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Killexams : Avaya Certification test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/132-S-100 Search results Killexams : Avaya Certification test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/132-S-100 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Avaya Killexams : If you want to land a job or get a raise in the tech industry, you have to pass a test — and pretty much everyone is cheating on the exams

Bill really didn't want to fail.

A Midwestern tech worker who had risen to become a vice president of IT at a big bank, Bill was set to take a Microsoft certification test to prove his proficiency with the company's Azure platform. Passing the test would help boost his career, adding another technical certification to his résumé that he could parlay into a raise, or maybe even a higher-paying job.

But after spending several hundred dollars to register for the test and studying for weeks, he didn't want to leave anything to chance. 

So he decided to cheat. 

It wasn't hard. With a little searching online, Bill — whose real identity Insider is concealing to avoid professional repercussions — was able to find the exact test he was going to take, along with the answers. He set aside a few hours, learned them all by heart, and aced the test. 

It was one in a long line of tech certifications that Bill freely acknowledges he earned, at least in part, by cheating. And he's far from alone: In the tech industry, it's an open secret that there are thousands, if not millions, of cheaters just like Bill. By combing through "exam dumps" or "brain dumps" — online repositories of certification tests, answers included — fraudsters can rack up professional credentials without knowing anything about what they're being tested on. And the companies issuing the specialized certifications, from Microsoft and Amazon to Google and Salesforce, have been virtually powerless to stop the cheating, even on the major platforms that they own. 

The rise of test dumps for tech certifications could have devastating consequences. Tech insiders familiar with the practice say unqualified candidates are using copies of exams for major tech systems and software to land jobs handling sensitive data and mission-critical infrastructure that affect employers and consumers alike. 

"If you step on a plane to Phoenix from San Francisco, imagine how you would feel if you found out your pilot cheated on all the exams and memorized all the answers," said Humphrey Cheung, an engineer with more than two decades of experience in the tech industry who has seen test dumps used countless times. "That would kind of suck, right?" 

A problem for companies, customers, and workers

Underneath every modern business, from grocery stores to missile manufacturers, lies a complex web of servers, databases, and other technology that is maintained by an army of IT and tech workers. In today's increasingly digitized economy, this critical infrastructure is as essential as electricity and water. Companies rely on tech to do everything from tracking sales and paying vendors to keeping their employees connected via Slack.

But with so many different platforms and systems to manage, companies need a quick way to ensure that IT employees and job candidates are proficient with the tools they're expected to work with. That's where third-party certifications come in. Like plumbers or electricians, IT workers earn independent certifications to confirm they understand leading systems and can install and repair them on the fly. Need to prove you can connect a Cisco router, or deploy a Salesforce instance, or secure a dataset in Google Cloud? Just get certified. 

The popularity of certification tests has exploded in latest years. The research firm IDC estimates that the US market for IT education and training that includes certification tests is now worth $1.4 billion a year. That's in part because third-party certification offers workers a quick route into the tech industry without an expensive college degree, and in part because tech vendors have discovered that they can outsource the work of maintaining the systems they sell to third-party IT companies staffed up with certified technicians instead of having giant, cumbersome customer-service departments of their own.

Imagine how you would feel if you found out your pilot cheated on all the exams and memorized all the answers.

But the high stakes have also led to what many in the industry acknowledge privately is an epidemic of cheating. It's impossible to put a reliable number on the amount of cheating happening, but Cheung and several other industry veterans said that based on how often they've spoken to people who admit to using test dumps and seen them circulate in professional networks, they'd guess that nearly half of all certifications worldwide are obtained by test-takers who crib the answers from test dumps.

These fraudulently obtained certifications are not just prevalent but also dangerous, certifications experts who track the use of these test dumps say. It can be hard to pin direct customer harm on test dump usage, these experts said, in part because companies are reluctant to admit to that sort of harm — if an employee screws something up, companies are much more likely to just fire them, not launch an investigation into their professional qualifications. But the cheating is clearly having a corrosive effect on the tech industry, particularly the hiring process.

"Maybe the person themselves doesn't deliver the value that they're supposed to have delivered," Randy Russell, the director of certification at Red Hat, an open source solutions provider, said. He added that fraudulently obtained certifications can also damage the reputation of the certification issuer, making the credentials they issue more suspect in the eyes of recruiters and hiring managers.

