 03 Nov 2022 01:29:00 -0500 en-AU text/html https://au.news.yahoo.com/iot-identity-access-management-iam-132900541.html Killexams : 2022 Major Layoffs Grow: Blue Apron Lays Off 10% Of Staff

    Tech startup Pluralsight became the latest company to lay off employees on Tuesday, one day after banking giant Goldman Sachs reportedly weighed plays for its latest large round of layoffs—as employers fear high inflation could slide the economy into recession.

    Dec. 13, 2022Pluralsight is cutting 20% of its workforce, CEO Aaron Skonnard informed employees in a memo this week, attributing the online education company’s decision to a “challenging economic environment” that has “accelerated” in the most recent fiscal quarter.

    Dec. 12, 2022Goldman Sachs is finalizing plans to eliminate more than 400 retail banking positions, according to Bloomberg, on top of reinstating a policy to annually fire between 1% and 5% of its lowest-performing staffers, which the New York Times first reported in September (Goldman Sachs could not be immediately reached for comment).

    Dec. 8, 2022Blue Apron announced it’s cutting 10% of its corporate workforce (roughly 165 of its 1,657 employees, according to its fourth quarter financial report) in a press release, as the meal-kit company pushes to reduce its expenses, following a 93% drop in shares over the past year, from $11.40 to $0.79.

    Dec. 8, 2022San-Francisco-based tech company Airtable laid off 254 employees in its business development and engineering teams, while three executives have also left the company, TechCrunch reported.

    Dec. 7, 2022Adobe could be cutting roughly 100 employees from its sales department, according to Bloomberg, although several employees were allowed to move to other positions within the company, according to an unnamed source.

    Dec. 7, 2022Plaid CEO Zach Perret announced in a blog post that the San Francisco-based online financial services company will lay off 260 employees amid “slower-than-expected growth” following its decision to hire “aggressively” as consumers turned to it during the Covid-19 pandemic.

    Dec. 6, 2022San Francisco-based online real estate company Doma unveiled plans to cut 515 positions (roughly 40% of its workforce) in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing—its third round of layoffs this year, following its decision to axe 310 employees in May and 250 more in August.

    Dec. 6, 2022Morgan Stanley’s layoffs, first reported by CNBC citing unnamed sources, could affect around 1,600 of the more than 81,000 people employed by the company according to its latest quarterly report—less than a week after CEO James Gordon warned “some people are going to be let go.”

    Dec. 6, 2022BuzzFeed CEO Jonah Peretti announced the media outlet will cut 180 employees (12% of its staff), in an internal memo, saying the company, which also owns the Huffington Post and Complex Networks, needs to “adapt, invest in our strategy to serve our audience best and readjust our cost structure” to endure poor economic conditions that he predicts “will extend well into 2023.”

    Dec. 5, 2022PepsiCo, which makes its namesake Pepsi soda along with products like Gatorade, Lays chips and Quaker Oats, is reportedly eliminating hundreds of jobs at headquarters in Chicago; Purchase, New York; and Plano, Texas, according to information obtained by the Wall Street Journal, as part of a plan “to simplify the organization so we can operate more efficiently” (the company did not immediately respond to a request for comment from Forbes seeking further details).

    Dec. 1, 2022Gannett, the parent company of USA Today, the Detroit Free Press, Indianapolis Star and Cincinnati Enquirer, began laying off employees on Thursday, a spokesperson confirmed to Forbes, estimated to affect 6% of employees in the company’s 3,400-person media division—the company’s latest round of cuts after the country’s largest newspaper chain let go of 400 employees in August amid “ongoing macroeconomic volatility.”

    Nov. 30, 2022CNN also began laying off staff, with CEO Chris Licht calling it a “gut punch” in a memo—the media company did not specify how many employees have been affected, though it could gut the company’s HLN cable network, Variety reported, citing unnamed sources (CNN did not immediately respond to a request for more details from Forbes).

    Nov. 30, 2022H&M announced the job cuts—expected to affect 1,500 employees (less than 1% of the company’s 155,000 employees—in a statement Wednesday morning, as part of a restructuring plan it released in September to deliver an estimated annual savings of $190 million (Forbes has reached out to H&M for additional details).

    Nov. 30, 2022Cryptocurrency exchange Kraken CEO Jesse Powell announced the company will let go of 1,100 employees (30% of its workforce), as it deals with “macroeconomic and geopolitical factors.”

