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Exam Code: 010-160 Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
010-160 Linux Essentials Certificate Exam, version 1.6

Exam Title : LPI Linux Essentials
Exam ID : 010-160
Exam Duration : 60 mins
Questions in test : 40
Passing Score : 500 / 800
Exam Center : LPI Marketplace
Real Questions : LPI Linux Essentials Real Questions
VCE practice questions : LPI 010-160 Certification VCE Practice Test

Topic 1: The Linux Community and a Career in Open Source
1.1 Linux Evolution and Popular Operating Systems
Description: Knowledge of Linux development and major distributions.
Key Knowledge Areas:
Distributions
Embedded Systems
Linux in the Cloud
The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:
Debian, Ubuntu (LTS)
CentOS, openSUSE, Red Hat, SUSE
Linux Mint, Scientific Linux
Raspberry Pi, Raspbian
Android
1.2 Major Open Source Applications
Description: Awareness of major applications as well as their uses and development.
Key Knowledge Areas:
Desktop applications
Server applications
Development languages
Package management tools and repositories
The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:
OpenOffice.org, LibreOffice, Thunderbird, Firefox, GIMP
Nextcloud, ownCloud
Apache HTTPD, NGINX, MariaDB, MySQL, NFS, Samba
C, Java, JavaScript, Perl, shell, Python, PHP
dpkg, apt-get, rpm, yum

1.3 Open Source Software and Licensing
Description: Open communities and licensing Open Source Software for business.
Key Knowledge Areas:
Open source philosophy
Open source licensing
Free Software Foundation (FSF), Open Source Initiative (OSI)
The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:
Copyleft, Permissive
GPL, BSD, Creative Commons
Free Software, Open Source Software, FOSS, FLOSS
Open source business models

1.4 ICT Skills and Working in Linux
Description: Basic Information and Communication Technology (ICT) skills and working in Linux.
Key Knowledge Areas:
Desktop skills
Getting to the command line
Industry uses of Linux, cloud computing and virtualization
The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:
Using a browser, privacy concerns, configuration options, searching the web and saving content
Terminal and console
Password issues
Privacy issues and tools
Use of common open source applications in presentations and projects
Topic 2: Finding Your Way on a Linux System
2.1 Command Line Basics
Description: Basics of using the Linux command line.
Key Knowledge Areas:
Basic shell
Command line syntax
Variables
Quoting
The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:
Bash
echo
history
PATH environment variable
export
type

2.2 Using the Command Line to Get Help
Description: Running help commands and navigation of the various help systems.
Key Knowledge Areas:
Man pages
Info pages
The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:
man
info
/usr/share/doc/
locate

2.3 Using Directories and Listing Files
Description: Navigation of home and system directories and listing files in various locations.
Key Knowledge Areas:
Files, directories
Hidden files and directories
Home directories
Absolute and relative paths
The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:
Common options for ls
Recursive listings
cd
. and ..
home and ~
2.4 Creating, Moving and Deleting Files
Description: Create, move and delete files and directories under the home directory.
Key Knowledge Areas:
Files and directories
Case sensitivity
Simple globbing
The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:
mv, cp, rm, touch
mkdir, rmdir

Topic 3: The Power of the Command Line
3.1 Archiving Files on the Command Line
Description: Archiving files in the user home directory.
Key Knowledge Areas:
Files, directories
Archives, compression
The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:
tar
Common tar options
gzip, bzip2, xz
zip, unzip

3.2 Searching and Extracting Data from Files
Description: Search and extract data from files in the home directory.

Key Knowledge Areas:

Command line pipes
I/O redirection
Basic Regular Expressions using ., [ ], *, and ?
The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:

grep
less
cat, head, tail
sort
cut
wc


3.3 Turning Commands into a Script
Weight: 4

Description: Turning repetitive commands into simple scripts.

Key Knowledge Areas:

Basic shell scripting
Awareness of common text editors (vi and nano)
The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:

#! (shebang)
/bin/bash
Variables
Arguments
for loops
echo
Exit status
Topic 4: The Linux Operating System
4.1 Choosing an Operating System
Weight: 1

Description: Knowledge of major operating systems and Linux distributions.

Key Knowledge Areas:

Differences between Windows, OS X and Linux
Distribution life cycle management
The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:

GUI versus command line, desktop configuration
Maintenance cycles, beta and stable


4.2 Understanding Computer Hardware
Weight: 2

Description: Familiarity with the components that go into building desktop and server computers.

Key Knowledge Areas:

Hardware
The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:

Motherboards, processors, power supplies, optical drives, peripherals
Hard drives, solid state disks and partitions, /dev/sd*
Drivers


4.3 Where Data is Stored
Weight: 3

Description: Where various types of information are stored on a Linux system.

Key Knowledge Areas:

Programs and configuration
Processes
Memory addresses
System messaging
Logging
The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:

ps, top, free
syslog, dmesg
/etc/, /var/log/
/boot/, /proc/, /dev/, /sys/


4.4 Your Computer on the Network
Weight: 2

Description: Querying vital networking configuration and determining the basic requirements for a computer on a Local Area Network (LAN).