And for those recruiters and companies, they're forced to eat up more of their time weeding out candidates who may be cheaters. "The hiring managers and companies are also harmed, because they now have to devote more time and resources to vetting who is and isn't actually qualified," Tim Woodruff, a developer and consultant who specializes in the IT tool ServiceNow and has tracked the use of test dumps in the industry, said. But the biggest losers in the whole debacle, Woodruff said, are the aspirant tech workers who are taking the certifications legitimately, only to see the value of these tests degrade. "The people trying to launch or grow their career are probably the ones who are harmed most of all," he said.

Given how high-tech the industry is, the wave of cheating is surprisingly a low-tech scam. Many of the questions on major technical certification tests are reused for months or even years, so unscrupulous test-takers simply jot down or memorize the exam, type them up afterward, and then post the Questions Answers online. Prospective test-takers then pay for access to the completed test and breeze through their own exam. It's the same kind of scam college students run, just transferred to the world of IT testing.

The people trying to launch or grow their career are probably the ones who are harmed most of all

Exam dumps have been around for years. In 2002, a man in Vancouver, Washington, pleaded guilty to theft of trade secrets after compiling answers to the Microsoft exams for system engineers and solution developers and selling them online. But two decades later, such cheating is so ubiquitous that people are no longer being charged for the theft. Cheat sheets are available through countless channels online, from group chats and social-media ads to the websites of hundreds of companies — with names like CertKillers.net and ExamTopics.com and DumpsGate.com — that openly sell the answers to certification exams. Some of the sites feature threads and forums where users praise the dumps for helping them cheat, helpfully correct mistakes in the posted tests, and request the answers for other certification exams.

"Exam dumps are an industry now, is the sad truth," Michael Paul, a data-protection consultant in the United Kingdom, said. "You get this attitude from some people of, 'Oh, I just need to get the test passed.' They don't care that they're diminishing the entire value of that certification." 

In an ironic twist, major tech companies host lively marketplaces for test dumps on their own platforms. On the messaging app Telegram, group chats with impressive-sounding names like "Salesforce Support" connect thousands of users looking to buy and sell test dumps. Cheaters say that WhatsApp, the messaging app owned by Facebook's parent company, Meta, is a popular venue for finding dumps, and sellers advertise their wares on Instagram, YouTube, and Amazon's Marketplace. You can buy the answers to major tech certifications — including Microsoft Azure and Amazon Web Services — for as little $10, complete with reviews attesting to their reliability. 

Even LinkedIn, the job-networking site owned by Microsoft, has become a place where users offer test dumps for sale — despite the fact that Microsoft's own tools are affected by the cheating. The answers to "LinkedIn Skill Assessments," a set of free in-house exams that LinkedIn offers to enable users to certify their proficiency with dozens of tech tools, from Adobe Illustrator to Google Analytics, are all freely available on GitHub, which is also owned by Microsoft. Gleeful TikTok users have been quick to make videos highlighting this flaw in LinkedIn's tests.

The reasons for cheating

Cheung, the developer based in Singapore, was working for a networking company a few years ago when he received a résumé from a job applicant who had recently obtained his certification as a Cisco Certified Network Professional.

Cheung noticed some potential red flags in the application, so he invited the candidate to sit down with a Cisco router and run through a few problems. The candidate was stumped. Cheung then asked him to change some basic configurations. The candidate still couldn't do it — even after Cheung told him he could use Google for help.

"People get nervous in an interview, and I'm OK with that," Cheung said. "So I gave him every chance, and he couldn't do it." 

Ultimately, it became clear to Cheung that despite the candidate's "certification" in Cisco systems, he had no clue what he was doing. So Cheung asked the candidate if he had used an test dump to pass his certification. The defeated-looking candidate said yes.

For some, using test dumps is driven by nothing more than a desire to climb the corporate ladder by any means necessary. They aren't thinking about getting caught — they're thinking about whether or not the cheat sheets are right. Because test dumps are crowd-sourced by people who previously took the tests, there's no guarantee that the dump-makers copied out the questions correctly — or that they actually knew which of the multiple-choice options were the right answers. "When I started looking for the questions, there's a lot of wrong answers, so I didn't trust it," said an IT consultant in Italy who used an test dump this summer. 

But others have more complex reasons for cheating. For some, it's the expense. Certification tests can cost several hundred dollars a pop — or more for higher-level credentials. Sometimes the test fees are paid for by a worker's employer, but those trying to break into the industry often have to foot the bill themselves. Bill, the IT worker at a Midwestern bank, said that one reason he cheated was the reassurance the test dump gave him that he wouldn't have to pay to retake the test.