    Nov. 30, 2022In a letter to employees announcing plans to cut 1,250 workers, DoorDash CEO Tony Xu said the food delivery company is “not immune to the external challenges” and that the company’s growth has “tapered” following a “sudden and unprecedented” Covid-era expansion when consumers had turned to delivery services.

    Nov. 29, 2022AMC Networks chairman James Dolan announced a round of large-scale layoffs in a memo on Tuesday, the Wall Street Journal reported, just hours after the beleaguered entertainment company’s CEO Christina Spade stepped down after just three months in the role (Dolan did not clarify how many employees would be affected by the job cuts and AMC did not immediately respond to a request for comment from Forbes).

    Nov. 22, 2022HP Inc. plans to reduce its global headcount by approximately 4,000 to 6,000 employees by the end of 2025, the firm disclosed in its fourth-quarter earnings release, which outlined efforts to cut annual costs by $1.4 billion amid softening consumer demand and a “volatile” economic environment.

    Nov. 18, 2022Carvana is cutting roughly 8% of its workforce across its corporate, technology and operations teams, according to a person familiar with the matter, as the Arizona-based company struggles with high financing costs and delayed car purchases.

    Nov. 18, 2022Nuro, the San Francisco Bay Area-based autonomous vehicle delivery startup, is planning to cut 20% of its workforce, co-founders Jiajun Zhu and Dave Ferguson said Friday morning in an email to employees, blaming the cuts on a “variety of macroeconomic challenges,” including “geopolitical uncertainty, energy crises, persistent inflation and an impending U.S. recession.”

    Nov. 17, 2022“Current economic conditions” prompted officials at Roku to eliminate roughly 7% of its U.S. workforce (200 employees), the company announced in a press release Thursday morning, as the company looks to “drive future growth and enhance our leadership position.”

    Nov. 16, 2022Cisco’s job cuts could affect up roughly 4,100 workers (roughly 5% of the company’s 83,000 employees), according to CFO Scott Herren, who called the cuts a “rebalance across the board” in an earnings call, Barron’s reported (Cisco did not immediately respond to a Forbes inquiry).

    Nov. 16, 2022In a blog post, Amazon Senior Vice President of Devices and Services Dave Limp said the layoffs come as the company continues to face an “unusual and uncertain macroeconomic environment”—days after multiple outlets reported Amazon is planning to lay off as many as 10,000 employees in corporate and technology roles, although the number of jobs being reduced remains in flux, the New York Times noted.

    Nov. 15, 2022Asana COO Anne Raimondi announced the software company will lay off 9% of its workforce (roughly 230 of the company’s 2,560 employees, according to Pitchbook) in a LinkedIn post, saying the cuts will target staff worldwide—it’s also the latest tech company based in the San Francisco Bay Area to announce major cuts, following Twitter, Meta, Lyft, Stripe, Salesforce, Chime and Opendoor.

    Nov. 11, 2022Disney told executives it plans to implement “a targeted hiring freeze” and anticipates job cuts, according to CNBC, after reporting quarterly losses earlier this week, though it’s not clear how many employees will be affected by the changes.

    Nov. 11, 2022Juul announced the layoffs, which are expected to affect roughly 30% of its workforce, the Wall Street Journal reported, as the embattled company secures additional funding from investors to avoid bankruptcy two months after it agreed to pay $438 million to settle a lawsuit from 33 states and Puerto Rico into claims the company marketed its products to teenagers, and as the company appeals the Food and Drug Administration’s ban on the sale of its vaporizers.

    Nov. 10, 2022Barclays started laying off roughly 200 employees in its banking and trading departments this week, sources told Bloomberg, while Citigroup is cutting 50 trading employees, CNBC reported, following the lead of Goldman Sachs, SoftBank and Wells Fargo, which all implemented major job cuts earlier this year (Barclays and Citigroup did not immediately respond to requests for comment from Forbes).

    Nov. 9, 2022Redfin announced in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing it would cut 13% of its staff (862 employees), while another 218 employees whose roles were eliminated will be given new positions in the company—its second round of layoffs in recent months following its decision to cut 8% of its staff in June as mortgage rates continued to climb, jumping to a 22-year high.