Key Knowledge Areas:

Internet, network, routers
Querying DNS client configuration
Querying network configuration
The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:

route, ip route show
ifconfig, ip addr show
netstat, ss
/etc/resolv.conf, /etc/hosts
IPv4, IPv6
ping
host
Topic 5: Security and File Permissions
5.1 Basic Security and Identifying User Types
Weight: 2

Description: Various types of users on a Linux system.

Key Knowledge Areas:

Root and standard users
System users
The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:

/etc/passwd, /etc/shadow, /etc/group
id, last, who, w
sudo, su


5.2 Creating Users and Groups
Weight: 2

Description: Creating users and groups on a Linux system.

Key Knowledge Areas:

User and group commands
User IDs
The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:

/etc/passwd, /etc/shadow, /etc/group, /etc/skel/
useradd, groupadd
passwd


5.3 Managing File Permissions and Ownership
Weight: 2

Description: Understanding and manipulating file permissions and ownership settings.

Key Knowledge Areas:

File and directory permissions and ownership
The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:

ls -l, ls -a
chmod, chown


5.4 Special Directories and Files
Weight: 1

Description: Special directories and files on a Linux system including special permissions.

Key Knowledge Areas:

Using temporary files and directories
Symbolic links
The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:

/tmp/, /var/tmp/ and Sticky Bit
ls -d
ln -s

Linux Essentials Certificate Exam, version 1.6
BEA Certificate Practice Test
Killexams : BEA Certificate practice questions - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/010-160 Search results Killexams : BEA Certificate practice questions - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/010-160 https://killexams.com/exam_list/BEA Killexams : Election certification delays few, but a 'test run' for 2024

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 15:11:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.bgdailynews.com/news/politics/election-certification-delays-few-but-a-test-run-for-2024/article_e7d7f68a-d0c7-5afb-9f5d-e56e78dc6cd8.html Killexams : Letter: Maybe there should be a voting test for uninformed voters

Tue, 22 Nov 2022 01:28:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.lagrandeobserver.com/opinion/letters/letter-maybe-there-should-be-a-voting-test-for-uninformed-voters/article_eccf6cd3-b0e8-5e2e-933a-21c303bea6d2.html Killexams : Bounteous Achieves Acquia DXP Practice Certification

Bounteous is proud to be awarded the Acquia DXP Practice Certification for demonstrating technical achievement and mastery across Acquia's Marketing and Drupal Cloud technologies.

Bounteous, the digital innovation partner of the world's most ambitious brands, is proud to announce its designation as an Acquia Certified DXP Practice. The award is granted to partners who demonstrate the highest levels of technical competence across all Acquia's technologies, including Drupal Cloud and Marketing Cloud.

"We are thrilled to be accredited with Acquia's highest level of practice certification and look forward to continued Co-innovation alongside Acquia," said Megan Donahue, SVP of Business Development at Bounteous. "We are extremely proud of achieving DXP Practice Certification as an Acquia partner because it confirms our expertise in building complete digital solutions for our clients and proves our mastery of Acquia technologies."

To earn DXP Practice Certification, partners must achieve certification in both Drupal Cloud and Marketing Cloud. Each designation requires a core team of Acquia-certified developers, significant hands-on experience delivering Acquia products to clients, and a rigorous company review with Acquia partner specialists.

As a Certified DXP Practice, Bounteous receives the benefits of a deeper working relationship with Acquia, and heightened visibility as a trusted technical partner. The certification as a DXP Practice underscores Bounteous' expertise as a technical solution provider and helps customers realize the tremendous value of working with Acquia.

"We're proud to recognize Bounteous, as a certified Drupal Cloud, Marketing Cloud and DXP practice," said Mark Royko, Director of Practice Development at Acquia. "By achieving DXP certification, we know we can count on partners like Bounteous to help deliver on the world's only Open DXP."

As an Acquia Global Partner, Bounteous has specialization and expertise across all of Acquia's product offerings and a proven record of delivering transformative business experiences using both Marketing and Drupal Cloud.

The Acquia Practice Certification Program rewards partners who demonstrate a mastery of Acquia's Cloud Platform in three separate areas: Drupal Cloud, Marketing Cloud and DXP. These certifications are awarded to organizations with a proven record of technical achievement, and a commitment to driving transformative business engagements on the Acquia Platform.

To learn more about Acquia's Practice Certification Program, please visit https://www.acquia.com/partners/practice-certification-program.

About Acquia

Acquia empowers the world's most ambitious brands to create digital customer experiences that matter. With open source Drupal at its core, the Acquia Open DXP enables marketers, developers and IT operations teams at thousands of global organizations to rapidly compose and deploy digital products and services that engage customers, enhance conversions and help businesses grow their digital presence.

About Bounteous

Founded in 2003 in Chicago, Bounteous is a leading digital experience consultancy that co-innovates with the world's most ambitious brands to create transformative digital experiences. With services in Strategy, Experience Design, Technology, Analytics, and Marketing, Bounteous elevates brand experiences and drives superior client outcomes. For more information, please visit www.bounteous.com. For more information about co-innovation, obtain the Co-Innovation Manifesto at co-innovation.com.

For the most up-to-date news, follow Bounteous on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, and Instagram.

All logos, company and product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.

