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Exam Code: 010-111 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
010-111 ACSM certified Personal Trainer

The exam content outline is the blueprint for your certification examination. Every question on the exam is associated with one of the knowledge or skill statements that are found in the exam content outline. obtain the outline that corresponds to the certification of your choice, and you'll also find the percentage of questions within each domain of the exam.

A job task analysis study was completed to describe the job functions of an ACSM Certified Personal Trainer® (ACSM-CPT®). The job task analysis serves as the foundation for the ACSM-CPT® exam blueprint (also known as an exam content outline) which assesses the practice-related knowledge of professionals seeking certification as a requirement of the job as a personal trainer. It is important to note that all ACSM-CPT® examination questions are based on the exam content outline.

Task Name Cognitive Level
I. Initial Client Consultation and Assessment
A. Provide documents and clear instructions to the client in preparation Recall
for the initial interview.
1) Knowledge of:
a) the components of and preparation for the initial client consultation.
b) the necessary paperwork to be completed by the client prior to the initial client
interview.
2) Skill in:
a) effective communication.
b) utilizing multimedia resources (e.g., email, phone, text messaging).
B. Interview the client to gather and provide pertinent information prior to Application
fitness testing and program design.
1) Knowledge of:
a) the components and limitations of a health/medical history, preparticipation
screening, informed consent, trainer-client contract, and organizational policies
and procedures.
b) the use of medical clearance for exercise testing and program participation.
c) health behavior modification theories and strategies.
d) orientation procedures, including equipment utilization and facility layout.
2) Skill in:
a) obtaining a health/medical history, medical clearance, and informed consent.
Job Tasks
Each performance domain is divided into job tasks. Within each task is a list of statements that describe what a personal trainer should know and/or be able to perform as part of their job. Table 2 should provide candidates with a sense of the breadth and depth of information that will be covered on the ACSM-CPT® exam.
Table 2. Job tasks and related knowledge and skill statements
C. Review and analyze client data to identify risk, formulate a plan of action, Synthesis and conduct physical assessments.
1) Knowledge of:
a) risk factors for cardiovascular disease.
b) signs and symptoms of chronic cardiovascular, metabolic, and/or pulmonary disease. c) the process for determining the need for medical clearance prior to participation in fitness testing and exercise programs.
d) relative and absolute contraindications to exercise testing.
2) Skill in:
a) identifying modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease and teaching clients about risk reduction.
b) determining appropriate fitness assessments based on the initial client consultation.
c) following protocols during fitness assessment administration.
D. Evaluate behavioral readiness and develop strategies to optimize Application exercise adherence.
1) Knowledge of:
a) behavioral strategies to enhance exercise and health behavior change (e.g., reinforcement, S.M.A.R.T. goal setting, social support).
b) health behavior change models (e.g., socioeconomic model, readiness to change model, social cognitive theory, theory of planned behavior) and effective strategies that support and facilitate behavioral change.
2) Skill in:
a) setting effective client-oriented S.M.A.R.T. behavioral goals.
b) choosing and applying appropriate health behavior modification strategies based on the clients skills, knowledge and level of motivation.
E. Assess the components of health- and/or skill-related physical fitness to Synthesis establish baseline values, set goals, and develop individualized programs.
1) Knowledge of:
a) the basic structures of bone, skeletal muscle, and connective tissue.
b) the basic anatomy of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems.
c) the definition of the following terms: anterior, posterior, proximal, distal, inferior, superior, medial, lateral, supination, pronation, flexion, extension, adduction, abduction, hyperextension, rotation, circumduction, agonist, antagonist, and stabilizer.
d) the sagittal, frontal (coronal), transverse (horizontal) planes of the body and plane in which each muscle action occurs.
e) the interrelationships among center of gravity, base of support, balance, stability, and proper spinal alignment.
f) the following curvatures of the spine: lordosis, scoliosis, and kyphosis.
g) the differences between the aerobic and anaerobic energy systems and the effects of acute and chronic exercise on each.
h) acute responses to cardiorespiratory exercise and resistance training.
i) chronic physiological adaptations associated with cardiovascular exercise and resistance training.
j) physiological responses related to warm-up and cool-down.
k) physiological basis of acute muscle fatigue, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), and musculoskeletal injury/overtraining.
l) physiological adaptations that occur at rest and during submaximal and maximal exercise following chronic aerobic and anaerobic exercise training.
m) physiological basis for improvements in muscular strength and endurance.
n) expected blood pressure responses associated with postural changes, acute physical exercise, and adaptations as a result of long-term exercise training.
o) types of muscle contraction, such as isotonic (concentric, eccentric), isometric (static), and isokinetic.
p) major muscle groups (e.g., trapezius, pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi, deltoids, biceps, triceps, rectus abdominis, internal and external obliques, erector spinae, gluteus maximus, hip flexors, quadriceps, hamstrings, hip adductors, hip abductors, anterior tibialis, soleus, gastrocnemius).
q) major bones (e.g., clavicle, scapula, sternum, humerus, carpals, ulna, radius, femur, fibula, tibia, tarsals).
r) joint classifications (e.g., hinge, ball and socket).
s) the primary action and joint range of motion specific to each major muscle group.
t) the following terms related to muscles: hypertrophy, atrophy, and hyperplasia.
u) physiological basis of the components of health-related physical fitness (cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition).
v) normal chronic physiologic adaptations associated with cardiovascular, resistance,
and flexibility training. w) test termination criteria, and proper procedures to be followed after discontinuing an exercise test.
x) anthropometric measurements and body composition techniques (e.g., skinfolds, plethysmography, bioelectrical impedance, infrared, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), body mass index (BMI), circumference measurements).
y) fitness testing protocols, including pre-test preparation and assessments of cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition.
z) interpretation of fitness test results.
aa) the recommended order of fitness assessments.
bb) appropriate documentation of signs or symptoms during an exercise session.
cc) various mechanisms for appropriate referral to a physician.
2) Skill in:
a) locating/palpating pulse landmarks, accurately measuring heart rate, and obtaining rating of perceived exertion (RPE).
b) selecting and administering cardiovascular fitness assessments.
c) locating anatomical sites for circumference (girth) and skinfold measurements. d) selecting and administering muscular strength and muscular endurance assessments.
e) selecting and administering flexibility assessments for various muscle groups. f) recognizing postural deviations that may affect exercise performance and body alignment.
g) delivering test and assessment results in a positive manner. F. Develop a plan and timeline for reassessing physical fitness, goals, and Application related behaviors.
1) Knowledge of:
a) developing fitness plans based on the information obtained in the client interview and the results of the physical fitness assessments.
b) alternative health behavior modification strategies.
c) the purpose and timeline for reassessing each component of physical fitness (cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition).
II. Exercise Programming and Implementation A. Review the clients goals, medical history, and assessment results and Recall determine exercise prescription.
1) Knowledge of:
a) the risks and benefits associated with guidelines for exercise training and programming for healthy adults, older adults, children, adolescents, and pregnant women.
b) the risks and benefits associated with guidelines for exercise training and programming for clients with chronic disease who are medically cleared to exercise.
c) Health-related conditions that require consultations with medical personnel prior to initiating physical activity.
d) components of health-related physical fitness (cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition).
e) program development for specific client needs (e.g., sport-specific training, performance, lifestyle, functional, balance, agility, aerobic and anaerobic).
f) special precautions and modifications of exercise programming for participation in various environmental conditions (e.g., altitude, variable ambient temperatures, humidity, environmental pollution).
g) documenting exercise sessions and performing periodic re-evaluations to assess changes in fitness status.
B. Select exercise modalities to achieve the desired adaptations based on the Application clients goals, medical history, and assessment results.
1) Knowledge of:
a) selecting exercises and training modalities based on clients age, functional capacity, and exercise test results.
b) the principles of specificity and program progression. c) the advantages, disadvantages, and applications of interval, continuous, and circuit training programs for cardiovascular fitness improvements.
d) activities of daily living (ADLs) and their role in the overall health and fitness of the client.
e) differences between physical activity recommendations and training principles for general health benefits, weight management, fitness improvements, and athletic performance enhancement.
f) advanced resistance training programming (e.g., super sets, Olympic lifting, plyometric exercises, pyramid training).
g) the six motor skill-related physical fitness components; agility, balance, coordination, reaction time, speed and power.
h) the benefits, risks, and contraindications for a wide variety of resistance training exercises specific to individual muscle groups (e.g., for rectus abdominis, performing crunches, supine leg raises, and plank exercises).
i) the benefits, risks, and contraindications for a wide variety of range of motion exercises (e.g., dynamic and passive stretching, Tai Chi, Pilates, yoga, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, partner stretching)
j) the benefits, risks, and contraindications for a wide variety of cardiovascular training exercises and applications based on client experience, skill level, current fitness level and goals (e.g., walking, jogging, running).
C. Determine initial Frequency, Intensity, Time, Type, Volume and Progression Application (i.e., FITT-VP Principle) of exercise based on the clients goals, medical history, and assessment results.
1) Knowledge of:
a) the recommended FITT-VP principle for physical activity for cardiovascular and musculoskeletal fitness in healthy adults, older adults, children, adolescents, and pregnant women.
b) the recommended FITT-VP principle for development of cardiovascular and musculoskeletal fitness in clients with stable chronic diseases who are medically cleared for exercise.
c) exercise modifications for those with physical and intellectual limitations (e.g., injury rehabilitation, neuromuscular and postural limitations). d) implementation of the components of an exercise training session (e.g., warm-up, conditioning, cool down, stretching). e) application of biomechanics and exercises associated with movements of the major muscle groups (i.e., seated knee extension: quadriceps).