    Nov. 9, 2022Mark Zuckerberg, the CEO of Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp parent company Meta, confirmed the social media company will lay off 13% of its workforce (11,000 employees) on Wednesday, blaming its low revenue on “macroeconomic downturn” and “increased competition”—making it one of the largest rounds of cuts for a major tech company so far this year, following a hiring freeze announced in September.

    Nov. 8, 2022Salesforce cut fewer than 1,000 employees on Monday, a source familiar with the move told CNBC, and it’s reportedly planning to lay off roughly 2,500 of the company’s 72,223 employees (approximately 3.5% of its workforce, according to Pitchbook) for “performance issues,” Protocol reported, citing an industry source and a former employee.

    Nov. 8, 2022Zendesk is planning to lay off roughly 350 employees, including 84 in California, SF Gate and the San Francisco Chronicle reported, citing a tweet from a member of San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors referencing the company’s filing of a Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification notice filed last week (Zendesk did not immediately respond to a Forbes inquiry).

    Nov. 3, 2022Billionaire Elon Musk reportedly plans to cut roughly 50% of Twitter’s 7,500 employees, multiple outlets reported Thursday—one week after the world’s richest man took over the company, with previous reports indicating he could lay off 25% and as much as 75% of the workforce, although Musk has walked back on that original number.

    Nov. 2, 2022Online financial services company Chime will lay off 12% of its staff, with the cuts expected to affect 160 of the company’s 1,300 employees, a spokesperson told CNBC, as the San-Francisco-based online banking and financial services company attempts to recapitalize “regardless of market conditions,” according to an internal memo obtained by TechCrunch.

    Nov. 3, 2022Rideshare giant Lyft will reportedly lay off 13% of its staff, according to a letter from company officials obtained by CNBC, with job cuts affecting approximately 650 employees (13% of its staff of roughly 5,000, not including its contracted drivers), marking the company’s second round of layoffs this year, after it laid off 60 workers in July (Lyft did not immediately respond to an inquiry from Forbes).

    Nov. 3, 2022Stripe announced plans to cut 14% of its workforce (roughly 1,120 of its 8,000 positions as of October, according to PitchBook) as the online financial services company contends with “stubborn inflation, energy shocks, higher interest rates, reduced investment budgets and sparser startup funding,” after the company “overhired” and “underestimated both the likelihood and impact of a broader slowdown,” CEO Patrick Collison announced in a statement to employees.

    Nov. 2, 2022In a blog post released Wednesday, Opendoor CEO Eric Wu blamed the company’s job cuts, which affect 18% of its workforce, on “the most challenging real estate market in 40 years” and a “need to adjust our business”—as the housing market continues to cool in the wake of rising inflation and the Federal Reserve’s four rounds of interest rate hikes this year.

    Nov. 1, 2022Upstart’s layoffs are expected to affect roughly 7% of the cloud-based AI lending company’s workforce, with cuts primarily among employees who work in loan applications, a spokesperson confirmed to Forbes, saying the move comes “given the challenging economy.”

    Oct. 28 ,2022Zillow, the Seattle-based online real estate company, plans to let go of 300 workers (roughly 5% of its nearly 5,800 employees), TechCrunch reported, nearly a year after it announced plans to lay off another 2,000 employees.

    Oct. 26, 2022Seagate Technology CEO Dave Mosley said the cuts, estimated to affect 8% of the data storage company’s workforce, follow “global economic uncertainties” and reduced demand, as the company’s shares plummet to $53.69 from a peak of $117.67 in January.

    Oct. 25, 2022Manufacturing giant Philips unveiled plans to lay off approximately 4,000 workers amid a “worsening macroeconomic environment,” with the cuts expected to affect more than 5% of the company’s workforce in both the Netherlands—where the company is based—and the United States.

    Oct. 22, 2022Vacasa’s layoffs affect roughly 3% of the company’s workforce, primarily in its corporate divisions, Skift reported—its second round of cuts this year following its decision to let go of 25 sales employees in July—a spokesperson told Skift the company is attempting to “optimize our resources and teams to be efficient and align with our priorities.”

    Oct. 19, 2022Philadelphia-based delivery startup Gopuff laid off as many as 250 employees in its third round of layoffs this year, unnamed sources told Bloomberg, after cutting roughly 400 in March and 100 in January—a company spokesperson told Forbes the recent cuts are part of a 10% reduction announced over the summer.