I was quite surprised to see the test that came up was literally the same questions

For others, it's desperation. The IT consultant in Italy, who asked to remain anonymous, said he studied hard for a certification offered by the cybersecurity firm CyberArk, and thought he knew the subject matter. But he turned out to be a bad test-taker, and he failed the test — twice. So he found some dumps online, studied the braindump questions in advance, and finally passed. He then used the certification to help him land a pay raise. 

There's a perception in the tech industry that test dumps are particular widespread in emerging market economies, where the relative cost of taking a test — and the potential payoff for achieving a certification — is much higher. "Broadly speaking, we do find that there tends to be more issues around test security in those markets, India being one in particular where we see a fair amount of it," said Russell, the Red Hat director. "Getting certified in that market can actually be absolutely transformative to one's income prospects and livelihood."

An engineer from Pakistan said when he was starting his career, he used dumps to get his first Salesforce certification. Taking the test cost him the equivalent of half his monthly salary — he simply couldn't afford to fail and pay to retake it. After memorizing some test dumps he found, he aced the test. 

"I was quite surprised to see the test that came up was literally the same questions," he recalled. "They didn't have a big bank of questions." He now works for a major tech firm in the United States and said he only obtains certifications through legitimate means now.

But the perception that workers from poorer countries are more likely to be cheaters can also fuel racism against foreign-born tech workers. "People from India are often looked upon with a disproportionate level of suspicion," Woodruff, the ServiceNow developer, said. "Companies and hiring managers are much more likely to assume that an Indian person obtained their certifications by fraudulent means, even if that biased expectation is subconscious and due to their latest experiences in hiring."

Companies are trying, and failing, to fight back

Given the onslaught of cheating, companies that offer certifications are taking a variety of countermeasures to try to combat cheaters. Some periodically refresh the exams with new questions; others monitor test-takers to see if anyone is answering the exams suspiciously fast. A Google spokesperson said the company asks exam-dump sites to take down the questions — an approach that seems unlikely to stem the tide of cheating. ServiceNow said it employs data analytics to identify when clusters of exam-takers all answer questions similarly, indicating that they likely used the same test dump.

Red Hat, the cybersecurity firm, eschews multiple-choice questions altogether, opting instead for hands-on exams that require the test-taker to demonstrate real proficiency with its tools. Many companies incorporate a hands-on component in their most senior certifications, but the increased costs of supervising and assessing such tests make them too expensive for many entry-level certifications.

But certification companies acknowledge that they are far from eradicating the problem. The more people cheat, the more others feel obligated to utilize underhanded methods to keep up with the cheaters they're competing against. And in many cases, the cheating appears to be condoned — and even encouraged — by employers. Vendors often deliver consulting and technical-support companies better deals on their products if the firms have more certified workers on staff. Multiple tech workers told Insider that it's common for unscrupulous employers to push their workers to use illicit dumps to earn extra credentials — either to make the company more attractive to potential clients or to earn it a discount on IT products.

One said his company provided him with copious test dumps when he asked them if they had any legitimate training resources for an upcoming test he was due to take. It made him suspect the expertise of his colleagues, and paranoid that if his employer's actions ever emerged, he might also be falsely accused of using dumps and stripped of his legitimately acquired certifications.

Fed up with the lack of progress at cracking down on cheaters, some workers in the tech industry are taking matters into their own hands. Woodruff spent the summer infiltrating multiple Telegram groups — some of which have thousands of members — that are dedicated to sharing the company's exams. Over time, he gained the trust of the group's administrators, ultimately convincing them to appoint him as a fellow administrator to help oversee the groups. 

He immediately disbanded the groups and banned all their members, disrupting — if only temporarily — one small part of the exam-dump trade.


Rob Price is a correspondent at Insider, based in San Francisco.

Got a tip? Contact Rob by phone or Signal at +1 650-636-6268, email at rprice@insider.com, or on Twitter at @robaeprice. Confidentiality offered.

Correction: November 14, 2022 — An earlier version of this story misstated the scope of Red Hat's business, it is an open source solutions provider not solely a security software provider.

Sun, 13 Nov 2022 10:01:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.businessinsider.com/tech-workers-cheating-certification-exam-dumps-jobs-higher-pay-promotions-2022-11
Killexams : Avaya demos how customers can tap into the metaverse

Multinational technology company Avaya has shown how customers can immerse themselves in the metaverse with a technology demonstration that extends contact centre capabilities into new, virtual territory.

Shown at Gartner IT Symposium / Xpo in Barcelona, Avaya’s “Metaverse Experience” concept builds the link between the metaverse and the real world.

It demonstrates how organisations can extend their contact centre capabilities into the metaverse using Avaya Experience Platform.