© 2022 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

Thu, 03 Nov 2022 01:06:00 -0500 text/html https://www.benzinga.com/pressreleases/22/11/b29545044/bounteous-achieves-acquia-dxp-practice-certification
Killexams : Election certification fights are a ‘test run’ for 2024

Before November, election officials prepared for the possibility that Republicans who embraced former President Donald Trump’s lies about voter fraud would challenge the verdict of voters by refusing to certify the results.

Three weeks after the end of voting, such challenges are playing out in just two states, Arizona and Pennsylvania, where Democrats won the marquee races for governor and U.S. Senate.

Legal experts predict the bids are doomed because local governmental bodies typically don’t have the option to vote against certifying the results of their elections. It also reflects the limited ability of election conspiracy theorists to disrupt the midterms. One rural Arizona county has drawn court challenges after its refusal to certify, but another flirting with blocking certification backed off amid legal threats.

In Pennsylvania, a handful of the state’s 67 counties have delayed certification because of recounts demanded by local conspiracy theorists in scattered precincts. But in most states, certification has gone smoothly.

“Before Election Day, I thought Republicans would exploit the certification process to undermine election results,” said Marc Elias, a Democratic attorney who has sued to compel the lone Arizona county to certify.

That there’s only one county delaying so far in that important battleground state, where Republican candidates who denied Joe Biden’s victory in the 2020 presidential race ran unsuccessfully for governor and secretary of state, is “good news, and a bit of a surprise,” Elias said.

The outcome is a reflection of the diminished opportunities election conspiracy theorists have to control elections after a number of their candidates were routed in statewide elections for positions overseeing voting. They’re largely left with a growing footprint in conservative, rural counties. Still, that’s enough to cause headaches for having the election results certified on a statewide basis, raising concerns about how rural counties might respond after the next presidential election.

“It is one of the few places where election deniers have a lever of power,” Rick Hasen, a law professor at the University of California at Los Angeles, said of the local political bodies charged with certifying election results in most states. “It’s a good test run for 2024, showing state courts they’re going to have to step in.”

The movement that embraces Trump’s lies about voting hoped it would have many more levers after November. Candidates who backed Trump’s efforts to overturn the 2020 election ran for top posts with power over state voting — including secretary of state, which in most states is the top election position — in five of the six swing states that were key to Trump’s 2020 loss. They lost every race in each of those states.

In 2020, Trump tried unsuccessfully to get Republican governors and secretaries of state to overrule their own voters and declare him the winner of some of the states won by Biden. With 2024 on the horizon, Trump now has fewer officials in his party to pressure if he becomes the nominee.

A Democrat, Secretary of State Katie Hobbs, defeated Trump-backed Republican Kari Lake in the race for Arizona governor, flipping it out of the GOP category, and a Democrat also won the race to replace Hobbs. A Democrat defeated an election conspiracy theorist running for Nevada secretary of state, shifting another swing-state election office from the GOP.

On the local level, the picture is blurrier. There are more than 10,000 local election offices in the country that follow guidelines set by secretaries of state or other agencies that their states designate as the top election authorities. That’s where conspiracy theorists won at least some new offices and still have the power to disrupt proceedings.

During the June primary in New Mexico, rural Otero County refused to certify the results of its election, preventing the state from making the winners official until the state Supreme Court ordered it to act. That set a template that election lawyers feared would be vastly replicated in the weeks after the midterms. But this time even Otero certified its winners without complaint.

In Michigan, where a GOP slate of election conspiracy theorists was defeated in statewide races, the Republican candidate for secretary of state, Kristina Karamo, implored the state’s bipartisan board of canvassers not to certify the election during a hearing earlier this week. Karamo insisted there had been widespread fraud, even though she lost her race against Democratic Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson by more than 13 percentage points.

Tony Daunt, the Republican chair of the certification board, responded by blasting candidates who “feed into this nonsense” by making “claims that fire everybody up because it’s a short-term gain for them, and that’s dangerous to our system.” The board unanimously certified the election.

In Pennsylvania, the most prominent certification hiccup has come in Luzerne County, north of Philadelphia, which voted for Trump by 14 percentage points in 2020. County commissioners delayed certifying the election on Monday after one Democrat abstained from voting following an Election Day fiasco in which the election office ran out of ballots.

But the Democrat, Daniel Schramm, later told reporters he would vote to certify on Wednesday, after having time to confirm that the foul-up didn’t disenfranchise any voters. Certification is being delayed in a few other counties after local Republican committees and voters requested recounts.

In Arizona, the two Republicans on Cochise County’s three-member county commission blew past Monday’s certification deadline, saying they needed more information on the certification of vote tabulators, even though there have been no problems with voting or ballot counting in their county.

The secretary of state’s office has sued, saying that it must certify the state’s elections by Dec. 8. If Cochise, which voted for Trump in 2020 by nearly 20 percentage points, declines to include its conservative electorate in the total and a court doesn’t force it to, that would change the tally in one of the state’s congressional seats from being narrowly won by a Republican to narrowly being taken by a Democrat.

“The only legal effect this has is to disenfranchise all their voters,” said David Becker of the Center for Election Innovation.

The efforts to delay certification are dangerous even if they’re doomed to fail, Becker and others said. They continue to sow discontent and distrust of voting and democracy.