    Oct. 18, 2022Microsoft’s cuts will affect less than 1% of its 180,000 workers, a spokesperson told CNBC, three months after the Redmond, Wash.-based tech company announced it would slash another 1% of its workforce, with the cuts coming in the company’s modern life experiences team—a Microsoft spokesperson told Forbes the company will “evaluate our business priorities on a regular basis and make structural adjustments accordingly.”

    Oct. 14, 2022HelloFresh, which took off during pandemic-related shutdowns, cut 611 workers workers and shut down a California production facility this week as the company focuses on “newer, more efficient sites,” a company spokesperson told Business Insider.

    Oct. 14, 2022Beyond Meat announced it will lay off 19% of its workforce, as the California-based company struggles with a decline in demand for plant-based meats driven by inflation as consumers opt for cheaper alternatives, company officials said.

    Oct. 14, 2022Nevada-based real estate valuation firm Clear Capital announced plans to cut 27% of its global workforce (roughly 378 employees), TechCrunch reported, including 108 employees at its California office.

    Oct. 13, 2022Oracle is laying off 201 employees, according to multiple outlets, citing documents filed to the state’s Employment Development Department, two months after the company started laying off an undisclosed number of its estimated 143,000 employees, as part of a larger plan to cut thousands, The Information reported.

    Oct. 12, 2022Intel could reportedly cut thousands of employees, including roughly 20% in its sales and marketing departments, Bloomberg reported citing unnamed sources familiar with the proposal, following a disappointing company financial forecast in July it blamed on a “sudden and rapid” economic decline, while its shares shrank by more than half over the past year, to $25.04.

    Oct. 11, 2022Brex’s job cuts affect 136 employees, bringing its staff to roughly 1,150, as the company adjusts to a “new macro environment” that “warrants a new level of focus and financial discipline,” CEO Pedro Franceschi wrote in a blog post.

    Oct. 6, 2022Peloton’s layoffs, which affect roughly 12% of the company, come two months after a memo to employees obtained by Bloomberg revealed the exercise equipment maker cut nearly 800 jobs, and announced plans to shut stores and raise prices for its Bike+ and Tread machines.

    Sept. 29, 2022SoftBank is prepping to cut at least 150 of the 500 workers employed by the Vision Fund, the Japanese conglomerate’s venture capital arm, which would would affect roughly 30% of staff, according to Bloomberg, a move that SoftBank’s billionaire founder and CEO Masayoshi Son hinted at last month after a record $23 billion quarterly loss (it’s unclear whether the layoffs will affect employees at the Lond0n-headquartered fund’s two U.S. locations in Silicon Valley and Miami).

    Sept. 28, 2022San Francisco-based electronic signature company DocuSign will lay off 9% of its more than 7,400 employees (roughly 670 employees), the company announced in a Securities and Exchange filing Wednesday, saying the cuts are necessary to ensure we are capitalizing on our long-term opportunity and setting up the company for future success.”

    Sept. 26, 2022Wells Fargo reportedly announced plans to lay off 36 employees, bringing the bank’s total layoffs since April to more than 400, Iowa CBS affiliate KCCI reported, following the banking giant’s decision earlier this month to cut roughly 75 in its home mortgage division (Wells Fargo did not immediately respond to an inquiry from Forbes).

    Sept. 21, 2022In a similar move, Google also alerted about 50 employees—roughly half of those employed at the firm’s startup incubator Area 120—they need to find a new internal role within three months if they want to stay at Google, the Journal reported.

    Sept. 21, 2022Clothing outlet Nordstrom plans to lay off 231 employees at an Iowa distribution center starting next month, local ABC affiliate KCRG reported, citing a spokesperson who said the move is necessary to “better align with the current needs of our business” (Nordstrom did not immediately respond to an inquiry from Forbes).

    Sept. 20, 2022Gap could cut as many as 500 corporate jobs from its offices in New York and San Francisco, as well as offices in Asia, unnamed sources told the Wall Street Journal on Tuesday (A Gap spokesperson confirmed the layoffs to Forbes but would not provide further detail).

    Sept. 16, 2022AbbVie reportedly announced plans to lay off 99 employees while Bristol Myers Squibb plans to cut 261, according to state filings seen by Endpoints News, making them the latest pharmaceutical companies to slim down their workforces, following Biogen and Teva, which reportedly cut 300 jobs last month.