It also shows how businesses can imagine how their contact centre agents can support and interact with customers within the virtual world.

“Avaya customers can experiment with the metaverse and add contact centre capabilities without having to bring in a new platform or go through a major upgrade,” said ZK Research founder and principal analyst Zeus Kerravala.

“Organisations are competing in an experience economy, and they need advanced features and capabilities to deliver the experiences that their customers and employees demand. But they also need a migration path to rolling out these capabilities that does not involve the disruptive ripping and replacing of existing technology,” said Avaya vice president specialists organisation Yaser Alzubaidi.

“With the Avaya Experience Platform, we are bringing this ability to life—and the Metaverse Experience concept is a prime example of what you can achieve with such a platform.”

The Metaverse Experience is one of a number of concepts being demonstrated by Avaya at Gartner IT Symposium / Xpo in Barcelona, where the company is showcasing solutions that enable organisations to turn every moment with customers into momentum for their businesses.

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Killexams : Revamped Avaya Roadmap Orbits Around Cloud, Experience Platform

Networking News

Gina Narcisi

The UC giant’s updated product roadmap reflects Avaya’s plan to tap into its massive install base and pave the way for migration to the cloud or the addition of over-the-top cloud solutions that won’t “disrupt” communications infrastructure that’s already in place, the company tells CRN.

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Avaya experienced a turbulent 2022 with missed revenue targets and earnings, layoffs, and a new CEO brought on to redirect the company. Now, the unified communications powerhouse is unveiling an updated and simplified product roadmap.

The company is placing a larger emphasis on the omnichannel Avaya Experience platform, the centerpiece of its cloud strategy, in a way that both addresses the market demand for all-in-one for contact center as-a-service (CCaaS) solutions, while balancing the needs of its massive install base of customers, Steve Forcum, head of Solutions Marketing for Avaya, told CRN.

“What we want to do is we want to meet our customers where they are. Experience Platform is an incredible piece of tech, but at the end of the day, moving what works in your organization to a different platform simply to add these capabilities is a lot of times a nonstarter for our customers,” he said.

The Avaya Experience Platform is the company’s “North Star” in which the rest of Avaya’s portfolio orbits, Forcum said. The goal of the platform is to empower organizations to support the touch points that occur between the business or brand and the end customers, but then weaving them into an ongoing discussion. “This is really where the magic happens,” he said. “If I’m in a discussion with a customer and they tell me that two weeks ago, they spoke to someone, I can actually go back in time [and] see who that person was talking to and pull up the transcript of what was said. This way, I can pick that conversation where and when it left off and then treat it like a relay race for the next employee that’s going to interact with this customer.”

The next step will include harvesting the data collected by the platform and turning it into actionable information for partners and end customers that go beyond simple performance metrics, Forcum said.

[Related: Avaya CEO Calls For ‘Innovation Without Disruption’ For Enterprises ]

Avaya is still the largest premise-based UC provider on the market, which gives partners the unique ability to transition or even partially transition customers to the cloud based on their requirements, according to the company. There are many customers that aren’t looking to rip and replace their existing premise-architected communications solutions, but they may be interested in moving to the cloud for contact center-as-a-service (CCaaS) or an omnichannel collaboration solution, Avaya’s new CEO Alan Masarek told CRN in September.

“The beauty is, no one wants to go through that loss of the rip and replace. We can uniquely provide what competitors can’t. A competing [solution], by definition, is a complete rip and replace. Ours is not. It’s innovation without disruption and that really resonates with customers and partners,” Masarek said.

Offering innovation without disruption starts with Avaya’s customer base currently on the Avaya Aura and Contact Center Elite platforms, which make up the bulk of Avaya’s 100 million-seat install base, Forcum said.

Most of these customers have these solutions deployed in their data centers, he added. “The first thing we’re communicating to these customers is that if it ain’t broke, you don’t need to fix it. If your voice is routing properly, if you’ve got all these applications intertwined and you don’t want to move that to somewhere else, you don’t have to.”

This strategy will allow partners to help their customers “upgrade in place,” while keeping the existing platform current, while buying the product on a perpetual license or if they move to a subscription model. “You can pull down services from Experience Platform to add to that environment … we’re empowering further choice,” Forcum said.

Avaya in 2023 will be launching a unified client for Contact Center Elite and the Experience Platform to deliver users a single sign-on and pane of glass with which to view customer interactions. Avaya will also be adding an over-the-top integration between the Experience Platform and Avaya IP Office for VoIP, Forcum added.