f) establishing and monitoring levels of exercise intensity, including heart rate, RPE, pace, maximum oxygen consumption and/or metabolic equivalents (METs).
g) determining target/training heart rates using predicted maximum heart rate and the heart rate reserve method (Karvonen formula) with recommended intensity percentages based on client fitness level, medical considerations, and goals.
h) periodization for cardiovascular, resistance training, and conditioning program design and progression of exercises.
i) repetitions, sets, load, and rest periods necessary for desired goals. j) using results from repetition maximum tests to determine resistance training loads. D. Review the proposed program with the client, demonstrate exercises, and Application teach the client how to perform each exercise.
1) Knowledge of:
a) adaptations to strength, functional capacity, and motor skills.
b) the physiological effects of the Valsalva Maneuver and the associated risks.
c) the biomechanical principles for the performance of common physical activities (e.g., walking, running, swimming, cycling, resistance training, yoga, Pilates, functional training).
d) the concept of detraining or reversibility of conditioning and effects on fitness and functional performance.
e) signs and symptoms of over-reaching/overtraining.
f) modifying exercise form and/or technique to reduce musculoskeletal injury.
g) exercise attire for specific activities, environments, and conditions (e.g., footwear, layering for cold, light colors in heat).
h) communication techniques for effective teaching with awareness of visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learning styles.
2) Skill in:
a) demonstrating exercises designed to enhance cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, balance, and range of motion.
b) demonstrating exercises for improving range of motion of major joints.
c) demonstrating a wide range of resistance training modalities and activities (e.g., variable resistance devices, dynamic constant external resistance devices, kettlebells, static resistance devices).
d) demonstrating a wide variety of functional training exercises (e.g., stability balls, balance boards, resistance bands, medicine balls, foam rollers).
e) proper spotting positions and techniques for injury prevention and exercise assistance.
E. Monitor the clients technique and response to exercise, providing Synthesis modifications as necessary.
1) Knowledge of:
a) normal and abnormal responses to exercise and criteria for termination of exercise (e.g., shortness of breath, joint pain, dizziness, abnormal heart rate response).
b) proper and improper form and technique while using cardiovascular conditioning equipment (e.g., stair-climbers, stationary cycles, treadmills, elliptical trainers).
c) proper and improper form and technique while performing resistance exercises (e.g., resistance machines, stability balls, free weights, resistance bands, calisthenics/body weight).
d) proper and improper form and technique while performing flexibility exercises (e.g., static stretching, dynamic stretching, partner stretching).
2) Skill in:
a) interpreting client comprehension and body language during exercise.
b) effective communication, including active listening, cuing, and providing constructive feedback during and after exercise.
F. Recommend exercise progressions to Excellerate or maintain the clients Synthesis fitness level.
1) Knowledge of:
a) exercises and program modifications for healthy adults, older adults, children, adolescents, and pregnant women.
b) exercises and program modifications for clients with chronic disease who are medically cleared to exercise (e.g., stable coronary artery disease, other cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome, hypertension, arthritis, chronic back pain, osteoporosis, chronic pulmonary disease, chronic pain).
c) principles of progressive overload, specificity, and program progression. d) progression of exercises for major muscle groups (e.g., standing lunge to walking lunge to walking lunge with resistance).
e) modifications to periodized conditioning programs to increase or maintain muscular strength and/or endurance, hypertrophy, power, cardiovascular endurance, balance, and range of motion/flexibility.
G. Obtain client feedback to ensure exercise program satisfaction and adherence. Recall 1) Knowledge of:
a) effective techniques for program evaluation and client satisfaction (e.g., survey, written follow-up, verbal feedback).
b) client goals and appropriate review and modification.
III. Exercise Leadership and Client Education
A. Optimize participant adherence by using effective communication, motivational Synthesis techniques, and behavioral strategies.
1) Knowledge of:
a) verbal and nonverbal behaviors that communicate positive reinforcement and encouragement (e.g., eye contact, targeted praise, empathy).
b) learning preferences (auditory, visual, kinesthetic) and how to apply teaching and training techniques to optimize training session.
c) applying health behavior change models (e.g., socioecological model, readiness to change model, social cognitive theory, theory of planned behavior) and strategies that support and facilitate adherence.
d) barriers to exercise adherence and compliance (e.g., time management, injury, fear, lack of knowledge, weather).
e) techniques to facilitate intrinsic and extrinsic motivation (e.g., goal setting, incentive programs, achievement recognition, social support).
f) strategies to increase non-structured physical activity (e.g., stair walking, parking farther away, biking to work).
g) health coaching principles and lifestyle management techniques related to behavior change.
h) leadership techniques and educational methods to increase client engagement. 2) Skill in:
a) applying active listening techniques.
b) using feedback to optimize a clients training sessions.
c) effective and timely uses of a variety of communication modes (e.g., telephone, newsletters, email, social media).
B. Educate clients using scientifically sound resources. Application 1) Knowledge of:
a) influential lifestyle factors, including nutrition and physical activity habits. b) the value of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins as fuels for exercise and physical activity.
c) the following terms: body composition, body mass index, lean body mass, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and body fat distribution.
d) the relationship between body composition and health.
e) the effectiveness of diet, exercise and behavior modification as a method for modifying body composition.
f) the importance of maintaining hydration before, during and after exercise. g) Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
h) the Female Athlete Triad.
i) the myths and consequences associated with various weight loss methods (e.g., fad diets, dietary supplements, over-exercising, starvation diets).
j) the number of kilocalories in one gram of carbohydrate, fat, protein and alcohol. k) industry guidelines for caloric intake for individuals desiring to lose or gain weight. l) accessing and disseminating scientifically-based, relevant, fitness- and wellnessrelated resources and information.
m) community-based exercise programs that provide social support and structured activities (e.g., walking clubs, intramural sports, golf leagues, cycling clubs).
n) stress management and relaxation techniques (e.g., progressive relaxation, guided imagery, massage therapy).
IV. Legal and Professional Responsibilities
A. Collaborate with health care professionals and organizations to create a Application network of providers who can assist in maximizing the benefits and minimizing the risk of an exercise program.
1) Knowledge of:
a) reputable professional resources and referral sources to ensure client safety and program effectiveness.
b) the scope of practice for the Certified Personal Trainer and the need to practice within this scope.
c) effective and professional communication with allied health and fitness professionals.
d) identifying individuals requiring referral to a physician or allied health services (e.g., physical therapy, dietary counseling, stress management, weight management, psychological and social services).
B. Develop a comprehensive risk management program (including an Application emergency action plan and injury prevention program) consistent with industry standards of care.
1) Knowledge of:
a) resources available to obtain basic life support, automated external defibrillator (AED), and cardiopulmonary resuscitation certification.
b) emergency procedures (i.e., telephone procedures, written emergency procedures, personnel responsibilities) in a health and fitness setting.
c) precautions taken to ensure participant safety (e.g., equipment placement, facility cleanliness, floor surface).
d) the following terms related to musculoskeletal injuries (e.g., shin splints, sprain, strain, bursitis, fractures, tendonitis, patellofemoral pain syndrome, low back pain, plantar fasciitis).
e) contraindicated exercises/postures and risks associated with certain exercises (e.g., straight-leg sit-ups, double leg raises, full squats, hurdlers stretch, cervical and lumbar hyperextension, standing bent-over toe touch).
f) the responsibilities, limitations, and legal implications for the Certified Personal Trainer of carrying out emergency procedures.
g) potential musculoskeletal injuries (e.g., contusions, sprains, strains, fractures), cardiovascular/pulmonary complications (e.g., chest pain, palpitations/ arrhythmias, tachycardia, bradycardia, hypotension/hypertension, hyperventilation), and metabolic abnormalities (e.g., fainting/syncope, hypoglycemia/hyperglycemia, hypothermia/hyperthermia).
h) the initial management and basic first-aid procedures for exercise-related injuries (e.g., bleeding, strains/sprains, fractures, shortness of breath, palpitations, hypoglycemia, allergic reactions, fainting/syncope).
i) the need for and components of an equipment service plan/agreement. j) the need for and use of safety policies and procedures (e.g., incident/accident reports, emergency procedure training) and legal necessity thereof.
k) the need for and components of an emergency action plan.
l) effective communication skills and the ability to inform staff and clients of emergency policies and procedures.
2) Skill in:
a) demonstrating and carrying out emergency procedures during exercise testing and/or training.
b) assisting, spotting, and monitoring clients safely and effectively during exercise testing and/or training.
C. Adhere to ACSM Certifications Code of Ethics by practicing in a professional Recall manner within the scope of practice of an ACSM Certified Personal Trainer.
1) Knowledge of:
a) the components of both the ACSM Code of Ethics as well as the ACSM Certified Personal Trainer scope of practice.
b) appropriate work attire and professional behavior.
2) Skill in:
a) conducting all professional activities within the scope of practice of the ACSM Certified Personal Trainer.
D. Follow industry-accepted professional, ethical, and business standards. Recall 1) Knowledge of:
a) professional liability and potential for negligence in training environments. b) legal issues for licensed and non-licensed healthcare professionals providing services, exercise testing and risk-management strategies.
c) equipment maintenance to decrease risk of injury and liability (e.g., maintenance plan, service schedule, safety considerations).
E. Respect copyright laws by obtaining permission before using protected Recall materials and any form of applicable intellectual property.
1) Knowledge of:
a) national and international copyright laws.
2) Skill in:
a) referencing non-original work.
F. Safeguard client confidentiality and privacy rights unless formally waived or in Recall emergency situations.
1) Knowledge of:
a) practices/systems for maintaining client confidentiality.
b) the importance of client privacy (i.e., client personal safety, legal liability, client credit protection, client medical disclosure).
c) the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) laws.