    Sept. 14, 2022Twilio CEO Jeff Lawson announced the move to cut 11% (roughly 800-900 of the company’s nearly 8,000 employees) on a company blog, saying the workforce grew “too fast” and “without enough focus” over the past two years.

    Sept. 13, 2022Warner Bros. Discovery, which formed in a merger between the two production giants in April, could reportedly cut “hundreds” of ad sales employees from the WarnerMedia and Discovery sides of the company, Axios reported, citing unnamed sources, as the company looks to downsize its advertising team representing HBO, CNN, Discovery, Turner and Warner Bros. Entertainment, according to Insider, which also spoke to unnamed sources.

    Sept. 9, 2022Beaumont-Spectrum, which formed earlier this year out of a merger between Beaumont and Spectrum, cut 400 corporate positions as the health care network struggles with “significant financial pressures from historic inflation, rising pharmaceutical and labor costs, COVID 19, expiration of CARES Act funding and reimbursement not proportional with expenses.”

    Sept. 2, 2022Banking giant Citigroup reportedly made layoffs in its home mortgage division that a source told Bloomberg encompassed fewer than 100 positions.

    Sept. 2, 2022SoftBank, the Tokyo-based investment management giant, reportedly plans to cut up to 20% of the roughly 500 staffers at its Vision Fund three weeks after the fund posted a record loss in the fiscal quarter ending in June.

    Sept. 2, 2022Investment banking giant Credit Suisse could reportedly cut as many as 5,000 jobs as the scandal-hit bank seeks to turnaround its reputation and reduce costs, according to Reuters.

    Aug. 31, 2022Snap, the California-based developer of mobile app Snapchat, announced plans to lay off more than 1,200 employees (roughly 20% of its staff), in its second round of job cuts this summer, according to an internal memo obtained by CNN.

    Aug. 31, 2022Bed Bath & Beyond unveiled plans to lay off 20% of its workforce and take out $500 million in new financing, as the struggling retail giant closes 150 “lower-producing” stores amid continuing issues with low sales.

    Aug. 31, 2022VF Corporation, the parent company of brands such as Vans, Timeberland and the North Face, reportedly cut 300 employees and eliminated 300 open positions (less than 1% of its global workforce), with CEO Steve Rendle writing in an internal letter to employees obtained by the Denver Business Journal that the cuts come amid an environment that will “likely continue to be marked by volatility” (VF confirmed the layoffs to Forbes but would not provide further details).

    Aug. 30, 2022Snap CEO Evan Spiegel announced in a company memo that the company will lay off 20% of its than 6,400 workers (1,280 employees), the Verge reported, saying the company is facing a “lower rate of revenue growth”—the company’s stock price has plummeted nearly 80% since earlier this year.

    Aug. 26, 2022Online mortgage lender Better.com reportedly announced its third round of layoffs this year and its fourth in the past 12 months, laying off close to 250 employees, an unnamed worker told TechCrunch—bringing the company’s total layoffs since December to roughly 4,000 as the company struggles amid a precipitous downturn in the housing market (Better.com did not immediately respond to an inquiry from Forbes).

    Aug. 25, 2022Artificial intelligence startup DataRobot interim CEO Debanjan Saha announced the Boston-based company’s second round of job cuts since May in a move “to adapt to changing market dynamics,” and even though the company did not specify the number of employees leaving, LinkedIn reported it will affect 26% of its staff, which, according to the site TechTarget, would mean roughly 260 of its 1,000 employees.

    Aug. 25, 2022Tennessee-based trucking company U.S. Xpress cut 5% of its corporate workforce, a spokesperson confirmed to local ABC affiliate WTVC, bringing its total layoffs this summer to roughly 140, following a round of cuts in May that slashed another 5% of the company’s corporate staff, reported at the time to be around 70 employees.

    Aug. 22, 2022Ford announced it will let go about 3,000 office and contract employees as the carmaker moves to cut spending as it transitions to producing electric vehicles, according to the Wall Street Journal.

    Aug. 19, 2022Boston-based online furniture retailer Wayfair slashed 870 jobs (nearly 5% of the company’s 18,000 employees), according to an internal memo from CEO Niraj Shah obtained by the Boston Globe, which stated the company was rebuilding after the Covid-19 pandemic but that their “team is too large for the environment we are now in.”