David Levine, a former election official who is a fellow with the Alliance for Securing Democracy, noted that conspiracy theories about elections have reached such a fever pitch in Arizona that Bill Gates, the Republican chair of the county commission in Maricopa County, which includes Phoenix. has been given additional security by the local sheriff.

“When you supply legitimacy to baseless accusations about the election process, there is a concern that more of that will occur,” Levine said.

Maricopa County, which includes Phoenix, certified its election results on Monday, after dozens of attendees demanded the board not do it. Some complained about printer malfunctions in the county, the state’s most populous, that led to confusion and long lines on Election Day — even though Maricopa officials said everyone had a chance to vote and that all legal ballots were counted.

In other counties, activists also spoke out against certification, though unsuccessfully. In Yavapai County, north of Phoenix, a woman who gave her name as Nancy Littlefield, wearing a hoodie patterned on the American flag, made clear that part of her objections were because she simply didn’t like the outcome of the election.

She urged Yavapai board members not to certify the vote because “I moved from California so I could be free and live my life and have my voice heard.”

Story by Nicholas Riccardi. Associated Press writers Joey Cappelletti, Jonathan J. Cooper, Anita Snow, Christina A. Cassidy and Mark Scolforo contributed to this report.

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 23:20:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.bangordailynews.com/2022/11/30/national-politics/election-certification-fights/
Killexams : Illness, injuries hamper Bills practice

A lot of fans looked at the Buffalo Bills' schedule in August and said to themselves, "Cleveland Browns. At home. In November. No Deshaun Watson at quarterback. The Bills can win that with one hand tied behind their backs." Lo and behold, the Bills might actually have to beat the Browns on Sunday with one hand tied figuratively behind their backs.

Forecasts are calling for the bulk of the big snowstorm to be finished by Sunday morning. But wind gusts of up to 30 mph are estimated for Sunday afternoon, and there is the distinct possibility of snow flurries during the game, with generalized snowfall moving south of the city.

Here come the Browns, led by the No. 3 rusher in the NFL, Nick Chubb, and one of the better offensive lines in the league. Chubb is averaging 5.7 yards a carry, best in the league.

If the weather limits the ability of Josh Allen to throw and Stefon Diggs to catch to any degree, it's an equalizer for Cleveland.

People are also reading…

Meanwhile, Allen is on an interception slump the past 10 quarters and could use a little more help carrying the offensive load.

It would be nice if the Bills' running game turned in a 60-minute performance for a change.

Devin Singletary still is looking for his first 100-yard game. His season high is 85 yards at Kansas City on 17 carries. That was the only game this season in which he has had more than 14 carries.

Nevertheless, the Bills' linemen took encouragement from last week's 30-point outing against Minnesota.

Singletary had 41 yards on 4.6 yards a carry in the first half and scored his first two rushing TDs of the season.

"The running game is definitely getting there," said guard Ryan Bates. "We've been getting good yards a carry. ... We've got to trust the coaching and keep doing what we're doing. It's really just execution."

"The running game is getting closer," said guard Rodger Saffold. "It's kind of like little things that you don't expect that you can't really see if you're a fan watching. It's stuff we know in our room. It's like little mistakes, like maybe a wrong call, one area that messes up the whole play."

The Bills couldn't keep the run game going in the second half and continued to have problems in converting short yardage runs.

"Those are what I'm talking about," Saffold said of short-yardage runs. "It's little, minute things that you wouldn't even think matter. Things that we talk about, we gotta walk through it, we practice it. It's a learning curve."

The Bills are a passing team, just like Kansas City. That's the way it should be with an elite quarterback like Allen or Patrick Mahomes. The main issue is not with the Bills running a lot more, but running more efficiently.

The Bills' linemen fully understand that Allen's passing needs to be the offense's main mode of transportation. Still, Saffold doesn't deny that getting more in-game repetitions helps as the season goes along.

"If you're not doing the run as much as a team, you have to try to fix those things as you go," he said. "If you're running the ball consistently over and over again, those problems may happen at the beginning of the year then you start seeing them go away. There's some things we do that we have to kind of go through the growing pains and deal with those adjustments on the fly which is also going to help us get better."

The Bills' line also is going through the process of mastering the techniques of offensive line coach Aaron Kromer.

"Under the tutelage of Kromer, we keep getting better over the course of the year," Saffold said. "You start seeing us come more together to where it's consistent."

Kromer teaches his linemen that power comes from the ground up, using the leverage that comes from a solid base, with the feet firmly planted to lift the defender off his spot. It's the same school of blocking taught by Cleveland's legendary line coach, Bill Callahan, who is a mentor to Kromer.

Bates isn't panic about the weather forecast.

"I like this kind of weather," he said. "I feel like the way I play; knees under shoulders, feet grounded, it doesn't affect my play a lot differently. The style and technique Krom teaches here, it's all about cleats in the ground, grounded, not falling forward. If anything, I think if it snows, it affects the D-line more than the O-line because of the way they're rushing, they're trying to bend the edge. The grip on the ground is not as good."

Maybe the Bills' passing game will catch a break from the weather.