ACSM certified Personal Trainer
ACSM certified information source
Killexams : ACSM certified information source - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/010-111 Search results Killexams : ACSM certified information source - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/010-111 https://killexams.com/exam_list/ACSM Killexams : USAW + ACSM No result found, try new keyword!In this two-day course, you will gain practical information from top-level coaches about weightlifting technique, assessing movement, motor learning, effective coaching, and programming training. Thu, 13 Feb 2020 12:20:00 -0600 text/html https://www.teamusa.org/USA-Weightlifting/Coaching/ACSM Killexams : Certification For Open Source Hardware Announced

Today at the Open Hardware Summit in Portland, Alicia Gibb and Michael Weinberg of the Open Source Hardware Association (OSHWA) launched the Open Source Hardware Certification program. It’s live, and you can certify your own hardware as Open Hardware right now.

What Is Open Source Hardware?

Open Source Hardware can’t be defined without first discussing open source software. At its very core, open source software is just a copyright hack, enabled by a worldwide universal computer network. The rise of open source software is tied to the increasing ease of distributing said software, either through BBSes, Usenet, and the web. Likewise, Open Source Hardware is tied to the ease of distributing, modifying, and building hardware.

In the 1980s, there were no services that could deliver a custom circuit board to anywhere on the planet for a dollar per square inch. When open software began, CNC machines were expensive tools, now you can build a very good machine for just a week’s wages. We are currently living at the dawn of Open Source Hardware, enabled by the creation of Open Source design tools that have themselves been used to create physical tools. Inexpensive 3D printers, open source oscilloscopes, circuit board plotters, and the entire hackerspace movement are as revolutionary as the Internet. These devices and the Internet are the foundations for Open Hardware and software, respectively.  The objections to why hardware is incompatible with Open Source no longer apply and small-scale manufacturing techniques are only going to get better.

Open source is a moral imperative in the truest Kantian sense of the word. It is a good unto itself. Of course, this means open source is also mind-numbingly prescriptivist. Holy scrolls have defined dozens of different open source licenses. The relevant license for Open Source Hardware has already been laid out to define the freedoms and responsibilities of all Open Source Hardware creators. Open Source Hardware is a tangible thing, from a laptop to a lampshade, whose design is available so anyone can make, modify, distribute, and sell that thing. Native documentation is required, and software required to run this thing must be based on an OSI-approved license.

The definition of Open Source Hardware has been around for a few years now, and since then the community has flourished, there’s a great gear logo, and you can buy real, functional hardware that bills itself as Open Source Hardware. It’s become a selling point, and this has become a problem.

Many hardware creators don’t adhere to the definition of Open Source Hardware. In some cases, the design files simply aren’t available. If they are, they could be unmodifiable. The software used to create these design files could cost thousands of dollars per seat. This is the problem the movement faces — Open Source Hardware must have a certification program. Unlike open source software, where the source is almost proof enough that a piece of software complies with an open source license, hardware does not have such obvious assurances.

Software Is Closed By Default, Hardware Is Open And The Licenses Are Harder

All software is closed by default. Anything written is covered by copyright, and the developers of open source software choose to license their works under an open source license. Open source software, then, is a copyright hack, enabled because all software is closed by default.

Hardware, on the other hand, is open by default. If you build a device to automatically inject epinephrine intramuscularly, you must go out of your way to patent your device. Only a patent will deliver you the ability to license your work, and before that patent is published anyone can make their own epinephrine pen. If you build something with an FPGA, the code that programs the FPGA is covered by copyright, but an arbitrary circuit that uses that FPGA isn’t. Any generic piece of Open Source Hardware could be covered under patents, trademarks, and a dozen licenses. Therefore, an Open Source Hardware license is impractical. This is why OSHWA is not releasing an Open Source Hardware license, and instead creating an Open Source Hardware certification program. No Open Source Hardware license could cover every edge case, and a certification is ultimately the only solution.

The Open Source Hardware Certification Program

At last year’s Open Hardware Summit, OSHWA formally announced the creation of the Open Hardware Certification program. Now, this program is live, and the certification database will growing very, very quickly. At its heart, the Open Source Hardware Certification program is pretty simple — create hardware that complies with the community definition of Open Source Hardware.

The theoretical basis for the need of an Open Source Hardware license is the fact that anyone is able to manufacture hardware. Of course, there are limits to technology and no one has a 14nm silicon fab line in their garage. This is a problem for any piece of Open Source Hardware, and the technical capability for anyone to recreate integrated circuits and other high technologies is the sole source of the traditional objections to any open hardware license. Garage-based fabrication is always improving, though, but closed hardware in the form of NDA’d chips will remain a problem for years to come.

The clearest example of the problem with closed-source chips is bunnie’s Novena laptop. This laptop is designed as both a hacker’s laptop and an artifact of Open Hardware. Although most of the chips used in the Novena are available without signing NDAs, open source, and blob-free 3D graphics acceleration was unavailable when the laptop launched. This non-open graphics problem will be fixed with open source drivers, but it does illustrate the problem of Open Source Hardware. Even though chips might be available, there might be binary blobs required for full functionality. You can build an Open Hardware chip in VHDL, but it’s not really open if you have to use closed-source FPGA dev tools.

OSHWA’s solution to this problem is simply asking for hardware creators to act in good faith. The certification program won’t knock points off for using closed source binary blobs if that’s the only way of doing something. Open Source Hardware is just slightly more aware of the pace of technical progress, and what is closed today may be open tomorrow. Building a piece of Open Source Hardware isn’t an all or nothing proposal; just deliver your best effort to make it open, and technology or reverse engineers will probably make it more open in the future.

oshwOf course, with any certification program, there must be some effort given to enforcement. If an Open Hardware project is certified under the program but does not meet the guidelines of the certification program, fines may be levied against the project creators. Again, good faith of the project creator is assumed, and a project found not in compliance with the certification program will be given 90 days to either fix the problem or remove the project from the certification program. After 90 days, there’s a 120-day period of public shaming, and after that small fines of $500 per month. The worst offender will get a fine of up to $10,000 per month, but that would require years of non-compliance, and it’s very doubtful any conflict with OSHWA will ever reach that stage. It should be noted these fines have a legal basis in the trademark of the OSHW certification logo, and if you don’t use the OSHW logo or certify your project, there’s nothing OSHWA can do.