    Aug. 18, 2022Software company New Relic laid off 110 employees, including 90 in the U.S. (roughly 5% of its workforce), CEO Bill Staples posted in a statement on the company’s website, writing the cuts are essential in light of “current information on growth trends and market expectations.”

    Aug. 16, 2022Philadelphia-based Audacy, the second biggest radio company in the United States, cut 5% of its workforce (estimated to be roughly 250 employees), Inside Radio reported, with CEO David Field saying the cuts come “in light of current macroeconomic headwinds.”

    Aug. 16, 2022Apple, the world’s most valuable company, laid off 100 contracted recruiters amid a hiring slowdown, Bloomberg reported (Apple did not respond immediately to an inquiry from Forbes).

    Aug. 15, 2022HBO Max cut 70 jobs (14% of its workforce) in a cost-cutting effort that comes four months after Discovery’s $43 billion acquisition of HBO Max parent company WarnerMedia, and a week after the company announced plans to combine the streaming service with Discovery+ as soon as next year, Deadline reported.

    Aug. 12, 2022Texas-based home health services company Signify Health laid off 489 employees, a cost-cutting move that comes weeks after health care giant CVS made a bid to purchase the company, multiple outlets reported.

    Aug. 11, 2022Meditation app Calm CEO David Ko announced plans to lay off 90 employees (20% of the company’s workforce) in a memo to employees, saying, “we as a company are not immune to the impacts of the current economic environment."

    Aug. 10, 2022California tech startup Nutanix announced plans to cut 270 (4% of its workforce) by the end of October, according to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing, in an effort to reduce expenses.

    Aug. 10, 2022Fast casual salad shop Sweetgreen cut 5% of its corporate workforce, attributing company losses to a slow return to the office and lingering Covid-19 cases, in a conference call, CNBC reported.

    Aug. 9, 2022Website design company Wix.com made its second round of layoffs this year, cutting 100 employees as company President and COO Nir Zohar told Israeli newspaper Calcalist, “the world has experienced an economic crisis and we have seen U.S. GDP fall without growth.”

    Aug. 9, 2022Canadian social media management company Hootsuite reportedly announced plans to cut 30% of its estimated 1,000 employees.

    Aug. 8, 2022Groupon unveiled plans to lay off 15% of its workforce (500 employees), primarily in the company’s technology and sales departments, with CEO Kedar Deshpande writing in a message to employees obtained by Forbes, “our cost structure and our performance are not aligned.”

    Aug. 8, 2022Snap started laying off an undisclosed number of its 6,000 employees, following a disappointing earnings report released last month, The Verge reported, citing anonymous sources.

    Aug. 5, 2022iRobot, the maker of Roomba, cut 10% of its workforce (140 employees), as the company restructures after being purchased by Amazon for $1.7 billion, the company told Forbes, adding the job cuts were not related to the acquisition.

    Aug. 4, 2022California-based video game developer Jam City laid off between 150-200 employees — roughly 17% of its workforce — VentureBeat reported, stating the cuts come “in light of the challenging global economy and its impact on the gaming industry.”

    Aug. 3, 2022Walmart—the largest private employer in the United States—plans to cut 200 of its corporate employees as the company seeks to restructure, the Wall Street Journal reported, citing anonymous sources.

    Aug. 2, 2022Online brokerage Robinhood cut 23% of its staff, with CEO Vlad Tenev citing a drop in trading activity, high inflation and a “broad crypto market crash”—the move comes after Robinhood laid off 9% of its full-time employees in April, a set of cuts Tenev says “did not go far enough.”

    July 27, 2022Fitness company F45 Training laid off 110 employees, or 45% of its workforce, as CEO Adam Gilchrist stepped down.

    July 26, 2022E-commerce company Shopify became the latest company to lay off employees, cutting ties with 1,000 (10% of its workforce), CEO Tobi Lutke announced, saying skyrocketing demand for online shopping during the pandemic has leveled off, and that the company made a bet that “didn’t pay off.”

    July 22, 2022Boston tech-watch company Whoop slashed 15% of its workforce, telling the Boston Globe it now has 550 employees (meaning it cut close to 97) adding in a statement, “given how negatively the macro environment has evolved, we need to grow responsibly and control our own destiny.”

    July 21, 20227-Eleven, which operates 13,000 convenience stores across North America, cut 880 U.S. corporate jobs, just over a year after it completed a $21 billion deal to purchase Speedway.