Maybe the snow band won't be over Orchard Park to start the game. The most ideal path to victory over the Browns would be the same way the Bills beat the Green Bay Packers. Boat race them with early scores. The Bills were up on the Packers, 24-7, at halftime. At that point, all the running in the world wasn't going to bring Green Bay back.

But the weather may not make it so easy for the Bills.

It's a good idea if the Bills keep working their ground game some more this week. The Browns' defense ranks 23rd in rushing yards allowed and 27th in yards per carry allowed. They're last in rushing DVOA, the Football Outsiders' metric that factors in the competition.

Everyone knows what happened to the Bills last year on two awful passing days in Orchard Park— the regular-season losses to Indianapolis and New England.

The last six games on this year's schedule — three at home and three on the road — all are outdoors at cold weather sites.

The Bills' offensive line and running backs can pull more weight. At some point over the next two months — and probably Sunday — the team is going to need it.

Wed, 16 Nov 2022 22:07:00 -0600 en text/html https://buffalonews.com/illness-injuries-hamper-bills-practice/article_3b96c3fd-beb6-5b51-95e0-052ec56bea8a.html
Killexams : Election certification delays few, but a 'test run' for 2024

Before November, election officials prepared for the possibility that Republicans who embraced former President Donald Trump's lies about voter fraud would challenge the verdict of voters by refusing to certify the results.

Three weeks after the end of voting, such challenges are playing out in just two states, Arizona and Pennsylvania, where Democrats won the marquee races for governor and U.S. Senate.

Legal experts predict the bids are doomed because local governmental bodies typically don't have the option to vote against certifying the results of their elections. It also reflects the limited ability of election conspiracy theorists to disrupt the midterms. One rural Arizona county has drawn court challenges after its refusal to certify, but another flirting with blocking certification backed off amid legal threats.

In Pennsylvania, a handful of the state's 67 counties have delayed certification because of recounts demanded by local conspiracy theorists in scattered precincts. But in most states, certification has gone smoothly.

“Before Election Day, I thought Republicans would exploit the certification process to undermine election results,” said Marc Elias, a Democratic attorney who has sued to compel the lone Arizona county to certify.

That there's only one county delaying so far in that important battleground state, where Republican candidates who denied Joe Biden's victory in the 2020 presidential race ran unsuccessfully for governor and secretary of state, is “good news, and a bit of a surprise,” Elias said.

The outcome is a reflection of the diminished opportunities election conspiracy theorists have to control elections after a number of their candidates were routed in statewide elections for positions overseeing voting. They're largely left with a growing footprint in conservative, rural counties. Still, that's enough to cause headaches for having the election results certified on a statewide basis, raising concerns about how rural counties might respond after the next presidential election.

“It is one of the few places where election deniers have a lever of power,” Rick Hasen, a law professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, said of the local political bodies charged with certifying election results in most states. “It's a good test run for 2024, showing state courts they're going to have to step in.”

The movement that embraces Trump's lies about voting hoped it would have many more levers after November. Candidates who backed Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election ran for top posts with power over state voting — including secretary of state, which in most states is the top election position — in five of the six swing states that were key to Trump's 2020 loss. They lost every race in each of those states.

In 2020, Trump tried unsuccessfully to get Republican governors and secretaries of state to overrule their own voters and declare him the winner of some of the states won by Biden. With 2024 on the horizon, Trump now has fewer officials in his party to pressure if he becomes the nominee.

A Democrat, Secretary of State Katie Hobbs, defeated Trump-backed Republican Kari Lake in the race for Arizona governor, flipping it out of the GOP category, and a Democrat also won the race to replace Hobbs. A Democrat defeated an election conspiracy theorist running for Nevada secretary of state, shifting another swing-state election office from the GOP.

On the local level, the picture is blurrier. There are more than 10,000 local election offices in the country that follow guidelines set by secretaries of state or other agencies that their states designate as the top election authorities. That's where conspiracy theorists won at least some new offices and still have the power to disrupt proceedings.

During the June primary in New Mexico, rural Otero County refused to certify the results of its election, preventing the state from making the winners official until the state Supreme Court ordered it to act. That set a template that election lawyers feared would be vastly replicated in the weeks after the midterms. But this time even Otero certified its winners without complaint.

In Michigan, where a GOP slate of election conspiracy theorists was defeated in statewide races, the Republican candidate for secretary of state, Kristina Karamo, implored the state's bipartisan board of canvassers not to certify the election during a hearing earlier this week. Karamo insisted there had been widespread fraud, even though she lost her race against Democratic Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson by more than 13 percentage points.

Tony Daunt, the Republican chair of the certification board, responded by blasting candidates who “feed into this nonsense” by making “claims that fire everybody up because it’s a short-term gain for them, and that’s dangerous to our system.” The board unanimously certified the election.

In Pennsylvania, the most prominent certification hiccup has come in Luzerne County, north of Philadelphia, which voted for Trump by 14 percentage points in 2020. County commissioners delayed certifying the election on Monday after one Democrat abstained from voting following an Election Day fiasco in which the election office ran out of ballots.

But the Democrat, Daniel Schramm, later told reporters he would vote to certify on Wednesday, after having time to confirm that the foul-up didn't disenfranchise any voters. Certification is being delayed in a few other counties after local Republican committees and voters requested recounts.