The old Open Source Hardware ‘gear’ logo — unquestionably a better logo — will still remain in use, and no one is going will look down on you for using it. Using the trademarked OSHW logo, though, is the only way any certification program can be enforced.

The Objections To Open Source Hardware

Of course, the Open Source Hardware Certification program has been more than two years in the making, and that’s time enough for a few people to start having very strong opinions about it. A few years ago, Saar Drimer of Boldport said he won’t be using the Open Source Hardware logo on his boards. This is despite the fact that he loves Open Source Hardware, has written open source PCB design software, and offers a 20% discount on open source contract work. His reason is simple: adding a logo brings baggage, and building Open Source Hardware is not mutually exclusive with putting a logo on a board. Dave Jones is a big supporter of Open Hardware, but he realizes the famous gear logo is becoming meaningless through abuse.

You need only look back on the last twenty or thirty years of the world of Open Source Software to get a sense of where Saar and Dave are coming from; Stallman does not believe in a moral imperative to Open Hardware, whereas most everyone in attendance of today’s Open Hardware Summit does. Gnome versus KDE is nothing compared to the religious war we potentially face between various Open Hardware philosophies. The Open Source Hardware community is relearning what the open source software community learned twenty years ago. We can only hope to learn from their missteps.

But Open Source Hardware has a much bigger obstacle to adoption than politicking and empire building. Open source software is a simple concept — you have a (copy) right to whatever software, music, words, or boat hull designs you create. You can, therefore, deliver others the right to use, study, share, and modify that work. Physical objects and artifacts do not have copyright, they have patents. Patent law in the United States is atrocious, and just because you were the first to create a useful invention doesn’t mean a patent would be invalidated. This is the greatest challenge to anything developed as Open Source Hardware. The only solution to this is prior art and patent inspectors that know where to look.

This Will Take a While to Work Out

The Open Source Hardware Certification program is going to take a while to unravel. OSHWA doesn’t believe this certification program will be a repository used by patent inspectors looking for prior art. The legal basis for the certification is literally built upon every piece of intellectual property law. It is, perhaps, an answer to the most complex legal questions ever: what is property, what is intellectual property and can the concept of physical things be given away.

No one has an answer to these questions, or at least an answer that can be summed up in one-page FAQ. The Open Source Hardware Certification program is an attempt to answer these questions, and so far it’s the best attempt yet.

None of this matters unless the community gets behind it, and if another competing Open Source Hardware certification or license pops up, the community may very well migrate to that. Judging from the last thirty years of open source software license drama, we can only hope that the community figures this out the first time, and we hope this certification program is a rousing success.

Mon, 07 Nov 2022 10:00:00 -0600 Brian Benchoff en-US text/html https://hackaday.com/2016/10/07/certification-for-open-source-hardware-anounced/
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  • When evaluating prospective information-security candidates, employers should look for certifications as an important measure of excellence and commitment to quality.
  • This article is for business owners looking to hire cybersecurity experts, or for individuals interested in pursuing a cybersecurity career. 

Cybersecurity is one of the most crucial areas for ensuring a business’s success and longevity. With cyberattacks growing in sophistication, it’s essential for business owners to protect their companies by hiring qualified cybersecurity experts to manage this aspect of their business. The best candidates will have a certification in information security and cybersecurity. This guide breaks down the top certifications and other guidance you’ll need to make the right hire for your company. It’s also a great primer for individuals who are embarking on a cybersecurity career.

Best information security and cybersecurity certifications

When evaluating prospective InfoSec candidates, employers frequently look to certification as an important measure of excellence and commitment to quality. We examined five InfoSec certifications we consider to be leaders in the field of information security today.

This year’s list includes entry-level credentials, such as Security+, as well as more advanced certifications, like Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH), Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP), Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA). According to CyberSeek, more employers are seeking CISA, CISM and CISSP certification holders than there are credential holders, which makes these credentials a welcome addition to any certification portfolio.

Absent from our list of the top five is SANS GIAC Security Essentials (GSEC). Although this certification is still a very worthy credential, the job board numbers for CISA were so solid that it merited a spot in the top five. Farther down in this guide, we offer some additional certification options because the field of information security is both wide and varied.

1. CEH: Certified Ethical Hacker

The CEH (ANSI) certification is an intermediate-level credential offered by the International Council of E-Commerce Consultants (EC-Council). It’s a must-have for IT professionals who are pursuing careers in white hat hacking and certifies their competence in the five phases of ethical hacking: reconnaissance, enumeration, gaining of access, access maintenance and track covering. 

CEH credential holders possess skills and knowledge of hacking practices in areas such as footprinting and reconnaissance, network scanning, enumeration, system hacking, Trojans, worms and viruses, sniffers, denial-of-service attacks, social engineering, session hijacking, web server hacking, wireless networks and web applications, SQL injection, cryptography, penetration testing, IDS evasion, firewalls and honeypots. CEH V11 provides a remapping of the course to the NIST/NICE framework’s Protect and Defend (PR) job role category, as well as an additional focus on emerging threats in cloud, OT and IT security, such as fileless malware.

To obtain a CEH (ANSI) certification, candidates must pass one exam. A comprehensive five-day CEH training course is recommended, with the exam presented at the course’s conclusion. Candidates may self-study for the exam but must submit documentation of at least two years of work experience in information security with employer verification. Self-study candidates must also pay an additional $100 application fee. Education may be substituted for experience, but this is evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Candidates who complete any EC-Council-approved training (including with the iClass platform, academic institutions or an accredited training center) do not need to submit an application prior to attempting the exam.

Because technology in the field of hacking changes almost daily, CEH credential holders are required to obtain 120 continuing-education credits for each three-year cycle.

Once a candidate obtains the CEH (ANSI) designation, a logical progression on the EC-Council certification ladder is the CEH (Practical) credential. The CEH (Practical) designation targets the application of CEH skills to real-world security audit challenges and related scenarios. To obtain the credential, candidates must pass a rigorous six-hour practical examination. Conducted on live virtual machines, candidates are presented 20 scenarios with questions designed to validate a candidate’s ability to perform tasks such as vulnerability analysis, identification of threat vectors, web app and system hacking, OS detection, network scanning, packet sniffing, steganography and virus identification. Candidates who pass both the CEH (ANSI) and the CEH (Practical) exams earn the CEH (Master) designation.

CEH facts and figures

Certification name Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) (ANSI)
Prerequisites and required courses Training is highly recommended. Without formal training, candidates must have at least two years of information security-related experience and an educational background in information security, pay a nonrefundable eligibility application fee of $100 and submit an exam eligibility form before purchasing an exam voucher.
Number of exams One: 312-50 (ECC Exam)/312-50 (VUE) (125 multiple-choice questions, four hours)
Cost of exam $950 (ECC exam voucher) Note: An ECC exam voucher allows candidates to test via computer at a location of their choice. Pearson VUE exam vouchers allow candidates to test in a Pearson VUE facility and cost $1,199.
URL https://www.eccouncil.org/programs/certified-ethical-hacker-ceh
Self-study materials EC-Council instructor-led courses, computer-based training, online courses and more are available at ECCouncil.org. A CEH skills assessment is also available for credential seekers. Additionally, Udemy offers CEH practice exams. CEH-approved educational materials are available for $850 from EC-Council.

Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) training

While EC-Council offers both instructor-led and online training for its CEH certification, IT professionals have plenty of other options for self-study materials, including video training, practice exams and books.

Pluralsight currently offers an ethical-hacking learning path geared toward the 312-50 exam. With a monthly subscription, you get access to all of these courses, plus everything else in Pluralsight’s training library. Through Pluralsight’s learning path, students can prepare for all of the domains covered in the CEH exam.  

CyberVista offers a practice exam for the CEH 312-50 certification that includes several sets of exam-like questions, custom quizzes, flash cards and more. An exam prep subscription for 180 days costs $149 and gives candidates access to online study materials, as well as the ability to obtain the materials for offline study. Backed by its “pass guarantee,” CyberVista is so confident its practice exam will prepare you for the CEH exam that the company will refund its practice test costs if you don’t pass.

Did you know?FYI: Besides certifications in information security and cybersecurity, the best IT certifications cover areas such as disaster recovery, virtualization and telecommunications.

2. CISM: Certified Information Security Manager

The CISM certification is a top credential for IT professionals who are responsible for managing, developing and overseeing information security systems in enterprise-level applications or for developing organizational security best practices. The CISM credential was introduced to security professionals in 2003 by the Information Systems Audit and Control Association (ISACA).