    July 20, 2022Seattle real estate startup Flyhome axed 20% of its staff, reported to be close to 200 workers, as the company navigates “uncertain economic conditions.”

    July 20, 2022Ford plans to lay off up to 8,000 employees as the automaker seeks to pivot away from gas-powered cars and toward electric vehicle production, Bloomberg reported.

    July 19, 2022Vimeo CEO Anjali Sud announced on LinkedIn the online video company is cutting 6% of its workforce to “come out of this economic downturn a stronger company.”

    July 19, 2022Ohio-based automated health software startup Olive laid off 450 employees, nearly 35% of the company, as CEO Sean Lane admitted the company’s commitment to “act with urgency” led to a hiring spree that proved to be too much to handle, prompting him to “rethink this approach.”

    July 18, 2022Crypto exchange Gemini cut 68 employees—or 7% of its staff—less than two months after it let go of 10% of its workforce, according to TechCrunch.

    July 14, 2022OpenSea, the New-York based non-fungible token (NFT) company, announced in a tweet it laid off 20% of its staff over fears of “broad macroeconomic instability” with the possibility of “prolonged downturn.”

    July 13, 2022Online ordering startup ChowNow laid off 100 people, TechCrunch reported, as it reels back from a “large and ambitious” budget it couldn’t meet amid fears a stunted market could fuel a recession.

    July 13, 2022Tonal, the at-home fitness company, cut 35% of its workforce amid a worsening “macroeconomic climate and global supply chain challenges.”

    July 12, 2022Tesla laid off 229 employees, primarily in its autopilot division, and shut down its San Mateo, California, office, just weeks after CEO Elon Musk sent an email to executives, saying he had a “super bad feeling” about the economy and planned to cut 10% of his workforce, Reuters reported.

    July 12, 2022Some 1,500 employees at the international delivery startup Gopuff were let go, (10% of its staff) and 76 of its U.S. warehouses were shut down, according to a letter to investors first reported by Bloomberg, as the company moves away from a growth-at-all-costs model.

    July 12, 2022California-based mortgage lender loanDepot announced plans to lay off 2,000 workers by the end of the year, bringing its 2022 layoffs to 4,800 — more than half of the company’s 8,500 employees — as the housing market “contracted sharply and abruptly,” CEO Frank Martell said in a statement.

    July 11, 2022Electric automaker Rivian unveiled plans to lay off 5% of the company’s 14,000 employees in areas that grew “too quickly” during the pandemic and to halt hiring of non-factory workers, according to an internal email from CEO RJ Scaringe, Bloomberg reported.

    July 7, 2022Real estate firm Re/Max announced plans to lay off 17% of its workforce by the end of the year, with a goal of bringing in $100 million in annual mortgage-related revenue by 2028.

    June 22, 2022JPMorgan Chase — the nation’s largest bank — laid off and reassigned more than 1,000 of its 274,948 employees, citing rising mortgage rates and increased inflation.

    June 15, 2022Real estate companies Compass and Redfin announced plans to cut 10% and 8% of their workforces, respectively, following a 3.4% drop in home sales from April to May, according to the National Association of Realtors, amid concerns the once red-hot housing market had cooled.

    June 14, 2022Some 1,100 Coinbase employees learned they had been released after losing access to their work emails, marking an 18% reduction in the crypto company’s staff — a move that CEO Brian Armstrong called essential to “stay healthy during this economic downturn” — and a warning sign of a recession and a “crypto winter” after a 10-plus-year crypto boom.

    May 21, 2022Used car seller Carvana CEO Ernie Garcia III sent an email to 2,500 employees — 12% of the company’s workforce — informing them they had lost their jobs, one week after freezing new hiring, as the company embraced for what looked like a looming recession in car sales, and reports of a “spendthrift” business style had come back to bite the company.

    Wed, 21 Sep 2022 05:30:00 -0500 Brian Bushard en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/brianbushard/2022/12/13/2022-major-layoffs-grow-twitter-goldman-sachs-pluralsight-cutting-hundreds-of-jobs/
    Killexams : NABARD DA Result 2022 (Released) @nabard.org: obtain Development Assistant PDF Here

    NABARD DA Result 2022: National Bank for Agriculture & Rural Development released the result of the Development Assistant exam 2022. Candidates can check the result pdf here.