In Arizona, the two Republicans on Cochise County's three-member county commission blew past Monday's certification deadline, saying they needed more information on the certification of vote tabulators, even though there have been no problems with voting or ballot counting in their county.

The secretary of state's office has sued, saying that it must certify the state's elections by Dec. 8. If Cochise, which voted for Trump in 2020 by nearly 20 percentage points, declines to include its conservative electorate in the total and a court doesn't force it to, that would change the tally in one of the state's congressional seats from being narrowly won by a Republican to narrowly being taken by a Democrat.

“The only legal effect this has is to disenfranchise all their voters,” said David Becker of the Center for Election Innovation.

The efforts to delay certification are dangerous even if they're doomed to fail, Becker and others said. They continue to sow discontent and distrust of voting and democracy.

David Levine, a former election official who is a fellow with the Alliance for Securing Democracy, noted that conspiracy theories about elections have reached such a fever pitch in Arizona that Bill Gates, the Republican chair of the county commission in Maricopa County, which includes Phoenix. has been given additional security by the local sheriff.

“When you supply legitimacy to baseless accusations about the election process, there is a concern that more of that will occur," Levine said.

Maricopa County, which includes Phoenix, certified its election results on Monday, after dozens of attendees demanded the board not do it. Some complained about printer malfunctions in the county, the state's most populous, that led to confusion and long lines on Election Day — even though Maricopa officials said everyone had a chance to vote and that all legal ballots were counted.

In other counties, activists also spoke out against certification, though unsuccessfully. In Yavapai County, north of Phoenix, a woman who gave her name as Nancy Littlefield, wearing a hoodie patterned on the American flag, made clear that part of her objections were because she simply didn't like the outcome of the election.

She urged Yavapai board members not to certify the vote because “I moved from California so I could be free and live my life and have my voice heard.”

___

Associated Press writers Joey Cappelletti in Lansing, Michigan; Jonathan J. Cooper and Anita Snow in Phoenix; Christina A. Cassidy in Atlanta; and Mark Scolforo in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, contributed to this report.

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 15:14:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-politics/donald-trump-ap-republicans-pennsylvania-arizona-b2235823.html
Killexams : Election certification delays few, but a 'test run' for 2024

Before November, election officials prepared for the possibility that Republicans who embraced former President Donald Trump's lies about voter fraud would challenge the verdict of voters by refusing to certify the midterm results.

Three weeks after the end of voting, such challenges are playing out in just two states, Arizona and Pennsylvania, where Democrats won the marquee races for governor and Senate.

Legal experts predict the bids are doomed because local governmental agencies typically don't have the option to vote against certifying the results of their elections. But experts also say the delays are a signal that the United States must brace itself for similar disruptions in the next presidential contest.

“It is one of the few places where election deniers have a lever of power,” Rick Hasen, a law professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, said of the local political authorities responsible for certifying election results in most states. “It’s a good test run for 2024, showing state courts they’re going to have to step in.”

For now, the certification delay in a smattering of rural counties in just two states reflects the limited ability of election conspiracy theorists to disrupt the midterms. One rural Arizona county has drawn court challenges after its refusal to certify, but a second one that was flirting with blocking certification backed off amid legal threats.

In Pennsylvania, a handful of the state's 67 counties have delayed certification because of recounts demanded by local conspiracy theorists in scattered precincts. But in most states, certification has gone smoothly.

“Before Election Day, I thought Republicans would exploit the certification process to undermine election results,” said Marc Elias, a Democratic lawyer who has sued to compel the lone Arizona county to certify.

That there's only one county delaying so far in that important battleground state, where Republican candidates who denied Joe Biden's victory in the 2020 presidential race ran unsuccessfully for governor and secretary of state, is “good news, and a bit of a surprise,” Elias said.

In Wisconsin, where Trump pressured Republican lawmakers to decertify the 2020 results, the chair of the state elections commission certified the results of the midterm election during a quick meeting Wednesday without fanfare. Minnesota, where the failed Republican secretary of state candidate had cast doubt on the legitimacy of the 2020 presidential election, the state canvassing board certified this year's results without drama on Tuesday.

The smooth outcome in most of the country is a reflection of the diminished opportunities election conspiracy theorists have to control elections after a number of their candidates were routed in statewide elections for positions overseeing voting. They're largely left with a footprint in conservative, rural counties. Still, that's enough to cause headaches for having the election results certified on a statewide basis, raising concerns about how rural counties might respond after the next presidential election.

The movement that embraces Trump's lies about voting hoped it would have many more levers after November. Candidates who backed Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election ran for top posts with power over state voting — including secretary of state, which in most states is the top election position — in five of the six swing states that were key to Trump's 2020 loss. They lost every race in each of those states.

Democratic Secretary of State Katie Hobbs defeated Trump-backed Republican Kari Lake in the race for Arizona governor, flipping it out of the GOP category, and a Democrat also won the race to replace Hobbs. A Democrat defeated an election conspiracy theorist running for Nevada secretary of state, shifting another swing-state election office from the GOP.

On the local level, the picture is blurrier.

There are more than 10,000 local election offices in the country that follow guidelines set by secretaries of state or other agencies that their states designate as the top election authorities. That's where conspiracy theorists won at least some new offices and still have the power to disrupt proceedings.