ISACA’s organizational goals are specifically geared toward IT professionals who are interested in the highest-quality standards with respect to the auditing, control and security of information systems. The CISM credential targets the needs of IT security professionals with enterprise-level security management responsibilities. Credential holders possess advanced and proven skills in security risk management, program development and management, governance, and incident management and response.

Holders of the CISM credential, which is designed for experienced security professionals, must agree to ISACA’s code of ethics, pass a comprehensive examination, possess at least five years of experience in information security management, comply with the organization’s continuing education policy and submit a written application. Some combinations of education and experience may be substituted for the full experience requirement.

The CISM credential is valid for three years, and credential holders must pay an annual maintenance fee of $45 (ISACA members) or $85 (nonmembers). Credential holders are also required to obtain a minimum of 120 continuing professional education (CPE) credits over the three-year term to maintain the credential. At least 20 CPE credits must be earned every year.

CISM facts and figures

Certification name

Certified Information Security Manager (CISM)

Prerequisites and required courses

To obtain the CISM credential, candidates must do the following:

  1. Pass the CISM exam.
  2. Agree to the ISACA code of professional ethics.
  3. Adhere to ISACA’s CPE policy
  4. Possess a minimum of five years of information security work experience in described job practice analysis areas. Experience must be verifiable and obtained in the 10-year period prior to the application date or within five years of exam passage. There are some exceptions to this requirement depending on the current credentials held.
  5. Apply for CISM certification. (The processing fee is $50.) The credential must be obtained within five years of exam passage.

Number of exams

One: 150 questions, four hours

Cost of exam

Exam fees: $575 (members), $760 (nonmembers)

Exam fees are nontransferable and nonrefundable.

URL

https://www.isaca.org/credentialing/cism

Self-study materials

Training and study materials in various languages, information on job practice areas, primary references, publications, articles, the ISACA Journal, review courses, an exam prep community, terminology lists, a glossary and more are available at ISACA.org. Additionally, Udemy offers comprehensive training for the certification exam.

Other ISACA certification program elements

In addition to CISM, ISACA offers numerous certifications for those interested in information security and best practices. Other credentials worth considering include the following:

  • Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA)
  • Certified in the Governance of Enterprise IT (CGEIT)
  • Certified in Risk and Information Systems Control (CRISC)

The CISA designation was created for professionals working with information systems auditing, control or security and is popular enough with employers to earn it a place on the leaderboard. The CGEIT credential targets IT professionals working in enterprise IT management, governance, strategic alignment, value delivery, and risk and resource performance management. IT professionals who are seeking careers in all aspects of risk management will find that the CRISC credential nicely meets their needs.

Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) training

Pluralsight offers a CISM learning path containing five courses and 17 hours of instruction. The courses cover the domains addressed in the exam, but the learning path is aimed at the CISM job practice areas. 

CyberVista offers a CISM online training course in both live and on-demand formats. The course includes more than 16 hours of training videos, supplementary lessons, custom quizzes, practice exam questions and access to experts through the instructor. As with other CyberVista courses, the CISM training course comes with a “pass guarantee.” 

Did you know?Did you know?: According to CyberSeek, there are enough workers to fill only 68% of the cybersecurity job openings in the U.S. A cybersecurity certification is an important way to demonstrate the knowledge and ability to succeed in these job roles.

3. CompTIA Security+

CompTIA’s Security+ is a well-respected, vendor-neutral security certification. Security+ credential holders are recognized as possessing superior technical skills, broad knowledge and expertise in multiple security-related disciplines.

Although Security+ is an entry-level certification, the ideal candidates possess at least two years of experience working in network security and should consider first obtaining the Network+ certification. IT pros who obtain this certification have expertise in areas such as threat management, cryptography, identity management, security systems, security risk identification and mitigation, network access control, and security infrastructure. The CompTIA Security+ credential is approved by the U.S. Department of Defense to meet Directive 8140/8570.01-M requirements. In addition, the Security+ credential complies with the standards for ISO 17024.

The Security+ credential requires a single exam, currently priced at $381. (Discounts may apply to employees of CompTIA member companies and full-time students.) Training is available but not required.

IT professionals who earned the Security+ certification prior to Jan. 1, 2011, remain certified for life. Those who certify after that date must renew the certification every three years to stay current. To renew, candidates must obtain 50 continuing-education units (CEUs) or complete the CertMaster CE online course prior to the expiration of the three-year period. CEUs can be obtained by engaging in activities such as teaching, blogging, publishing articles or whitepapers, and participating in professional conferences and similar activities.

CompTIA Security+ facts and figures

Certification name

CompTIA Security+

Prerequisites and required courses

None. CompTIA recommends at least two years of experience in IT administration (with a security focus) and the Network+ credential before the Security+ exam. Udemy offers a complete and comprehensive course for the certification.

Number of exams

One: SY0-601 (maximum of 90 questions, 90 minutes to complete; 750 on a scale of 100-900 required to pass)

Cost of exam

$381 (discounts may apply; search for “SY0-601 voucher”)

URL

https://certification.comptia.org/certifications/security

Self-study materials

Exam objectives, demo questions, the CertMaster online training tool, training kits, computer-based training and a comprehensive study guide are available at CompTIA.org.

CompTIA Security+ training

You’ll find several companies offering online training, instructor-led and self-study courses, practice exams and books to help you prepare for and pass the Security+ exam.

Pluralsight offers a Security+ learning path as a part of its monthly subscription plan for the latest SY0-601 exam. Split into six sections, the training series is more than 24 hours long and covers attacks, threats and vulnerabilities; architecture and design; implementation of secure solutions; operations and incident response; and governance, risk and compliance.

CyberVista offers a Security+ practice exam so you can test your security knowledge before attempting the SY0-601 exam. The test comes with a 180-day access period and includes multiple sets of exam questions, key concept flash cards, access to InstructorLink experts, a performance tracker and more. As with CyberVista’s other offerings, this practice exam comes with a “pass guarantee.”

4. CISSP: Certified Information Systems Security Professional

CISSP is an advanced-level certification for IT pros who are serious about careers in information security. Offered by the International Information Systems Security Certification Consortium, known as (ISC)2 (pronounced “ISC squared”), this vendor-neutral credential is recognized worldwide for its standards of excellence.

CISSP credential holders are decision-makers who possess the expert knowledge and technical skills necessary to develop, guide and manage security standards, policies and procedures within their organizations. The CISSP certification continues to be highly sought after by IT professionals and is well recognized by IT organizations. It is a regular fixture on most-wanted and must-have security certification surveys.

CISSP is designed for experienced security professionals. A minimum of five years of experience in at least two of (ISC)2’s eight common body of knowledge (CBK) domains, or four years of experience in at least two of (ISC)2’s CBK domains and a college degree or an approved credential, is required for this certification. The CBK domains are security and risk management, asset security, security architecture and engineering, communications and network security, identity and access management, security assessment and testing, security operations, and software development security.

(ISC)2 also offers three CISSP concentrations targeting specific areas of interest in IT security:

  • Architecture (CISSP-ISSAP)
  • Engineering (CISSP-ISSEP)
  • Management (CISSP-ISSMP)

Each CISSP concentration exam is $599, and credential seekers must currently possess a valid CISSP.

An annual fee of $125 is required to maintain the CISSP credential. Recertification is required every three years. To recertify, candidates must earn 40 CPE credits each year, for a total of 120 CPE credits within the three-year cycle.

CISSP facts and figures 

Certification name

Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) 

Optional CISSP concentrations:  

  • CISSP Architecture (CISSP-ISSAP)
  • CISSP Engineering (CISSP-ISSEP)
  • CISSP Management (CISSP-ISSMP)

Prerequisites and required courses

At least five years of paid, full-time experience in at least two of the eight (ISC)2 domains or four years of paid, full-time experience in at least two of the eight (ISC)2 domains and a college degree or an approved credential are required. Candidates must also do the following:

  • Agree to the (ISC)2 code of ethics.
  • Submit the CISSP application.
  • Complete the endorsement process.

Number of exams

One for CISSP (English CAT exam: 100-150 questions, three hours to complete; non-English exam: 250 questions, six hours) 

One for each concentration area

Cost of exam

CISSP is $749; each CISSP concentration is $599.

URL

https://www.isc2.org/Certifications/CISSP

Self-study materials

Training materials include instructor-led, live online, on-demand and private training. There is an exam outline available for review, as well as study guides, a study app, interactive flash cards and practice tests.

Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) training

Given the popularity of the CISSP certification, there is no shortage of available training options. These include classroom-based training offered by (ISC)2, as well as online video courses, practice exams and books from third-party companies.