For customers that are ready to go all-in on cloud for their communications needs, Avaya is ready to move IP Office users to Avaya Cloud Office (ACO), its UC offering based on the RingCentral platform. ACO and the Experience Platform are already fully integrated for combined UC and CCaaS needs.

Avaya said it plans on introducing more than 300 new features and enhancements to its communications solutions over the course of 2023.

Removing Complexity

In going live with its updated product roadmap, Avaya wanted to stress clarity and simplicity, Forcum said.

One of the first places the Durham, N.C.-based company is starting is injecting clarity within its product naming convention, which has been “conceptual” and will now be more “tangible,” Forcum said. For example, the company’s OneCloud CCaaS cloud-based contact center solution is now referred to as the Avaya Experience Platform. Avaya OneCloud Private, its private cloud offering, is now Avaya Enterprise Cloud as a nod to the offering’s strength with large customers, the company said.

“This is an ongoing effort that will be applying to other areas of our product portfolio to make it easier to understand when we’re explaining solutions, and when customers are looking at different products, and what we’re actually aiming at,” he said.

The embattled company, in addition to simplifying its product portfolio, has also been working on “right sizing the organization. Avaya in September initiated cost-cutting measures that includes an unspecified number of layoffs following its plan announced in July to begin “significant” cost-cutting measures to the tune of $225 million to $250 million during the company’s last fiscal quarter.

“As previously stated, lowering our costs, including through a reduction in our workforce, is necessary to position Avaya as a more agile and innovative organization and to align Avaya’s cost structure with our contractual, recurring revenue business model,” said Avaya CEO Alan Masarek in a statement regarding the layoffs two months ago.

Masarek said the company’s “reset” has required difficult decisions across the organizations and within Avaya’s portfolio, but said the changes are “necessary” to facilitate the company’s software transformation, in a blog post published on Tuesday.

Avaya has about 90,000 customers globally, according to the company.

Gina Narcisi

Gina Narcisi is a senior editor covering the networking and telecom markets for CRN.com. Prior to joining CRN, she covered the networking, unified communications and cloud space for TechTarget. She can be reached at gnarcisi@thechannelcompany.com.

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 17:16:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.crn.com/news/networking/revamped-avaya-roadmap-orbits-around-cloud-experience-platform
Killexams : No-exam life insurance policies: Everything to know
Prepare today for a secure tomorrow
To get a no-exam life insurance policy, you can search online for simplified or guaranteed issue policies, which are relatively common.  KATLEHO SEISA / Getty Images

Obtaining life insurance can help you pass money on to your family or other beneficiaries after your death. But not all life insurance policies are the same. Not only can there be differences in factors like monthly premiums and policy limits, but there can also be varying requirements to qualify for a life insurance policy.

One route that some people take is obtaining a no-exam life insurance policy, meaning you don't have to visit a doctor to be eligible. If you don't want to make an extra trip to the doctor's office or you're concerned the test results could lead to even higher costs, then this may be a reasonable option. 

Here's a look at some of the top life insurance providers available. 

Before you make any final decisions, let's take a closer look at what no-exam life insurance policies are — and why you might consider going this route.

What is no-exam life insurance?

No-exam life insurance can include several different types of life insurance that do not require medical exams to initiate coverage. Here are two examples:

  • Simplified issue life insurance: This type of insurance can be for either term life insurance or whole life insurance. As the name implies, these policies follow a simplified process. Rather than needing a medical exam, you can answer a few basic questions and get a decision online in just a few minutes.
  • Guaranteed issue life insurance: This type of policy typically applies to permanent life policies. This is geared more toward those with health conditions and who may be older, so they can benefit those who want a guarantee to qualify, rather than being rejected following a medical exam. However, these policies typically have a waiting period of a couple of years, meaning the benefits might not kick in for someone who dies shortly after applying.

How to get a no-exam life insurance policy

To get a no-exam life insurance policy, you can search online for simplified or guaranteed issue policies, which are relatively common. You can also dig into the offerings of different insurance companies, as even if an insurance provider uses different terminology, they might still allow for coverage without an exam.

To learn more about different types of life insurance policies and options, speak to an expert. Haven Life, a New York City-based life insurance agency, can walk you through the process. You just need to answer a few basic questions to get a free quote.


Don't assume that just because something isn't specifically called a "no-exam life insurance policy" you need an exam. Regardless of what the provider calls the policy, check the fine print to see if you need a medical test or not.

Some providers also offer options like being able to convert a term life insurance policy into a whole life insurance policy without needing a medical exam. That's not to say that you're always better off converting vs. taking out a new policy, but it could be worth considering.