During the June primary in New Mexico, rural Otero County refused to certify the results of its election, preventing the state from making the winners official until the state Supreme Court ordered it to act. That set a template that election lawyers feared would be vastly replicated in the weeks after the midterms. But this time, even Otero County certified its winners without a delay. New Mexico's canvass board certified the statewide results Wednesday.

In Michigan, where a GOP slate of election conspiracy theorists was defeated in statewide races, the Republican candidate for secretary of state, Kristina Karamo, implored the state's bipartisan board of canvassers not to certify the election during a hearing this week. Karamo insisted there had been widespread fraud, even though she lost her race against Democratic Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson by more than 13 percentage points.

Tony Daunt, the Republican chair of the certification board, responded by blasting candidates who “feed into this nonsense” by making “claims that fire everybody up because it’s a short-term gain for them, and that’s dangerous to our system.” The board unanimously certified the election.

In Pennsylvania, the most prominent certification hiccup has come in Luzerne County, north of Philadelphia, which voted for Trump by 14 percentage points in 2020. County commissioners delayed certifying the election on Monday after one Democrat abstained from voting following an Election Day fiasco in which the election office ran out of ballots.

The Democrat, Daniel Schramm, joined the two other Democratic commissioners on the five-member board Wednesday to certify the vote after telling reporters he was confident no citizen was unable to vote. Certification is being delayed in a few other counties after local Republican committees and voters requested recounts.

In Arizona, the two Republicans on Cochise County's three-member county commission blew past Monday's certification deadline, saying they needed more information on the certification of vote tabulators, even though there have been no problems with voting or ballot counting in their county.

The secretary of state's office has sued, saying that it must certify the state's elections by Dec. 8.

“The only legal effect this has is to disenfranchise all their voters,” said David Becker of the Center for Election Innovation.

The efforts to delay certification are dangerous even if they're doomed to fail, Becker and others said. They continue to sow discontent and distrust of voting and democracy.

David Levine, a former election official who is a fellow with the Alliance for Securing Democracy, noted that conspiracy theories about elections have reached such a fever pitch in Arizona that Bill Gates, the Republican chair of the county commission in Maricopa County, which includes Phoenix. has been given additional security by the local sheriff.

“When you supply legitimacy to baseless accusations about the election process, there is a concern that more of that will occur," Levine said.

Maricopa County, which includes Phoenix, certified its election results on Monday, after dozens of attendees demanded the board not do it. Some complained about printer malfunctions in the county, the state's most populous, that led to confusion and long lines on Election Day — even though Maricopa officials said everyone had a chance to vote and that all legal ballots were counted.

In other counties, activists also spoke out against certification, though unsuccessfully. In Yavapai County, north of Phoenix, a woman who gave her name as Nancy Littlefield, wearing a hoodie patterned on the American flag, made clear that part of her objections were because she simply didn't like the outcome of the election.

She urged Yavapai board members not to certify the vote because “I moved from California so I could be free and live my life and have my voice heard.”

———

Associated Press writers Joey Cappelletti in Lansing, Michigan; Jonathan J. Cooper and Anita Snow in Phoenix; Christina A. Cassidy in Atlanta; and Mark Scolforo in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, contributed to this report.

———

Follow the AP’s coverage of the 2022 midterm elections at https://apnews.com/hub/2022-midterm-elections

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 15:25:00 -0600 en text/html https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/election-certification-delays-test-run-2024-94190557
Killexams : Election certification delays few, but a 'test run' for 2024

Before November, election officials prepared for the possibility that Republicans who embraced former President Donald Trump's lies about voter fraud would challenge the verdict of voters by refusing to certify the midterm results.

Three weeks after the end of voting, such challenges are playing out in just two states, Arizona and Pennsylvania, where Democrats won the marquee races for governor and Senate.

Legal experts predict the bids are doomed because local governmental agencies typically don't have the option to vote against certifying the results of their elections. But experts also say the delays are a signal that the United States must brace itself for similar disruptions in the next presidential contest.

“It is one of the few places where election deniers have a lever of power,” Rick Hasen, a law professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, said of the local political authorities responsible for certifying election results in most states. “It’s a good test run for 2024, showing state courts they’re going to have to step in.”

For now, the certification delay in a smattering of rural counties in just two states reflects the limited ability of election conspiracy theorists to disrupt the midterms. One rural Arizona county has drawn court challenges after its refusal to certify, but a second one that was flirting with blocking certification backed off amid legal threats.

In Pennsylvania, a handful of the state's 67 counties have delayed certification because of recounts demanded by local conspiracy theorists in scattered precincts. But in most states, certification has gone smoothly.

“Before Election Day, I thought Republicans would exploit the certification process to undermine election results,” said Marc Elias, a Democratic lawyer who has sued to compel the lone Arizona county to certify.

That there's only one county delaying so far in that important battleground state, where Republican candidates who denied Joe Biden's victory in the 2020 presidential race ran unsuccessfully for governor and secretary of state, is “good news, and a bit of a surprise,” Elias said.