Pluralsight’s CISSP learning path includes 12 courses and 25 hours of e-learning covering the security concepts required for the certification exam. Available for a low monthly fee, the CISSP courses are part of a subscription plan that gives IT professionals access to Pluralsight’s complete library of video training courses.

When you’re ready to test your security knowledge, you can take a simulated exam that mimics the format and content of the real CISSP exam. Udemy offers CISSP practice questions to help you prepare for this challenging exam.

5. CISA: Certified Information Systems Auditor

ISACA’s globally recognized CISA certification is the gold standard for IT workers seeking to practice in information security, audit control and assurance. Ideal candidates can identify and assess organizational threats and vulnerabilities, assess compliance, and provide guidance and organizational security controls. CISA-certified professionals demonstrate knowledge and skill across the CISA job practice areas of auditing, governance and management, acquisition, development and implementation, maintenance and service management, and asset protection.

To earn the CISA certification, candidates must pass one exam, submit an application, agree to the code of professional ethics, agree to the CPE requirements and agree to the organization’s information systems auditing standards. In addition, candidates must possess at least five years of experience working with information systems. Some substitutions for education and experience with auditing are permitted.

To maintain the CISA certification, candidates must earn 120 CPE credits over a three-year period, with a minimum of 20 CPE credits earned annually. Candidates must also pay an annual maintenance fee ($45 for members; $85 for nonmembers).

CISA facts and figures

Certification name

Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA)

Prerequisites and required courses

To obtain the CISA credential, candidates must do the following:

  1. Pass the CISA exam.
  2. Agree to the ISACA code of professional ethics.
  3. Adhere to ISACA’s CPE policy.
  4. Agree to the information auditing standards.
  5. Possess a minimum of five years of information systems auditing, control or security work in described job practice analysis areas. Experience must be verifiable and obtained in the 10-year period prior to the application date or within five years after the exam is passed. There are some exceptions to this requirement depending on the current credentials held.
  6. Apply for CISA certification. (The processing fee is $50.) The credential must be obtained within five years of exam passage.

Number of exams

One: 150 questions, four hours

Cost of exam

$575 (members); $760 (nonmembers)

URL

https://www.isaca.org/credentialing/cisa

Self-study materials

ISACA offers a variety of training options, including virtual instructor-led courses, online and on-demand training, review manuals and question databases. Numerous books and self-study materials are also available on Amazon.

Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA) training

Training opportunities for the CISA certification are plentiful. Udemy offers more than 160 CISA-related courses, lectures, practice exams, question sets and more. On Pluralsight, you’ll find 12 courses with 27 hours of information systems auditor training covering all CISA job practice domains for the CISA job practice areas.

Beyond the top 5: More cybersecurity certifications

In addition to these must-have credentials, many other certifications are available to fit the career needs of any IT professional interested in information security. Business owners should consider employing workers with these credentials as well.

  • The SANS GIAC Security Essentials (GSEC) certification remains an excellent entry-level credential for IT professionals seeking to demonstrate that they not only understand information security terminology and concepts but also possess the skills and technical expertise necessary to occupy “hands-on” security roles.
  • If you find incident response and investigation intriguing, check out the Logical Operations CyberSec First Responder (CFR) certification. This ANSI-accredited and U.S. DoD-8570-compliant credential recognizes security professionals who can design secure IT environments, perform threat analysis, and respond appropriately and effectively to cyberattacks. Logical Operations also offers other certifications, including Master Mobile Application Developer (MMAD), Certified Virtualization Professional (CVP), Cyber Secure Coder and CloudMASTER.
  • The associate-level Cisco Certified CyberOps Associate certification is aimed at analysts in security operations centers at large companies and organizations. Candidates who qualify through Cisco’s global scholarship program may receive free training, mentoring and testing to help them achieve a range of entry-level to expert certifications that the company offers. CompTIA Cybersecurity Analyst (CySA+), which launched in 2017, is a vendor-neutral certification designed for professionals with three to four years of security and behavioral analytics experience.
  • The Identity Management Institute offers several credentials for identity and access management, data protection, identity protection, identity governance and more. The International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP), which focuses on privacy, has a small but growing number of certifications as well.
  • The SECO-Institute, in cooperation with the Security Academy Netherlands and APMG, is behind the Cyber Security & Governance Certification Program; SECO-Institute certifications aren’t well known in the United States, but their popularity is growing. 
  • It also may be worth your time to browse the Chartered Institute of Information Security accreditations, the U.K. equivalent of the U.S. DoD 8570 certifications and the corresponding 8140 framework.

Also, consider these five entry-level cybersecurity certifications for more options.

TipTip: Before you decide to purchase training for a certification or an exam voucher, see if your employer will cover the cost. Employers may cover all or part of the cost if you have a continuing education or training allowance, or if the certification is in line with your current or potential job duties.

Information security and cybersecurity jobs

According to CyberSeek, the number of cybersecurity job openings in the U.S. stands at almost 598,000, with about 1.05 million cybersecurity professionals employed in today’s workforce. Projections continue to be robust: The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics expects 33% growth in information security analyst positions between 2020 and 2030; in comparison, the average rate of growth for all occupations is about 8%.

Security-related job roles include information security specialist, security analyst, network security administrator, system administrator (with security as a responsibility) and security engineer, as well as specialized roles, like malware engineer, intrusion analyst and penetration tester.

Average salaries for information security certified and security engineers – two of the most common job roles – vary depending on the source. For example, SimplyHired reports about $74,000 for specialist positions, whereas Glassdoor‘s national average is about $108,000. For security engineers, SimplyHired reports almost $112,000, while Glassdoor’s average is more than $111,000, with salaries on the high end reported at $261,000. Note that these numbers frequently change as the sources regularly update their data. [Meet the man who kept Microsoft safe and secure for more than a decade.]

Our informal job board survey from April 2022 reports the number of job posts nationwide in which our featured certifications were mentioned on a given day. This should deliver you an idea of the relative popularity of each certification.

Job board search results (in alphabetical order by cybersecurity certification)

Certification

SimplyHired

Indeed

LinkedIn Jobs

TechCareers

Total

CEH (EC-Council)

1,989

3,907

7,952

2,829

16,677

CISA (ISACA)

5,389

12,507

20,573

4,701

43,170

CISM (ISACA)

3,467

6,656

14,503

4,072

28,698

CISSP [(ISC)2]

11,472

23,463

34,716

11,060

80,711

Security+ (CompTIA)

5,953

6,680

5,998

1,851

20,482

Did you know?Did you know?: Cybersecurity matters even when you’re traveling. Find out how to keep your computer secure when you’re on the road for business or pleasure.

The importance of hiring information security and cybersecurity professionals

According to Risk Based Security‘s 2021 Year End Data Breach Quickview Report, there were 4,145 publicly disclosed breaches throughout 2021, containing over 22 billion records. This is the second-highest number of breached records, after an all-time high the year before. The U.S. was particularly affected, with the number of breaches increasing 10% compared with the previous year. More than 80% of the records exposed throughout 2021 were due to human error, highlighting an ever-increasing need for cybersecurity education, as well as for highly skilled and trained cybersecurity professionals. [Learn how to recover from a data breach.]

If you’re serious about advancing your career in the IT field and are interested in specializing in security, certification is a great choice. It’s an effective way to validate your skills and show a current or prospective employer that you’re qualified and properly trained. If you’re a business owner, hiring certified professionals and skilled IT managers can help prevent cyberattacks and provide confidence that your company’s security is in the right hands. In the meantime, review our quick cybersecurity tips to Excellerate your company’s protection.

Jeremy Bender contributed to the writing and research in this article.

Thu, 01 Dec 2022 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/10708-information-security-certifications.html
Killexams : Nevion Wins ISO Certification For Information Security Management

OSLO, Norway—Nevion has received ISO 27001 certification after a rigorous assessment of its information security management systems by independent certification body NEMKO.

Compliance with ISO 27001 assures companies and individuals doing business with Nevion that the company manages risk in a structured and appropriate way, it said.

Tue, 15 Nov 2022 02:25:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.tvtechnology.com/news/nevion-wins-iso-certification-for-information-security-management
Killexams : Avatier Achieves ISO 27001 Certification for its Information Security Management System

PLEASANTON, Calif., Nov. 14, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Avatier, the industry leader in identity and access management, today announced it has received ISO 27001:2013 certification for its Information Security Management System (ISMS).

ISO 27001:2013 is an information security standard published by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), the world's largest developer of voluntary international standards, and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Avatier's certification was issued by A-LIGN, an independent and accredited certification body based in the United States, on the successful completion of a formal audit process. This certification is evidence that Avatier has met rigorous international standards in ensuring the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of the Avatier Identity Anywhere platform.