How much does no-exam life insurance cost?

No-exam life insurance policies typically cost much more than ones with medical exams. That's because the insurer needs to account for the extra risk that can come from not knowing enough about your medical situation.

For example, with one major life insurance provider, a simplified issue life insurance policy for a 20-year/$500,000 term for a 40-year-old, non-smoker woman in good health in California costs nearly $50 per month. In contrast, the same type of policy for regular term life insurance with a medical test only has an estimated cost of $30 in monthly payments.

You can also compare prices and plans by scouring life insurance providers online and getting free quotes.

Is no-exam life insurance worth it?

There can be a cost to the convenience of no-exam life insurance policies. But it's also possible that the economics work out in your favor. It's possible that something would be discovered during a medical test that increases your risk to the insurer, thereby raising your rates or perhaps even making you ineligible altogether. No-exam life insurance policies can also benefit those who don't qualify for typical life insurance due to factors such as age or medical history. 

However, if you're in relatively good health, meet a prospective insurer's age requirements and are comfortable seeing a doctor, then this type of insurance may not be for you — as you may secure a lower price with the medical exam.

Bottom line

Overall, a no-exam life insurance policy can offer a path for some higher-risk individuals to obtain life insurance or it could be a good way to quickly obtain coverage. However, you might be able to find lower rates if you go through with a medical exam, so it could be worth exploring your options to see what best fits your budget and goals.

Wed, 30 Nov 2022 15:13:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.cbsnews.com/news/what-is-no-exam-life-insurance-policy/
Killexams : Election certification delays few, but a 'test run' for 2024

Before November, election officials prepared for the possibility that Republicans who embraced former President Donald Trump's lies about voter fraud would challenge the verdict of voters by refusing to certify the midterm results.

Three weeks after the end of voting, such challenges are playing out in just two states, Arizona and Pennsylvania, where Democrats won the marquee races for governor and Senate.

Legal experts predict the bids are doomed because local governmental agencies typically don't have the option to vote against certifying the results of their elections. But experts also say the delays are a signal that the United States must brace itself for similar disruptions in the next presidential contest.

“It is one of the few places where election deniers have a lever of power,” Rick Hasen, a law professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, said of the local political authorities responsible for certifying election results in most states. “It’s a good test run for 2024, showing state courts they’re going to have to step in.”

For now, the certification delay in a smattering of rural counties in just two states reflects the limited ability of election conspiracy theorists to disrupt the midterms. One rural Arizona county has drawn court challenges after its refusal to certify, but a second one that was flirting with blocking certification backed off amid legal threats.

In Pennsylvania, a handful of the state's 67 counties have delayed certification because of recounts demanded by local conspiracy theorists in scattered precincts. But in most states, certification has gone smoothly.

“Before Election Day, I thought Republicans would exploit the certification process to undermine election results,” said Marc Elias, a Democratic lawyer who has sued to compel the lone Arizona county to certify.

That there's only one county delaying so far in that important battleground state, where Republican candidates who denied Joe Biden's victory in the 2020 presidential race ran unsuccessfully for governor and secretary of state, is “good news, and a bit of a surprise,” Elias said.

In Wisconsin, where Trump pressured Republican lawmakers to decertify the 2020 results, the chair of the state elections commission certified the results of the midterm election during a quick meeting Wednesday without fanfare. Minnesota, where the failed Republican secretary of state candidate had cast doubt on the legitimacy of the 2020 presidential election, the state canvassing board certified this year's results without drama on Tuesday.

The smooth outcome in most of the country is a reflection of the diminished opportunities election conspiracy theorists have to control elections after a number of their candidates were routed in statewide elections for positions overseeing voting. They're largely left with a footprint in conservative, rural counties. Still, that's enough to cause headaches for having the election results certified on a statewide basis, raising concerns about how rural counties might respond after the next presidential election.

The movement that embraces Trump's lies about voting hoped it would have many more levers after November. Candidates who backed Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election ran for top posts with power over state voting — including secretary of state, which in most states is the top election position — in five of the six swing states that were key to Trump's 2020 loss. They lost every race in each of those states.

Democratic Secretary of State Katie Hobbs defeated Trump-backed Republican Kari Lake in the race for Arizona governor, flipping it out of the GOP category, and a Democrat also won the race to replace Hobbs. A Democrat defeated an election conspiracy theorist running for Nevada secretary of state, shifting another swing-state election office from the GOP.

On the local level, the picture is blurrier.