In Wisconsin, where Trump pressured Republican lawmakers to decertify the 2020 results, the chair of the state elections commission certified the results of the midterm election during a quick meeting Wednesday without fanfare. Minnesota, where the failed Republican secretary of state candidate had cast doubt on the legitimacy of the 2020 presidential election, the state canvassing board certified this year's results without drama on Tuesday.

The smooth outcome in most of the country is a reflection of the diminished opportunities election conspiracy theorists have to control elections after a number of their candidates were routed in statewide elections for positions overseeing voting. They're largely left with a footprint in conservative, rural counties. Still, that's enough to cause headaches for having the election results certified on a statewide basis, raising concerns about how rural counties might respond after the next presidential election.

The movement that embraces Trump's lies about voting hoped it would have many more levers after November. Candidates who backed Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election ran for top posts with power over state voting — including secretary of state, which in most states is the top election position — in five of the six swing states that were key to Trump's 2020 loss. They lost every race in each of those states.

Democratic Secretary of State Katie Hobbs defeated Trump-backed Republican Kari Lake in the race for Arizona governor, flipping it out of the GOP category, and a Democrat also won the race to replace Hobbs. A Democrat defeated an election conspiracy theorist running for Nevada secretary of state, shifting another swing-state election office from the GOP.

On the local level, the picture is blurrier.

There are more than 10,000 local election offices in the country that follow guidelines set by secretaries of state or other agencies that their states designate as the top election authorities. That's where conspiracy theorists won at least some new offices and still have the power to disrupt proceedings.

During the June primary in New Mexico, rural Otero County refused to certify the results of its election, preventing the state from making the winners official until the state Supreme Court ordered it to act. That set a template that election lawyers feared would be vastly replicated in the weeks after the midterms. But this time, even Otero County certified its winners without a delay. New Mexico's canvass board certified the statewide results Wednesday.

In Michigan, where a GOP slate of election conspiracy theorists was defeated in statewide races, the Republican candidate for secretary of state, Kristina Karamo, implored the state's bipartisan board of canvassers not to certify the election during a hearing this week. Karamo insisted there had been widespread fraud, even though she lost her race against Democratic Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson by more than 13 percentage points.

Tony Daunt, the Republican chair of the certification board, responded by blasting candidates who “feed into this nonsense” by making “claims that fire everybody up because it’s a short-term gain for them, and that’s dangerous to our system.” The board unanimously certified the election.

In Pennsylvania, the most prominent certification hiccup has come in Luzerne County, north of Philadelphia, which voted for Trump by 14 percentage points in 2020. County commissioners delayed certifying the election on Monday after one Democrat abstained from voting following an Election Day fiasco in which the election office ran out of ballots.

The Democrat, Daniel Schramm, joined the two other Democratic commissioners on the five-member board Wednesday to certify the vote after telling reporters he was confident no citizen was unable to vote. Certification is being delayed in a few other counties after local Republican committees and voters requested recounts.

In Arizona, the two Republicans on Cochise County's three-member county commission blew past Monday's certification deadline, saying they needed more information on the certification of vote tabulators, even though there have been no problems with voting or ballot counting in their county.

The secretary of state's office has sued, saying that it must certify the state's elections by Dec. 8.

“The only legal effect this has is to disenfranchise all their voters,” said David Becker of the Center for Election Innovation.

The efforts to delay certification are dangerous even if they're doomed to fail, Becker and others said. They continue to sow discontent and distrust of voting and democracy.

David Levine, a former election official who is a fellow with the Alliance for Securing Democracy, noted that conspiracy theories about elections have reached such a fever pitch in Arizona that Bill Gates, the Republican chair of the county commission in Maricopa County, which includes Phoenix. has been given additional security by the local sheriff.

“When you supply legitimacy to baseless accusations about the election process, there is a concern that more of that will occur," Levine said.

Maricopa County, which includes Phoenix, certified its election results on Monday, after dozens of attendees demanded the board not do it. Some complained about printer malfunctions in the county, the state's most populous, that led to confusion and long lines on Election Day — even though Maricopa officials said everyone had a chance to vote and that all legal ballots were counted.

In other counties, activists also spoke out against certification, though unsuccessfully. In Yavapai County, north of Phoenix, a woman who gave her name as Nancy Littlefield, wearing a hoodie patterned on the American flag, made clear that part of her objections were because she simply didn't like the outcome of the election.

She urged Yavapai board members not to certify the vote because “I moved from California so I could be free and live my life and have my voice heard.”

___

Associated Press writers Joey Cappelletti in Lansing, Michigan; Jonathan J. Cooper and Anita Snow in Phoenix; Christina A. Cassidy in Atlanta; and Mark Scolforo in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, contributed to this report.

___

Follow the AP’s coverage of the 2022 midterm elections at https://apnews.com/hub/2022-midterm-elections

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 15:09:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://news.yahoo.com/election-certification-delays-few-test-050553041.html
Killexams : Election Certification Delays Few, but a 'Test Run' for 2024 No result found, try new keyword!Election Certification Delays Few, but a 'Test Run' for 2024 Before November, election officials prepared for the possibility that Republicans who embraced former President Donald Trump's lies ... Tue, 29 Nov 2022 15:08:00 -0600 text/html https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/pennsylvania/articles/2022-11-30/election-certification-delays-few-but-a-test-run-for-2024
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