Avatier develops identity management and governance platforms that enable organizations to scale faster, innovate quicker and embrace change more securely. Avatier's identity access management (IAM) and identity governance and administration (IGA) solutions do not require client software, so management is in real-time across any platform, such as Google Chrome, Microsoft Teams, or iOS and Android.

"This certification demonstrates Avatier's continued commitment to information security at every level and ensures our customers that the security of their data and information has been addressed, implemented, and properly controlled in all areas of their organization," said Jeremy Russeau, Avatier CISO.

About Avatier Corporation

Avatier is the Identity Management company of the future with innovative solutions for today. Avatier develops a "state of the art" identity management platform enabling workforce collaboration resulting in better customer experiences and increased revenue. The company's Identity Anywhere platform uses container technology, providing maximum flexibility, scalability and security in a platform-independent and portable solution that future-proofs your investment. Avatier's identity management and access governance solutions make the world's largest organizations more secure and productive in the shortest time at the lowest costs. Avatier brings all your back-office business applications and employee assets together and manages them as one.

For more information, visit www.avatier.com.

SOURCE: Avatier
Mon, 14 Nov 2022 02:12:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.darkreading.com/operations/avatier-achieves-iso-27001-certification-for-its-information-security-management-system
Killexams : 3 Ways To Excellerate Your Marketing Strategy For 2023

Sometimes marketing strategies are built on a combination of intuition and historical data. Chief marketing officers and directors use what they know to fuel their plans for both digital and traditional ad campaigns. But as the success of marketing strategies becomes more dependent on real-time data and evolving technology, new approaches are necessary.

Getting to know your audience doesn’t look the same as before because third-party research and data are becoming less relevant. And new analytics tools are providing up-to-the-second details on which campaigns work and which ones should go away. Improving your future marketing efforts is critical, as these efforts will impact your company’s ROI. Here are three ways to do that.

1. Pay Attention to Website Analytics

Digital marketing strategies usually have one end goal in mind: conversions. For most businesses, a conversion from a digital ad or piece of content means an online sale. A lead clicks on a product ad or a blog post link and follows through with a purchase. While it sounds simple in theory, what drives conversions and e-commerce sales is more complex.

Marketers typically build more than one lead source into their digital marketing strategies. They might integrate pay-per-click ads, landing pages, blog posts, videos and emails into the same promo launch or plan. All these capture leads, direct audiences to the online store and appeal to various stages of the sales funnel. It’s not enough to use overall e-commerce sales of a product or service as the benchmark for success.

You have to know what brought leads and current customers to your website’s store. Maybe your pay-per-click ads have a higher conversion rate than your emails. At the same time, your emails are more effective at targeting existing clients than video ads. However, it’s difficult to track what’s working and contributing to the bottom line without integrated data.

Comprehensive dashboards that centralize ad spend, conversion info and general e-commerce analytics are essential to real-time campaign monitoring and adjustments. Companies like Triple Whale are making it easier for marketers to access the tools they need for immediate insights. Its platform reveals the return on ad spend for each campaign, website traffic source and social media platform, allowing marketers to double down on the channels that are yielding conversions.

2. Take Charge of Audience Data

Sources of third-party data, including Apple’s iOS and Firefox web browsers, are starting to dry up. While some browsers are delaying the demise of third-party cookies, the end of this information source is near. Other external sources of audience insights, such as market research agencies, might provide some nuggets of truth. However, relying on this method can eat into ROI and only deliver generalized or aged data.

Audience insights from external sources may lead your marketing strategies in the wrong direction. Or they might not be specific enough to come up with game plans that produce the results you want. Taking charge of data collection yourself helps you design more effective strategies. You can use real-time conversation tools and customized experiences to learn about your audiences.

Surveys and chatbots are examples of ways businesses can start collecting data straight from the source. These tools are also ways to converse with your leads and client base, learning what makes them tick. You’ll glean why certain offers attract your audiences from these interactions. Using the details, you can better define and segment who’s most likely to buy from you and what their purchase triggers are.

As a result, your marketing strategies and campaigns can appeal to specific concerns and pain points. The audience insights you collect will also help you narrow down the online content experiences various segments want. Your company can take A/B testing or personalization to the next level with custom content that incorporates buying behaviors and interests. Your strategies won’t use kitchen-sink tactics or become a perpetual experiment to see what sticks.

3. Humanize the Brand

The most memorable ads and websites tell a story. They don’t overtly sell or feel like marketing spin. Campaigns and strategies need to bring in the numbers. But impersonal or self-serving tactics that don’t connect with audiences are less likely to do so. People can see through the hype and are more skeptical of claims a brand makes about itself.

Marketing strategies that integrate branding and storytelling instead of just promos and PR tend to make emotional connections. Brand stories and values inspire audiences and deliver them reasons other than a rock-bottom price to buy. Storytelling also humanizes a brand and builds customer relationships. It’s what differentiates a company from competitors offering similar solutions while appealing to a target market’s unique motivators.

Furthermore, brands don’t have to limit storytelling to internal marketing teams. Satisfied clients and influencers can be fruitful sources of content for videos, blog posts and general campaigns. Having someone audiences know and trust tell part of a brand’s story builds awareness and establishes credibility. Marketing strategies that bring brand enthusiasts and users into the mix demonstrate what companies offer besides products that might be commodities.

Creating Better Marketing Plans

Marketing strategies are road maps that include tactics for converting audience interest into sales. Yet plans are only as good as the data that informs them. Shifting to real-time market and campaign insights leads to messages that persuade and connect with the people behind the numbers. Brands that don’t lose sight of why audiences convert can design strategies that create profitable relationships instead of short-term results.

Sat, 19 Nov 2022 09:59:00 -0600 John Hall en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/johnhall/2022/11/20/3-ways-to-improve-your-marketing-strategy-for-2023/
Killexams : Sonix Announces SOC 2 Type 2 Certification

SAN FRANCISCO - December 6, 2022 - ( Newswire.com )

Sonix is beyond thrilled to announce that the company has achieved its SOC 2 Type 2 compliance certification. This certification demonstrates its commitment to security and privacy and reinforces its position as a leader in the industry. This certification validates that Sonix meets the highest standards for security and privacy.

"Achieving SOC 2 Type 2 compliance is a major accomplishment for Sonix," said CEO and co-founder Jamie Sutherland. "While security has always been a top priority for us, having an independent audit verifies this commitment."

The SOC 2 Type 2 certification was conducted by an independent third-party auditor. It includes a detailed examination of Sonix's policies and procedures related to security and privacy. SOC 2 Type 2 compliance asserts that the internal systems and controls of the organization are effective at meeting audit standards on a continuous basis related to governance and risk management, access control, data security, monitoring and reporting, and incident response.

"SOC 2 Type 2 compliance is the gold standard for security and privacy," said Sutherland. "We are proud to offer our customers the peace of mind that comes with knowing that their data is protected by the highest standards."

For more information about our SOC 2 Type 2 compliance certification, please visit sonix.ai or contact wecare@sonix.ai.

About Sonix

Sonix automatically transcribes, translates, and helps you organize your audio and video files in over 40 languages. Fast, accurate, affordable, and secure. Millions of users from all over the world. Search transcripts, share transcripts, dozens of export options, integrations, subtitles, captions, and full API.

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Press Release Service by Newswire.com

Original Source: Sonix Announces SOC 2 Type 2 Certification

Mon, 05 Dec 2022 20:09:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.eagletribune.com/sonix-announces-soc-2-type-2-certification/article_9ccb7b5d-2f44-5558-99a3-baff80820842.html
Killexams : Cinode Obtains ISO Certification for Information Security, According to ISO27001 No result found, try new keyword!Cinode has received certification “according to ISO/IEC 27001:2013, and means that the SaaS service meets the high requirements of information security, which include confidentiality ... Mon, 07 Nov 2022 09:16:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.crowdfundinsider.com/2022/11/198334-cinode-obtains-iso-certification-for-information-security-according-to-iso27001/ Killexams : Is CAPM Worth It? Salary And Job Growth

Editorial Note: We earn a commission from partner links on Forbes Advisor. Commissions do not affect our editors' opinions or evaluations.

If you’re a project management professional with less than three years of experience, and you are looking to boost your resume and certify your skills and knowledge, the Certified Associate of Project Management (CAPM)® certification may benefit you.

Early-career professionals who are wondering if the CAPM is worth it should consider the certification’s key factors. This article overviews factors to consider regarding CAPM certification, including costs, salary and growth potential and career options.

What is CAPM Certification?