There are more than 10,000 local election offices in the country that follow guidelines set by secretaries of state or other agencies that their states designate as the top election authorities. That's where conspiracy theorists won at least some new offices and still have the power to disrupt proceedings.

During the June primary in New Mexico, rural Otero County refused to certify the results of its election, preventing the state from making the winners official until the state Supreme Court ordered it to act. That set a template that election lawyers feared would be vastly replicated in the weeks after the midterms. But this time, even Otero County certified its winners without a delay. New Mexico's canvass board certified the statewide results Wednesday.

In Michigan, where a GOP slate of election conspiracy theorists was defeated in statewide races, the Republican candidate for secretary of state, Kristina Karamo, implored the state's bipartisan board of canvassers not to certify the election during a hearing this week. Karamo insisted there had been widespread fraud, even though she lost her race against Democratic Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson by more than 13 percentage points.

Tony Daunt, the Republican chair of the certification board, responded by blasting candidates who “feed into this nonsense” by making “claims that fire everybody up because it’s a short-term gain for them, and that’s dangerous to our system.” The board unanimously certified the election.

In Pennsylvania, the most prominent certification hiccup has come in Luzerne County, north of Philadelphia, which voted for Trump by 14 percentage points in 2020. County commissioners delayed certifying the election on Monday after one Democrat abstained from voting following an Election Day fiasco in which the election office ran out of ballots.

The Democrat, Daniel Schramm, joined the two other Democratic commissioners on the five-member board Wednesday to certify the vote after telling reporters he was confident no citizen was unable to vote. Certification is being delayed in a few other counties after local Republican committees and voters requested recounts.

In Arizona, the two Republicans on Cochise County's three-member county commission blew past Monday's certification deadline, saying they needed more information on the certification of vote tabulators, even though there have been no problems with voting or ballot counting in their county.

The secretary of state's office has sued, saying that it must certify the state's elections by Dec. 8.

“The only legal effect this has is to disenfranchise all their voters,” said David Becker of the Center for Election Innovation.

The efforts to delay certification are dangerous even if they're doomed to fail, Becker and others said. They continue to sow discontent and distrust of voting and democracy.

David Levine, a former election official who is a fellow with the Alliance for Securing Democracy, noted that conspiracy theories about elections have reached such a fever pitch in Arizona that Bill Gates, the Republican chair of the county commission in Maricopa County, which includes Phoenix. has been given additional security by the local sheriff.

“When you deliver legitimacy to baseless accusations about the election process, there is a concern that more of that will occur," Levine said.

Maricopa County, which includes Phoenix, certified its election results on Monday, after dozens of attendees demanded the board not do it. Some complained about printer malfunctions in the county, the state's most populous, that led to confusion and long lines on Election Day — even though Maricopa officials said everyone had a chance to vote and that all legal ballots were counted.

In other counties, activists also spoke out against certification, though unsuccessfully. In Yavapai County, north of Phoenix, a woman who gave her name as Nancy Littlefield, wearing a hoodie patterned on the American flag, made clear that part of her objections were because she simply didn't like the outcome of the election.

She urged Yavapai board members not to certify the vote because “I moved from California so I could be free and live my life and have my voice heard.”

———

Associated Press writers Joey Cappelletti in Lansing, Michigan; Jonathan J. Cooper and Anita Snow in Phoenix; Christina A. Cassidy in Atlanta; and Mark Scolforo in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, contributed to this report.

———

Follow the AP’s coverage of the 2022 midterm elections at https://apnews.com/hub/2022-midterm-elections

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 15:25:00 -0600 en text/html https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/election-certification-delays-test-run-2024-94190557
Killexams : Avaya Investor Alert

Securities Litigation Partner James (Josh) Wilson Encourages Investors Who Suffered Losses Exceeding $50,000 In Avaya To Contact Him Directly To Discuss Their Options

New York, New York--(Newsfile Corp. - December 6, 2022) - Faruqi & Faruqi, LLP, a leading national securities law firm, is investigating potential claims against Avaya Holdings Corp. ("Avaya" or the "Company") (NYSE: AVYA).

If you suffered losses exceeding $50,000 investing in Avaya stock or options and would like to discuss your legal rights, call Faruqi & Faruqi partner Josh Wilson directly at 877-247-4292 or 212-983-9330 (Ext. 1310). You may alsoclick here for additional information: www.faruqilaw.com/AVYA.

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There is no cost or obligation to you.

Faruqi & Faruqi is a leading minority and Woman-owned national securities law firm with offices in New York, Pennsylvania, California and Georgia.