    NABARD DA Result 2022 is now available on the official website of the National Bank for Agriculture & Rural Development i.e. nabard.org. NABARD has created a PDF file consisted the roll numbers of all the candidates who qualified for the exam held on 06 November 2022.  All shortlisted candidates are now required to appear for the main exam.  NABARD DA Result Link is also provided in this article below.

    NABARD DA Result obtain Link

    NABARD Development Assistant Hindi Result

    NABARD DA Mains exam 2022

    The main exam for all the candidates whose roll number is on the list will be held on 24 December 2022. Such candidates will be required to obtain NABARD DA Mains Admit Card in order to attend the exam.

    How to obtain NABARD DA Result 2022 ?

    Step 1: Go to the website of the NABARD - nabard.org

    Step 2: Visit the ‘Careers Notices’ Section

    Step 3: Click on the post name given under ‘Recruitment Of Development Assistant/ Development Assistant (Hindi) - 2022 - Roll Nos. Of Candidates Shortlisted For Main Examination (Disclaimer: Though Utmost Care Has Been Taken While Preparing The Merit List, NABARD Reserves The Right To Rectify Inadvertent Errors, If Any)’

    Step 4: obtain NABARD Development Assistant Result

    Step 5: Check the roll numbers of the candidates who qualified in the exam

    Step 6: Take the print out of the result

    Qualified candidates in the mains exam will be called to appear for Language Proficiency Test.

    NABARD is looking to fill 177 vacancies for the post of Development Assistant and Development Assistant (Hindi), Group -B across the country.

    How to obtain Nabard Development Assistant Result ?

    The selection list can be obtain from the website of NABARD.

    What is NABARD DA Mains Date ?

    24 Dec 2022

    Mon, 05 Dec 2022 17:51:00 -0600 text/html https://www.jagranjosh.com/articles/nabard-da-result-2022-download-development-assistant-pdf-here-1670312880-1
    Killexams : CBSE Date Sheet 2023: Board To Release Class 10, 12 Timetable PDF obtain Link Soon on cbse.nic.in

    CBSE has also announced the Class 10, 12 practical exam dates, the exam is scheduled to be held from January 1, 2023. The exams in schools of winter-bound areas will be held from November 15 to December 14.

    This year, over 34 lakh students have registered for the CBSE Class 10, and 12 Board Exams 2023.

    CBSE News 2023: The Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) is likely to release the CBSE Class 10 and Class 12 date sheets soon. The candidates who are preparing for the examination must note that CBSE class 10 and CBSE class 12 timetables would be available on the official website of the board i.e. cbse.nic.in soon after the formal announcement. According to the latest update, CBSE Date Sheet 2023 Class 10, 12 PDFs would be released soon on the official website cbse.nic.in.

    To recall, CBSE Board Exams 2023 dates have already been announced in July 2022. The latest notice shared by CBSE mentions that the 10th and12th board exams 2023 would begin from February 2023.

    CBSE 10th 12th Exams 2023: Steps To Check Schedule At Cbse.gov.in

    For the convenience of the candidates, we have mentioned the steps via which they can obtain the timetables here:

    1. Visit the official websites- cbse.gov.in, cbseacademic.nic.in
    2. Click on 10th, 12th exam 2023 schedule link
    3. 10th, 12th separate exam datesheets will appear on screen in PDF format
    4. Download 10th, 12th exam datesheets, take a print out for further reference.

    CBSE has also announced the Class 10, 12 practical exam dates, the exam is scheduled to be held from January 1, 2023. The exams in schools of winter-bound areas will be held from November 15 to December 14.

    “As per provisions, the practical examinations, project or internal assessment for the session 2022-23 are scheduled from January 1, 2023 for all affiliated schools in India and abroad. However, the schools situated in the winter-bound areas are expected to remain closed during the month of January due to the winter season. Accordingly, the exams for both Classes 10 and 12 for winter-bound schools are to be conducted from November 15, 2022 to December 14, 2022,” a CBSE official statement said.

    Published Date: November 10, 2022 4:49 PM IST

    Updated Date: November 10, 2022 6:41 PM IST

    Mon, 14 Nov 2022 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.india.com/education/cbse-date-class-12-class-10-sheet-2023-latest-news-november-live-update-board-to-release-matric-higher-secondary-timetable-pdf-download-link-soon-on-cbse-nic-in-icse-5735414/
    300-410 exam dump and training guide direct download
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