The CAPM certification is a beginner-level credential administered by the Project Management Institute (PMI) that validates an individual’s knowledge and competency in project management fundamentals. The certification serves entry-level professionals, project team members and project managers who are seeking to advance their knowledge and implement best practices in their day-to-day work.

CAPM Certification Cost and Exam​​

Several components factor into the total CAPM certification cost. These expenses include exam fees, training costs, study resources and renewal fees.

The CAPM exam fee is mandatory, and test-takers must pay it directly to PMI. The fee breaks down as follows.

  • Exam fee. $225 for PMI members and $300 for nonmembers
  • Re-examination fee. $60 for PMI members and $150 for nonmembers

Training Costs

CAPM training and exam preparation courses typically incur additional costs. Fees for training courses vary depending on the program. CAPM bootcamps typically start at around $200. In just three or four days, these programs provide the 23 hours of project management education required for CAPM certification.

A training course can cost between $300 and $500. There are several training options available for certification candidates with varying budgets.

PMI bases the current CAPM certification exam on the sixth edition of the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK)® Guide. PMI members receive this guide with their memberships. Nonmembers must purchase the PMBOK if they want to use it to prepare for the exam. PMI bundles this edition of the PMBOK Guide with its Agile Practice Guide, which is available to purchase from PMI for $49.

Note that starting in 2023, the CAPM exam will no longer be based on the PMBOK Guide.

Resources and Practice Tests

For the current version of the CAPM exam, test-takers should review the sixth edition of the PMBOK. PMI also recommends those pursuing CAPM certification to prepare through courses and study groups in addition to self-study. Local PMI chapters often offer formal study courses, as do PMI-authorized training partners. Costs vary among providers.

CAPM candidates may take practice exams as well. The costs of these exams widely vary, and there are some free practice questions available online. PMI offers sample test questions and the CAPM handbook—both excellent tools for self-study—online for free.

CAPM Renewal Costs

The CAPM renewal fee is $60 for PMI members and $150 for nonmembers. CAPM-certified professionals who want to maintain their CAPM status must renew their certification every three years, during which they must complete 15 professional development units.

PMI periodically updates the renewal process for CAPM certification, so make sure to check PMI’s website to stay on top of the most current renewal requirements and costs.

CAPM Salary and Job Growth Potential

PMI projects that the global economy will need 25 million new project management employees to meet demand by 2030: 12 million due to the field’s projected expansion, and 13 million due to worker retirements. This amounts to 2.3 million project management job openings per year until 2030, indicating strong, steady growth for the field.

Even early-career project management professionals earn relatively high salaries as well, according to PMI. In the U.S., project professionals with less than three years of experience earn a median annual salary of $78,279.

Below we list a few roles, spanning from entry-level to senior positions, that you may qualify for with a CAPM certification.

Project Management Analyst

Median Annual Salary: $93,000

Job Description: Management analysts make recommendations to Excellerate organizations’ efficiency. These professionals, also called management consultants, analyze how an organization might increase its profits by reducing costs and increasing revenues and advise managers accordingly.

Management analysts should have a bachelor’s degree and several years of work experience. CAPM certification is not required for this role, but it can bolster your resume.

Project Coordinator

Average Annual Salary: More than $48,000

Job Description: Project coordinators assist project managers by organizing projects to ensure they’re completed on time and within budget. These professionals coordinate project management activities, resources and equipment. They also collaborate with clients to identify and define project objectives, requirements and scope.

Project coordinators analyze risks, monitor project plans and oversee work hours, schedules and spending. Project coordinators often organize and participate in stakeholder meetings.

Project Manager

Median Annual Salary: $94,500

Job description: Project managers provide critical leadership to help organizations complete projects. These professionals oversee ongoing projects to ensure teams meet deadlines, project requirements and client expectations. They submit deliverables, prepare status reports and streamline communications between teams, team members, stakeholders and clients. They help identify and resolve issues that arise during the project duration.

Project Management Director

Average Annual Salary: More than $123,000

Job description: Project management directors strategically develop, direct and manage multiple projects within larger organizations. They establish methodologies and standards to set measurable quality and productivity targets. These professionals oversee finances, coordinate resources within the defined scope and monitor potential risks to ensure teams complete projects on time and within budget.

Is a CAPM Certification Worth It?

The CAPM certification is a respected designation that indicates a commitment to the field and certifiable knowledge and experience in project management. If you’re contemplating earning a CAPM certification, consider the following factors before taking the plunge.

Consider Your Career

A CAPM certification can help individuals with up to three years of experience in project management boost their resumes and help their job applications stand out.

The certification is a solid place to start if your professional goals include project management. It can serve as a stepping stone toward more advanced positions and certifications in the field, such as the Project Management Professional (PMP)® credential. In fact, CAPM certification fulfills the formal training PMP certification requirements.

Look at Earning Potential

Earning CAPM certification can increase your earning potential. Payscale reports that CAPM-certified professionals earn around $68,000 per year. Note that several factors can impact your earning potential, including your level of education, job title, location and professional experience.

Expand Your Job Opportunities

CAPM certification assesses candidates against strict guidelines that demand competency in and knowledge of project management skills, methodologies, processes and best practices. This professional designation can help your resume stand out and deliver you a competitive edge when applying for jobs. It signals to employers that you can successfully fulfill their roles, duties and responsibilities.

A Stepping Stone to the PMP Certification

CAPM certification builds a strong foundation in project management fundamentals and can serve as a stepping stone toward the PMP certification. Before applying for the PMP exam, candidates must meet the following requirements.

  • Hold a four-year degree.
  • Have 36 months of experience in leading projects.
  • Complete 35 hours of project management education or training or CAPM certification.

Alternatively, you may:

  • Hold a high school diploma or associate degree.
  • Have 60 months of experience leading projects.
  • Complete 35 hours of project management education or training or CAPM certification.
Thu, 01 Dec 2022 11:04:00 -0600 Mariah St John en-US text/html https://www.forbes.com/advisor/education/capm-certification-salary/
Killexams : CGI's Momentum® Java Cryptographic Module receives Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) certification

FAIRFAX, Va., Nov. 10, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- CGI Federal Inc., the wholly-owned U.S. operating subsidiary of CGI Inc. (NYSE: GIB) (TSX: GIB.A), is pleased to report that its Momentum Java Cryptographic Module has received Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) certification, an important standards certification for the protection of sensitive and valuable data within federal systems. The certification was achieved after an extensive verification and validation process through an independent, accredited lab.

"More than 190 federal organizations, agencies and federally funded non-profits trust CGI's Momentum to help manage their end-to-end financial, acquisition and budget formulation processes," stated John B. Owens II, Senior Vice-President and Enterprise Solutions Group lead at CGI Federal. "The rigorous certification process, which includes an independent lab test that searches for flaws in the software, provides added, tested security that our ensures our enterprise resource planning (ERP) solution meets modern security threats, whether data is active or at rest."

CGI Momentum product suite uses the Java Cryptographic Module to implement a wide array of cryptographic algorithms including Suite B algorithms, a set of cryptographic algorithms selected by National Security Agency (NSA) to protect both classified and unclassified national security systems and information. The module is used to provide data at rest encryption, data in transit encryption, PKI key management, digital signature generation and other crypto operations through a trusted and Tested implementation. The certification complements the previously obtained FIPS accreditation for CGI Momentum C++ Cryptographic Module.

"Strong cryptography is the foundation of CISA Zero Trust Architecture (ZTA)," said Saidul Islam, CGI Federal Director, Momentum Product Security. "The use of validated crypto module in Momentum product suite helps our customers as they go through their ZTA journeys in line with federal mandates."

The certification, facilitated by third party vendor SafeLogic, runs through August 2024.

About CGI Federal

CGI Federal Inc., a wholly-owned U.S. operating subsidiary of CGI Inc., is dedicated to partnering with federal agencies to provide solutions for defense, civilian, healthcare and intelligence missions. Founded in 1976, CGI is among the largest IT and business consulting services firms in the world. With 88,500 consultants and other professionals across the globe, CGI delivers an end-to-end portfolio of capabilities, from strategic IT and business consulting to systems integration, managed IT and business process services and intellectual property solutions. CGI works with clients through a local relationship model complemented by a global delivery network that helps clients digitally transform their organizations and accelerate results. With Fiscal 2021 reported revenue of C$12.13 billion, CGI shares are listed on the TSX (GIB.A) and the NYSE (GIB). Learn more at cgi.com.

 

Cision View original content:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/cgis-momentum-java-cryptographic-module-receives-federal-information-processing-standards-fips-certification-301674227.html

SOURCE CGI Federal, Inc.

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