On June 27, 2022, Avaya announced $600 million in aggregate financing commitments, including $350 million of new Senior Secured Term Loans and $250 million of Exchangeable Senior Secured Notes. Management claimed "[t]his funding supports and accelerates our business model transformation."

A month later, on July 28, 2022, Avaya announced its board fired CEO James M. Chirico, Jr. The company also announced disastrous preliminary Q3 2022 financial results that included expected revenues and adjusted EBITDA well below previously given guidance and an unquantified but "significant" impairment charge. In addition, the company withdrew its 2022 guidance. This news sent the price of Avaya shares crashing 57% lower the next day.

Then, on Aug. 9, 2022, Avaya announced: (1) it determined there is substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern; (2) it would not timely file its financial statements for the quarter ended June 30, 2022; (3) its Audit Committee commenced internal investigations into circumstances surrounding the company's financial results for the quarter; and, (4) the Committee also commenced an investigation into matters raised by a whistleblower. This news sent the price of Avaya shares crashing 45% lower that day.

Most recently, on Nov. 30, 2022, Avaya announced it would not timely file its financial statements for its fiscal year ended Sept. 30, 2022, revealed that its internal investigation is continuing, and admitted that it did not appropriately log the whistleblower's email received by a member of its Board of Directors and did not convey its existence to management or to its outside auditor.

Attorney Advertising. The law firm responsible for this advertisement is Faruqi & Faruqi, LLP (www.faruqilaw.com). Prior results do not guarantee or predict a similar outcome with respect to any future matter. We welcome the opportunity to discuss your particular case. All communications will be treated in a confidential manner.

To view the source version of this press release, please visit https://www.newsfilecorp.com/release/146996

Tue, 06 Dec 2022 09:02:00 -0600 text/html https://stockhouse.com/news/press-releases/2022/12/06/avaya-investor-alert
Killexams : Avaya discloses ICFR weaknesses linked to whistleblower logs

Avaya Holdings disclosed its assessment of internal control over financial reporting (ICFR) in its fiscal year 2021 annual report can’t be relied upon, along with acknowledging weaknesses in its ethics and compliance program.

The deficiencies in internal control over financial reporting (ICFR) represented “material weaknesses,” the cloud technology company said in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) on Wednesday. While Avaya contends with the control lapses, the company will file late its annual report for the year ended Sept. 30, 2022, it disclosed separately.

The announcements follow internal investigations and audits the company launched after learning its financial results for the quarter ended June 30, 2022, would be “significantly lower than previous expectations,” according to a late filing notice Avaya delivered to the SEC on Aug. 9.

Fri, 02 Dec 2022 04:33:00 -0600 Adrianne Appel en text/html https://www.complianceweek.com/accounting-and-auditing/avaya-discloses-icfr-weaknesses-linked-to-whistleblower-logs/32407.article
Killexams : SatixFy stock price doubles in a day; Avaya Holdings and Rumble among Tech losers

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Thu, 17 Nov 2022 13:19:00 -0600 en text/html https://seekingalpha.com/news/3909373-satixfy-stock-price-doubles-in-a-day-avaya-holdings-and-rumble-among-tech-losers
Killexams : Avaya Holdings Corp. (AVYA)

Business Wire

RALEIGH-DURHAM, N.C., December 13, 2022--Avaya Holdings Corp. (NYSE: AVYA) ("Avaya" or "the Company") today publicly disclosed certain business information that it confidentially shared with certain of its financial stakeholders. This information was shared in connection with ongoing constructive discussions Avaya is having with its financial stakeholders regarding a comprehensive resolution to strengthen the Company’s balance sheet and position the business for long-term success.

Mon, 05 Dec 2022 10:00:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/quote/AVYA/chart/ Killexams : Avaya appoints Dino Beverakis as A/NZ boss
Dino Beverakis (Avaya)

Dino Beverakis (Avaya)

Credit: Avaya

Avaya Australia and New Zealand has appointed its second managing director in two years in the form of Dino Beverakis. 

The unified communications vendor officially promoted Beverakis from A/NZ head of professional services to the MD role, although ARN understands he has been leading the operation unofficially for some time. 

Beverakis is based in Sydney and reports to Sami Ammous, vice president for East Asia and the Pacific at Avaya.

He fills the role previously held by Simon Vatcher from August 2020 until July last year. Vatcher had replaced Peter Chidiac, who joined Avaya in 2016 and left in early 2020 to join Microsoft. 

In his new role, Beverakis is charged with driving growth in the region, working alongside customers and channel partners in Federal and State Government, banking and financial services and education.